(Updated)- NB Resident Opens First-of-Its-Kind Wellness Center in Findlay

New Business Offers Natural, Non-Drug Option to Strengthen Bones and Muscles, Fight Osteoporosis, Improve Balance, and Significantly Improve Sports Performance.

Stacey Phillips, of North Baltimore,  will be opening the area’s first “OsteoStrong®” Center, in Findlay. OsteoStrong® is a national health-and-wellness franchise business out of Tennessee, with multiple locations in that state, as well as Alabama, California, New Mexico, North Carolina, Texas, and other states. Boasting approximately 35 locations nationwide, OsteoStrong® has existed for about 4 years. Ohio is among the fastest growing states for the company, and interest among both users and potential franchisees is high.

Stacey is a 1988 graduate of NBHS. She is happily married to Jim Phillips, a 1979 graduate of NBHS. They have 6 children (all graduates of NBHS too) with 2 proudly serving in the armed services. They also have 3 amazing grandsons & 1 granddaughter. Stacey is the daughter of Shirley and the late Chester Paul.

Mrs. Phillips has a Master’s degree in Business from BGSU, and loves learning. She said,”I decided to start an OsteoStrong franchise, when I read the incredible scientific research results regarding multiple sclerosis and fibromyalgia. OsteoStrong has already been proven to stop and reverse bone loss in Osteoporosis, eliminate joint and back paint, and drastically improve sports performance.” OsteoStrong is a non-pharmaceutical, natural way to use your body’s own resources (adaptive response) to heal itself.
OsteoStrong 2
Stacey Phillips (in pink shirt) works with a client at her Osteo Strong center
OsteoStrong 3
Stacey explains the proper use of the equipment
OsteoStrong 1
Thumbs up for a successful session!

OsteoStrong® offers a safe, natural way to strengthen bones, muscles, and joints. While each OsteoStrong® Center offers vibration plate therapy, and many, including the one in Findlay, offer HydroMassage, the star of each location is something called a bioDensity machine. It resembles the familiar Nautilus machine except that it’s connected to a computer and monitors. Dr. John Jaquish, a biomedical engineer, was inspired to create it because his own mother had osteoporosis and wanted a non-drug way to reverse her condition.

People using the bioDensity machine push, pull, and lift multiples of their body weight in what are called “trigger point” events. Their efforts are measured using precision strain gauges, and those measurements are recorded by a computer system. The whole time, the person using the machine sees how much force they are generating versus their last session on a monitor, and, after the entire session, users receive a detailed report graphing their progress over time. The entire process takes just a few minutes. According to several published studies, users have increased bone density by amounts that approach or exceed those claimed by leading osteoporosis medications and that are far greater than the traditional exercises often recommended to strengthen bones, like weight training and running.

October 20 is Osteoporosis Awareness Day, which is intended to bring awareness to the serious and growing public health threat posed by Osteoporosis. Government statistics show that in the United States, 54 million people have either osteoporosis or osteopenia, a precursor to osteoporosis. Internationally, 1 in 3 women and 1 in 5 men over the age of 50 will suffer an osteoporotic fracture. And while osteoporosis is often thought of as a bigger problem for women than for men, the risk of a man having an osteoporosis-related fracture is 27%, double the risk of prostate cancer.

Many people are unaware that bones are living tissue, just like muscle, and grow in response to stimulus – or shrink in its absence – just like muscles. If enough force is applied to bones, they grow stronger. This principle is called “Wolff’s Law,” which has been taught in medical schools for over a century. The bioDensity device works according to that law. According to published research, regular users of the device have improved their bone mineral density, or BMD – the standard measure of bone health – by more than 7% over the course of a year, which is on par with osteoporosis medications. Participants in the most recent study improved their hip and spine bone mineral density by even greater percentages after 6 months.

The benefits, particularly for the elderly, extend beyond bone and muscle strength. According to an independent, randomized clinical trial published in the Journal of Physical Activity and Aging, people in their 70s-90s were able to improve their balance by nearly 30% after 12 weeks of bioDensity and vibration plate sessions totaling 15 minutes a week. Equally important, they increased their functional independence scores, a vitally important issue for older Americans.

Phillips says that the OsteoStrong® “workout” solves two of the biggest challenges presented by the growing osteoporosis problem: injury risk and treatment compliance. As for injury risk, “most people know that they must exercise for overall health and that they must do specific strength-training exercises to make their bones strong. But the problem is that bones grow stronger only when subjected to loads that people cannot safely handle when lifting weights in a gym. This machine solves that problem because it is “self-loading,” meaning that, throughout the process, the user controls how much effort and force she is applying while in an optimal biomechanical position, supervised by what is called a “session coach.” This is in contrast to traditional weight lifting, where the user cannot alter the amount of weight she is lifting during the lift. In addition, people say they don’t have the time to spend hours in the gym. This solves the ‘I just don’t have time’ problem because people can do their sessions in their street clothes and complete the entire workout in a few minutes once a week. And for people who are active already, it isn’t going to disrupt their normal workout routine. They can pop in on the way to or from work, while running errands, or even on their way to another workout.”

Phillips says that the science is clear: “You don’t need to spend hours working out to make bones strong. What you need to do is the right kind of exercise for a very brief time. Bones get stronger when the right force is applied to them. Lots of repetitions of light weights are great for burning calories and toning, but do very little for bone health, according to published research.”

One unique feature of the machine is that it displays how much force a person is putting out and records and tracks that information over time. “It’s totally objective. There’s no guesswork about whether someone is getting stronger. Either they are or they aren’t, and the data tells us.” The machine uses sensitive strain gauges like those used in industrial applications to measure how much weight a person is lifting, and it displays that output on screens that both the user and the machine operator see in real time. “You just don’t get that sort of instant feedback plus long-term history in any other strength training equipment,” she says. “Plus,” Phillips adds, “this feedback loop makes the process fun for people.”

Because reducing fall risk is also key to preventing osteoporotic fractures, OsteoStrong® tracks its members’ balance improvements using something called a “BTracks Balance Tracking System,” a precision medical device that precisely measures an individual’s body “sway.” “Over time, our members should improve their balance in addition to their strength, and this device allows us to measure balance and track it over time. Everything we do here is objectively measured and tracked so that people know whether what they are doing is actually working. You don’t get that sort of objective feedback in most other fitness industries,” says Phillips, “and that is another thing that sets us apart.

Though developed as a natural treatment option for osteoporosis, OsteoStrong® is also marketed to the active population. Athletes such as football players, soccer players, and gymnasts, as well as middle-aged and older weekend warriors, endurance athletes, and even golfers stand to benefit from using the technology offered at his center. Dr. Jaquish is an avid triathlete who has competed in Ironman events, and became interested in the technology because he was concerned about his own history of injuries. “Like most middle aged people who engage in a lot of physical activity, I was getting injured a lot. I began to look for non-drug/non-supplement methods to protect me against injuries so that I could continue doing endurance sports at a high level.” He adds, “if you talk to strength experts, they’ll tell you that isometric exercise – that is, exercise where the joint angle is fixed – where a person can apply maximal force is a good addition to any strength training regime. The reason people don’t do a lot of isometrics, however, is twofold: first, they cheat but not applying all of their force because they don’t know how much force they are actually putting out; and second, they don’t have a way to measure how much force they’re putting out. The bioDensity machine solves both of those problems because it precisely measures and displays your force, and tracks it over time. Because each session takes just a few minutes, it is a perfect complement to other weight training and easily fits into anyone’s schedule.”

OsteoStrong® doesn’t replace medical or chiropractic care, or regular physical exercise. Phillips explains: “We don’t substitute what we do here for sound medical advice from a person’s physician, chiropractor, or other care giver. We do not give medical advice or diagnose. We offer a natural, safe, and proven way for people to improve their bone health, muscular strength, and balance. You can’t train for a marathon by doing only this, but doing this will make you a stronger runner.”

“With an aging population, a growing osteoporosis problem, decreased physical activity across all age groups, and public concern over the well-publicized side effects of prescription medications, OsteoStrong® is well positioned to grow in Ohio and nationwide, because it offers a proven, convenient way to prevent or reverse bone loss.” There’s been a lot of interest in this business model here in Ohio, which, statistically, has an aging population, and, let’s face it, probably has major Vitamin D deficiencies due to the long, grey winters (Vitamin D is necessary for bone health.). We’re now among the fastest growing states for this franchise.”

Copies of the referenced studies may be downloaded from the OsteoStrong® Facebook page at www.facebook.com/osteostrongfindlay. Stacey’s website is  www.osteostrongfindlay.com .   Additional information on the company and the equipment it uses can be found at www.osteostrong.me, www.biodensity.com, www.vibeplate.com, and www.hydromassage.com.

Stacey concluded, “OsteoStrong is not a gym, drug, or diet. Simply put, we are a human performance center specially designed to naturally leverage your body’s own built-in systems to improve bone density, regain balance, and increase strength at just about any age. My mission is not to just slow the process of aging, but actually reverse the process for bones, balance, and muscle naturally. ”

The OsteoStrong Findlay Center can be reached by phone at 419-581-5632, or in person at 655 Fox Run Road, Suite E, Findlay.

Tigers Win in their Second Contest of the Weekend

Maumee Valley Country Day School visits the Jungle……………

The Tigers hosted Maumee Valley Country Day School Saturday night at the Jungle, with the hometown boys picking up the win 58-46.

 

1234Final Score
MVCD121217546
NB1415161358

Tiger Scoring

Chad Wright-36
Noah Brian-12
Brody Naugle-5
Julian Hagemyer-3
Sean Watson-2

Rebounds-31

Wright-14
Watson-8

Assists

Watson-4
Brian-4

NB’s JV won the first contest of the night, 45-32

Fotos by Ferg

bbb vs mvcd var1
Sean Watson stops and pops
bbb vs mvcd var2
Noah Brian for three
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Brody Naugle watches as his shot goes in
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The girls went with a “pink” theme to show support tonight!
bbb vs mvcd var5
Taylor Bishop grabs a rebound
bbb vs mvcd var6
Chad Wright lays it in
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JV Action-Tyler Bumpus playing defense
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JV Action-Bryce Gunter with 2 and the foul
 Sean Watson stops and pops
JV Action- Tyler Durfey gets ready to shoot a foul shot

The Tigers are now 10-7 overall. There next game is at Cory Rawson on February 5th, followed by a home game on Saturday, Feb. 6th vs. Northwood.

 

The Follow Up Story on WCHS New Arrivals

WCHS had taken in sixteen animals to start and most of them have been adopted to their forever homes. Since then an additional six dogs from that case have been brought in to the shelter…..

(Bowling Green, OH)- A month ago Wood County Humane Society (WCHS) assisted Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) Animal Rescue Team with a hoarding situation in Southern Ohio. Immediate medical care was given to the 166 animals living in deplorable conditions. WCHS is an Emergency Placement Partner for HSUS to offer assistance for cases of this kind. WCHS had taken in sixteen animals to start and most of them have been adopted to their forever homes. Since then an additional six dogs from that case have been brought in to the shelter.

The remaining dogs range from adult to senior ages. They are mixed breeds and are medium sized. VP of Operations Deb Johnson who helped with veterinary needs and the transport of the animals stated, “These dogs are all very friendly and lovable.” Some were in need of further medical attention, such as dentals, once transported to WCHS. Most are now available for adoption at the shelter and any potential owner can fill out an application. Pictures of the dogs can be found on the WCHS website www.woodcountyhumanesociety.com. You can also stop at the shelter located at 801 Van Camp Road, Bowling Green, Ohio. Adoption hours at the shelter are Wednesday and Thursday from 12 to 7p.m. and Friday, Saturday, and Sunday from 12 to 4p.m.

The WCHS, located in Bowling Green, Ohio, is a private, non-profit managed admission shelter providing care for homeless and abused pets and investigating cruelty complaints in Wood County. The organization receives no funding from government organizations, The United Way, or national humane organizations, instead relying on earned revenue and the generosity of individual donors and businesses to fund our programs such as Safe Haven and food assistance programs, spay/neuter transport, and educational presentations. The WCHS provides care for hundreds of animals each year—from dogs and cats, to horses, goats, and pocket pets. All animals admitted into our adoption program are housed and cared for as long as it takes to find their fur-ever home. For more information on adopting and/or volunteering, see:

http://www.woodcountyhumanesociety.org.

Chowline: Exercise important, but calories count more

It’s no surprise that most Americans need more exercise……

Chowline is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu

chow_caloriesexercise-1
(Click on article to ENLARGE)

NB Historical Society News – Winter 2016

A Periodic Publication of the North Baltimore Ohio Area Historical Society – Winter 2016

Knowing where you’ve been, helps you see where you’re going

RICK MAYS DONATES CHANDLER AND PRICE LETTERPRESS

NB Historical Society News – Winter 2016

A Periodic Publication of the North Baltimore Ohio Area Historical Society  –  Winter 2016

Knowing where you’ve been, helps you see where you’re going

RICK MAYS DONATES CHANDLER AND PRICE LETTERPRESS

NBOAHS President Courtney Mays, Rick Mays and Past President Janice Emahiser
NBOAHS President Courtney Mays, Rick Mays and Past President Janice Emahiser

Rick Mays, local resident and businessman, recently donated a ca. 1916, Chandler and Price Letterpress which was used in his family business, to the North Baltimore Ohio Area Historical Society. This is especially significant as it provides a much needed interactive display which can serve as an educational tool for visitors of all ages. Rick has promised to be available to give demonstrations on operating the press at Good Ole Summertime and possibly on other occasions. Stay tuned for more information on demonstrations. Although “Chandler” has been donated to the Historical Center, Mabar Printing continues to operate at their new location at 400 N. Tarr.

The Chandler and Price Company was founded in 1881 in Cleveland by Harrison T. Chandler and William H. Price. The company manufactured machinery for professional printers. They first marketed the 10 x 15 Letterpress in 1887. Within 20 years Chandler and Price had became the dominant supplier of presses beating out dozens of companies, producing over 100 models of presses. By 1910, the company had sold over 38,000 presses. In the 1930’s, it was estimated that over 90% of professional presses were produced by Chandler and Price. Letterpresses remained in use through the late 1960’s when the offset lithograph displaced letterpresses; however, many shops retained their platen presses for foiling, perforating, numbering, and die cutting into the 21st century. Chandler and Price ceased production of the letterpress in 1964.

The following article was written by Rick Mays prior to the time that the press was donated to the Historical Center.

A STORY ABOUT A SMALL-TIME AMERICAN PRINTSHOP

By Eric (Rick) Mays
Current Owner of Mabar Printing Service

This story is about Mabar Printing Service in North Baltimore, Ohio. The name was formed in 1950 when William McCoy “Mac” Mays and newly married bride Barbara Bucher came up with the name by combining Mac and Barb. Mac bought a 10 x 15 open feed Chandler and Price letterpress and housed it in the garage which was owned by Barbara’s mother, Goldie Bucher, at 304 N. Main Street.

NBOAHS Rick Mays with “Chandler” - July 19, 1984, NB News
Rick Mays with “Chandler” – July 19, 1984, NB News

Mac subsequently worked at Kennedy Printing in Findlay and the NB News as a job printer. In December of 1960 Mac and Barbara built a small building at the back of their property at 408 North Tarr Street, which has been Mabar Printing Service ever since. In April of 1984 son Eric “Rick” Mays bought the business and has owned it ever since. Small town printshops have taken a hit in recent years with all the PC’s, digital copiers, and such; however, Mabar is one of the oldest businesses in North Baltimore. There is, of course, much, much more to the story, like how after one year in business Mabar nearly closed and if it wasn’t for the compassion of a young lady named Bernadine King it possibly would have. Mabar’s Chandler letterpress is nearly 100 years old. A Google search of the serial number shows that it was manufactured in 1916. To find out more about Mabar Printing Service just ask Rick–you all know he’s good for an old STORY!!! Thank you for listening.

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THE HISTORICAL CENTER WILL BE CLOSED TO THE PUBLIC DURING THE MONTHS OF JANUARY AND FEBRUARY.

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KING GEORGE III AND DEWEYVILLE CEMETERY

By Larry E. Slaughterbeck

A few weeks ago a lady visited our North Baltimore Area Historical Center seeking any information we might have on the Archer family that is buried in the small cemetery which is located on private property on Deweyville Road. I was happy to share what I knew…my father; Edward Slaughterbeck had done extensive research on this chapter of the family. It is very interesting that the 1776 American Revolution leads to a small family burial plot at the edge of town.

Historians disagree with the date of Henry Archer’s birth. He was born December 12, 1750, in Suffolk, England. In England, Henry and his best friend, John Taylor, were King George’s bodyguards. This was probably because of their physical NBOAHS King Georgestrength and strong character. King George III requested that they serve in the 63rd British Light Infantry under Lord Cornwallis in the Americas. Shortly before the campaign at Yorktown, Henry was sent out on a scouting party and taken captive by the “Peoples General”, General Marquis de Lafayette. He was imprisoned in Camp Chase, near Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and was released when peace was declared. He decided to stay in America as he liked the people and wanted to raise a family here.

About 1778 he met Hannah Keine (Keline), a Quaker born in Philadelphia. They were to be married 82 years and had a very interesting life. They had eight children; nearly all lived to be over 80 years old. Hannah died at the age of 105 and Henry at the age of 110. They were held in high esteem by everyone. They were honored for their advanced age and the town they lived in took the name of Old Hundred, West Virginia.

Henry was very proud of his war experience and his loyalty to the King and; therefore, refused to sign the Oath of Allegiance to the American Colonists until it was explained to him that he couldn’t sell his land unless he did. He felt he let the King down, although he strongly defended his adopted land in deed and voice when necessary. During the War of 1812, he was called by the government to serve which he was proud to do and shouldered his rifle and started off by foot to report.

My ancestors through the generations passed down orally that Henry Archer greatly admired King George and spoke often of the king being an avid gardener. Back to the beginning of this article; some of Henry’s heirs are buried in North Baltimore. Since I have never seen the grave markers I assume that it is his son, James Archer who married Henry Copus’ daughter. Copus was the first landowner in Bloom Township and his father was Reverend James Copus of the 1812 Massacre at Mifflin, Ohio.

Part of this text was taken directly from an article I found while researching for this article and from family history. Anyway it makes for interesting reading and re-hashing.

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NEW NBOAHS OFFICERS ELECTED

The following officers will serve until November 2017:
President Courtney Mays
Vice-President Margaret Bobb
Secretary Paula Miklovic
Treasurer Gwenn Mauk

Newsletter Editor – Margaret Bobb

Board Members – Thomas Boltz, Janis Dukes, Janice Emahiser, Phyllis Mercer, Pam Seiler, Larry Slaughterbeck, Rick Van Mooy

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ANSWER TO FALL NEWSLETTER QUESTION:

Delbert Latta lived in this house on E. Water St. in the 1930’s. He attended school in N.B. and graduated from McComb H.S. in 1938.

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2016 MEMBERSHIP INFORMATION

NOW IS THE TIME TO RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP!

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Exciting things are happening at the N. B. Historical Center. This year we have added a number of significant artifacts to our collection including: Dr. Henry’s surgical instruments, Dr. Foltz’s medical journals, and the Mabar Chandler and Price Letterpress. In addition, we will be restoring the Estey parlor organ to playing condition in the near future! Your membership helps us to continue the work of preserving the history of N. Baltimore and area.

New members are always welcome … Spread the word!

Membership form at the end of this newsletter!

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WELCOME NEW MEMBERS
Virgil and Peggy Thompson; Kitty Burns Florey

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The North Baltimore Ohio Area Historical Society
229 North Main Street, P.O. Box 174
North Baltimore, Ohio, 45872
(419) 257-2266
Email: nbahs@wcnet.org

NBAHS Website  (www.northbaltimorehistory.org) for more history articles and Society news.

NBOAHS Santa

You may remember this Santa from his visits to the N. B. Food Center in the 1950’s. He now resides in the Juvenile Room at the Historical Center (when he’s not at the North Pole).

 

 

C
C

Time Change for NB Council Going Forward

VILLAGE OF NORTH BALTIMORE
COUNCIL MEETING
February 2, 2016

***7:00 PM***

AGENDA

VILLAGE OF NORTH BALTIMORE
COUNCIL MEETING
February 2, 2016

***7:00 PM***

AGENDA

I. Pledge of Allegiance

II. Roll Call

III. Approval of the Minutes

IV. Public Participation

Guest Speakers: George Walton, President & CEO of Hancock-Wood
John Rauch of RCAP

V. Letters and Communications

VI. Administrative Reports

Finance Officer:

EMS Chief:

Fire Chief:

Police Chief:

Utility Director:

DPW Superintendent:

Village Administrator:

Clerk:

Appointed Legal Counsel:

Mayor:

VII. Standing Committees

Economic and Community Development (Ms. Thompson)

Public Safety (Mr. Patterson)

Personnel, Policy and Ordinance Review (Mr. Rose)

Public Works (Mr. Carles)

Public Utilities (Mr. Van Mooy)

Finance and Technology (Mr. Archer)

VIII. New Legislation, Resolutions, Motions or Business

No readings

IX. Second Reading of Ordinances and Resolutions

ORDINANCE 2016-01 AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION ACCOUNTS FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2016, PROVIDING EXPENDITURE FROM STATE OF OHIO PUBLIC SAFETY GRANT PROCEEDS

ORDINANCE 2016-02 AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION ACCOUNTS FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2016, PROVIDING EXPENDITURE FROM STATE OF OHIO PUBLIC SAFETY GRANT PROCEEDS

ORDINANCE 2016-03 AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION ACCOUNTS FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2016, PROVIDING EXPENDITURE FROM CEMETERY GUARDRAIL INSURANCE PROCEED
X. Third Reading of Ordinances and Resolutions

No readings

XI. Other New Business

XII. Other Old Business

XIII. Executive Session

XIV. Payment of the Bills

XV. Adjournment

Van Buren Schools students visit Hancock-Wood Electric

Last week, nearly 100 eighth grade students from Van Buren Schools learned the ins-and-outs of the electric co-op world when they toured Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative corporate offices in North Baltimore, Ohio. The staff at Hancock-Wood, including President and CEO George Walton, was excited to share the technology that has kept Member lights on for more than 75 years in northwest Ohio.

Van Buren Schools students visit Hancock-Wood Electric
NORTH BALTIMORE, OHIO–January 29, 2016 – Last week, nearly 100 eighth grade students from Van Buren Schools learned the ins-and-outs of the electric co-op world when they toured Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative corporate offices in North Baltimore, Ohio. The staff at Hancock-Wood, including President and CEO George Walton, was excited to share the technology that has kept Member lights on for more than 75 years in northwest Ohio.
 
Walton said, “Giving these students an inside look at our member services along with IT, Communications, Engineering and Operations functions provides them with a better understanding of how an electric utility works. We emphasize how important their schooling is and what life benefits they could achieve by furthering their education – they might just become our employees one day!”
 
Walton spoke about the many disciplines of education each department head and employees received to attain the positions they hold at Hancock-Wood. 
 
Students toured the offices and warehouses and even visited the “War Room,” from where operations personnel are dispatched when an outage is reported. Bill Barnhart, vice president of engineering and operations, and Andy Fisher, engineering supervisor, conducted a mock outage so students could see the steps taken in restoring power as quickly as possible. Often, Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA), advanced technological communications equipment, is utilized to “back feed” power from an alternate substation to the point of delivery.  
 
Josh Soltis, a network support technician, shared with the students the information technology (IT) secure server room, where computer technology systems are stored. Soltis explained to the students how the servers work and how they are climate and security protected.
 
Ryan Goolsby, distribution engineer, shared technology on the re-closer devices the engineering department uses to help reduce outage time. Goolsby said, “This (technology) can automatically eliminate disruptions caused by tree branches or squirrels without crews being dispatched to the scene.” 
 
Students were especially excited to have a chance to control larger equipment, such as the power auger which is used by the line crew to drill holes or place poles in areas not accessible to a service truck.
 
Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative, established April 20, 1938, serves more than 13,000 accounts in Hancock, Wood, Allen, Erie, Hardin, Henry, Putnam, Sandusky, Seneca and Wyandot counties. Throughout the cooperative’s history, HWEC has delivered reliable, affordable services and supported energy efficiency along with educational and charitable causes to make a positive impact within the communities it serves.
 
For more information, visit the HWE web site at www.hwe.coop or call 800-445-4840.

Lutheran Church News — St. Luke’s (NB) & St. John’s (McComb)

for Sunday, January 31st…….

St. Luke’s Lutheran Church, North Baltimore

“The Light of Love” is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic at St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in North Baltimore on Sunday, January 31 at 10:15 a.m.

Sunday School for all ages begins at 9:00 a.m.

St. John’s Lutheran Church, McComb

“The Light of Love” is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic at St. John’s Lutheran Church in McComb on Sunday, January 31 at 8:00 a.m.

Sunday School begins at 9:15 a.m. (a joint Sunday School with the McComb United Methodist Church).

UPDATED with Photos– Arlington Boys Steal a Victory in The Jungle

North Baltimore Boys Basketball lost to Arlington in a tough fashion Friday night, 56 – 54.

North Baltimore Boys Basketball lost to Arlington in a tough fashion Friday night, 56 – 54.

The Tigers led 28 – 14 at the half, but turnovers and cold shooting allowed the Red Devils to get back into the game, eventually catching NB with a minute and a half to go in the game.

Chad Wright had 22 points. Noah Brian hit 14 points, had 2 steals and 3 assists. Sean Watson had 11 points and 8 rebounds. Julian Hagemyer had 2 points and 8 rebounds. Chase Naugle added 5 points.

NB falls to 9 – 7, 4 – 4 in the BVC.

Arlington won the JV game 57 – 31.

Fotos by Ferg

bbb vs arl var1
Julian Hagemyer fires from the corner
bbb vs arl var2
Sean Watson plays some tough D
bbb vs arl var3
Chase Naugle makes an acrobatic pass to Watson
bbb vs arl var4
Chad Wright hits for 2 of his game high 22 points
bbb vs arl jvar3
JV cheerleaders
bbb vs arl jvar2
JV Action- Noah Cotterman lays it in
bbb vs arl jvar1
JV Action-Harley Cole calls for the ball

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ODOT District Two Monthly Construction Update – January 29, 2016

ODOT District Two Monthly Construction Update – January 29, 2016

 Lucas/Wood Counties

1. Interstate 75: Widening *UPDATE*
Wood & Hancock Counties (170-14, 199-14, 237-14 & 3000-14):

Interstate Restrictions:

Effective Saturday, January 30, from 7am until 3pm, northbound I-75, from US 6 to SR 582, will be reduced to one lane for barrier wall repair. 

Effective Monday, February 1 at 9pm, through Tuesday, February 2 at 6am, the ramp from eastbound I-475 to southbound I-75 will be closed for pavement repair.  Detour: northbound I-75; SR 795 (Exit 193); southbound I-75.

Through November, overnight, from 7pm until 6am, single lane restrictions are possible on I-75 between the I-75/I-475 interchange in Perrysburg and CR 99 in Hancock County.  Through December, southbound I-75 is reduced to two lanes from US 20 to I-475 in Perrysburg. Through December, 11-foot lane width restrictions are in place on I-75 between US 20 in Perrysburg and CR 99 in Hancock County. 

Ramp Restrictions:

·         Through July, 11-foot lane width restrictions are in place on the ramps from northbound and southbound I-75 to Cygnet Road (Exit 171) and from Cygnet Road to northbound and southbound I-75.

Local Routes:
Through April, Township Road 101 in Hancock County, between CR 220 and TR 142, is closed for bridge work over I-75.

Through March, Bays Road at I-75 is closed for bridge work.  Detour: SR 25; SR 281; Solether Road.  Project complete: October 2017.  All work is weather permitting.

2. Interstate 75: Widening
Lucas County (485-14, 536-14):
  Through July 2018, overnight, 7pm through 6am, single lane restrictions are possible on I-75, from I-475 in Toledo to I-280 for bridge work.  Through September, one lane of I-75 traffic is maintained in the current northbound lane and one lane of traffic is relocated to southbound I-75 and separated by barrier wall.

The following ramps are closed:

·         Through June, the ramp from Phillips Avenue to northbound I-75.  Detour: Manhattan Boulevard; Lagrange Street; South Expressway Drive.

·         Through July, the ramp from southbound I-75 to Phillips Avenue (Exit 206).  Detour: North Expressway Drive (Exit 207); Stickney Avenue; South Expressway Drive.

·         Through September, the ramp from northbound I-75 to Jeep Parkway (Exit 205A).  Detour: Berdan Avenue (Exit 205B); Detroit Avenue.

·         Through September, the ramp from northbound I-75 to Phillips Avenue (Exit 206).  Detour: south Expressway Drive (Exit 207); Stickney Avenue; North Expressway Drive.

·         Through July 2018, the ramp from Jeep Parkway to southbound I-75.  Detour: Berdan Avenue.

·         Through July 2018, the ramp from Willys Parkway to northbound I-75.  Detour: Berdan Avenue; Detroit Avenue; Phillips Avenue.

·         Through July 2018, the ramp from southbound I-75 to Willys Parkway (Exit 205A).  Detour: Detroit Avenue (Exit 203B).

Local Streets:

Through January, expect lane restrictions on Stickney Avenue at I-75 for bridge work.

Through May, expect lane restrictions on Berdan Avenue at I-75 and Detroit Avenue at I-75 for bridge work.

Through June, South Expressway Drive is restricted to a single lane between Stickney Avenue and Lagrange Street.

Through July, expect lane restrictions on Phillips Avenue at I-75 for bridge work.

Through September, Jeep Parkway from Central Avenue to Berdan Avenue is closed.  Central Avenue; Detroit Avenue; Berdan Avenue.

Through September, the ramp from northbound I-75 to Berdan Avenue is restricted to right turn only movements.  Suggested alternate route: Berdan Avenue; Detroit Avenue; Phillips Avenue; Haverhill Drive.

Through November, Elm Street and Wersell Avenue at South Expressway Drive, is closed.

Through May 2017, the Polish Village Overpass is closed for bridge work.  Detour: North Expressway Drive; Stickney Avenue; South Expressway Drive.

Through July 2018, Willys Parkway from Pioneer Lane to Jeep Parkway is closed.

Project complete: September 2018.  All work is weather permitting.

3. Interstate 75: Pavement Rehabilitation
Lucas County (268-14): 
Through August, I-75, from the I-75/475 split in Toledo to the Anthony Wayne Trail, is reduced to two lanes.  Overnight, 10pm through 6am, single lane restrictions are possible in this work zone. 

Through August, the following ramps are restricted or closed:

·         The interchange ramp from eastbound I-475 to southbound I-75 is reduced to one lane.

·         The interchange ramp from northbound I-75 to westbound I-475 is reduced to one lane.

·         The ramp from D­etroit Avenue to southbound I-75 is closed.  Detour: Monroe Street; Michigan Avenue; SR 25.

·         The ramp from Detroit Avenue to northbound I-75 is closed.  Detour: Monroe Street; 14th Street.

Through May, Oakwood Avenue, between Wells Street and Grove Place, is closed for bridge work.  Seek alternate route.  Project complete: August.  All work is weather permitting.

4. Interstate 75: Rest Area Closure

Wood County (170-14)Through July, the northbound and southbound I-75 rest areas are closed as part of the I-75 widening project.  Project complete: July.  All work is weather permitting.

 

5. Interstate 475: Pavement Repair *NEW WORK*

Lucas County:  Effective Saturday, January 30 at 7pm, through Sunday, January 31 at 11am, southbound I-475, between Bancroft Street and Hill Avenue, will be reduced to one lane for pavement repair.  All work is weather permitting.

 

6. Interstate 475: ProMedica Parkway Ramp
Lucas County:
  Through December, the ramp from ProMedica Parkway to eastbound I-475 is closed for traffic control.  Detour: westbound I-475; Douglas Road.  All work is weather permitting.

7. Interstate 475/U.S. Route 23: Interchange Upgrade
Lucas County (184-14 & 210-15):
 The new ramp from southbound US 23 to Central Avenue is open.  The new ramp from westbound I-475 to Central Avenue (Exit 13) is also open.  Through May, southbound US 23 traffic is reduced to one lane from the I-475/US 23 split in Sylvania to Central Avenue.

Overnight lane restrictions are possible at the interchange of I-475/US 23 from Central Avenue to N. Holland Sylvania Road.  Project complete: June.  All work is weather permitting.

 

8. Interstate 475: Bridge Widening

Lucas County (251-13 & 235-14):  Overnight lane restrictions on I-475, between Angola Road and Salisbury Road/Dussel Drive, will resume in the spring.  Through August, 11-foot lane width restrictions are in place on I-475, between Angola Road and Salisbury Road/Dussel Drive.  Project complete: August.  All work is weather permitting.  

9. Interstate Maintenance Work

Lucas and Wood Counties:  Through December, intermittent overnight lane restrictions are possible on I-75, I-280 and I-475 in Lucas and Wood counties for maintenance work.  Project complete: December.  All work is weather permitting.

10. U.S. Route 20: Central Avenue Interchange Project
Lucas County (210-15): 
Through September 2017, overnight from 8pm until 6am, lane restrictions are possible on I-475/US 23 between Dorr Street and the I-475/US 23 interchange.  11-foot lane width restrictions are in place within the work zone. Additional restrictions will be announced.
Project complete: September 2017.  All work is weather permitting. 

 

11. U.S. Route 23: Pavement Marking Installation *RESTRICTIONS SATURDAY*

Lucas County:  Effective Saturday, January 30, from 9:30am until 1pm, southbound US 23, between Monroe Street (Exit 234) and the I-475/US 23 interchange, will be reduced to one lane for pavement marking installation.  All work is weather permitting.

12. State Route 25: Safety Project
Lucas County (299-15):
  Through September, southbound (outbound from downtown Toledo) Anthony Wayne Trail, between Hippo Way and City Park Boulevard, is reduced two lanes for pavement rehabilitation.  Project complete: November.  All work is weather permitting.

 

13. McCord Road: Underpass Construction
Lucas County (236-14): 
Through September, McCord Road between North Mall Drive/Hall Road and Spectrum Drive is closed to vehicular and pedestrian traffic.  Detour: Holland Park Boulevard; North Mall Drive.  Project complete: November.  All work is weather permitting.

14. U.S. Route 6: Pavement Reconstruction and Bridge Work
Wood County (170-14):
  Through June, the ramp from southbound I-75 to eastbound US 6 is closed.  Detour: westbound US 6; SR 25.  Through June, US 6, between SR 25 and Dunbridge Road, is reduced to one lane in each direction.  Lane widths are restricted to 11ft in this work zone.  Work complete: June.  All work is weather permitting.

 

15. State Route 64: Slide Repair
Wood County (155-15):
  Through March, intermittent lane restrictions are possible on SR 64, between Reitz Road and SR 64/65 Waterville Bridge, for finish work.  Project complete: April.  All work is weather permitting.

 

Ottawa/Sandusky/Seneca Counties

 

16. State Route 2: Lightner Road Bridge Widening *UPDATE*

Ottawa County (232-15):  Through Friday, February 12, SR 2, between SR 53 and SR 269, may be reduced to one lane for bridge work.  Through August, intermittent lane restrictions are possible on SR 2, between SR 53/SE Catawba Road and SR 269, for bridge work.  Additionally, Lightner Road, between Kirk Road and East State Road, may be reduced to one lane for temporary pavement construction.  Traffic will be maintained by flaggers.  Additional restrictions will be announced.  Project complete: September.  All work is weather permitting.

 

17. State Route 2: Culvert Replacement *NEW WORK*

Ottawa County:  Effective Monday, February 8, through Friday, February 12, SR 2, between Cousino Road and Decant Road, will be closed for culvert replacement.  Detour: I-280; SR 51 (Exit 6A); SR 579.  All work is weather permitting.

Williams/Fulton/Henry Counties

18. State Route 109: Damascus Bridge: Bridge Replacement

Henry County (1-15):  Through October 2017, motorists should watch for additional truck traffic near SR 109 at the Damascus bridge for bridge work.  Work impacting traffic will be announced.  Project complete: October 2017.  All work is weather permitting.

19. State Route 110: Slide Repair *WESTBOUND LANE CLOSURE BEGINS MONDAY*
Henry County (135-15
):  Effective Monday, February 1, through September, westbound SR 110, between CR P3 and Appian Avenue in Napoleon, is closed for slide repair.  Detour: CR P3, CR 12; Appian Avenue.  Eastbound SR 110 in this area will remain open and local access will be maintained.  Project complete: September.  All work is weather permitting. 

District Wide 

                                                                                                                                                      

20. Various Routes: Guardrail & Electrical Maintenance

District Wide (1053-15 & 1059-15):  Through December, intermittent lane restrictions are possible district wide for guardrail and electrical maintenance.  Project complete: December.  All work is weather permitting.