Lady Tigers vs Otsego Foto Gallery

North Baltimore Lady Tigers opened the new season in The Jungle Friday night and Ferg was there – here are Fotos by Ferg.

North Baltimore Lady Tigers opened the new season in The Jungle Friday night and Ferg was there – here are Fotos by Ferg.
Leah Lee drills a 3 ball
Simone Thompson goes up strong
Grace Hagemyer battles for the rebound
Caitlin Schwartz goes in for a layup
Halie (Ya Ya) Inbody saves the ball from going out of bounds.
Kenzie Perez from deep

NBHS Team Photo and Roster for Wrestling

for 2018-2019.

Here is the photo and roster for the 2018-2019 NBHS Wrestling team

NB Wrestling 2018-2019
Back Row: Coach Garner, Santos Canales, Brendan Cotterman, Zeth Johnson, Blayne Keller, Simon Sexton, Coach Knepper; Middle Row: Dalton Teaford, Levi Trout, Kalyeah Powell, Darrian Zitzelberger, Brendon Woodward, Brandon Biller; Bottom Row (Jr High): Kyle Green, Zach Livingston, Don Courtney

UPDATED – Otsego Spoils Lady Tiger Hoops Home Opener

Otsego visited The Jungle Friday evening to open the 2018 – 19 Lady Tiger basketball campaign, in non-league play.

Otsego visited The Jungle Friday evening to open the 2018 – 19 Lady Tiger basketball campaign, in non-league play.

The visitors opened a 24 – 19 halftime lead and then came out after the half fired up defensively for the big win, the final score 53 – 27.

Scoring for NB: Leah Lee 12 points, Simone Thompson 9 points; Sydnee Smith, Halie Inbody and Hailey Watson each scored 2 points.

Up next for the Tigers is AT Old Fort on Nov. 27, JV tips at 6:00, in non-league play.

Otsego  14-11-14-14—53
North Baltimore  9-10-2-6—27

Lee – 4-3’s, 2 rebounds

Thompson – 7 rebounds

McCartney – 6 rebounds

Field Goals Made – Attempts: 11-31 (35%)

Free Throws Made – Attempts: 1-8 (13%)

Rebounds – 23

Turnovers – 17

Varsity Overall Record 0-1

NB won the Junior Varsity game 42 – 24.

Makenzie Perez – 15

Caitlin Schwartz – 9

Halie Inbody – 8

Cassadie Jacobs- 4

Gabbie Estrada – 3

Jordan Baker – 2

Emma Cotterman – 1

JV Overall Record 1-0

UPCOMING GIRLS GAMES

Tue 11/27 @ Old Fort, 6pm
Thur 11/29 @ Pandora-Gilboa, 6pm

 

New Tips To Try To Prevent Weed Killer’s Spread

New restrictions a federal agency has put on using a controversial weed killer aren’t enough to prevent it from spreading onto nearby plants, according to an Ohio State University weed expert.

Dicamba can damage soybean plants that aren’t resistant to it, causing cupped leaves. (Photo: OSU Extension)

Published on November 20, 2018

COLUMBUS, Ohio — New restrictions a federal agency has put on using a controversial weed killer aren’t enough to prevent it from spreading onto nearby plants, according to an Ohio State University weed expert.

As a result, Mark Loux, a weed specialist with Ohio State University Extension, and colleagues from Purdue University and the University of Illinois have created a list of additional precautions that farmers should try to follow whenever they use dicamba. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of Ohio State’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

The additional recommendations from Loux and his colleagues include not applying dicamba if  the temperature is warmer than 80 degrees or if the forecast indicates wind gusts over 10 miles per hour. The recommendations also say that farmers should apply dicamba early in the season around the time of crop planting, or soon after the emergence of the crop and weeds.

They also suggest that farmers talk to their neighbors before applying dicamba so that farmers know what plants are nearby that could potentially be affected by any spread of dicamba.

“We think our recommendations will help,” Loux said, “but not guarantee against dicamba moving from the area where it was applied and injuring or killing plants that were not supposed to be affected.”

Dicamba has been shown to easily spread well beyond the fields where it was sprayed, damaging or killing crops. Nationwide, there have been complaints and lawsuits, claiming damages.

On Oct. 31, the Environmental Protection Agency announced it would continue to allow farmers to keep using dicamba until at least December 2020. The agency required changes to the label that detail additional stipulations on when and how to use the weed killer to try to protect nearby fields.

“What (the EPA has) done is to try to make changes to prevent dicamba from moving around into other places,” Loux said.

But those changes aren’t enough, he said. Even with the added EPA restrictions, dicamba could still go airborne and spread to other plants that it was not intended to kill, Loux said.

“The weed science community is pretty unhappy, and doesn’t believe these EPA regulations are really going to help much,” he said.

New regulations include the prohibition of using dicamba on soybeans more than 45 days after planting, specifying certain times of the day dicamba can be applied, and clarifying who is authorized to apply it.

These regulations don’t have Loux or the weed science community convinced.

“There is some question as to whether 45 days actually does anything,” he said.

The farming community isn’t sold either.

“Support for using dicamba after plants have emerged is split amongst the farming community depending upon whether or not you like dicamba,” Loux said.

Those who like using dicamba are happy they get to continue. Many see it as an effective tool in controlling weeds that resist herbicides. Those who don’t like dicamba believe the EPA isn’t doing enough to prevent the dangers the herbicide poses to nearby crops.

An EPA press release states that dicamba is helpful to farmers, and that EPA is supporting farmers who rely on the chemical.

The new EPA regulations include the following:

  • Only certified applicators may apply dicamba over the top (those working under the supervision of a certified applicator may no longer make applications).
  • Over-the-top application of dicamba is prohibited on soybeans up to 45 days after planting.
  • Application is allowed only from one hour after sunrise to two hours before sunset.

To view the full list of recommendations on dicamba use from Loux and his colleagues, visit: go.osu.edu/dicambatips.

To learn more about the EPA’s decision to allow the continued use of dicamba, visit go.osu.edu/EPArelease.