Tigers Celebrate “Senior Night” With a WIN

Tigers end regular season with a 17-5 overall record, 9-2 BVC, second place finish………………

Finishing the regular season with a 17-5 record, the North Baltimore Tigers secured second place in the Blanchard Valley Conference. The Tigers hosted Value in the Jungle as they celebrated Senior Night.

1234Final
Vanlue1214111552
North Baltimore1514251468

Brady Rader–21 points, 3R, 3S
Julian Hagemyer–13 points,3R,1A,1S
Chase Naugle–12 points,3R, 3A, 1S
Tyler Durfey–9 points, 3R, 1A, 1S
Levi Gazarek–5 points, 7R, 2A
Noah Cotterman–4 points, 2R
Adam Flores–4 points, 4R, 1A, 1S

Junior Varsity: North Baltimore, 48-34.

Lutheran Church News

“Cross-Shaped Living” is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic …………………….

St. Luke’s Lutheran Church, North Baltimore

“Cross-Shaped Living” is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic at St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in North Baltimore on Sunday, February 25 at 10:15 a.m.

Sunday School for all ages begins at 9:00 a.m.

Following worship, the SLCW (St. Luke’s Church Women) will hold a “Soup and Bake Sale.” Proceeds will be for ministries of the SLCW, within and beyond the congregation.

On Saturday, February 24, the SLCW held the annual “Soup Saturday” ministry where containers of soup were prepared and delivered to the homebound and others.

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St. John’s Lutheran Church, McComb

“Cross-Shaped Living” is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic at St. John’s Lutheran Church in McComb on Sunday, February 25 at 8:00 a.m.

Sunday School begins at 9:15 a.m. A joint adult Sunday School is with the McComb United Methodist Church.

Beat Winter Blues with a Little Help From Vitamin D

Wholesome ingredients can help up your intake during the cold days of winter……….

(Family Features) Staying indoors and wrapping up in a blanket is one way to avoid winter’s  weather, but less exposure to the sun can also put you at risk of a vitamin D deficiency. Milk is the primary source of vitamin D in the American diet, according to research published in the FASEB Journal, making it a great choice on dark winter days.

An 8-ounce glass of milk provides 30 percent of the daily value of vitamin D, so just three cups of milk each day will provide 90 percent of your body’s recommended daily requirements. Milk is also an easy way to get other essential nutrients like B vitamins for energy, high-quality protein for lean muscle and vitamin A for a healthy immune system.

When you need a quick way to warm up on a cold day, try this creamy chicken corn chowder recipe that can be made with a pressure cooker. Cooked with wholesome ingredients like milk, chicken and potatoes and topped with bacon and green onions, it’s an easy and delicious addition to your weekly meal rotation. For more recipes to warm up your winter, visit milklife.com.

Pressure Cooker Corn Chowder

Servings: 12

  • 6          slices (6 ounces each) thick-cut bacon, chopped
  • 1          small yellow onion, diced
  • 3          cloves garlic, minced
  • 1          pound boneless skinless chicken breast, diced
  • 1          bag (16 ounces, about 3 1/3 cups) frozen corn kernels
  • 4          cups chicken broth
  • 1          pound unpeeled or peeled Yukon Gold potatoes, cut into 1/4-1/2-inch chunks
  • 1/2       teaspoon kosher salt, plus additional, to taste
  • 1/2       teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper, plus additional, to taste
  • 2          tablespoons cornstarch
  • 1 1/2    cups fat-free milk
  • 2-3       green onions, sliced (optional)
  • 1          tablespoon heavy cream or half-and-half (optional)
  1. Heat large skillet over medium-high heat. Add chopped bacon and cook until crispy. Using a slotted spoon, transfer cooked bacon to paper towel-lined plate and pour off all but 1 tablespoon bacon fat.
  2. Return skillet to stove. Add onion and garlic; saute 2 minutes, stirring frequently. Add diced chicken and frozen corn; saute for an additional 3 minutes, stirring often.
  3. Remove skillet from heat and transfer contents to pressure cooker. Add chicken broth, potatoes, salt and pepper. Close and seal pressure cooker, making sure the vent is in the sealed position. Cook on high 8 minutes.
  4. While the chowder cooks, make a slurry by whisking cornstarch (or flour) into milk. Set aside.
  5. When done, remove pressure cooker from heat. Allow pressure to release on its own or carefully quick-release pressure after a few minutes. Stir in the cornstarch-milk slurry. Cover and allow chowder to thicken for 10-15 minutes before serving.
  6. Portion soup into bowls and generously top with bacon. Garnish with green onion and cream or half-and-half, if desired. Season with additional salt and pepper, to taste.

Nutritional information per serving: 190 calories; 5 g fat; 1.5 g saturated fat; 35 mg cholesterol; 14 g protein; 20 g carbohydrates; 2 g fiber; 530 mg sodium; 52 mg calcium (6% of daily value). Nutrition figures based on using fat-free milk.

SOURCE:
MilkPEP

Church News for Sunday, February 25, 2018

Second Sunday of Lent………………

Church of the Good Shepherd United Methodist

Church of the Good Shepherd United Methodist will celebrate the Second Sunday in Lent on February 25, with worship beginning at 10:15 a.m.  Rev. Susan Kronbach will continue our sermon series focusing on the practices of the faithful life – this week:  “From Fasting to Charity”  Sunday School for youth and adults begins at 9:15 a.m.  Sunday School for the children is held during worship, after the Children’s Moments.

Other activities at the church this week include choir practice each Wednesday evening at 7:00 p.m.  Looking ahead, we have rescheduled our “Fun Night” to Sunday, March 4, 5:00-7:00 p.m.

Lenten activities this week:

Lenten Lunch – Wednesday, Feb. 28 at noon at St. James United Methodist Church.

Lenten conversation about fasting and charity on Wednesday evening at 6:15 p.m.

Bairdstown United Methodist Church

 

The Bairdstown United Methodist Church will celebrate the Second Sunday in Lent on February 25, with worship beginning at 9:15 a.m.  Rev. Susan Kronbach will preach “From Prayer to Service … part 2 ”  Sunday School class is held immediately following worship.  Please plan to join us as you are able!

Get Focused

Plan to make productivity a priority……………..

(Family Features) Although there are many reasons to feel stressed in the workplace, productivity is often at the root. After all, productive employees are often perceived as the most valuable employees and when productivity fails, it tends to put everyone on edge.

Concerns about productivity are broadly founded. They may be related to your self-assessment of your own performance, or it could be that a manager is demanding more. Or maybe you’re collaborating with a team of peers and are struggling to find your footing, and collectively productivity is down.

Productivity is not only good for business; it’s good for worker morale, too. A productive work day can produce a sense of accomplishment and pride, and may result in a less stressful work environment. You can take a proactive role in improving your own productivity with these ideas.

 

1. Face a challenge head on. Procrastination can be the ultimate roadblock to productivity. For many, that means saving the least desired task on your to-do lists for the end of the day. However, by the end of the day, it’s too easy to delay the task until tomorrow. Instead, start the day with your least desired task. This is when you’ll have the most energy and you’ll kick off your day feeling accomplished, ready to tackle whatever comes next.

2. Be intentional with your time. It may seem counterintuitive, but taking breaks can help you have a more productive day. When you feel your energy start to wane, give yourself a timeout. Take a 15-minute walk, run the stairs or spend some time drawing in your notebook. Over the course of a week, pay attention to your schedule and start to plan your meetings and tasks around breaks so you’re working during periods of the day when you’re the most energized.

3. Capture ideas when they come. Let’s face it: not every great idea arrives at the ideal moment. While it’s possible to key your ideas immediately into your smartphone, that can come with multiple obnoxious distractions. However, trying to recreate that flash of inspiration at a more opportune time more often than not falls short with missing details.

An option like the Bamboo Slate smartpad allows you to write naturally with pen on any paper without the social media notifications and email alerts. With the push of a button, you can then convert your handwritten notes into “living” digital files. With Wacom Inkspace, you can organize, edit and share your notes and sketches on your enabled smartphone, tablet or other devices. In case you’re not near your mobile device when inspiration strikes, you can store up to 100 pages on your smartpad and sync later. Learn more at bamboo.wacom.com.

4. Identify areas for collaboration. Everyone has strengths and weaknesses. The key is knowing yourself well enough to know when you need to ask for help to be more productive. Wasting time on tasks you don’t excel in can slow everyone down. Rather, find others whom you can collaborate with and learn from to help you improve your productivity over time.

5. Stay organized. When you’re working under continuous deadlines, things can really start to pile up – literally. Digging through a mess to find the report containing the data you need or the invoice to cross reference is a waste of precious time. Allow the clutter to build during the work day if you must, but make it a goal to never leave the office without bringing some order to the day’s chaos. Coming in each morning to a desk that is de-cluttered and ready for the day ahead can be a big productivity booster.

Learn to Make Lists with Purpose

List-making has long been revered as the classic time management tool, and technology makes it easier than ever to blend this analog task with your digital world by using smart notebooks like the Bamboo Slate to create an online to-do list.

Consider these three list styles to determine the approach that best fits your work style to put you on your way to more productive days:

Categorized lists. Most people start with a daily to-do list, focusing just on the most urgent tasks for the day. Once you’ve mastered that approach, try looking ahead to the future to help you meet your goals. For this technique, you might consider an annual list or even a life list to help put the big picture in perspective and make it more manageable to accomplish your desires. Others go so far as to categorize their time to focus their attention on different types of tasks on different days.

To-do vs. done lists. Another option is to use lists to catalog both the items you need to do and those you’ve already completed. A “done list” can be a motivating factor in pushing forward with your to-do list by letting you see your accomplishments in writing.

Bullet journaling. The bullet journal approach is a four-step process designed to make the to-do list less of a chore and more efficient. A step-by-step guide shows you how to create more productive lists you can easily reference in the future.

SOURCE:
Wacom