Arrest Made in Recent NB Garage Break-Ins

North Baltimore Police Chief Allan Baer reports an arrest has been made in the recent garage break-ins.

North Baltimore Police Chief Allan Baer reports an arrest has been made in the recent garage break-ins.

Baer reports: “On May 26th, 2016 James R. Ankney, 32, of North Baltimore was arrested for his involvement of a Breaking and Entering of a detached garage in the 300 block of N. Main St.  The offense occurred April 14th, 2016.

During a several week time span, approximately eight detached garages were broken into.

Ankney was charged with one Count Felony 5 – Breaking & Entering and one Count Felony 4 – Theft.

The investigation continues and additional charges may be forth coming.

Passage of Animal Cruelty Legislation

Public Animal Welfare Society (PAWS Ohio) is Key Player in Passage of Animal Cruelty Legislation

Public Animal Welfare Society (PAWS Ohio) is Key Player in Passage of Animal Cruelty Legislation

COLUMBUS, Ohio   May 27, 2016   – House Bill 60 or, as it is referred to in Ohio, Goddard’s Law, has passed the Ohio Senate and House and is now awaiting the formal signature of Governor John Kasich. The new law will make it a fifth-degree felony to knowingly cause serious physical harm to a companion animal.

Amy Beichler, Executive Director of The Public Animal Welfare Society (PAWS Ohio), along with Cleveland’s Fox 8 Weatherman, Dick Goddard, for whom the new law is named, have been active for over four years in pursuit of the passage of this bill. “This has been a long and hard road with many obstacles along the way” Beichler stated yesterday. “But, thanks to the efforts of concerned and caring individuals like Dick Goddard, State Representatives Bill Patmon and Dave Hall, and Ohio Senator Larry Obhof, we were able to get this extremely important piece of legislation passed for companion animals.”

The Public Animal Welfare Society (PAWS Ohio), centered in Cleveland, Ohio, is a 40-year-old, nonprofit organization whose mission is to rescue and foster companion animals in an effort to find them permanent homes. Beichler, who has led the organization for over 12 years, has championed the fight for stronger punishment for animal cruelty throughout her tenure.

In addition to Goddard’s Law, which protects companion animals, “Jethro’s Bill,” which increases the penalties for killing a police dog was also included in the approved legislation. The bill would elevate the assault offense in Ohio and carry a mandatory prison sentence.

NB Deal Day 2016 Registration Form

Garage Sale lists will be available June 18th (the day of) at the NORTH BALTIMORE MARATHON and ONLINE at TheNBXpress.com

REGISTRATION FORM

Garage Sale lists will be available June 18th (the day of) at the NORTH BALTIMORE MARATHON and ONLINE at TheNBXpress.com

NB Deal Days 2016 Reg Form

Cost: $5.00
All Garage Sales will be included on a list with address, name and items for sale
Advertising of the NB Deal Day will be placed online at www.thenbxpress.com

Return this form, along with the $5.00 fee, by Monday, June 13th

In Person: NB Village Hall – 205 N. Main St. (M-F 8:30 am-4:30 pm)

Or Mail To: Christopher M. Snyder 402 E. Walnut St. N. Baltimore, Ohio 45872

Make checks payable to: Christopher M. Snyder

Questions or concerns? Please E-Mail nb_dealdays@yahoo.com

North Baltimore Deal Day (NB Community Garage Sale Day) is privately sponsored by:  Christopher M. Snyder

NORTH BALTIMORE DEAL DAY – Saturday, June 18th, 2016

FREE MUSEUM ADMISSION FOR MILITARY PERSONNEL AND FAMILIES

Wood County Historical Museum is one of more than 2,000 museums across America to offer free admission to military personnel and their families this summer in collaboration with the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, and the Department of Defense

Military personnel and their families are invited to tour the Wood County Historical Center & Museum at no charge this summer as part of the annual Blue Star Museums program in a collaboration with the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense.

This promotion will last through Labor Day weekend (Sunday, September 4). The Museum is open Monday – Friday, 10 AM – 4 PM and weekends from 1-4 PM (closed on holidays). The scenic grounds are open daily dawn to dusk for photos, picnics, and walking.

“The Blue Star Museums program is a fun, free activity for military families to enjoy during the summer months,” said NEA Chairman Jane Chu. “The program is also a great way for service member families to connect to their new communities, and it can provide a meaningful way for families to reconnect after deployment. The Blue Star Museums program is also a perfect way for the arts community to say ‘thank you’ to our service members and their families for the sacrifices they make on our behalf, every day.”

Currently on exhibit: Be Your Own Museum: Our Community’s Collections is a new museum experience where our public has becomes the curator. Local history is personal history, it’s community history – and we have added collections from 14 community members to the displays from sewing machines to super heroes!


The Wood County Historical Museum is located at 13660 County Home Road in Bowling Green, Ohio – just east of the I-75/Rt 6 interchange. For more information, please call 419-352-0967 or visit www.woodcountyhistory.org.

For a complete list of nation-wide participating museums, visit www.arts.gov/bluestarmuseums

WCHistoricalMuseum 1 WCHistoricalMuseum 2

NBHS Track Awards Held

Held last Tuesday May 24th in the HS Auditeria…….

The North Baltimore High School Track Awards were held last Tuesday May 24th in the HS Auditeria.

Girls’ HS Track Awards
Captain Award – Megan Ernsberger, Kenzie Carles
MVP Runner – Megan Ernsberger
MVP Field – Jordan Bucher, Kiley Brooker
Tiger Spirit Award – Hanna Rose
Coaches Award – Rachel Crouse
BVC All-Academic – Leah Hetrick, Megan Ernsberger, Kenzie Carles
Boys’ HS Track Awards
Captain Award – Tyler Stimmel, Danny Crouse, Zach Meggitt
MVP Runner – Tyler Stimmel
MVP Field – Zach Meggitt
Tiger Spirit – Hank Matthes
Coaches Award – Noah Brian
BVC All-Academic – Tyler Stimmel, Zach Meggitt, Hank Matthes
1st Year Varsity Girls – Jordan Bucher, Cristina Morales, Rachel Crouse, Katie Leady, Lanie McCartney, Kiley Brooker
1st Year Varsity Boys – Noah Brian, James Smith, Eli Smith, Hank Matthes, Hunter Wymer
2nd Year Varsity Girls – Marina Kimmel, Hanna Rose, Hailey Powell
2nd Year Varsity Boys – Josh Rockhill, Kyle Gerdeman, Noah Pelton, Aaron Fisher, Brandon Lanning, Isaiah Reinhart, Zach Meggitt
3rd Year Varsity Girls – Leah Hetrick, Cassidy Hiser, Kiah Powell
3rd Year Varsity Boys – Danny Crouse
4th Year Varsity Girls – Megan Ernsberger, Kenzie Carles
4th Year Varsity Boys – Tyler Stimmel, Cody Gerdeman

(Click on photo to Enlarge)

NBHS Track Awards
Picture Attached Back Row L to R – Kenzie Carles, Hanna Rose, Noah Brian, Zach Meggitt, Cody Pelton, Hank Matthes, Danny Crouse, Kiley Brooker Front Row L to R – Leah Hetrick, Tyler Stimmel, Jordan Bucher, Megan Ernsberger, Rachel Crouse

 

(Thank you to Suzanne Bucher for submitting results and photo)

OHSAA Softball, Baseball and Track State Tournament Pairings and Information

Softball and baseball state tournaments begin Thursday, while track gets underway Friday

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The pinnacle of the spring sports postseason has arrived, as the Ohio High School Athletic Association will conduct state tournaments this week in softball, baseball and track and field.

 

On Thursday morning, the 39th annual softball state tournament begins at historic Firestone Stadium in Akron, while the 89th annual baseball state tournament gets underway at beautiful Huntington Park in downtown Columbus. Please see below for softball and baseball state tournament pairings.

 

On Friday morning, the 109th annual boys and 42nd annual girls track and field state tournament begins at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at The Ohio State University. Please see below for state qualifiers and important state meet information (traffic, parking, facility regulations, walk-through, etc.).

 

State Tournament Tickets (children ages 2 and under are free)

SOFTBALL: Tickets are $8 each at the gate per person per session. During the semifinals, both games in each division are one session. There is no pre-sale.

BASEBALL: Tickets are $8 each at the gate per person per day. There is no pre-sale.

TRACK: Tickets are $10 each at the gate per person per day. There is no presale.

 

Softball and Baseball State Tournament Information

  • Pairings and Schedule: SEE BELOW
  • Softball State Tournament Coverage: http://www.ohsaa.org/sports/sb/girls/2016/2016SBcoverage.htm
  • Baseball State Tournament Coverage: http://www.ohsaa.org/sports/bb/boys/2016/2016BBcoverage.htm
  • Coaches and Media Teleconferences June 1: The head coaches of the teams that have reached the softball and baseball state tournaments will be available during a media teleconference on Wednesday, June 1, for 10 minutes each. Media are to contact Tim Stried (tstried@ohsaa.org) for details.
  • RADIO COVERAGE: See below for OHSAA Radio Network broadcast information. All 12 games from both state tournaments will be broadcast live by the network.
  • TELEVISION COVERAGE: The softball state championship games will be shown on tape-delay by SportsTime Ohio. The baseball state championship games will be shown live by Time Warner Cable.
  • Media credentials and parking note: Please see the link above for the state tournament credential center. Note that there are no media parking passes available for the softball and baseball state tournaments.

 

OHSAA Radio Network broadcast information for the baseball and softball state tournaments is posted at: http://www.ohsaa.org/news/Radio/radiohome.asp

Radio stations – please see details below the pairings below for state tournament broadcast information, which can include a fee waiver of regional and state tournament rights fees.

 

Track and Field

 

Important State Meet Traffic Flow Announcement

Due to multiple events occurring in the area, all guests coming to Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium for the state track and field meet should use the Ackerman Road exit from State Route 315. For reference, Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium is located at 2450 Fred Taylor Drive, Columbus, but please use the Ackerman Road exit even if coming from south of the stadium.

 

Participant Drop Off and School Vehicle Parking

School vehicles (busses and school vans) will be permitted to enter the parking lot just south of the stadium to drop off state qualifiers and coaches. On Friday, only vehicles marked as “school transportation” (busses and school vans) will be permitted to park by the OSU baseball stadium (south end of the drop-off lot). On Saturday, only vehicles marked as “school transportation” (busses and school vans) will be permitted to park in the ABB lot on the north side of Ackerman Road (north of the stadium). Participants arriving in non-school vehicles do not have access to these parking areas.

 

State Meet Walk-Through Available June 2

The track at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium (not the shot put or discus areas) will be open from 4 p.m. until 6 p.m. on Thursday, June 2, for state qualifying student-athletes to visit, if desired. This availability is only for a “walk-through” and no implements (including batons, hurdles, starter blocks, shot puts, discus, etc.) are permitted. The facility will not open until 4 p.m. and will close promptly at 6 p.m.

 

Spike Regulation

Spikes longer than 1/4″ pyramids are not permitted. Needle spikes and Christmas tree spikes are not permitted. The clerks will be checking spike length just before the races and at check-in. If a competitor is in violation of this rule, he/she will not be allowed to participate.

 

Temporary Tents Not Permitted in Pole Vault Area

Attention pole vault state qualifiers: Temporary tents are not permitted to be set up in the pole vault area at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium.

 

RV Parking

RVs are permitted to park in the Buckeye Lots, which are located north of the stadium, on the west side of Fred Taylor Drive (just north of the shot put and discus areas). RVs that arrive prior to Friday must pay for each parking space that is in use. Parking fees are paid to OSU CampusParc:  http://osu.campusparc.com

 

 

2016 Softball State Tournament Pairings

All Games at Firestone Stadium, Akron

Home Team Listed First. Rankings as of Final Coaches Association State Poll.

 

Division IV

Jeromesville Hillsdale (24-3) vs. #5 Strasburg-Franklin (24-6) Thursday, June 2, 10 a.m.

#7 Williamsburg (28-0) vs. #4 Convoy Crestview (24-4), Thursday, June 2, 12:30 p.m.

Div. IV State Championship: Saturday, June 4, 10 a.m.

Division III

#1 Wheelersburg (25-2) vs. Johnstown-Monroe (24-7), Thursday June 2, 3 p.m.

#7 Canfield South Range (28-3) vs. #6 Milan Edison (24-3), Thursday, June 2, 5:30 p.m.

Div. III State Championship: Saturday, June 4, 1 p.m.

Division II

#2 LaGrange Keystone (27-4) vs. Hamilton Ross (21-7), Friday, June 3, 10 a.m.

#7 Akron Archbishop Hoban (23-5) vs. #1 Hebron Lakewood (27-0), Friday, June 3, 12:30 p.m.

Div. II State Championship: Saturday, June 4, 4 p.m.

Division I

#3 Mason (25-2) vs. #9 Cuyahoga Falls Walsh Jesuit (22-5), Friday, June 3, 3 p.m.

#5 Amherst Steele (25-5) vs. #4 Ashville Teays Valley (22-6), Friday, June 3, 5:30 p.m.

Div. I State Championship: Saturday, June 4, 7 p.m.

 

 

2016 OHSAA Baseball State Tournament Pairings

All games at Huntington Park, Columbus

Home team listed first. Rankings as of Final Coaches Association State Poll.

 

Division II

Home team listed first

No. 2 Steubenville (25-2) vs. No. 1 Defiance (27-2), Thursday, June 2, 10 a.m.

No. 12 Poland Seminary (28-3) vs. Hamilton Badin (20-10), Thursday, June 2, 1 p.m.

Div. II State Championship: Saturday, June 4, 10 a.m.

 

Division I

Home team listed first

Cincinnati La Salle (24-7) vs. No. 8 Solon (25-4), Thursday, June 2, 4 p.m.

No. 17 Cleveland St. Ignatius (22-10) vs. Pickerington North (21-9), Thursday, June 2, 7 p.m.

Div. I State Championship: Saturday, June 4, 1 p.m.

 

Division III

Home team listed first

Versailles (22-4) vs. No. 1 Berlin Hiland (28-2), Friday, June 3, 10 a.m.

Bellville Clear Fork (19-12) vs. No. 7 Apple Creek Waynedale (25-4), Friday, June 3, 1 p.m.

Div. III State Championship: Saturday, June 4, 4 p.m.

 

Division IV

Home team listed first

No. 10 Fort Recovery (22-8) vs. No. 5 Newark Catholic (22-9), Friday, June 3, 4 p.m.

No. 15 North Lewisburg Triad (25-7) vs. Cuyahoga Heights (14-9), Friday, June 3, 7 p.m.

Div. IV State Championship: Saturday, June 4, 7 p.m.

 

 

OHSAA Radio Network to Broadcast Baseball and Softball State Tournaments

The OHSAA Radio Network broadcast every game from the baseball and softball state tournaments June 2-4. By carrying some of the broadcasts, radio stations can have their own regional and state tournament rights fees waived. The fee waiver can be applied to individual stations, or to a cluster of stations under the same management. Please contact Tim Stried for details.

 

2016 Baseball and Softball State Tournaments Program Log (20 local avails each game): http://www.ohsaa.org/news/Radio/2016BaseballSoftball/2016BaseballSoftballTemplate.pdf

 

2016 Baseball and Softball State Tournaments Network Delivery Details: http://www.ohsaa.org/news/Radio/2016BaseballSoftball/2016BaseballSoftballNetworkDelivery.pdf

 

OHSAA Radio Network Home: http://www.ohsaa.org/news/Radio/radiohome.asp

 

What is the OHSAA Radio Network? http://www.ohsaa.org/news/Radio/RadioNetworkExplanation.pdf

 

Which Stations Have Carried the Network? http://www.ohsaa.org/news/Radio/Affiliates.pdf

 

Parenting Press: Encouraging Children’s Curiosity

Parents can destroy curiosity by not allowing their child to explore…..

Tip—Parents need to work at nurturing the curiosity children are born with.

To be curious is to have the desire to figure out or to understand, to be eager to learn or to know. All children are born with this quality. Indeed, curiosity is necessary to survival. Babies are constantly exploring. Children often ask endless questions. They learn because they are curious. A curious, learning child often evolves into a self-educating adult. It is a quality and a value that can add enormously to a fulfilling life.

Harriet Heath, Ph.D., developmental psychologist and author of Using Your Values to Raise Your Child to Be an Adult You Admire, says parents can deliberately nurture or discourage curiosity in their children. The basis for curiosity is basically “an awareness of the details in one’s environment and an understanding of how they relate to each other,” says Heath.

She points out that parents can use a child’s curiosity to help her learn countless things she needs for a successful life. On the other hand, parents can also destroy curiosity by not allowing their child to explore, by overstimulating her with too much to explore, by not allowing her to explore at her own pace, and even by not reinforcing that she has learned something from her exploration.

Link to book description

Tools—Heath offers ideas and tips for teaching and preserving curiosity in children at different ages and stages.

  • Baby: Infants satisfy their curiosity through their senses. Give baby things to look at, reach out for and manipulate. Let him touch your face, hair, and body. Give a crawling baby safe space to explore, inside and outside. Since babies immediately begin learning language at birth, talk to him all the time about what he is experiencing.
  • Toddler: Allow your toddler to continue to explore and offer her even more and new opportunities. Let her struggle to figure out how to do something (for example, toddlers benefit just as much by figuring out that a square peg won’t fit into a round hole as they do from understanding that a round peg will fit into a round hole) and let her experiment with how things work. Use discipline techniques that help her understand cause and effect.
  • Preschooler: Continue as for the toddler. Take note of his interests and build on that with field trips, books, and the Internet. Change your focus as you see his interests change.
  • School-age: Continue exploring with your child and show her how to find answers to her questions. Discuss what she learns with her. Be aware of what is happening in her school and how she responds to it. Many schools are excellent sources of encouragement and assistance, but some can stifle curiosity with dull lessons and rigid curricula. Be your child’s advocate for appropriate learning situations. Provide and support outside interests for her.
  • Teenager: He should be able to ask questions and develop a strategy for finding answers about issues that are straightforward. He may be asking questions for which there are no answers yet and may begin to think about getting the specialized skills needed for finding those answers (i.e., college or other training).

You’ll find more practical tips you can use right now in Using Your Values to Raise Your Child to Be an Adult You Admire by Harriet Heath, Ph.D.

 

Chow Line: In 2018, food labels will give more information

The new Nutrition Facts information won’t be on food labels for awhile, but you may like what you see when they do appear…..

I heard something on the news about the Nutrition Facts labels changing. What are the details?

The new Nutrition Facts information won’t be on food labels for awhile, but you may like what you see when they do appear.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the updated design on May 20. Large manufacturers have until July 26, 2018, to start using the new label. Smaller companies will get an extra year. This is the first update to the Nutrition Facts label in 20 years.

One of the most sought-after changes will be the inclusion of “Added Sugars” on the label. Currently, the label just includes “sugars” as a category under carbohydrates, but it’s impossible to tell how much of that is naturally occurring, from fruit- or milk-based ingredients, for example, and how much is added during processing.

FDA Food Label

The 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that we limit added sugars to no more than 10 percent of our daily calorie intake. So, if you eat about 2,000 calories a day, you should consume no more than 200 calories, or 50 grams, of added sugars a day. The new labels will list the amount of added sugars in both grams and as a percent of a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet. This will not only help consumers interested in limiting their added sugar intake, it could encourage manufacturers to reduce the amount of added sugars they use in their products.

Other changes in the new label include:

  • Larger and bolder typeface for both calories and serving sizes. These two pieces of information are among the most important to help people make healthy food choices, but they don’t get much prominence on the current label.
  • Some foods will have “dual column” labels to indicate both “per serving” and “per package” calorie and nutrition information. These will be required on products that have multiple servings but could reasonably be consumed all in one sitting, such as a pint of ice cream or a 3-ounce bag of chips. The first column will provide nutrition information if you just consume one serving — 1 ounce of those chips in the 3-ounce bag, for example. The second column will provide the same information if you eat the entire package.
  • Labels will include information on vitamin D and potassium content. Some people are not getting enough of these nutrients, which puts them at higher risk for chronic disease. Labels will no longer be required to list vitamins A and C, because deficiencies in those vitamins are now rare. Calcium and iron will continue to be listed. A bonus: Instead of listing just a percentage, or the “percent Daily Value,” these nutrients will also have the actual amount listed in grams. Daily Values are helpful indicators of how much a food provides towards the daily recommended amount for a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, but it also can be helpful for consumers to see what that equates to in actual grams.

For more details on the new Nutrition Facts labels, go to www.fda.gov.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

NBYL Baseball – Boys 15U – May 28

North Baltimore 15U wins in 6 innings vs. Bowling Green 2, by a score of 16 – 6.

North Baltimore 15U wins in 6 innings vs. Bowling Green 2, by a score of 16 – 6.

Leading hitters for NB were Durfey 2 – 3 with 2 rbi; Cotterman 2 – 3 hitting a Home Run and adding a double to collect 3 rbi; and Baker 3 – 3 with a double.

Email you results, schedules and photos to – editor@thenbxpress.com

Boy Scout Troop 315 Newsletter for June 2016

A note from the Scoutmaster:

My heart and passion for scouting is very strong. Each child that gets something out of our program makes me feel overwhelmed with joy. We struggle at times with finding balance with boys being boys and working them through a program as scouts to see them become amazing people. These accomplishments come at a price.

A note from the Scoutmaster:

My heart and passion for scouting is very strong.  Each child that gets something out of our program makes me feel overwhelmed with joy.   We struggle at times with finding balance with boys being boys and working them through a program as scouts to see them become amazing people.  These accomplishments come at a price.

Boys will be boys,

They test our ability to lead,

They find creative, sometimes unwise alternatives to problems,

We fail, take our licks and get back up,

WE catch them after the fact.

You know,  when you’re a volunteer and give something your all, it doesn’t always go smoothly.  The scouts will do the opposite of what’s suggested and realize later in life what benefits were bestowed on them, but not as youth. 

Do I worry?  

Yes…. each time I take responsibility for an outing. The  troop is not just about the boys, it’s about the families who are involved and dedicated people who allow the charter to be active in N.B. Many troops struggle to get commitment from adults and because of that, they fall into numbers struggles,  Troops with 5 or 6  boys, just qualifying to exist dictate the enthusiasm of its leadership.  I can’t  be more thankful that we do have parents and college aged kids stepping up. True. my younger leaders need guidance and will evolve with their responsibilities, but we all learn from experience. 

Tim Brown, one of my assistants, has been growing and learning. His current military obligations in the National Guard are helping him with communication and leadership.  We talk after each meeting and through the week about scouting:  how to improve, ways to do better and mishaps that can be corrected.  He recently got word that his unit may be deployed in October, so I’ll lose his help for 12 – 18 months.  We’ll pray and wish him well on his duties and a safe return!

May 30

Memorial Day Parade.   Class A uniform.  Meet at fire station at 8:30 – 8:45 am.  We will conclude at the Maplewood Cemetery with speeches and parents can pick up there. 

June 4 

Don’t forget, Saturday, June 4, We will be doing a service project out at Doc Robert’s woods.  This is a requirement for the Camp Alaska scouts, but all are invited.

June 7

Tuesday, June 7.  Our troop voted to go to Monsoon Lagoon in Port Clinton.  We will leave the Scout House at 9:30 am.  Cost is $25.00 for all day (ride everything) pass.  Scouts requested to buy food there, but I am willing to pack a cold cut cooler or sack lunches. 

June 18

In our past, to prepare for camp,  scouts would earn spending money by holding a bake sale in conjunction with Garage Sale Days.  Please let me know if we are interested in continuing this tradition.  The bakes was originally set up by our FAB 4 and parents.  Hank, Cody, Tyler and Danny.  This year it would be in Saturday, June 18, in front of either the Theater or CyberSolutions (my shop).

June 26 – July 2

Summer Camp.  Are we ready.  Do we all have our physicals done?  I will be attending the pre-leaders meeting and picking up our hats and turning in paperwork for the troop.  Scouts will need to break into 2 patrols and plan the kitchen meal chart for the week.  Ahh yes, scout cooking….

Remember

Any and all parents are welcome to assist in any way to help the troop.  We are only as good as the people who care and get involved. Be willing to take the chance of creating lasting bonds with community and families through time.  I love it when I hear of scouters who have been through thick and thin, but cheerfully smile into their 20, 30 and 50 years of service.  I want to be that person.

Please read the Sentinel Tribune piece on our Senior Eagle scouts.  Here is the link below.  I am so proud of them:

Shawn Benjamin, Scout Master
nbtroop315@aol.com

NBHS Track – Regional Track Results

One athlete ends career as one begins. Two North Baltimore High School Tiger Track athletes qualified for the Division III Region 10, at Tiffin Columbian’s Frost-Kalnow Stadium, held May 25th and 27th.

by Suzanne Bucher

One athlete ends career as one begins. Two North Baltimore High School Tiger Track athletes qualified for the Division III Region 10, at Tiffin Columbian’s Frost-Kalnow Stadium, held May 25th and 27th.

Senior Megan Ernsberger finished her stellar career by finishing 10th in the 100 hurdles. Megan ran her race in 16.31 seconds.

Freshman Jordan Bucher began her career by finishing 7th in the pole vault. Jordan tied her career best with a clearance of 9 feet.

Great job Lady Tigers!!!

NB Track Regional 2016 Megan Ernsberger and Jordan Bucher
Senior Megan Ernsberger and Freshman Jordan Bucher at the Regionals
NB Track Regional 2016 Megan Ernsberger hurdles
Senior Megan Ernsberger in the OHSAA Regional Hurdles
NB Track Regional 2016 Jordan Bucher Pole Vault action
Bucher clears the bar at 9′ 0″, tied her personal best and finished 7th.
NB Track Regional 2016 Jordan Bucher Pole Vault podium
Jordan in 7th – The top 4 advanced to the state meet.

For complete results go to:  Baums Page for Sports