OVI Checkpoint in Wood County Friday Night (Aug. 17)

The Wood County Sheriff’s Office announced today that anĀ OVI checkpoint will be held in Wood County tomorrow evening, Friday, Aug. 17.

The Wood County Sheriff’s Office announced today that an OVI checkpoint will be held in Wood County tomorrow evening, Friday, Aug. 17.

The OVI checkpoint, funded by federal grant funds, is planned to deter and intercept impaired drivers.

The location of the checkpoint will be announced Friday morning.

The Wood County Sheriff’s Office reminds you to call 911 if you suspect an impaired driver!

Council Has Interim Police Chief on Special Meeting Agenda

VILLAGE OF NORTH BALTIMORE
SPECIAL COUNCIL MEETING

August 16, 2018
5:00pm

VILLAGE OF NORTH BALTIMORE
SPECIAL COUNCIL MEETING

August 16, 2018
5:00pm

AGENDA

I. Pledge of Allegiance

II. Roll Call

III. New Legislation, Motions or Business

ORDINANCE NO. 2018-34

AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE ESTIMATE OF REVENUES FOR THE BUDGET
YEAR BEGINNING JANUARY 1, 2019, AUTHORIZING CERTIFICATION OF SAME TO THE WOOD COUNTY AUDITOR

ORDINANCE NO. 2018-35
AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE FINANCE OFFICER TO ENTER INTO AN AGREEMENT TO PURCHASE COMPUTER SYSTEM UPGRADES NEEDED BY THE VILLAGE TO MAINTAIN SECURITY AND FUNCTION AND TO DECLARE AN EMERGENCY.

ORDINANCE NO. 2018-36
AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR & PUBLIC SAFETY CHIEFS TO UPFIT THE DODGE RAM KING CAB TRUCK, CURRENTLY BEING UTILIZED AS AN EMS FIRST RESPONDER VEHICLE, AS A POLICE CRUISER AND TO DECLARE AN EMERGENCY.

ORDINANCE NO. 2018-37
AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE PUBLIC UTILITIES SUPERINTENDENT TO ENTER INTO AN AGREEMENT WITH POHLKAT TO COMPLETE THE LAGOON CLEANING AND TO DECLARE AN EMERGENCY.

ORDINANCE NO. 2018-38
AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE PUBLIC UTILITIES SUPERINTENDENT TO ENTER INTO AN AGREEMENT WITH JDE TO COMPLETE THE COMPUTER UPGRADES AT THE UTILITY PLANTS AND TO DECLARE AN EMERGENCY.

IV. EXECUTIVE SESSION

ORDINANCE NO. 2018-39
AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO APPOINT _____________________________ AS INTERIM POLICE CHIEF EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY AND TO DECLARE AN EMERGENCY.

V. Other New Business

VI. Other Old Business

VII. Adjournment

Gleaner Arbor Serves at Hot Air Balloon Festival

Gleaners serve runners at the Up, Up & Away 5k….

Saturday, August 11 at 7:30am the weather was very foggy in Findlay, Ohio That didn’t stop Gleaner Arbor members from coming out to prepare a water stop, to serve runners in the Up, Up & Away 5k. Proceeds go to support Special Olympics in Hancock County. The race got underway at 8am.

As runners passed Elijah Cunningham, Courtney VanHorn, Craig Swope, Leah Trout, Jamie Cunningham, Alex Trout and Tammy Trout handed out water while Elaine Swope supplied them with more filled cups. Eric Trout filled cups and Russ Cunningham raked dropped cups off the road and out of the grass.

Halfway through the race, the fog lifted enough for a few hot air balloons to be seen flying overhead.

They were headed for Emory Adams Park, which is where the 5k was finishing. Gleaner served 216 of the 334 finishers. We even had a few runners say, “just throw the water at me”. With the fog came 98% humidity so runners were feeling it’s effects. This is how the Gleaner NB Arbor closed out their FY 17/18 activities.


 
 
Submitted by Elaine Swope

BVHS: Lung Cancer Screening and Prevention

Your best defense against cancer is having a strong offense….

From Blanchard Valley Health System’s Brianne Hottinger,
Armes Family Cancer Care Center

Brianne Hottinger, BSN, RN, OCN, CBCN, TTS

According to the Center for Disease Control, lung cancer is the lung cancer is the most fatal type of cancer and the second most common cancer in the United States among both men and women. The most significant action one can take to reduce the risk of lung cancer is quitting smoking. When a smoker quits, his or her heart rate and blood pressure drops 20 minutes after the last cigarette. Five years after quitting, risk for certain cancers such as mouth, throat, esophagus and bladder cancers are reduced by half. Additionally, cervical cancer and stroke risks are reduced to the same level of risk as a non-smoker. It is never too late to abandon the habit. Anyone who wants to quit smoking is strongly encouraged to seek help and ask their provider for guidance. Information and tips can also be accessed from the quit line at 1-800-QUIT-NOW, and online resources can be found through local hospitals.

A second way to prevent and discover lung cancer early is through a lung cancer screening program. This program is billed to your insurance as a low-dose CT scan and is covered by most insurances, but each individual should contact their insurance to inquire about coverage. Anyone with a high risk for lung cancer is encouraged to receive a screening. Someone who is “high risk” is defined as a current or former smoker who has quit within the last 15 years, is 55-77 years old, and has a tobacco history of 30 or more pack years. Pack years can be calculated by multiplying the number of packs of cigarettes smoked per day by the number of years the person has smoked.

Providers can refer patients to the lung cancer screening program by contacting an oncology nurse navigator to begin the process of enrollment. Once the information is reviewed for accuracy and passed on to a pulmonologist participating in the program, the pulmonologist will call the patient and set up an office visit to review the patient’s history, risks and benefits of the program. After this visit, the first low-dose CT exam is scheduled.

Each low-dose CT exam is given a Lung-RADS category. This category determines when patients should return for a follow-up based on whether findings are negative, benign or suspicious. As the patient progresses through the program, a care navigator records results to help determine program effectiveness.

Your best defense against cancer is having a strong offense. This offense is preventing cancer by smoking cessation, healthy living and screening when appropriate. If you have any questions about lung cancer prevention and screening, reach out to your provider or call an oncology nurse navigator.

 

Fast, Family-Friendly Recipes Make Dinner Doable

Between work, the carpool line and shuttling kids to extracurriculars, the increase in family commitments often leaves little time in the kitchen or at the dining table….

 

(Family Features) As the fall season begins, kids go back to school and schedules once again book up with activities.

Between work, the carpool line and shuttling kids to extracurriculars, the increase in family commitments often leaves little time in the kitchen or at the dining table. Although the drive-thru is an easy solution, healthier options can be scarce and the cost of takeout piles up. Instead, add some quick family meals to your arsenal.

Southwestern Bean Mexican Pizza made with READ Southwestern Bean Salad is a fun twist on the Italian favorite that pairs perfectly with fruit, carrot sticks or a salad for a complete, family-friendly meal.

For an easy make-ahead option, grab a jar of Aunt Nellie’s Beets and make Beef, Beet and Horseradish Wraps. Both recipes can help you have dinner on the table in 30 minutes or less.

For more quick and easy dinner ideas, visit READSalads.com and AuntNellies.com.

Southwestern Bean Mexican Pizza

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Servings: 8-10

  • 2 cans (15 ounces each) READ Southwestern Bean Salad
  • 1 pre-baked pizza crust (10-12-inch diameter)
  • 4 slices bacon, cooked crisp and crumbled (about 1/4 cup crumbled)
  • 1/2-3/4 cup thin bell pepper strips (1/4-inch thick), any color or combination
  • 3/4 cup shredded Mexican cheese blend
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • chopped avocado (optional)
  • sour cream (optional)
  1. Drain bean salads. Place half of beans in bowl of food processor; process until pureed but chunky.
  2. Spread puree evenly over pizza crust. Spoon remaining drained beans over puree. Sprinkle with bacon, bell pepper and cheese.
  3. Bake as directed on pizza crust package until heated through and cheese is melted, about 10-12 minutes.
  4. Sprinkle with chopped cilantro. Serve with avocado and sour cream, if desired.

Nutritional information per serving: 276 calories; 11 g protein; 35 g carbohydrates; 10 g fat; 648 mg sodium; 14 mg cholesterol; 5 g dietary fiber; 11 mg iron; .02 mg thiamin; 575 IU vitamin A; 7 mg vitamin C.

Beef, Beet and Horseradish Wraps

Prep time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4

  • 1 jar (16 ounces) Aunt Nellie’s Sliced Pickled Beets
  • 1/2 cup shredded carrots
  • 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
  • 1/2 cup spreadable cheese (such as goat cheese or herb soft cheese)
  • 2 large soft flour tortillas (about 10-12-inch diameter)
  • 10 green onions (green parts only)
  • 10 thin slices deli roast beef
  1. Drain beets; chop. Discard beet liquid. In medium bowl, combine beets, carrots and horseradish.
  2. Spread 1/4 cup cheese evenly over each tortilla, leaving 1-inch border. Arrange five green onions (do not chop) on each; press lightly into cheese. Place five slices roast beef on each tortilla to cover green onions then sprinkle beet mixture evenly over beef.
  3. Roll up tortillas in parallel direction of green onions. Wrap each roll tightly in plastic wrap. Refrigerate up to 4 hours.
  4. To serve, remove plastic wrap; cut each tortilla into two pieces.

Substitution: If horseradish is too pungent, omit or replace with diced jarred roasted red peppers or Dijon mustard.

Nutrition information per serving: 300 calories; 17 g protein; 34 g carbohydrates; 10 g fat; 520 mg sodium; 35 mg cholesterol; 2 g fiber; 3.18 mg iron; .26 mg thiamin; 2963.87 IU vitamin A; 8.79 mg vitamin C.

SOURCE:
Seneca Foods
Aunt Nellies

5 Tips to Help Reduce Litter and Protect the Oceans

Taking advantage of reusable containers for food and beverages is one way to live a more eco-friendly life…..

(Family Features) The tide of environmental studies showing the harmful effects of litter and mismanaged waste on oceans are seemingly everywhere. For example, 8 million metric tons of plastics wind up in streams, rivers and waterways each year, according to research published in “Science.”

According to the Ocean Conservancy, plastic product consumption is predicted to double over the next 10 years. With the health of the oceans closely tied to the health of the environment, marine life and humans, making choices that help reduce ocean pollution is one way to make an impact. In fact, research from the Plastic Free July Foundation shows that more than six in 10 people refuse plastic shopping bags, avoid pre-packed fruit and vegetables, pick up litter and avoid buying water in plastic bottles.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

“Mismanaged packaging waste is a threat to our oceans and the overall health of our planet,” said Lynn Bragg, president of the Glass Packaging Institute. “We can all make a difference by changing the type of food and beverage packaging we buy, opting for reusable and refillable containers, following local recycling guidelines and helping keep beaches and waterways clean.”

These tips from the Glass Packaging Institute are just a few ways to contribute:

  1. Think about the packaging you choose. When making a purchase, consider alternatives to plastic like glass or other natural and sustainable packaging. Glass, for example, is made mostly from sand and recycled glass, is reusable, recyclable and does not harm oceans or marine life.
  1. Choose reusable containers. Taking advantage of reusable containers for food and beverages is one way to live a more eco-friendly life. Since only 9 percent of plastic bottles are recycled, according to “National Geographic,” reusable containers can serve as an ideal replacement for bottled water whether at home or on-the-go. Rather than plastic, choose glass or stainless steel, which can hold hot or cold food and beverages, and help protect the contents from any chemicals.
  1. Reduce your single-use footprint. Whenever possible, bring reusable bags and containers to the store. Some foods like cereal, pasta and rice can be purchased from bulk bins and placed in a glass or stainless-steel storage container. To further cut down on plastic waste, consider switching to reusable straws, which are available in glass, stainless steel or bamboo.
  1. Recycle better. Learn what you can and can’t recycle in your community. Certain items like disposable cups, greasy pizza boxes, non-recyclable plastic containers (like those for yogurt) and take-out containers can contaminate entire batches of recycling. About 91 percent of plastic is not recycled and can linger in the environment for hundreds of years, contributing to ocean pollution. Glass containers are 100 percent recyclable; steel and aluminum cans and cardboard are also easily recyclable.
  1. Get involved. Volunteering or donating can help keep local beaches, parks and waterways clean. Getting involved with international and national groups with local chapters are also ways to participate in a local cleanup.

Find out more about the benefits of choosing and reusing glass packaging to help reduce ocean pollution at upgradetoglass.com.

 

SOURCE:
Glass Packaging Institute