St. Luke’s and St. John’s Lutheran Churches – Jan. 1

“Rejoicing in Difficult Times” is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic on New Year’s Day

St. Luke’s Lutheran Church, North Baltimore

“Rejoicing in Difficult Times” is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic at St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in North Baltimore on Sunday, January 1 at 10:15 a.m.

Sunday School for all ages begins at 9:00 a.m.

Members will lead worship at Briar Hill Health Campus at 2:00 p.m.

St. John’s Lutheran Church, McComb

“Rejoicing in Difficult Times” is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic at St. John’s Lutheran Church in McComb on Sunday, January 1 at 8:00 a.m. Sunday School begins at 9:15 a.m.

A joint adult Sunday School is with the McComb United Methodist Church.

‘Sore Loser Syndrome’ threatens to disrupt America’s political process

At year-end, efforts are being made to disrupt the transition process of President-elect Donald Trump by crowds of disgruntled protesters.

WASHINGTON, DC, Dec 30 – At year-end, efforts are being made to disrupt the transition process of President-elect Donald Trump by crowds of disgruntled protesters.  In response, Dan Weber, president of the Association of Mature American Citizens published the following opinion article today:
The political left suffers from ‘sore loser syndrome’ in the wake of the election of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States.
It’s not uncommon for depression to set in when the candidate of your choice loses an election, but the pathetic parade of despair on display among many of those who were sure that Hillary Clinton was destined to become president has reached new heights.  The fact is, the anti-Trumpers are having temper tantrums.
Rather than expressing their dissent in a manner that shows them to be members of the peaceful, loyal opposition, on more and more occasions the anti-Trump protesters seem bent on disrupting America’s political process.  In particular, a number of radical socialists and progressives have been engaging in activities such as inciting violent demonstrations, voter intimidation in targeting Electoral College delegates, and facilitating voter fraud, which are clearly criminal and may indeed border on treason inasmuch as they are designed to disrupt our Constitutional processes.  It has even been suggested that some of them are financially backed by sinister outside sources.
However, whether they are doing what they do wittingly or unwillingly is irrelevant because the future of our democracy is at stake.
When the much-maligned Richard Nixon lost the Presidential Election to John F. Kennedy by a narrow margin, he was urged to demand a recount of the vote.  But he said: “Our country cannot afford the agony of a constitutional crisis and I damn well will not be a party to creating one just to become president or anything else.”
The situation has grown so threatening that individuals who might, otherwise, be inclined to join the chorus of opposition to Mr. Trump’s election, are slowly but surely urging acceptance.
As Juliet Pesner, a contributor to the Harvard Political Review, put it in a recent article entitled, The Folly of Anti-Trump Protests: “protests that reject the presidency itself and feature the burning of American flags raise the question-at what point are we threatening the very institutions upon which our democracy stands.”
When President-elect Trump takes office on January 20th, instead of a parade to celebrate the occasion a massive, potentially unruly protest is likely to greet the new President.  In her Harvard Political review article, Ms. Pesner suggests that “tens of thousands” of protesters have already accepted online invitations to be there.
It will be a gathering of those afflicted with SLS, sore loser syndrome, and we can only hope that the leaders of the Democratic Party, including Hillary Clinton and President Obama, will intervene.  It’s the only known treatment that might work on those suffering from the disease.
ABOUT AMAC
The Association of Mature American Citizens [http://www.amac.us] is a vibrant, vital senior advocacy organization that takes its marching orders from its members.  We act and speak on their behalf, protecting their interests and offering a practical insight on how to best solve the problems they face today.  Live long and make a difference by joining us today at http://amac.us/join-amac.

Wood County Park District Offers January Programs

Register Now……………….

 

January Programs:
 

PiPs – Preschoolers in the Parks: Wildlife Detectives!

Friday, January 13; 10:00 am – 10:45 am

Please REGISTER ATTENDING CHILD ONLY. Children 3 – 6 years of age become honorary wildlife detectives. Enjoy a short story and hike while discovering how to interpret animal tracks and signs. Adult companions must remain with children for this program. Program may be altered or postponed due to inclement weather (snowfall, sub-zero wind chill). Please equip your child with appropriate clothing and footwear for weather conditions.

W.W. Knight Nature Preserve:

Friends’ Green Room

29530 White Road, Perrysburg

Register Here

 

RAD

Friday, January 13; 6:00 – 10:00 pm

Saturday, January 14; 8:00 am – 5 pm

The RAD program will offer participants a working knowledge of basic self-defense maneuvers, situational awareness, and verbal tactics that can assist before, during, and after an emergency. Participants should come to class prepared for physical activity not limited to striking a mat with hands and feet. We ask that you wear comfortable sports clothing that will allow for unrestricted movement, bring a water bottle, and writing utensil for the classroom portion. The class is free and open to females 12 and older. Past participants are always welcome to return to practice skills but please let us know prior to the date you plan to attend so we can insure we have enough equipment and staff.

W.W. Knight Nature Preserve:

Friends’ Green Room

29530 White Road, Perrysburg

Register Here

 

Food Preservation Series: Canned Bread
Tuesday, December 3; 6:00 – 9:00 pm
Canned bread? Is that even possible? Yep, and some folks give it as a holiday gift. The more important question is whether it’s safe. Come learn when it is and isn’t, and how to do it carefully. Leave with your own jar of canned bread. No experience necessary. Cost: $10/ Friends of the Wood County Parks: $5

Carter Historic Farm

Loomis Community Room

18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green

Register Here

 

Winter Bird Count for Kids
Saturday, January 21; 10:00 am – 12:30 pm
Join in the search to count as many birds as possible! Then feast on pizza while we make our countdown list.

W.W. Knight Nature Preserve:

Friends’ Green Room

29530 White Road, Perrysburg

Register Here

 

Interpretive Coloring Program

Tuesday, January 24; 6:00 – 8:00 pm

Join a fun and creative way to identify a variety of our local birds and butterflies. We provide templates and coloring materials – you get to make the drawings come to life. This program is intended for adults; previous artistic skill is not required.

Park District Headquarters

Community Classroom

18729 Mercer Road, Bowling Green
Register Here

 

Nature’s Nursery:

Owl Presentation and Owl Hike

Tuesday, January 24; 7:00 – 8:30 pm

Nature’s Nursery brings live owls to help us discover their fascinating natural history. A night hike will follow to look and listen for these elusive creatures.

W.W. Knight Nature Preserve:

Haskins Great Room

29530 White Road, Perrysburg

Register Here 

 

Christmas Tree Recycling

after Christmas through January 31st, 2017

Bring your used live Christmas tree (without any decorations) to one of the following locations:

Park District Headquarters

18729 Mercer Road, BG

Otsego Park

20000 West River Road

W.W. Knight Nature Preserve

29530 White Road, Perrysburg

William Henry Harrison Park

644 Bierley Avenue, Pemberville

Slippery Elm Trail restrooms

218 E. Broadway, North Baltimore

 

Carter Ruggers Meeting

Thursday, January 26; 7:00 – 9:00 pm

Join us on the 4th Thursday of each month to work on crocheted rugs. Open to all levels of experience, beginners and up. Bring your own materials for personal pieces; we provide materials for working on farm pieces. If you’re brand new to crocheted rugs, arrive at 6:00 pm for a jump start.

Carter Historic Farm

Loomis Community Room

18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green

Register Here

 

Nature Film Series

Friday, January 27; 7:00 – 9:00 pm

Enjoy popcorn and a movie at the nature center during a winter film series. Showings include: Earth From Above: Biodiversity (January 27), Glaciers: Ice on the Move (February 24), and Green Fire (March 10)

W.W. Knight Nature Preserve:

Haskins Great Room

29530 White Road, Perrysburg

Register Here 

 

Farm Play: Wooden Toys

Saturday, January 28; 2:00 – 4:00 pm

From fallen sticks to finely milled boards, many toys and games are made of wood. Watch and learn about a variety of wooden toys from the 1930s. Enjoy a winter snack while you build your own wooden toy to take home.

Carter Historic Farm

Loomis Community Room

18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green

Register Here 

 

WCPARKS app

free for Android and Apple devices

Stay up-to-date with your Wood County parks and programs with this easy-to-use app. Look for wcparks in the Appstore for iOS Apple, or GooglePlay for Android. 

The app features maps, programs, news, offers and much more.

 

Commemorative Trail

Engraved Bricks on Sale

Say it forever. Leave a legacy.

The brick path at W.W. Knight Nature Preserve in Perrysburg is an excellent way to celebrate loved ones, birthdays, anniversaries and legacies. Bricks and engravings are of the highest quality. 4″ x 8″ bricks are $100 (3 lines of text) and 8″ x 8″ bricks are $125 (5 lines).

Click here for an order form

 

Ohio Certified

Volunteer Naturalist

Certification Program

Register by Friday, February 10th!

Interested in the Ohio Certified Volunteer Naturalist (OCVN) program? This unique hands-on natural resource education program is coupled with community-based volunteer service. Sessions take place inside and out at Wood County Park District properties and off-site locations. Class topics include interpretation, ecology, birds, native plants, mammals, insects, geology, and more. Co-sponsored by WCPD and Ohio State University Extension of Wood County.

Nature education classes run April – June.

Contact Jim Witter (419) 661-1697 email

 

Beware of Scams

Attorney General DeWine Warns of Family Emergency Scams…..

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine recently warned Ohioans to beware of family emergency scams. Several Ohioans have reported losing thousands of dollars to the scam in recent weeks.

In the scam, con artists pose as relatives or friends and claim they need money right away to help with an emergency, such as getting out of jail or paying attorney fees after getting into a car accident. The most common version of the scam is the “grandparent scam,” which targets grandparents, but the scam also can affect parents, aunts, uncles, and family friends, among others.

“This is a horrible scam,” Attorney General DeWine said. “Con artists prey on people’s worst fears that something bad has happened to a loved one. They try to scare people into sending money right away. Once they get your money, they’re gone and the money’s gone.”

Since November, the Ohio Attorney General’s Office has received more than 20 complaints about the scam. The average reported loss was over $6,000.

In a typical variation of the scam, a grandparent receives a call claiming that a grandchild was in a car accident or found with drugs and needs money to cover bail or attorney fees. The grandparent is told to go the store, buy a gift card, and provide the card numbers over the phone, which allows the scammer to drain the card’s funds. In another variation of the scam, parents receive a call claiming their son or daughter has been kidnapped and is being held hostage. They are told to pay ransom to allow their child to return home safely.

Scammers generally tell their targets to pay using wire transfers, money orders, or gift cards. In some cases, after victims buy gift cards and provide the card numbers over the phone, they are told to mail the (drained) cards somewhere else. This makes it harder to report or stop the scam.

Tips to prevent family emergency scams include:

  • Communicate with your family members. Talk to your family about scams and discuss how you would communicate during a true emergency.
  • Verify a caller’s claims. If you receive a call about a family member in trouble, contact someone else, such as the person’s parents, to determine the person’s location and whether the person truly needs your help. Be wary if the caller asks you not to contact any other family members. This is a tactic used by scammers. When in doubt, ask questions only your real family members would know how to answer, such as the last time you saw each other.
  • Limit sharing information online. Don’t post upcoming travel plans or detailed personal information online, and encourage your family members to take similar precautions. Scammers may use information available online to learn more about their targets and to make their ploys seem more believable. Check your account privacy settings on social media and limit who can view your information.
  • Be wary of specific payment requests. If someone tells you that you must pay using a gift card, prepaid reloadable card, money transfer, or cash, it may be a scam. These payment methods are difficult to trace and are used regularly in scams. Once the money is sent, it is very difficult to recover.

The Ohio Attorney General’s Office warns consumers about scams and offers a variety of educational materials, including a phone scams checklist. To learn more or to report scams to the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, visit www.OhioProtects.orgor call 800-282-0515.

BG Arts Council Invites Artists Age 50 and Older to Submit Artwork

for “50+ Shades of Grey” Exhibit at Wood County Senior Center…………….

Bowling Green, OH – Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA) and The Bowling Green Arts Council invite adults age 50 and older to submit their artwork for “50+ Shades of Grey: An “Adult” Art Exhibit,” scheduled from February 10 to March 23, 2017.

 

Anyone age 50 or older living within 100 miles of Wood County is eligible to participate. Artists may submit up to two original works in any 2D medium. Work previously exhibited at a BG Arts Council show is not eligible. An entry fee of $20 is required per artist, allowing each artist to submit up to two of their own works. Entry fees are used for promotion and to support the activities of the BG Arts Council.

 

Artists’ work will be exhibited from February 10 to March 23 at the Wood County Senior Center in Bowling Green.

 

Entry form with full rules is available at www.wccoa.net or http://bgartscouncil.com/51-shades-of-grey and can be mailed along with payment by Wednesday, January 25, 2017 to:

 

BG Arts Council

c/o Wood County Senior Center

305 N. Main St.

Bowling Green, OH 43402

 

For more information on the programs and services WCCOA provides, contact us at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or visit our website at www.wccoa.net. Visit bgartscouncil.com for more information on the Bowling Green Arts Council.

Church News for Sunday, January 1, 2017–

For Bairdstown and Good Shepherd United Methodist Churches……

Church of the Good Shepherd United Methodist

Church of the Good Shepherd United Methodist will celebrate the 1st Sunday after Christmas and New Year’s Day on Sunday, January 1, with worship beginning at 10:15 a.m.

Rev. Susan Kronbach will preach from John 1:1-5, as we reflect on “Beginnings and Blessings!”

Sunday School for youth and adults is held at 9:15 a.m.; Sunday School for the children is during
worship, after the moments with the children.

Other activities at the church this week include choir practice each Wednesday evening at 7:00 p.m.

Bairdstown United Methodist Church

The Bairdstown United Methodist Church will celebrate the 1st Sunday after Christmas and New Year’s Day on Sunday, January 1, with worship beginning at 9:15 a.m.

Rev. Susan Kronbach will preach “Beginnings and Blessings!” from John 1:1-5.

Sunday School class is held immediately following worship.  Please plan to join us as you are able!

NB Masonic Lodge Donates to NB Library

The North Baltimore Masonic Lodge presents books annually to the Children’s library in hope of inspiring North Baltimore children to seek the joy and enjoyment of reading.

Jay Harris, Past Worshipful Master of North Baltimore Masonic Lodge 561 and Hugh W. Bowland, Past Master, present new children’s books to Cheryl Heilman, Youth Services Coordinator of the North Baltimore Public Library.

Jay Harris,Cheryl Heilman and Hugh W. Bowland

The North Baltimore Masonic Lodge presents books annually to the Children’s library in hope of inspiring North Baltimore children to seek the joy and enjoyment of reading.

Foto Gallery from NB Boys vs. TC

Fotos by Ferg from the North Baltimore High School Boys Basketball game with Toledo Christian. The Mini-Majorettes performed at half-time.

Fotos by Ferg from the North Baltimore High School Boys Basketball game with Toledo Christian.

NB lost the game – here is a link to that story – Tigers Boys vs. Toledo Christian

Check out Ferg’s work – Fotos by Ferg Foto Site

 

Resolutions for Your Home…

Resolutions for Your Home…When the new year arrives, promises and resolutions abound. Here’s the top-10 list of what the resolute home owner should accomplish this year.

Resolutions for Your Home…When the new year arrives, promises and resolutions abound. Here’s the top-10 list of what the resolute home owner should accomplish this year.

This time, it’s going to be different.  2017 a brand new year, brimming with possibilities, and you’ve resolved to move through your house like a whirling tornado of can-do, fixing, painting, and organizing. This year, nothing will stop you.
Welcome to your home improvement New Year’s Resolutions………
Based on the most-common top-ten resolutions gathered by Time magazine, USA.gov, and other sources, here is your inspiring list of home management goals.

  1. Lose weight (cut energy use)

Your house is a glutton, gobbling energy like a starved elephant. Gain control by trimming energy use.

A good place to start is your HVAC ductwork. Ducts are notorious energy-wasters, leaking your heating and cooling air through holes and loose connections.

Sealing and insulating your ductwork can improve the efficiency heating and cooling system by as much as 20%, saving you $200 per year or more, according to Energy Star. You’ll make your home more comfortable, and a more-efficient system helps extend the life of your furnace, air conditioner, or heat pump.

Because ducts are usually hidden inside walls, ceilings, attics, and crawl spaces, sealing and insulating them may be a difficult and time-consuming DIY job. If you can’t reach all your ducts, concentrate on those that are accessible.

Use duct sealant — called mastic — or metal-backed tape to seal the seams, holes, and connections. Don’t use the confusingly named “duct tape,” which won’t provide a permanent solution. Be sure to seal connections at vents and floor registers — these

are likely places for leaks to occur.

After sealing your ducts, wrap them in fiberglass insulation. Most hardware stores and home improvement centers have insulation wrap products made for ducts.

A professional heating and cooling contractor will charge $1,000 to $4,000 for the work, including materials, depending on the size of your home and accessibility to your ducts.

Insulating your ductwork may qualify for a rebate from your state or local municipality. Check the Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency.

  1. Quit smoking (purify indoor air)

The EPA lists indoor air quality as one of the top environmental health hazards. That’s because indoor air is full of potential contaminants, such as dust, mold spores, pollen, and viruses. The problem is at its worst during winter, when windows and doors are shut tight.

You can help eliminate harmful lung irritants in your home with these maintenance and improvement tips:

Maintain your HVAC system and change furnace filters regularly. Use the highest-quality filters you can afford ($10-$20) and change every month during peak heating and cooling seasons.

  • Keep indoor air pristine by using low-VOC paintswhen you remodel your rooms.
  • Use localized ventilation in kitchens and bathroomsto remove cooking fumes, smoke, and excess humidity. Make sure ventilation systems exhaust air to the outside of your home, rather than your attic crawl space or between ceiling joists.
  • In fireplaces and wood stoves, burn real firewoodrather than pressed wood products that may contain formaldehyde.
  • Use a portable air cleaner to help cleanse the air in single rooms. Portable air cleaner types include mechanical air filters, electrostatic precipitators, ion generators, and ultraviolet lamps.

Note that each type of air cleaner is designed to remove specific pollutants; no portable air cleaner removes all pollutants. Be wary of air cleaners that generate ozone — a known lung irritant.

  1. Get out of debt (budget for improvements) 

Creating a yearly budget for home improvement and maintenance helps prevent overspending, and encourages you to put aside money for major replacements — such as new roofing or a kitchen appliance — that come up every few years.

Protect your home finances by knowing how much you’ll probably spend each year. Data from the U.S. Census Bureau says that average annual maintenance and home improvement expenditures are about $3,300 per household. Leading lending institutions agree; HSH Associates and LendingTree.com place average costs of yearly maintenance and upkeep at 1% to 3% of your home’s initial price.

That means the owner of a $250,000 home should budget between $2,500 to $7,500 each year for upkeep and replacements. Have extra at the end of the year? Save it for more costly upkeep and replacement items down the road — you’ll probably need it then.

  1. Learn something new (educate yourself on home finances)

Want a little education that goes a long way toward your financial health? Learning how to improve your insurance score can help you keep your home insurance premiums from getting out of hand. Here are a couple of easy lessons:

  • Letting credit card debt build up is a black mark on your credit history — and an indicator that you’re likely to file an insurance claim. The more claims, the higher risk you appear to be to insurance agencies, which lowers your insurance score. Low scores mean higher rates for home insurance.
  • Keep payments on loans up-to-date. Don’t miss payment deadlines; if you do, notify your lender that your payment is forthcoming. Delinquent payments signal insurers that you can’t manage your money — resulting in a lower insurance score.

Need some Home Owner 101? Any time is a good time to bone up on basic home maintenance skills.

  1. Get organized (de-clutter) 

No excuses — that clutter has got to go! Start by creating more storage space so you can stash stuff easily.

At wit’s end for new storage space? You’ve probably got storage solutions you didn’t know you had. Put up a high shelf between the walls of a narrow hallway, and tuck storage in out-of-the-way nooks, such as under-stairs spaces and between wall studs.

If your small home is pinched for space, don’t despair: There’s still room for storage. Shoe organizers ($20) do more than hold shoes — use them to store keys, notepads, and cell phones. At about $300 per drawer, have a cabinetmaker install drawers in the toe kicks of your kitchen cabinets for napkins, cookie sheets, and appliance manuals.

More: Resolution: Put Your House on a Diet

  1. Volunteer (support your community)

In a world that often seems topsy-turvy, a little altruism helps restore balance. You can volunteer your time and energy to help others, and at the same time help promote safety and preserve the value of your neighborhood.

  • neighborhood watchprogram fosters a sense of community and helps stop crime. Set up a meeting with neighbors to discuss concerns and priorities. Gather facts to present at the meeting: What kinds of crimes happen nearby? Are there patterns? Ask a local police representative to come to your first meeting to answer questions.
  • Start a community garden. Bring together neighbors for bonding, eating healthier, and saving on groceries. A 4-by-16-foot raised bed garden plot provides $200-$600 worth of food annually. As the organizer, you can expect to spend 20-30 per month for six months getting your community garden going.
  1. Drink less (curb home water use) 

Our houses are thirsty. The average household uses about 400 gallons of water each day, or almost $700 per year in water and sewer costs. Making a few simple changes, such as installing EPA-certified WaterSense products, could trim up to $200 from your annual water bill. Add to that energy savings from reduced costs to heat water, and your yearly savings could reach $300 or more per year.

  • Low-flow showerheadsinclude technology that reduces the amount of flow yet keeps pressure up, resulting in shower streams that are powerful and satisfying. They cost from $10 to $150, and installation is an easy DIY job that takes only minutes.
  • Replacing your pre-1994, water-guzzling toilet with a low-flow toiletprevents $90 worth of water costs from being flushed away. HE (high-efficiency) toilets use compressed air and electric water pumps to flush with less than 1 gallon of water; older models required up to 8 gallons.
  1. Spend more time with family (share home improvement projects)

Spending quality time with your family takes quality planning — but it’s worth the effort. Rally your family around these fun-to-do projects to make every minute count:

  • Plant a tree. Pile the clan into the family wagon and shop for a tree that’ll become a new member of your family. Have your kids name it and help care for it. You might have to dig the hole, but everyone can take turns adding mulchand watering it. A bonus: planted where its shade will protect your house from summer sun, a $50-$100 tree cuts your yearly energy bill by $100 to $250.
  • Make a home emergency preparedness kit. Make a scavenger hunt of gathering up all the necessary supplies, such as flashlights, toilet paper, and duct tape, and assemble your kit during an evening together. It’s a good, non-scary way to teach small children about what to do if there’s an emergency.
  1. Get fit (exercise your DIY skills)

Looking to trim a little of the old spare tire? Routine home maintenance and repair is a double win — you’ll burn calories while keeping your house in tip-top shape. Try these essential fix-ups and improvements from CalorieLab:

  1. Be less stressed (use maintenance-free materials)

If you want less to worry about, install low-maintenance materials and products designed for durability and long, trouble-free service.

  • Fiber-cement sidinglasts for 50 years or more. It’s weather-proof, and resists dents, fire, insects, and rot. It’s exceptionally stable, even with changes in humidity, so that paint jobs last longer than on wood and wood-fiber siding products.
  • LED bulbslast a phenomenal 20,000 to 50,000 hours between changes, or about 18 to 46 years when used for 3 hours each day. Although the initial cost is high (about $40 per bulb), LED bulbs pay for themselves in energy savings in about 10 years.
  • Classic ceramic tilecomes in many colors and textures, but at its heart it’s incredibly tough, stain-resistant, and impervious to moisture. You can count on ceramic tile’s good looks to last for decades on floors and walls without needing repair or replacement.

Source: Houselogic.com

 

ODOT D-2 Construction Update Dec. 30

This is the final weekly construction update for the 2016 season. ODOT will send monthly updates and/or issue updates as needed.

ODOT District Two Weekly Construction Update Dec. 30

This is the final weekly construction update for the 2016 season.  ODOT will send monthly updates and/or issue updates as needed.

Updates are highlighted in bold and underlined.

Lucas/Wood Counties

1. Interstate 75: Widening
Wood & Hancock Counties (170-14, 199-14, 237-14 & 3000-14):

Interstate Restrictions:  Through July 2017, single lane restrictions are possible on I-75, between US 20 and CR 99 in Hancock County, for finish work.

Through Friday, December 30, daily from 9am until 4pm, southbound I-75, between Cygnet Road and US 224, may be reduced to one lane for traffic pattern change and pavement markings.

Southbound I-75, between Roachton Road and Eagleville Road, is now open to three lanes.

Northbound I-75, between CR 99 and SR 582, is now open to three lanes.

Ramp Restrictions:

Through Friday, December 30, daily from 9am until 4pm, short-term ramp closures are possible on the following ramps for striping.  Two consecutive exits will not be closed at the same time.

·         The ramps to/from southbound I-75 to/from Eagleville Road (Exit 168).

·         The ramps to/from southbound I-75 to/from SR 18 (Exit 167).

·         The ramps to/from southbound I-75 to/from SR 613 (Exit 164).

·         The ramps to/from southbound I-75 to/from CR 99 (Exit 161).

Project complete: October 2017.  All work is weather permitting.

2. Interstate 75: Widening *UPDATE*

Lucas County (485-14, 536-14):  Through September 2018, overnight, 7pm through 6am, single lane restrictions are possible on I-75, from I-475 in Toledo to I-280 for bridge work.

The following ramps are restricted/closed:

  • Through July 2018, the ramp from Phillips Avenue to southbound I-75 is closed.  Detour: northbound I-75; Stickney Avenue (Exit 207); North Expressway Drive; southbound I-75.
  • Through July 2018, the ramp from Jeep/Willys Parkway to southbound I-75 is closed.  Detour: Detroit Avenue.
  • Through July 2018, the ramp from Jeep/Willys Parkway to northbound I-75 is closed.  Detour: Berdan Avenue; Detroit Avenue; Phillips Avenue.
  • Through July 2018, the ramp from southbound I-75 to Jeep/Willys Parkway (Exit 205A) is closed.  Detour: Detroit Avenue (Exit 203B).

·         Through September 2018, the interchange ramp from eastbound I-475 to southbound I-75 is reduced to one lane.

Local Streets:

Effective Tuesday, January 3, through Friday, January 6, nightly from 8pm until 6am, Detroit Avenue under I-75 will be closed for bridge demolition.  Detour: Berdan Avenue; Haverhill Drive; Phillips Avenue.

Through May 2017, the Polish Village Overpass is closed for bridge work.  Detour: North Expressway Drive; Stickney Avenue; South Expressway Drive.

Through June 2017, South Expressway Drive is restricted to a single lane between Stickney Avenue and Lagrange Street.

Through June 2017, Elm Street and Wersell Avenue at South Expressway Drive, are closed.

Through June 2017, Stickney Avenue, is restricted to a single lane between North Expressway Drive and South Expressway Drive.

Through October 2017, expect lane restrictions on Phillips Avenue at I-75 for bridge work.

Through July 2018, lane restrictions are possible on Detroit Avenue at I-75 for bridge work.

Through July 2018, expect lane restrictions on Berdan Avenue at I-75 for bridge work.

Through July 2018, Willys Parkway from Pioneer Lane to Jeep Parkway is closed.

Project complete: September 2018.  All work is weather permitting.

3. Interstate 75: Rest Area Closure

Wood County (170-14)Through January 2017, the northbound I-75 rest area is closed for renovations.  Through June 2017, the southbound I-75 rest area is closed for renovations, pavement repair.  Project complete: June 2017.  All work is weather permitting.

4. Interstate 75: Lighting Repair *NEW WORK*

Lucas County:  Effective Thursday, January 5, through Friday, January 6, daily from 8am until 3pm, single lane restrictions are possible on I-75, between Ottawa River Road and the Ohio/Michigan line, for lighting repair.  All work is weather permitting.

5. Interstates 75/475: Lighting Installation *UPDATE*

Lucas and Wood Counties: The lane restrictions on southbound I-75, between SR 795 and US 20, scheduled for Friday, December 30, from 9am until 3pm, for highway lighting installation have been postponed due to weather.  Lane restrictions on northbound I-475, between Dorr Street and Hill Avenue, for lighting installation will be announced.  All work is weather permitting.

6. Interstate 280: Bridge Repair

Lucas County (1075-16):  Through January 2017, intermittent lane restrictions are possible on southbound I-280, between Greenbelt Parkway (Exit 11) and Starr Avenue (Exit 8), for lighting installation.  Project complete: January 2017.  All work is weather permitting.

7. Interstate 475: Lighting Repair *UPDATE*

Lucas County:  Through Friday, January 6, overnight from 8pm until 6am, lane restrictions are possible on eastbound I-475, between US 23 and the I-75/I-475 interchange in Toledo, for lighting repairs.  All work is weather permitting.

8. Interstate 475: ProMedica Parkway Ramp
Lucas County:
  The ramp from ProMedica Parkway to eastbound I-475 is open to access southbound I-75 only.  Through September 2018, the ramp from ProMedica Parkway to eastbound I-475 to access northbound I-75 is closed.  Detour: southbound I-75; Detroit Avenue (Exit 203B); northbound I-75.  All work is weather permitting.

 

9. Interstate Maintenance Work
Lucas and Wood Counties:
 Through December, lane restrictions are possible on the collector ramp from southbound I-75 to the Ohio Turnpike and SR 795 (Exit 195) for pavement repair.  The ramps will remain open.

Through December, intermittent overnight lane restrictions are possible on I-75, I-280 and I-475 in Lucas and Wood counties for maintenance work.  Project complete: December.  All work is weather permitting.

10. U.S. Route 20: Central Avenue Interchange Project
Lucas County (210-15):
 Through September 2017, Central Avenue, between McCord Road and Van Fleet Parkway, may be reduced to one lane for finish work. Through September 2017, lane restrictions are possible on I-475/US 23 between Dorr Street and N. Holland Sylvania Road.  Project complete: September 2017.  All work is weather permitting.

11. U.S. Route 20: Traffic Signal Upgrades *UPDATE*

Lucas County (301-16):  Through January 2017, daytime intermittent lane restrictions are possible at the intersection of Central Avenue/US 20 and Meijer Drive for finish work.  Project complete: February 2017.  All work is weather permitting.

12. State Route 2: Anthony Wayne Bridge Painting Project
Lucas County (220-16): 
Effective Monday, January 9, through November 2017, westbound SR 2, between Oak Street and Broadway Street, will be reduced to one lane for bridge painting.  Through November 2017, eastbound SR 2, between Broadway Street and Oak Street, will be reduced to one lane for bridge painting.  Additional lane restrictions on the Anthony Wayne Bridge and local road closures will be announced.  Project complete: November 2017.  All work is weather permitting.

 

13. Oakwood Avenue: Bridge Work *UPDATE*

Lucas County (268-14):  Through January 2017, Oakwood Avenue, between Wells Street and Grove Place, is closed for bridge work.  Seek alternate route.  Project complete: January 2017.  All work is weather permitting.

14. State Route 25: Diverging Diamond Interchange

Wood County (8029-16):  Through October 2017, overnight from 7pm until 6am, single lane restrictions are possible on I-475, between the I-75/475 interchange and Fort Meigs Road, for diverging diamond interchange work.  Additionally, overnight from 9pm until 6am, lane restrictions are possible on SR 25, between Levis Commons Boulevard and Eckel Junction Road, for diverging diamond interchange work.  Project complete: October 2017.  All work is weather permitting.

 

15. State Route 795: Traffic Signal Upgrades *UPDATE*

Wood County (301-16):  Through January 2017, daytime intermittent lane restrictions are possible on SR 795 at Glenwood Road, for traffic signal upgrades.  Project complete: February 2017.  All work is weather permitting.

Ottawa/Sandusky/Seneca Counties

16. State Route 53: Traffic Signal Upgrades *UPDATES*

Sandusky County (301-16):  Through January 2017, shoulder restrictions are possible on SR 53, between US 20 and Sean Street, for finish work. Additional restrictions may be announced.  Project Complete: February 2017.  All work is weather permitting.

Williams/Fulton/Henry Counties

17. U.S. Route 20A: Resurfacing and Signal Upgrades

Fulton County (8016-16):  Through January 2017, intermittent lane restrictions are possible on Airport Highway/US 20A, between the Lucas/Fulton County line and CR 3, for signal work.  Project complete: January 2017.  All work is weather permitting.

18. State Route 109: Damascus Bridge: Bridge Replacement

Henry County (1-15):  Through October 2017, motorists should watch for additional truck traffic near SR 109 at the Damascus bridge for bridge work.  Work impacting traffic will be announced.  Project complete: October 2017.  All work is weather permitting.

District Wide 

                                                                                                                                                      

19. Various Routes: Guardrail, Striping & Electrical Maintenance

District Wide (1053-15 & 1059-15 & 1044-15):  Through December, intermittent lane restrictions are possible district wide for guardrail, striping and electrical maintenance.  Project complete: December.  All work is weather permitting.

The Ohio Department of Transportation maintains the state’s largest man-made asset–the transportation system. ODOT’s mission is to provide the safe and easy movement of people and goods from place to place. As a $2.8 billion per year enterprise, ODOT invests the bulk of its resources in system preservation through maintenance, construction and snow and ice operations.

The environmental review, consultation, and other actions required by applicable Federal environmental laws for this project are being, or have been, carried out by ODOT pursuant to 23 U.S.C. 327 and a Memorandum of Understanding dated December 11, 2015, and executed by FHWA and ODOT.