NB JH Boys Basketball vs. Patrick Henry Dec. 13

North Baltimore Junior High Boys Basketball Results – 12/13/2014

North Baltimore Junior High Boys Basketball Results – 12/13/2014

In The Jungle vs. Patrick Henry:

8th Grade Boys

Patrick Henry – 49
NB – 25

Scoring for NB:

Tyler Durfey – 8

Logan Sams – 6

Brendan Cotterman – 6

Alec Engard – 2

Brandon Billard – 2

Bryant Matthes – 1

8th Grade Record: 1-3 Overall, 1-2 BVC

7th Grade Boys

Patrick Henry – 39
NB – 19

Scoring for NB:

Levi Gazarek – 8

Logan Gunter – 5

Clayton Heineman – 2

Hunter Vogelsong – 2

Kaleb Spence – 2

Record: 2-1 Overall, 2-0 BVC

Next Boys Jr High Games:

Mon 12/15/14 @ Arlington

Mon 12/22/14 Home vs Leipsic

Lutheran Church News — St. Luke’s (NB) & St. John’s (McComb)

“A Light Like No Other” based on John 1:6–8, 19–28 is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic at St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in North Baltimore on Sunday, December 14 at 10:15 a.m. The third candle of the Advent Wreath will be lit and the third felt flame will be added to the Advent Banner at the opening of worship to celebrate the Third Sunday in Advent. The Junior Choir will sing and Advent anthem. Sunday School for all ages begins at 9:00 a.m.

St. Luke’s Lutheran Church

“A Light Like No Other” based on John 1:6–8, 19–28 is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic at St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in North Baltimore on Sunday, December 14 at 10:15 a.m. The third candle of the Advent Wreath will be lit and the third felt flame will be added to the Advent Banner at the opening of worship to celebrate the Third Sunday in Advent. The Junior Choir will sing and Advent anthem. Sunday School for all ages begins at 9:00 a.m.

Members of the congregation will gather for Christmas Caroling on Monday, December 15. Participants will gather at the church at 5:00 for a time of fellowship, food, and treats, leaving for caroling at 6:00 p.m. The first stop will be Briar Hill Health Campus.

St. John’s Lutheran Church

The children of St. John’s Lutheran Church in McComb will present the Christmas message by telling the story “A Night Like No Other” on Sunday, December 14 at 8:00 a.m. Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic, as a compliment to the program will be “A Light Like No Other” based on John 1:6–8, 19–28.

The third candle of the Advent Wreath will be lit at the opening of worship to celebrate the Third Sunday in Advent. Sunday School begins at 9:15 a.m. (a joint Sunday School with the McComb United Methodist Church).

The children will gather at the Church on Saturday, December 13 at 4:00 p.m. to rehearse the Christmas Program.

Chow Line: When it comes to food, play it safe

Don’t let perishable food remain in the “danger zone” of 40 degrees to 140 degrees F for longer than two hours…..

Over the weekend, we did some holiday shopping and stopped at the grocery store. We were out for longer than I anticipated, and we left food in the car for about three hours before we got home. Is that food OK to eat? It was chilly, but I’m not sure how cold it was outside.  

It’s good that you’re asking. Too many people don’t take foodborne illness seriously. It’s hard to say why.

It could be because an illness doesn’t always occur when you don’t follow food safety guidelines. Let’s face it: If you became ill every single time after eating meat that’s not been cooked to the proper temperature, you would learn your lesson pretty quickly. If it rarely happens, you may never even associate your illness with those rare hamburgers you ate.

Another reason could be due to the fact that common symptoms of foodborne illness — nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea — mimic those of the flu or some other bug. There are more than 250 different types of foodborne illness out there. People may naively believe they have never experienced any of them, when, in fact, they have.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that each year, roughly 1 in 6 Americans, or 48 million people, get sick from foodborne illness. Of those, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die. Foodborne illness is a serious problem. Fortunately, it’s often preventable by taking a few precautions.

Those precautions include time and temperature control: Don’t let perishable food remain in the “danger zone” of 40 degrees to 140 degrees F for longer than two hours. That’s the temperature at which any foodborne pathogens that may be in the food can multiply rapidly and grow enough to cause illness.

In your case, the food you bought and kept in your car might have been kept cold enough for those three hours. But it might not have. You’d be hard-pressed to find a food-safety expert who would advise you to take a chance and eat that food — or worse, serve it to your holiday guests. Sadly, “when in doubt, throw it out” would apply here. The smart thing to do is to discard the questionable food and head back to the grocery store.

Foodsafety.gov, a federal website with valuable food safety information, offers more holiday food shopping guidance at www.foodsafety.gov/blog/2014/12/other-holiday-shopping-grocery-shopping.html. Check it out, and stay safe for the holidays.

Chow Line is a service of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH, 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.