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Photo Gallery: Village Council Holds Final Meeting of Year

Members complete terms of office, EMS pays tribute to wonderful examples of selfless service to our community……………………….

There was much to be thankful for, and to celebrate on Tuesday evening in the Council Chambers. Please see additional story on theNBXpress.com for all the details of the business conducted during the meeting. Here are some photos from the meeting for all to enjoy:

Thank you Council Members for your service to our community–L to R: Leslee Thompson (12 years), Rich Rose, Richard VanMooy. They received keys to the Village, and certificates of Thanks.
Mrs. Sally Powell (left) with Mayor Janet Goldner. The Mayor made a proclamation honoring the service and sacrifice of the late Kevin Powell, who was the first EMS Chief, and an EMS volunteer in North Baltimore when it was formed.
Mrs. Mary Brumbaugh(right) with Mayor Janet Goldner. The Mayor made a proclamation honoring the service and sacrifice of the late Nelson Brumbaugh, who was one of the first EMS volunteers, and an early volunteer EMS Chief in North Baltimore when it was formed.
Current EMS Chief Phil Walter and Mayor Goldner prepare to unveil the memorial on the back of the EMS van.
The Unveiling: “In Memory of Chief Nelson Brumbaugh and Chief Kevin Powell”
Mrs. Brumbaugh and Mrs. Powell admire the memorial

Ohio Announces the OhioMeansJobs-Readiness Seal for Ohio High School Graduates to Show Workplace Readiness

To earn the OhioMeansJobs-Readiness Seal, motivated high school students must demonstrate certain professional skills required for success in the workplace. Students work with at least three experienced and trusted mentors who validate the demonstration of these skills in school, work or the community………….

Ohio high school students now can earn recognition by showing they are prepared to contribute to the workplace and their communities. The OhioMeansJobs-Readiness Seal is a formal designation students can earn on their high school diplomas and transcripts indicating they have the personal strengths, strong work ethic and professional experience that businesses need.

“The 21st century workplace is rapidly changing, and businesses need to know graduates are leaving high school with job-ready professional skills,” said Paolo DeMaria, superintendent of public instruction. “Along with Ohio businesses, our team identified essential skills for workplace success and developed the OhioMeansJobs-Readiness Seal for students to demonstrate those attributes.”

To earn the OhioMeansJobs-Readiness Seal, motivated high school students must demonstrate certain professional skills required for success in the workplace. Students work with at least three experienced and trusted mentors who validate the demonstration of these skills in school, work or the community.

“Work ethic and resiliency are essential to success no matter what your education level or where you are in life,” said Ohio Department of Higher Education Chancellor John Carey. “The OhioMeansJobs-Readiness Seal will equip high school students to adapt to the rapidly changing workforce and to stand out with a much-in-demand credential.”

“Ohio businesses have expressed concern about a lack of soft skills among applicants,” said Ryan Burgess, Director of the Governor’s Office of Workforce Transformation. “The OhioMeansJobs-Readiness Seal will help Ohio’s graduates demonstrate to businesses that they have the skills necessary to succeed in the 21st century workplace.”

Established by the Ohio Legislature under House Bill 49, the Ohio Department of Education, Governor’s Office of Workforce Transformation and Ohio Department of Higher Education identified an initial list of professional skills based on reports by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, in partnership with The Conference Board, Partnership for 21st Century Skills, Society for Human Resource Management and Corporate Voices for Working Families.

In addition, state partners surveyed Ohio’s business community to select the most essential or important skills for workplace success. Through the survey, business leaders identified the 15 skills students must demonstrate to earn the seal. These skills include a commitment to being drug free, reliability, a strong work ethic, punctuality, discipline, teamwork and collaboration, professionalism, learning agility, critical thinking and problem-solving, leadership, creativity and innovation, good oral and written communication skills, an understanding of digital technology, global and intercultural fluency and career management.

The OhioMeansJobs-Readiness Seal is available for the graduating classes of 2018 and beyond and will be printed directly on Ohio diplomas and transcripts. The seal also counts toward graduation options for students in the class of 2018.

Guidance can be found on the Department’s website by clicking here.

Eight Pilot Counties Chosen for Foster Care Recruitment Program

An estimated half of all children in foster care are there because of parental substance abuse.There are nearly 3,000 more children in the child welfare system today than when the opioid crisis began seven years ago…………..

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine announced today (Wednesday) that eight counties hit hard by the opioid epidemic have been chosen to participate in a family finding and foster family recruitment program DeWine announced in August.

“Ohio still has a great need for families to help children in foster care. These can be biological family members or those who feel called to serve children in need,” said Attorney General DeWine. “I am pleased the grants we announced earlier this year will be used to address this need in counties that have been greatly impacted by this opioid epidemic.”

The pilot program, which is as part of a $1 million grant that the Attorney General announced in August, provides for the cost of a full-time staff member in each county who would be responsible for family search and engagement and foster family recruitment. The program will be administered by the Waiting Child Fund, a nonprofit with expertise in foster care which has pledged to contribute additional funds to the effort.

“Children are entering foster care throughout the state at an alarming rate.  The Ohio Attorney General is responding to this crisis by investing in a proven solution which empowers and supports kinship and foster families.  We are honored by the opportunity to grow our collaborative partnerships and ready to get to work helping more children and families,” said Mike Kenney, Executive Director of Waiting Child Fund.

The pilot counties include:

  • Allen
  • Clark
  • Cuyahoga
  • Fairfield
  • Highland
  • Montgomery
  • Summit
  • Stark

DeWine noted statistics on how the opioid epidemic has impacted Ohio’s child welfare system, including:

  • An estimated half of all children in foster care are there because of parental substance abuse.
  • There are nearly 3,000 more children in the child welfare system today than when the opioid crisis began seven years ago.
  • As of September 1st, more than 15,000 children were in foster care in Ohio.
  • However, Ohio has less than 7,200 foster families to fill this need.