ODOT Work at Findlay I-75 Interchange Monday

MONDAY – Bridge work will affect U.S. 68/state Route 15 interchange ramps…

Bridge work will affect U.S. 68/state Route 15 interchange ramps on Monday

LIMA, Ohio (March 15, 2018) – The following impacts to traffic related to the reconstruction and widening of Interstate 75 through Findlay and Hancock County are scheduled to occur: 

Interstate 75 will be reduced to one lane in both directions between state Route 224 and U.S. 68/state Route 15 for the setting of bridge beams over the Blanchard River.

  • Work is currently scheduled to take place April 16 through 19.
  • Hours of operation will be during nighttime hours, generally 9 p.m. to 7 a.m. each day.
  • Traffic on I-75, both directions, will be temporarily stopped in 15 minute intervals with traffic control provided by local law enforcement.
  • The ramp from U.S. 224 to I-75 southbound will used as a staging area for the beams. Ramp traffic will also be temporarily stopped in 15 minute intervals as needed during the operation. 
  • All Findlay entrance and exit ramps will remain open during the operation.

U.S. 68/state Route 15 interchange

The ramp from U.S. 68/state Route 15 to I-75 southbound will be closed from 9 p.m. Monday, March 19, to 7 a.m. Tuesday, March 20, as crews construct the deck on a new bridge structure over the ramp.

  • The ramp from I-75 southbound to U.S. 68/state Route 15 (loop ramp) will be temporarily stopped for short intervals between midnight and 5 a.m. the same night during the bridge deck construction.

Setting of bridge beams for a new ramp which will carry traffic on U.S. 68/state Route 15 to I-75 northbound will take place during daytime hours on Monday, March 19, weather permitting. Traffic will not be affected.

U.S. 68/state Route 15

U.S. 68/state Route 15 is reduced to one lane in both directions between Lima Avenue and the Findlay city line, which is just north of West Hobart Avenue, due to drainage work in preparation for road reconstruction. Lane restrictions for the drainage work continue through next week.

All exit and entrance ramps will remain open at Lima Avenue. Additional lane restrictions for reconstruction in the same area of U.S. 68/state Route 15 are expected soon.


About the Hancock I-75 project:

Interstate 75 will be reconstructed and widened beginning just south of Harrison Street/County Road 144, which is just south of the U.S. Route 68/state Route 15 interchange, to the county Road 99 interchange, Findlay, Hancock County. The project will reconstruct approximately five miles of the existing four lanes of Interstate 75, construct an additional lane of travel in each direction, replace all mainline bridges on I-75, replace the Harrison Street overpass, redesign and reconstruct the interchange between U.S. 68/state Route 15 and Interstate 75, and redesign and reconstruct the interchange with U.S. 68/state Route 15 at Lima Avenue. The project also includes the construction of noise walls at particular locations. Expected completion is May 2020. Beaver Excavating, Canton, serves as the general contractor.

Project information may be found at: http://tinyurl.com/hancock75

ODOT Camera I – 75 at SR 224

BROWN HONORS KAPTUR ON BECOMING LONGEST-SERVING WOMAN IN HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Senator Remembers Fighting Against NAFTA Together, Working to Protect Lake Erie

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) today(March16) honored friend and colleague, U.S. Rep. Marcy Kaptur, who on Sunday will become the longest-serving woman in the history of the U.S. House of Representatives.

“Having Marcy in Congress matters for so many reasons – it matters for the hundreds of thousands of Ohioans she serves so well. It matters for the perspective she brings as the daughter of working-class parents in our industrial heartland,” said Brown. “And it matters to the little girls in Toledo, who for 35 years have looked at pictures of their representative on the local news or in the paper, and have seen not another man in a suit, but someone who looks more like them. Someone they could grow up to be.”

Read Brown’s full speech as prepared for delivery below.

Mr./Madame President,

I rise today to honor my colleague, and my good friend, Marcy Kaptur.
Congresswoman Kaptur has dedicated her life to serving the people of
Toledo and northern Ohio, and this Sunday, she will become the
longest-serving woman in the history of the U.S. House of
Representatives.

On Sunday, she will have served in Congress 35 years, two months, and
15 days, breaking a record set in 1960.

Over those three and a half decades, Congresswoman Kaptur has been a
passionate, principled advocate for the Ohioans she serves.

She is the granddaughter of Polish immigrants, and comes from a
working-class, Catholic family. Her father was a trucker and an
autoworker, who became a small businessman. Her mother worked at the
Champion spark plug factory, where she helped organize the workers to
form a union.
Her story echoes that of so many of our generation – her parents
worked hard, and with the help of that union card, they earned their
way to a better life for their children. Marcy became the first in her
family to graduate from high school, and then college.

And Marcy Kaptur has never forgotten those roots, from her work for
Ohio’s Polish and Ukrainian communities to her fighting for Ohio
workers.

Unemployment reached 19 percent in Toledo in the early 1980s, when she
first ran for office. She said it was “the condition of working people
that drove me to change my life and run for office.”

She has lived up to that ideal, fighting for working families in Ohio
for every one of the nearly 13,000 days she has served in Congress.

She and I worked together in 1993, fighting against NAFTA, because we
knew it would mean job losses across Ohio.

Unfortunately, we were right. And since then, as we’ve fought bad
trade deal after bad trade deal, Marcy Kaptur has been a reliable ally
and leader in our fight for a trade policy that puts workers first.

We have also worked together to protect Ohio’s great natural resource,
Lake Erie.

We have fought for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, worked to
protect the lake from invasive Asian carp, and worked with farmers to
prevent runoff into Lake Erie – all to protect our lake and the Ohio
jobs that depend on it.

Marcy Kaptur has also gone to bat time and again for our American auto
industry. When some called the auto industry dead, we fought back.

We worked together and with autoworkers from Toledo and all across the
state and said, not on our watch.

Never bet against American workers and the American auto industry.

That scrappy, fighting spirit is one of the qualities I love most
about Ohioans – and you can find it in abundance in Marcy Kaptur.

No one fights harder for people from Toledo to Cleveland.

And you can see the love and respect that folks have for Marcy
everywhere you go. I remember going to a rally in Toledo for President
Obama. People were excited to see him of course, and I guess a few
people may have noticed I was there.

But when Marcy walked in, someone screamed “Marcy!” and man, it was
pandemonium. Everyone got to their feet like a rock star had just
taken the stage.

Because in Toledo, Marcy really is a rock star.

She is a fighter for the people of Ohio, and she’s a fighter for women
in her district and in Congress and all over the country. And it’s so
fitting that she reaches this milestone during Women’s History Month.

When she first joined the House, there were fewer than two dozen women
serving. She helped blaze a trail for so many women, and even told the
stories of the women who paved the way for her in her book, “Women of
Congress: a Twentieth Century Odyssey.”

Having Marcy in Congress matters for so many reasons – it matters for
the hundreds of thousands of Ohioans she serves so well. It matters
for the perspective she brings as the daughter of working-class
parents in our industrial heartland.

And it matters to the little girls in Toledo, who for 35 years have
looked at pictures of their representative on the local news or in the
paper, and have seen not another man in a suit, but someone who looks
more like them. Someone they could grow up to be.

Marcy, thank you for all of your service to Ohio. I hope we get to
keep working with you for another couple of decades.

Council Agenda – March 20, 2018

VILLAGE OF NORTH BALTIMORE – COUNCIL MEETING – March 20, 2018 – 5:30 PM – AGENDA

VILLAGE OF NORTH BALTIMORE – COUNCIL MEETING – March 20, 2018 – 5:30 PM – AGENDA

I. Pledge of Allegiance

II. Roll Call

III. Approval of the Minutes

IV. Public Participation (5min limit)

V. Letters and Communications

VI. Administrative Reports

Finance Officer: submitted

EMS Chief: No Reports Due
Fire Chief:
Police Chief:
Utility Director:
DPW Superintendent:

Village Administrator:
Next NRG Public Meeting April 10th at 7:00 pm at the Village Hall

Proposed Motion: To authorize the Village Administrator to advertise for bids for Hazard Tree Removal for 2018

Proposed Motion: To authorize the Village Administrator to begin the application process for the Surface Transportation Block Grant through TMACOG.

Clerk:

Appointed Legal Counsel:

Mayor:

VII. Standing Committees

Economic and Community Development (Ms. Zeigler)

Public Safety (Mr. Art Patterson)

Personnel, Policy and Ordinance Review (Mr. Carles)

Public Works (Mr. Aaron Patterson)

Public Utilities (Mr. Engard)

Finance and Technology (Mr. Beegle)

VIII. New Legislation, Resolutions, Motions or Business

ORDINANCE 2018-09 AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION ACCOUNTS FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2018, PROVIDING EXPENDITURE OF OHIO ATTORNEY GENERAL GRANT PROCEEDS.

IX. Second Reading of Ordinances and Resolutions

No readings

X. Third Reading of Ordinances and Resolutions

ORDINANCE 2018-03 AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE VILLAGE ADMINISTRATOR TO CONTRACT WITH SOUTHEASTERN EQUIPMENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF ACQUIRING A STREET SWEEPER
ORDINANCE 2018-04 AN ORDINANCE ESTABLISHING SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATION ACCOUNTS FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2018, PROVIDING EXPENDITURE OF 901 VEHICLE EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT CARRYOVER, 821 STREET CLEANING CARRY OVER

ORDINANCE 2018-05 AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE VILLAGE ADMINISTRATOR TO CONTRACT WITH NORTH BALTIMORE AMERICAN LEGION 539 FOR THE PURPOSE OF ENTERING A PROPERTY MAINTENANCE AGREEMENT

ORDINANCE 2018-06 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 925.01 TAPPING WATER AND SEWER LINES OF THE CODIFIED ORINANCES OF THE VILLAGE OF NORTH BALTIMORE

ORDINANCE 2018-07 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTION 935.04 POWERS OF THE VILLAGE ADMINISTRATOR, SETION 935.10 RIGHT TO APPEAL, SECTION 935.11 PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMITTEE AND 935.16 RIGHT TO INSPECT OF THE CODIFIED ORDINANCES OF THE VILLAGE OF NORTH BALTIMORE

ORDINANCE 2018-08 AN ORDINANCE ACCEPTING DONATION AND CONVEYANCE OF PARCEL NO. F23-310-350102009000 FROM MR. ROBERT HURST

XI. Other New Business

XII. Other Old Business

XIII. Payment of the Bills

XIV. Adjournment

Retirement Isn’t What it Used To Be…

AMAC: Many seniors who can’t afford to retire are joining America’s ‘nomadic workforce’

AMAC: Many seniors who can’t afford to retire are joining America’s ‘nomadic workforce’
WASHINGTON, DC, Mar 16 – A big part of the American Dream is the promise of an easier lifestyle in retirement, but “too many older Americans are living a vagabond existence in a retirement nightmare,” according to Dan Weber, president of the Association of Mature American Citizens.
Weber says that many would-be retirees dream of a life on the open road. “They fantasize about finally purchasing that RV they’ve always wanted and the prospect of driving off on cross country road trips. And, yes, there are those who manage to save enough for retirement and are well able to afford their fantasy. And then there are those who travel across America’s highways and byways in used campers—not for enjoyment, but to survive. There are tens of thousands of them, all part of what has come to be known as America’s nomadic workforce.”
The Great Recession that began in 2008 set the stage for this new lifestyle, according to Weber. “There are numerous rags-to-riches-to-rags stories of people who labored long and hard only to lose their savings in the recession and its aftermath. Now they are on the road in search of seasonal jobs as a means to make ends meet.”
The ‘nomadic workforce’ has grown so large that new online and offline recruitment services have been established to offer far-flung opportunities for mobile seniors to earn a living. CoolWorks.com, for example, lists seasonal “careers” in locations throughout the U.S. Snagajob.com is another service founded in the 21st Century to serve the needs of the nomadic workforce as is Backdoorjobs.com.
And, perhaps more to the point, mega-retailer, Amazon created a division called CamperForce some ten years ago. “It’s what you might call a full-service seasonal employment agency offering ‘opportunities’ for RV’ers throughout the U.S., particularly during Amazon’s busiest time of the year, the months prior to the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays,” says Weber. And, he adds, “it is important to note that CamperForce was established with senior citizens in mind, people in their 60s and 70s.  In fact, CamperForce recruiter Kelly Calmes boasts “we’ve had folks in their eighties who do a phenomenal job for us.

Chowline: Why Is Corned Beef Pink?

Today’s corned beef is now brined or cured using a salt water or sodium nitrite mixture, which fixes the pigment in the meat and causes it to be pink in color…………………….

Since corned beef is pink, how do you know if it’s fully cooked? And why is it pink anyway?

Corned beef is a brined, tougher cut of meat that can be either the brisket, rump or round that many Americans traditionally like to eat on St. Patrick’s Day along with cabbage.

Corned beef got its name from the corning or curing process that was historically used to preserve meat before modern refrigeration. The beef cuts were dry-cured in coarse pellets of salt that were typically the size of a kernel of corn. The pellets were rubbed into the meat to keep it from spoiling. Hence the name “corned” beef.

Today’s corned beef is now brined or cured using a salt water or sodium nitrite mixture, which fixes the pigment in the meat and causes it to be pink in color.

That’s why corned beef remains pink after cooking, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service. While many people think the color pink means that beef is not fully cooked, it’s important to note that this is not the case with corned beef.

However, because corned beef is a tougher cut of meat, it does take longer to fully cook. Corned beef is safe to eat once its internal temperature has reached at least 145 degrees Fahrenheit and has stood for about 20 minutes after removing it from heat, USDA recommends.

If you purchase corned beef, it can be safely stored in a refrigerator for up to 7 days past its sell-by date. If your package has a use-by date, the meat can be stored unopened in the refrigerator until that date, USDA recommends.

Corned beef can be safely cooked several ways, USDA says, including:

  • In the oven set at 350 degrees, with the brisket fat-side up. The meat should be slightly covered with about 1 inch of water, with the container covered throughout the cooking time. Allow about 1 hour per pound.
  • On the stove with the brisket fat-side up in a large pot covered with water. Bring the water to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, allowing about 1 hour per pound. Vegetables may be added during the last 20 to 30 minutes of cooking.
  • In a slow cooker. If you plan to use vegetables such as potatoes and carrots, put them in the bottom of the slow cooker and then place the brisket on top of the vegetables. Add about enough water to cover the meat and cook on the high setting for the first hour of cooking. Then cook for 10 to 12 hours on the low setting or 5 to 6 hours on high. Cabbage wedges may be added on top of the brisket during the last 3 hours of cooking.
  • In a microwave oven, allowing 20 to 30 minutes ofcooking time per pound. Place brisket in a large casserole dish and add enough water to cover the meat. Cover with a lid or vented plastic wrap and microwave on medium-low for half the estimated time. Turn the meat over and rotate the dish. Microwave on high for the remainder of time or until fork tender. Vegetables may be added during the final 30 minutes of cooking.

Leftover corned beef should be refrigerated within 2 hours of cooking and can be eaten safely for up to 4 days. Frozen leftover corned beef can safely be eaten for up to 3 months, USDA says. To reheat leftover corned beef, the meat should be brought up to 165 degrees before eating.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@osu.edu.

Lutheran Church News

for Sunday, March 18…………………………..

St. Luke’s Lutheran Church, North Baltimore

“Covenant Living” is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic at St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in North Baltimore on Sunday, March 18 at 10:15 a.m.

Sunday School for all ages begins at 9:00 a.m.

=========================================================

St. John’s Lutheran Church, McComb

“Covenant Living” is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic at St. John’s Lutheran Church in McComb on Sunday, March 18 at 8:00 a.m.

Sunday School begins at 9:15 a.m. A joint adult Sunday School is with the McComb United Methodist Church.