State Route 281 in Wood County

BOWLING GREEN (Wednesday, June 17, 2015) – The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) District Two announces the following update to the SR 281 bridge replacement project in Wood County. Updates are highlighted in bold and underlined:

BOWLING GREEN (Wednesday, June 17, 2015) – The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) District Two announces the following update to the SR 281 bridge replacement project in Wood County.  Updates are highlighted in bold and underlined:

State Route 281: Bridge Replacement *PROJECT COMPLETE*
Wood County (442-14): S
R 281, between SR 25 and Solether Road, is now open. The bridge replacement project is complete.

Downpours Flooding Parts of NB

The Gulf Moisture keeps getting pumped into our area, along with hot and humid temperatures, seemingly returning Northwest Ohio to its former day as the Great Black Swamp.

The Gulf Moisture keeps getting pumped into our area, along with hot and humid temperatures, seemingly returning Northwest Ohio to its former day as the Great Black Swamp.

Several inches of rain have fallen in various locales across the area, filling ditches, creeks, streams, golf course and of course streets, with water.

Here are some photos from around the area on June 16:

Grants Available to Focus on Reducing Nutrients In Lake Erie

Improving water quality in Ohio’s lakes and streams – especially those susceptible to blue-green algae – is a focus of this year’s federal grants for water quality improvement. Innovative and/or highly effective projects within the Lake Erie Watershed will receive strong consideration for part of the approximately $2 million funding available through Section 319 of the Clean Water Act.

Grants to Focus on Reducing Nutrients In Lake Erie 

Improving water quality in Ohio’s lakes and streams – especially those susceptible to blue-green algae – is a focus of this year’s federal grants for water quality improvement. Innovative and/or highly effective projects within the Lake Erie Watershed will receive strong consideration for part of the approximately $2 million funding available through Section 319 of the Clean Water Act.

Awards will be made to local governments, park districts and other organizations to implement projects that restore Ohio streams, reduce nutrients or decrease sediment (soil that runs off the land). These types of indirect discharges are known as nonpoint source (NPS) pollution. Projects that correct damage caused by stream modification or affect riparian habitat also will be considered.

The deadline for application is August 14, 2015 for funding during state fiscal year 2016.

Types of projects include but are not limited to:

  • stream restoration and/or dam removal projects;
  • wetland restoration and/or re-naturalization;
  • sediment and nutrient reduction;
  • regional watershed implementation support;
  • inland lake management; and
  • riparian habitat restoration.

Applications also must include project-specific educational and public outreach activities describing how the successes of the project will be communicated throughout the affected community.

In the United States, NPS pollution is the leading cause of water quality impairment. NPS pollution is caused by rain or snowmelt moving over and through the ground, picking up natural and human-made pollutants which are then deposited in lakes, rivers, wetlands and other waterways. Polluted runoff can have harmful effects on drinking water supplies, recreation, fisheries and wildlife. In 1987, Section 319 of the federal Clean Water Act amendments created a national grant program to control NPS pollution. Ohio EPA administers this grant program with funding from U.S. EPA, distributing more than $2 million each year to projects proposed by local governments and community organizations.

More information about grant opportunities is available online.

Completed applications may be mailed or delivered to Russ Gibson, NPS Program Manager, or Martha Spurbeck, Ohio EPA/Division of Surface Water, P.O. Box 1049, Columbus, Ohio, 43216-1049. All grant applications will be reviewed for completeness, technical merit and adherence to the 1987 Amendment to the Clean Water Act., U.S. EPA Section 319(h) Program Guidance and 2016 request for proposals criteria.

Library hosts “Lego Hour”

Builders of all ages are welcome to construct with library Legos in the Wolfe Community Room……

One of the regular events for the  Summer Reading Program at the North Baltimore Public Library, is LEGO HOUR.  Builders of all ages are welcome to construct with library Legos in the Wolfe Community Room. The theme for this summer’s program is “Every Hero Has a Story,”

Pictured are Javin and Jesse Whitacker in the foreground with teen volunteers, Denny Simon and Casey Mowery in the background.
Pictured are Javin and Jesse Whitacker in the foreground with teen volunteers, Denny Simon and Casey Mowery in the background.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Completed Lego creations are then transferred to the Wolfe Community Room hallway showcase for display until the next scheduled Lego Hour. This fun, interactive, and technology free program offers a chance to build a permanent display featuring Lego Friends Heartlake Lighthouse, a Lego Creationary board game, and a Lego table area.

U.S. Rep. Latta on EPA’s Proposed Ozone Rule and Impacts on Manufacturing

“Today, we heard from several witnesses who have expressed grave concerns for their industry and the negative impacts this proposal would bring. I have particular apprehension for how the rule would adversely effect the constituents in my district, and across the state of Ohio, which has historically been a manufacturing state,” said Rep. Latta.

Washington, D.C. – Today, Congressman Robert E. Latta joined colleagues on the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power at a hearing on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) new proposal for National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone Rule. Testimony was heard from seven witnesses discussing the potential impacts of the rule’s implementation on the manufacturing sector.

“Today, we heard from several witnesses who have expressed grave concerns for their industry and the negative impacts this proposal would bring. I have particular apprehension for how the rule would adversely effect the constituents in my district, and across the state of Ohio, which has historically been a manufacturing state,” said Rep. Latta.  “Since the proposal was first introduced, I have neither seen nor heard anything that would alleviate the concern that this is unnecessary regulation that would pose a heavy burden on American industry.”

The U.S. EPA initially established an ozone standard in 1971, and subsequently revised the standard in 1979, 1997, and 2008. Under the Clean Air Act, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for criteria pollutants, including ground-level ozone. The current standard, set in 2008, established an 8-hour standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb), replacing a 1997 standard equivalent to 84 ppb.

EPA has proposed to lower that standard to a range within 65 ppb to 70 ppb.

Ross E. Eisenberg, Vice President of Energy and Resources Policy for the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), was among witnesses offering testimony at the hearing.  Mr. Eisenberg, referring to the data determined by a previously released study, identified the proposal as “likely to be the most expensive regulation ever”.

The study estimated the proposal will cost as much as $140 billion per year, placing the equivalent of 1.4 million jobs in jeopardy annually. The study also estimates Ohio would experience a $22 Billion Gross State Product loss from 2017 to 2040, spend $840 Million in Total Compliance Costs and lose 22,914 jobs or job equivalents annually.

“It very much appears the administration is using the Clean Air Act to target specific industries, and certainly, if this rule is implemented, manufacturing is going to be one of those most negatively impacted. This is an industry that employs, directly or indirectly, millions of Americans who stand to face unnecessary adversity and declining opportunity as a result of regulatory overreach,” stated Latta.

Testimony was heard from Erin Monroe Wesley, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Baton Rouge Area Chamber. Ms. Wesley identified four businesses who were preparing to make significant ventures estimated to bring more than $7 billion in capital investments to the region. These companies, upon the release of the EPA proposal, either put the projects on hold or invested elsewhere, citing the proposal and lack of emission reduction credits as the basis for their decision.

“The previous revisions to the NAAQS standards are currently being implemented in counties across the country, and by the EPA’s own data, this has allowed ozone levels to decline over 30% by 1980.  These newly proposed standards are overly burdensome and deficiently demonstrative of providing any environmental benefit,” said Latta.  “We have already heard testimony demonstrating the simple possibility of these rules being implemented proving detrimental to a region’s workforce, and workforce growth. This will not be isolated to one area. If the EPA were to go forward with the rules under the current proposal, negative consequences would be felt by American workers across the board, and effectively stifle any opportunity for future economic growth.”

Wood County Health District Hopeful Outbreak Has Ended

“Our hearts go out to the residents, employees and their families affected by this outbreak,” states Health Commissioner Ben Batey.

(Bowling Green, OH) – On May 27th the Wood County Health District learned of positive salmonella test results in residents of Heritage Corner Assisted Living facility. We immediately notified the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) and began working with the facility to initiate infection control measures and attempt to identify the source of the infection. We also were in contact with a Food Safety Specialist with the ODH Food Safety Program. In addition ODH’s Division of Quality Assurance worked closely with the facility to monitor infection control practices.  As of today, there have been 18 positive cases but no new cases of symptoms have been reported since June 10th. Sadly, during the outbreak, we were notified that two residents who tested positive for salmonella had passed away. However, we cannot say whether this was related to the illness.

 

“Our hearts go out to the residents, employees and their families affected by this outbreak,” states Health Commissioner Ben Batey. “We truly appreciate all of the cooperation from the residents who have participated in the investigation during this difficult time in their lives.”

 

Everyone who has developed symptoms since May 27th has been tested but not everyone who has been tested has been positive and some test results are still pending. The normal incubation period for salmonella is 12-72 hours. With more than 6 days passing since the last new report of symptoms, the outbreak may be at its end.

 

According to Amy Jones, Director of Nursing, “Although we are still awaiting some test results, with the knowledge that there have been no new reports of symptoms, we are cautiously optimistic that the outbreak is done.”

 

Since learning of the outbreak, the health district has taken several steps to both try to identify the cause and prevent more cases. Sanitarians and an Ohio Department of Health Food Safety Specialist inspected the kitchen and spoke with the kitchen manager about food preparation practices and food sources. No major problems were identified.

 

The Health District and ODH recommended closing of common areas such as dining and activity rooms until the reports of new symptoms ceased. In addition the facility was encouraged to sanitize these areas and make hand sanitizer readily available throughout. The common areas were opened over the weekend after passing the 72 hour mark of the last report of new symptoms.

 

Several health district employees were in the facility last week and this week to provide information to residents and ask questions about food and activities in the last few weeks. The hope in these interviews is to try to identify an item or event that separates those that got sick and those that didn’t.

 

“We’re doing our best to find the source of the outbreak, but it’s important to remember that the majority of outbreaks are never traced back to a source,” said Connor Rittwage, Epidemiologist. “There can be so many variables when you’re talking about what people eat and do over the potential exposure period, that it can be difficult to identify a common link.”

 

But that doesn’t stop the Health District from trying. Information from interviews of the residents is still being analyzed and will take weeks to complete.

 

Batey states, “Even in these sorts of outbreaks where we may never know the exact cause, we aim to provide guidance and oversight to help quickly reduce the spread of the disease to others and their families. We remain committed to fully investigating all disease outbreaks in Wood County so that any insights found can be shared with individuals and facilities for future prevention measures.”

 

Background Information

 

  • Salmonella is an enteric bacterium, which means that it lives in the intestinal tracts of humans and other animals. Salmonella bacteria are usually transmitted to humans by eating foods contaminated with human or animal feces.
  • Salmonella bacteria are often found in food, water, and on animals. Salmonellosis is typically a food-borne illness acquired from contaminated raw poultry, eggs, and unpasteurized milk and cheese products. Although poultry and eggs are primary culprits, Salmonella can be found in a variety of foods including ground meat, fruits, and vegetables—even processed foods such as frozen pot pies. Contaminated foods usually look and smell normal.
  • Other sources of exposure include contact with infected animals/pets, especially turtles, iguanas, other reptiles, chicks, cattle and poultry.
  • An infected food handler who neglects to wash his or her hands with soap and warm water after using the bathroom may also contaminate food.
  • Most persons infected with salmonella develop symptoms including nausea, diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps; they typically start 12 to 72 hours after exposure.
  • There is no real cure for Salmonella infection, except treatment of the symptoms. Persons with severe diarrhea may require rehydration, often with intravenous fluids.
  • The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment. However, in some persons, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized.
  • Most people recover on their own; still, anyone with symptoms like these should see a health care provider right away.
  • Persons with diarrhea usually recover completely, although it may be several months before their bowel habits are entirely normal.
  • Although anyone can get a Salmonella infection, older adults, infants, and people with impaired immune systems are at increased risk for serious illness. In these people, a relatively small number of Salmonella bacteria can cause severe illness.