BVHS: Dr. Lorie Thomas Master Surgeon

“To be named a master surgeon by SRC is indeed an honor,” commented Dr. Thomas…..

Lorie Thomas, DO, a gynecologist at Blanchard Valley Health System (BVHS), has achieved accreditation as a master surgeon of both minimally invasive gynecology and robotic surgery by Surgical Review Corporation (SRC). This accreditation distinguishes Blanchard Valley Obstetrics & Gynecology, a division of BVHS, from many other outpatient facilities by providing the highest quality of care to its patients as determined by an independent, external process of evaluation.

Status as an accredited organization means BVHS along with Dr. Thomas has met nationally recognized standards. Not all health care organizations seek accreditation, and not all that undergo the rigorous on-site inspection process are granted accreditation.

“Blanchard Valley Health System strives to remain updated on the latest technologies and procedures,” said Chris Keller, president of Bluffton Hospital and vice president of Blanchard Valley clinical services and supply chain. “Dr. Thomas’ hard work to receive this accreditation reflects on our organization’s commitment to providing elite quality care to our patients.”

Health care organizations seeking accreditation by SRC undergo an extensive self-assessment and on-site inspection. This process includes physicians, nurses, and administrators who are actively involved in the accredited program. The inspection is consultative and educational, presenting best practices to help an organization improve its care and services.

“To be named a master surgeon by SRC is indeed an honor,” commented Dr. Thomas. “I am committed to continuously learning and passionate about providing the best care possible to my patients and allowing them to return to their lives.”

Established in 2003, SRC is an internationally recognized patient safety organization dedicated to recognizing and refining surgical care. SRC is the leading administrator of quality improvement and accreditation programs for surgeons and hospitals worldwide. SRC’s proven methodology, known as the “Cycle of Excellence,” results in quantifiable and unparalleled improvement in outcomes, patient safety and costs across surgical specialties. For more information, visit www.surgicalreview.org.

NB Board of Education Hires New Powell Principal

Welcome Mrs. Jonelle Semancik…………

The North Baltimore Board of Education held a special meeting on Wednesday for the purpose of hiring a new Principal for Powell Elementary School.

Jonelle Semancik was offered the position at a salary of $75,000. She replaces Mark Lange who recently resigned from the position citing “personal reasons.”

Our newest Tiger: Powell Principal Jonelle Semancik

Mrs Semancik is leaving Bowling Green Schools, where she has taught the last several years–at Ridge, Kenwood, and currently Crim Elementary Schools.

She said, ” I’m excited to become a part of your community.”

She earned her bachelors degree and principal’s certification from BGSU, and her masters degree from Marygrove College. She has two sons and loves sports (especially the Buckeyes) and lives in Waterville.

“I’m excited to be a Tiger!”she said.

Make sure you stop and introduce yourself to her and welcome her to Tiger Country.

OHSAA Football Computer Ratings – Oct. 9, 2018 (Entering Week 8)

Top eight schools from each region in the final report Oct. 28 will qualify for the playoffs…….

Top eight schools from each region in the final report Oct. 28 will qualify for the playoffs.

Division I

Region 1 – 1. Mentor (7-0) 21.8163, 2. Canton McKinley (7-0) 20.5837, 3. Euclid (6-1) 18.1558, 4. Lakewood St. Edward (4-2) 15.1944, 5. Solon (6-1) 14.2071, 6. Austintown-Fitch (5-2) 13.7807, 7. Cle. St. Ignatius (4-2) 12.6061, 8. Strongsville (4-3) 10.7571, 9. Cleveland Heights (5-2) 10.2071, 10. Berea (5-2) 9.6857, 11. Massillon Jackson (4-3) 9.65, 12. Shaker Hts. (5-2) 8.8286

Region 2 – 1. Dublin Coffman (7-0) 21.2571, 2. Reynoldsburg (6-1) 19.0357, 3. Gahanna Lincoln (4-3) 14.1429, 4. Westerville Central (4-3) 11.8286, 5. Powell Olentangy Liberty (4-3) 11.4429, 6. Delaware Hayes (5-2) 9.8857, 7. Tol. Whitmer (5-2) 9.5102, 8. Marysville (4-3) 8.3786, 9. Lewis Center Olentangy Orange (4-3) 8.35, 10. Dublin Jerome (3-4) 8.0929, 11. Tol. Start (3-4) 8.0357, 12. Findlay (3-4) 7.2429

Region 3 – 1. Clayton Northmont (6-1) 19.5, 2. Kettering Fairmont (6-1) 18.8857, 3. Pickerington Central (6-1) 18.8088, 4. Hilliard Davidson (6-1) 18.7214, 5. Springfield (6-1) 18.6286, 6. Miamisburg (6-1) 16.8304, 7. Hilliard Bradley (6-1) 16.4071, 8. Pickerington North (5-2) 13.8929, 9. Hilliard Darby (5-2) 12.5286, 10. Huber Hts. Wayne (4-2) 11.5833, 11. Lancaster (4-3) 9.7643, 12. Grove City Central Crossing (3-4) 5.3429

Region 4 – 1. Cin. Colerain (7-0) 18.7286, 2. Cin. Archbishop Moeller (6-1) 15.176, 3. Fairfield (6-1) 14.5214, 4. Mason (5-2) 12.7929, 5. Cin. Elder (4-3) 11.8704, 6. Milford (6-1) 11.3857, 7. Liberty Twp. Lakota East (5-2) 10.1929, 8. Cin. Western Hills (5-2) 9.4286, 9. Cin. Oak Hills (3-4) 9.0214, 10. Cin. Sycamore (4-3) 8.35, 11. Lebanon (4-3) 6.7429, 12. Cin. St. Xavier (3-4) 6.6143

Division II

Region 5 – 1. Akron Archbishop Hoban (7-0) 19.3367, 2. Garfield Hts. (7-0) 14.3857, 3. Maple Hts. (7-0) 14.1571, 4. Macedonia Nordonia (6-1) 12.0714, 5. Warren G. Harding (5-2) 11.0857, 6. Boardman (4-3) 10.4929, 7. Painesville Riverside (5-2) 9.4429, 8. Lyndhurst Brush (4-3) 8.1046, 9. Cle. Benedictine (3-4) 7.4357, 10. Twinsburg (4-3) 6.4286, 11. Mayfield (3-4) 6.0714, 12. Akron Ellet (5-2) 5.9357

Region 6 – 1. Tol. Central Cath. (7-0) 18.4673, 2. Whitehouse Anthony Wayne (7-0) 17.6143, 3. Avon Lake (7-0) 16.1214, 4. Avon (6-1) 13.25, 5. Parma Hts. Valley Forge (5-2) 12.9307, 6. Tol. St. John’s (5-2) 12.1857, 7. Holland Springfield (5-2) 12.0643, 8. Amherst Steele (5-2) 11.8143, 9. Olmsted Falls (5-2) 9.0357, 10. Tol. St. Francis de Sales (4-3) 8.9545, 11. North Olmsted (3-4) 6.0714, 12. Tol. Waite (4-3) 6.0612

Region 7 – 1. Massillon Washington (7-0) 20.4863, 2. Barberton (7-0) 18.7357, 3. Wadsworth (7-0) 17.1929, 4. Dresden Tri-Valley (7-0) 16.6929, 5. Canal Winchester (6-1) 14.5143, 6. Dover (5-2) 14.1786, 7. North Canton Hoover (5-2) 14.1357, 8. Medina Highland (6-1) 13.9214, 9. Whitehall-Yearling (6-1) 13.9071, 10. Wooster (5-2) 12.7571, 11. Massillon Perry (6-1) 12.0, 12. Cols. Northland (5-2) 11.1

Region 8 – 1. Kings Mills Kings (6-1) 18.3571, 2. Cin. Winton Woods (6-1) 16.85, 3. Troy (6-1) 15.4, 4. Chillicothe (6-1) 14.4786, 5. Morrow Little Miami (6-1) 13.3571, 6. Dublin Scioto (5-2) 13.2786, 7. Cin. Anderson (5-2) 12.1571, 8. Trenton Edgewood (5-2) 12.1, 9. Cin. La Salle (4-3) 12.0909, 10. Harrison (4-3) 11.6857, 11. Cin. Turpin (5-2) 9.8857, 12. Lewis Center Olentangy (3-4) 9.2929

Division III

Region 9 – 1. Chagrin Falls Kenston (7-0) 18.0714, 2. Canfield (7-0) 17.6714, 3. Akron East (6-1) 13.9714, 4. Medina Buckeye (6-1) 13.6214, 5. Alliance Marlington (6-1) 12.4381, 6. Chardon Notre Dame-Cathedral Latin (6-1) 11.6224, 7. Ravenna (5-2) 11.4571, 8. Norton (6-1) 11.3143, 9. Richfield Revere (5-2) 11.1643, 10. Aurora (4-3) 11.0143, 11. Beloit West Branch (6-1) 10.8304, 12. Alliance (4-3) 10.6786

Region 10 – 1. Bay Village Bay (7-0) 16.3, 2. Norwalk (6-1) 15.4387, 3. Tiffin Columbian (5-2) 13.1714, 4. Clyde (5-2) 13.0714, 5. Sandusky (5-2) 11.9286, 6. Bowling Green (3-4) 8.7071, 7. Defiance (4-3) 8.65, 8. Parma Padua Franciscan (5-2) 8.4357, 9. Mansfield Senior (3-4) 8.2, 10. Lexington (3-4) 7.8786, 11. Rocky River (4-3) 6.6429, 12. Tol. Scott (5-2) 5.5534

Region 11 – 1. Cols. Eastmoor Acad. (6-1) 18.1104, 2. Granville (6-1) 15.4786, 3. Bellbrook (7-0) 14.5571, 4. Cols. Bishop Hartley (5-2) 13.8857, 5. Thornville Sheridan (6-1) 13.0786, 6. Hillsboro (6-1) 12.8643, 7. Cols. St. Francis DeSales (5-2) 12.6071, 8. Jackson (5-2) 11.7214, 9. New Richmond (6-1) 11.3714, 10. The Plains Athens (6-1) 11.0866, 11. Bellefontaine (5-2) 9.9643, 12. Zanesville (5-2) 9.2929

Region 12 – 1. Day. Chaminade Julienne (6-1) 15.75, 2. Kettering Archbishop Alter (6-1) 14.2429, 3. Trotwood-Madison (5-2) 13.9408, 4. Wapakoneta (6-1) 13.5714, 5. Middletown Bishop Fenwick (5-2) 13.3071, 6. Hamilton Badin (5-2) 12.2857, 7. Vandalia Butler (4-3) 10.8357, 8. Cin. Mount Healthy (4-3) 10.5857, 9. Piqua (5-2) 9.3292, 10. Hamilton Ross (3-4) 6.8, 11. Celina (4-3) 6.0857, 12. Day. Carroll (4-3) 5.4429

Division IV

Region 13 – 1. Steubenville (6-1) 16.0865, 2. Perry (6-1) 15.6214, 3. Hubbard (7-0) 13.6143, 4. Poland Seminary (5-2) 9.9571, 5. East Liverpool (4-3) 9.3429, 6. Struthers (5-2) 8.7612, 7. Youngstown East (5-2) 8.5071, 8. Cuyahoga Falls Cuyahoga Valley Christian Acad. (4-3) 8.4643, 9. Wintersville Indian Creek (5-2) 8.2475, 10. Salem (3-4) 6.9286, 11. Canal Fulton Northwest (4-3) 6.8143, 12. Streetsboro (4-3) 6.3

Region 14 – 1. Bellville Clear Fork (7-0) 16.1786, 2. St. Marys Memorial (7-0) 15.6643, 3. Huron (5-2) 12.0643, 4. Van Wert (5-2) 11.9929, 5. Pepper Pike Orange (6-1) 11.9143, 6. Kenton (4-3) 11.2429, 7. Bryan (6-1) 10.8478, 8. Napoleon (5-2) 10.7714, 9. Sparta Highland (6-1) 9.7643, 10. Lorain Clearview (6-1) 8.9, 11. Shelby (4-3) 7.9791, 12. Milan Edison (3-3) 7.2222

Region 15 – 1. St. Clairsville (7-0) 17.0857, 2. Carroll Bloom-Carroll (6-1) 11.79, 3. Gallipolis Gallia Acad. (6-1) 11.4286, 4. Gnadenhutten Indian Valley (6-1) 11.0857, 5. Proctorville Fairland (4-3) 8.3429, 6. Chillicothe Unioto (4-3) 7.9163, 7. Newark Licking Valley (5-2) 7.4603, 8. New Lexington (5-2) 5.7357, 9. New Concord John Glenn (4-3) 5.7071, 10. Duncan Falls Philo (4-3) 5.5714, 11. Chillicothe Zane Trace (3-4) 5.5429, 12. Warsaw River View (4-3) 3.9429

Region 16 – 1. Cin. Wyoming (7-0) 16.891, 2. Cin. Indian Hill (6-1) 14.728, 3. Clarksville Clinton-Massie (6-1) 13.9714, 4. London (7-0) 12.5429, 5. Waverly (6-1) 11.3786, 6. Cin. Taft (5-1) 10.8056, 7. Cin. Aiken (5-2) 9.3643, 8. Batavia (5-2) 8.9286, 9. Plain City Jonathan Alder (5-2) 8.3929, 10. Springfield Shawnee (4-3) 8.1357, 11. Springfield Northwestern (5-2) 7.9929, 12. St. Bernard Roger Bacon (3-4) 6.1571

Division V

Region 17 – 1. Leavittsburg LaBrae (7-0) 12.9857, 2. Orrville (6-1) 12.7643, 3. Gates Mills Gilmour Acad. (7-0) 11.1531, 4. Akron Manchester (5-2) 10.9143, 5. Wickliffe (6-1) 10.5447, 6. Columbiana Crestview (4-2) 9.7222, 7. Garrettsville Garfield (5-2) 8.3286, 8. Magnolia Sandy Valley (6-1) 7.7643, 9. Orwell Grand Valley (6-1) 7.35, 10. Canfield South Range (4-3) 7.2893, 11. Beachwood (5-2) 6.8038, 12. Massillon Tuslaw (3-4) 6.1071

Region 18 – 1. Genoa Area (7-0) 14.0214, 2. Liberty Center (7-0) 14.0159, 3. Marion Pleasant (6-1) 11.6714, 4. Anna (5-2) 11.3286, 5. Oak Harbor (6-1) 10.1739, 6. Richwood North Union (5-2) 9.1234, 7. Millbury Lake (5-2) 9.1, 8. Casstown Miami East (5-2) 9.0857, 9. Pemberville Eastwood (5-2) 8.0, 10. Archbold (4-3) 7.95, 11. Brookville (6-1) 7.8, 12. West Milton Milton-Union (4-3) 7.7143

Region 19 – 1. Johnstown-Monroe (6-1) 13.4185, 2. West Lafayette Ridgewood (6-1) 10.6429, 3. Bellaire (6-1) 10.3131, 4. Ironton (5-2) 9.3071, 5. Amanda-Clearcreek (6-1) 8.7388, 6. Martins Ferry (5-2) 8.3357, 7. Byesville Meadowbrook (4-3) 7.2214, 8. Oak Hill (5-2) 6.4286, 9. Chesapeake (3-4) 6.3143, 10. Cols. Bishop Ready (3-4) 5.8786, 11. Richmond Edison (3-4) 4.7143, 12. Wellston (3-4) 3.7286

Region 20 – 1. Wheelersburg (6-1) 16.5643, 2. Portsmouth West (6-1) 12.0143, 3. Middletown Madison (7-0) 11.3929, 4. Jamestown Greeneview (6-1) 9.95, 5. Minford (6-1) 9.3857, 6. West Jefferson (5-2) 8.7872, 7. Batavia Clermont Northeastern (5-2) 8.05, 8. Cin. Madeira (4-3) 7.4357, 9. Cin. Purcell Marian (4-3) 6.1357, 10. Cin. Mariemont (4-3) 5.9466, 11. Cin. Hills Christian Acad. (4-2) 5.5833, 12. Cin. Summit Country Day (4-3) 5.4286

Division VI

Region 21 – 1. Mogadore (6-1) 15.3131, 2. Kirtland (7-0) 13.7929, 3. Creston Norwayne (6-1) 12.2357, 4. Rootstown (7-0) 12.0143, 5. Sugarcreek Garaway (7-0) 11.4357, 6. Salineville Southern (6-1) 11.0071, 7. New Middletown Springfield (6-1) 10.0571, 8. McDonald (7-0) 10.05, 9. Columbia Station Columbia (4-3) 9.3929, 10. Steubenville Cath. Central (5-2) 9.2922, 11. Berlin Center Western Reserve (6-1) 8.0857, 12. Hanoverton United (5-2) 7.0786

Region 22 – 1. Attica Seneca East (6-1) 11.1214, 2. Jeromesville Hillsdale (5-2) 9.2571, 3. Gibsonburg (6-1) 8.5357, 4. Bucyrus Wynford (5-2) 8.5137, 5. Loudonville (4-3) 7.9, 6. Columbus Grove (4-3) 7.8643, 7. Sherwood Fairview (4-3) 7.5286, 8. Northwood (6-1) 7.0857, 9. Hicksville (4-3) 6.7714, 10. Haviland Wayne Trace (4-3) 6.4143, 11. Castalia Margaretta (4-3) 6.3357, 12. Carey (4-3) 6.0

Region 23 – 1. Galion Northmor (7-0) 12.0571, 2. Bainbridge Paint Valley (7-0) 11.6786, 3. Chillicothe Southeastern (6-1) 10.4071, 4. Frankfort Adena (5-1) 10.0278, 5. Beverly Fort Frye (6-0) 9.6111, 6. Shadyside (6-1) 9.2357, 7. Grandview Hts. (5-2) 8.3143, 8. Milford Center Fairbanks (5-2) 7.95, 9. Worthington Christian (4-3) 6.6122, 10. Chillicothe Huntington (4-3) 6.1955, 11. Belpre (5-2) 6.025, 12. Howard East Knox (6-1) 6.0

Region 24 – 1. Coldwater (7-0) 15.6429, 2. Maria Stein Marion Local (7-0) 13.5929, 3. Lima Central Cath. (7-0) 13.3143, 4. Mechanicsburg (6-1) 13.0714, 5. Spencerville (5-2) 9.5571, 6. Cin. Deer Park (6-1) 9.1811, 7. Troy Christian (6-1) 9.0857, 8. St. Henry (5-2) 8.5357, 9. Lima Perry (6-1) 8.3929, 10. Covington (4-3) 8.2071, 11. Cin. Country Day (6-0) 7.8214, 12. Tipp City Bethel (4-3) 7.7571

Division VII

Region 25 – 1. Cuyahoga Hts. (5-2) 10.4714, 2. Ashland Mapleton (5-2) 8.8929, 3. Windham (6-1) 7.05, 4. East Canton (5-2) 6.9643, 5. Youngstown Valley Christian (5-2) 6.8878, 6. Ashtabula St. John (5-2) 5.2482, 7. Leetonia (3-4) 4.8, 8. Toronto (3-4) 4.7714, 9. Rittman (3-4) 4.2357, 10. Fairport Harbor Fairport Harding (3-4) 3.9143, 11. Richmond Hts. (3-4) 3.7929, 12. Lisbon David Anderson (3-4) 3.7714

Region 26 – 1. Sycamore Mohawk (7-0) 15.15, 2. McComb (6-1) 12.1357, 3. Pandora-Gilboa (7-0) 11.3571, 4. Edgerton (7-0) 11.2857, 5. Tiffin Calvert (6-1) 11.0214, 6. Greenwich South Central (6-1) 9.9143, 7. Norwalk St. Paul (6-1) 8.7929, 8. Leipsic (6-1) 8.5357, 9. Arlington (5-2) 7.8643, 10. Hamler Patrick Henry (4-3) 7.7786, 11. Antwerp (5-2) 6.4643, 12. Monroeville (4-3) 5.4143

Region 27 – 1. Canal Winchester Harvest Prep. (6-0) 12.2222, 2. Glouster Trimble (6-1) 10.0816, 3. Lucas (5-2) 9.6071, 4. Lancaster Fisher Cath. (4-2) 6.2369, 5. Franklin Furnace Green (5-1) 5.7339, 6. Racine Southern (6-1) 5.637, 7. Waterford (5-2) 5.5612, 8. Sugar Grove Berne Union (5-2) 5.5402, 9. Caldwell (5-2) 4.7, 10. Hannibal River (3-4) 4.3714, 11. Zanesville Bishop Rosecrans (4-3) 2.8875, 12. Portsmouth Notre Dame (1-6) 2.3687

Region 28 – 1. Fort Loramie (6-1) 13.4286, 2. Convoy Crestview (6-1) 10.3786, 3. Minster (5-2) 9.0143, 4. Ansonia (5-2) 8.4643, 5. Cin. Miami Valley Christian Acad. (5-1) 7.095, 6. DeGraff Riverside (4-3) 6.4143, 7. New Bremen (4-3) 5.8571, 8. Waynesfield Waynesfield-Goshen (4-3) 5.7374, 9. Sidney Lehman Cath. (4-3) 4.7857, 10. Mt. Blanchard Riverdale (4-3) 4.1, 11. North Lewisburg Triad (5-2) 3.8341, 12. Hamilton New Miami (3-4) 3.2551

Keep Pets Safe this Halloween

Just like with children, there are safety issues to consider when costuming your pets…….

(Family Features) Halloween isn’t just for humans; four-legged friends have plenty of opportunity to get in on the fun, too. However, it’s important to take some pet precautions that allow the whole family to enjoy the holiday safely, as the costumes and excitement can be overwhelming and some of the candy is even dangerous.

As you’re filling the candy buckets and assembling the perfect costumes, be sure to heed these tips from the experts at PetSmart for a Halloween filled with pet-friendly fun:

Out and about
Make sure pets have proper identification by microchipping and registering your pet’s microchip, and keeping identification and registration tags on their collars. This is especially important around Halloween, when open doors offer more opportunity for escape.

If your pet will be joining the family while trick-or-treating, be sure they are visible to motorists by using a reflective collar, harness or leash.

Costume concerns
Just like with children, there are safety issues to consider when costuming your pets. Not all dogs like wearing clothes and some may become stressed or agitated while wearing a costume or sweater. However, many dogs just need a little coaxing and positive reinforcement.

  • Start with a simple accessory, like a bandana, working your way up to a costume.
  • Make sure costumes include eye and ear holes, and if they don’t, consider removing whole portions of the costume to ensure your pet’s ability to see, hear and breathe. Make sure there isn’t anything that could be a tripping hazard. Also, be sure to check the costume for little parts within biting or chewing distance.
  • Dogs can overheat easily, so ensure your dog’s clothing is not too bulky or heavy if the weather is warm.
  • In the end, the top priority should be your pet’s comfort level.

Hazardous food and decorations
“It’s fun to include our pets in our celebrations, but it’s also important to be aware of the dangers associated with Halloween to ensure their safety,” said Jennifer Freeman, DVM, PetSmart’s resident veterinarian and pet care expert. “Keep chocolate and candy out of paws’ reach. Xylitol, a sugar substitute found in candy, gum, mints and baked goods, is toxic to pets and can cause liver damage.”

Keep the Halloween fun going by establishing some rules for your family and any guests joining the festivities:

  • Xylitol can be extremely dangerous to pets, even in small amounts. Just 1/8 teaspoon can cause dangerously low blood sugar in dogs and 1/2 teaspoon can cause liver damage. If xylitol is consumed by your pet, take him or her to a veterinarian immediately.
  • Natural stimulants in chocolate can cause a range of symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea and abnormal heart rhythm.
  • Raisins may cause a toxic reaction in dogs from vomiting to kidney failure.
  • Cellophane, plastic and paper from candy wrappers and lollipop sticks can cause gastrointestinal upset.
  • As an alternative to sharing dangerous snacks, stock up on some seasonal dog-friendly treats and set out a pet-specific bowl.

Seasonal decorations can also pose a threat:

  • Fall decorations like jack-o’-lanterns can cause gastrointestinal upset.
  • Glow sticks can cause irritation, agitation and vomiting.
  • Hot wax and flames from candles can potentially burn your pet’s nose, tongue or tail.

Don’t forget the fun
Despite some concerns, Halloween can still provide fun moments for your pet:

  • Take your dog along for trick-or-treating.
  • Allow your four-legged friend to greet trick-or-treaters at the door.
  • Encourage friends to dress up their pets and join the festivities.

Find more tips and tricks for keeping your pets safe this Halloween at PetSmart.com.

SOURCE:
PetSmart

Tinkle Time?

Waking up to go to the bathroom multiple times per night? It’s not because you’re ‘getting old’…………

(Family Features) It’s a common misconception: the older you get, the more frequently you need to use the bathroom at night. Did you know waking up more than once per night to urinate is a medical condition known as nocturia? Shockingly, 64 percent of American adults do not know.

A recent Harris Poll of more than 2,000 U.S. adults, endorsed by The Simon Foundation for Continence, National Association for Continence (NAFC) and the Prostate Conditions Education Council (PCEC), found that approximately one-third of them suffer from nocturia. Nocturia, which forces individuals to get up more than once per night to urinate, is a leading cause of sleep loss and can put one’s health at risk.

“Before receiving treatment for nocturia, I typically wound up making five trips to the bathroom each night, which I knew wasn’t normal,” said Jack Fagan, a 67-year-old resident of Sewell, NJ. “Treatment has made a noticeable impact on my quality of sleep. I find myself more refreshed and have the energy to enjoy time with family and friends.”

Most people living with nocturia (72 percent) reported they are negatively impacted by the condition at night; 43 percent of whom have trouble falling back to sleep, 12 percent indicated they wake up their partners and 10 percent expressed nervousness about tripping or falling while walking to the bathroom. The impact of nocturia-induced sleep loss can be wide-ranging, affecting physical and mental health. Sixty-one percent of nocturia sufferers experience daytime issues as a result of nighttime urination, including: drowsiness, irritability and reduced productivity and concentration.

Sixty-six percent of nocturia sufferers surveyed have never discussed their symptoms with a healthcare professional; half of respondents reported they thought it was a normal part of aging, and 27 percent believed nothing could be done to remedy the problem.

“We see patients who have suffered with nocturia for many years, as it slowly progresses from getting up twice to over four times per night to urinate,” said Roger Dmochowski, M.D., a nocturia sufferer and professor within the department of urologic surgery at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. “In my personal and professional experience, nocturia can have serious implications for an individual’s emotional state and daily life, due to sleep disruption, if not diagnosed and treated. Up until recently, we didn’t have effective treatments.”

For more information on nocturia, visit www.whatisnocturia.com, or  www.simonfoundation.org/nocturia.

The Harris Poll survey was funded by Avadel Pharmaceuticals and Serenity Pharmaceuticals.

SOURCE:
JPA Health Communications

Village Council Meets

Water, trees, parks, cameras, vacation time, economic development, policy changes, job vacancies, and more…………

By Sue Miklovic

Village Council met Tuesday night at Council Chambers for the monthly “Committee of the Whole” meeting. Council President Art Patterson was absent. Councilman Matt Beegle filled in as President Pro-tem.

Tom Clemons, Director of Wood County Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board gave a brief presentation of the upcoming tax levy replacement which will be on the November ballot. He mentioned there has been an increase in suicide deaths in Wood County this year, with men between 35-55 years old being the most common victim. He also talked about the opiate problem and said they were spending over $800,000 to fight this battle.

Tom Clemons, Director of Wood County Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board

Some of the topics discussed by council members included:

$- Plans to finish a design for a new water tower for the community. This has been started by Poggemyer Design and is approximately 60% complete. The council is deciding if they want to abandon the project or move forward, after what seems to be miscommunication about the method of pay for the design work.

$-The village budget for 2019 will hopefully be presented in November by Finance Officer Melanie Lee.

$- The continuing saga of the recycling operations was discussed.

$- Councilman Aaron Patterson said The Eagleville Road Ditch still has some trees that are to be removed. It was discussed making sure some money is budgeted in 2019 and 2020 for continued cleanup of that area.

$ It was suggested to put $5000.00 into the Park budget for 2019.

$ Councilwoman Leisa Zeigler shared information on economic development, and reminded other council members there is a need to move forward on the removal of dilapidated houses in the village.

$-Utilities Director Brian Roberts was seeking permission to purchase services to help move crushed concrete from Eagleville Road to the reservoir #1 area. The weight of the concrete was deemed to be too heavy for the village owned equipment.

$- Personnel and Policy Committee Chair Ty Carles discussed payout of unused vacation time for village employees who are unable to take the time due to restrictions on who is eligible to replace them because of licensing requirements. Three employees are currently in this situation.

$-Mayor Goldner said 70 applications had been received for the vacant Village Administrator position. They are being reviewed in order to begin interviews.

$- Ten residents have paid for trees as part of the village Tree Commission’s Set Back program. The trees will be purchased and planted through North Branch Nursery.

$-The village is still trying to move forward on the purchase of security cameras for the Village Hall and the Park.

$-There are plans to update the Village’s Brush Pick Up policy before the 2019 calendar is completed.