NAMI Newsletter – Jan. 2018

NAMI Wood County, Cable-Lite – January 2018

NAMI Wood County, Cable-Lite
What’s New!
The new class dates are now being set for the winter season!
Hearts and Minds, January 12, 2018.
Education Night, is scheduled for February 8th on the topic of eat disorders, not to be missed!
WRAP, The next 2 day workshop is scheduled for February 22 and 23!
Family To Family, Set to begin Monday, March 5th, 2018, and meet each Monday  until May 21!
Peer to Peer, Wednesdays, March 7th through May 9th4:00pm-6:00pm, At NAMI Wood County

Annual Dinner, has been scheduled for April 16, 2018! Stay tuned for more info!
Golf Outing, has been scheduled for June 8, stay tuned for more details!
NAMI Support Groups:
NAMI Family Support Group, is a peer-led support group for family members, caregivers and loved ones of individuals living with mental illness. Groups generally meet on a monthly basis. Read more…
NAMI Connections, is a recovery support group program for adults living with mental illness. Your group will provide respect, understanding, encouragement and hope. This relaxed approach can support you as you share the challenges and success of coping with mental illness. Read more…
**For questions or sign-up write info@namiwoodcounty.org or call
419-352-0626.
Tai Chi to Resume after the Holidays…
Tai Chi at Carter Farm will resume on January 16th, after the holidays. Stay tuned to your Remind App texts for helpful info on how to keep up your practice! Texts will go out once per week at our regular meeting time.
Update: An additional Tai Chi class is being added the 4th Thursday of each month at Otterbein Portage Valley near Pemberville starting January 25th!
NAMI Calendar
Wondering what is going on at NAMI this week, this month, this year? Check out the NAMI Calendar with one click and keep up to date!

Just Click Here!

Want to Support NAMI? Become a Member!
The membership includes being a member to the national,
state, and local NAMI

affiliates. You will receive the following subscriptions: NAMI Beginnings, NAMI Ohio’s News Briefs, and Advocate. You will also be included on the mailing list for the NAMI Ohio newsletter.  These magazines and newsletters inform people of the current issues with mental illnesses such as new medications or treatments. Thank you for your support. Click Here to Join

Winter Weather Alert!
An important message from the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services.  Read more>>

NAMI National: NAMI Gets Four Stars From Charity Navigator

NAMI has received a 4-star rating from Charity Navigator. This rating shows that NAMI adheres to best practices and fulfills our mission in a financially efficient way.
Read more>>


Perfectionism is destroying the mental health of my millennial generation
During many job interviews, it’s common to be asked: “What’s your biggest weakness?” It’s a horrible question to respond to on the spot. Read more>>
*NAMI Wood County does not endorse any particular news organization.
But anxiety presents a challenge for a New Year, to learn and to grow as an individual and to work toward a life free from fear. Read more>>
*Available at NAMI Wood County Library
Insights into our emotions from one of the most influential psychologists of our time.  Read more>>
*Available at NAMI Wood County Library
Local Events
Black Swamp Ice Frogs Fundraiser:

Date: 

03 February, 2018 Start Time:4:00 p.m. End Time:7:00 p.m.Location:First United Methodist Church, 1526 East Wooster Street Bowling Green 43402, Read more>>

“Access Denied: Food Deserts and Disability in Mississippi”: Film screening of “Access Denied: Food Deserts and Disability in Mississippi” Date: 11 January, 2018, Start Time: 4:30 pm. Read more>>

eBay Basics: Join WCDPL’s Marnie Pratt for this fun and informative program. Jan. 25, 10:30am. Read more>>
Quote of the week

“Happiness is not something you postpone for the future; it is something you design for the present.” -Jim Rohn
541 W. Wooster, Bowling Green, Ohio | info@namiwoodcounty.org
 419-352-0626 | www.namiwoodcounty.org

6 in 10 Ohio adults favor raising minimum age to buy tobacco to 21

half support increasing tax on cigarettes…………………

CINCINNATI. Jan 4, 2018. According to the 2017 Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP), sponsored by Interact for Health, nearly six in 10 Ohio adults (58 percent) reported that they favored legislation to raise the minimum legal age to buy tobacco products from 18 to 21. This is slightly more than in 2016, when 53 percent of adults favored such a law. “Raising the minimum legal age to buy tobacco products is likely to delay young adults from starting to smoke and, in the long run, reduce smoking-related health problems,” explains O’dell Moreno Owens, M.D., M.P.H., President/CEO, Interact for Health.

A majority of both Democrats and Republicans and just less than half of Independents favored raising the minimum legal age to buy tobacco to 21. Support for this policy varied by smoking status. Six in 10 adults who had never smoked (60 percent) and who used to smoke (61 percent) favored raising the minimum legal age. That compares with about half of adults who were current smokers (50 percent).

 

Half of Ohio adults support increasing tax on cigarettes

OHIP also asked Ohio adults if they favored or opposed a 65 cent per pack tax increase in the cost of cigarettes, a proposal under consideration at the time of the poll. More than half of Ohio adults (53 percent) favored a tax increase. About six in 10 Democrats (58 percent) and Republicans (60 percent) and four in 10 Independents (40 percent) favored this increase.

 

2 in 10 Ohio adults are current smokers, higher than nation

In 2017, 22 percent of Ohio adults reported being current smokers, the same as in 2016. An additional 23 percent were former smokers. This is higher than the 17 percent of adults nationwide who are current smokers, and much higher than the Healthy People 2020 goal of 12 percent.

More information about Ohioans’ views on tobacco policies, and other topics, is available at  www.interactforhealth.org/ohio-health-issues-poll.

 

About the Ohio Health Issues Poll

The 2017 Ohio Health Issues Poll (OHIP) is funded by Interact for Health. OHIP was conducted June 18 to July 30, 2017, by the Institute for Policy Research at the University of Cincinnati. A random sample of 836 adults from throughout Ohio was interviewed by telephone. This included 430 landline telephone interviews and 406 cell phone interviews. In 95 of 100 cases, statewide estimates will be accurate to ± 3.4%. There are other sources of variation inherent in public opinion studies, such as non-response, question wording, or context effects that can introduce error or bias. For more information about the Ohio Health Issues Poll, please visit www.interactforhealth.org/ohio-health-issues-poll.

 

About Interact for Health

Interact for Health builds healthy communities for all people. We serve as a catalyst for health and wellness by promoting healthy living through grants, education, research, policy and engagement. Interact for Health is an independent foundation that serves 20 counties in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana. More information is available on our website, www.interactforhealth.org.

Source: Paige Drees, Rick Miller Communications

NBHS Sports Update Jan. 7

Tigers have a Champion at Woodmore Wrestling; Boy’s roundballers win a pair…

Tigers have a Champion at Woodmore Wrestling; Boy’s roundballers win a pair…

NB Wrestler David Patterson wins the 132 pound title at Woodmore A Classic Wrestling Tournament.

Basketball Update:

Friday NB gets the win 62-54 at Riverdale, in BVC play.

Saturday at Holgate, NB gets the win 57-35 over Holgate, in non-league play.

NB Library Memorial Books Listed

North Baltimore Public Library

End of 2017 Memorials

North Baltimore Public Library

End of 2017 Memorials

Ringneck: a tribute to pheasants and pheasant hunting

In Memory of: Robert Hesse

Given by: Rick and Jan Stein, Jill Guy

Pioneer Woman Cooks: Come&Get it!

In Memory of: Karen Downs

Given by: Dr. Wolfe

Messy Church

In Memory of: Kevin Powell

Given by: Come Join Me Sunday School class

Messy Christmas

In Memory of: Kevin Powell

Given by: Come Join Me Sunday School class

Messy Easter

In Memory of: Kevin Powell

Given by: Come Join Me Sunday School class

Kindness

In Memory of: Kevin Powell

Given by: Pam Seiler

Back to School with Bigfoot

In Memory of: Karen Downs

Given by: Pam Seiler

A Birthday Party for Jesus

In Memory of: Gwyn Kay Ferguson

Given by: Love Mom and Dad

A Nativity ABC’s

In Memory of: Tenley Marie Benschoter

Given by: Love Mamaw Theresa

Grandmothers Are Part of the Family

In Memory of: Shirley Mercer Bomar

Given by: Rocky Ford Red Hatters

Chicken in School

In Memory of Karen Downs

Given by: Rick & Tonya Emahiser

Jingle Bells

In Memory of: March Bean

Given by: Rick & Tonya Emahiser

What Can I Bring? Southern Food for Any Occasion Life Serves Up

In Memory of: Dorothy Apple

Given by: Dr. Ralph Wolfe

Ashley Bell

In Memory of: Ruth Derrick

Given by: Her Family

Full Wolf Moon

In Memory of: Ruth Derrick

Given by: Her Family

Learn to Increase Your Chances of Winning the Lottery

In Memory of: Richard Hogston

Given by: Dr. Ralph Haven Wolfe

Angels: Who They Are, What They Do, and Why it Matters

In Memory of: Donna Akerman

Given by: Pam Seiler

Geometry of Hand-Sewing: A Romance In Stitches & Embroidery from Alabama Chanin & the School of Making

In Memory of: Dorothy Apple

Given by: Max & Marylyn Swope

Raise: What 4-H Teaches Seven Million Kids & How it’s Lesson Could Change Food & Farming Forever

In Memory of: Patricia Church Swope

Given by: Dr. Ralph Haven Wolfe

Garden Renovation: Transform Your Yard into the Garden of Your Dreams

In Memory of: Patricia Swope

Given by: Max & Marylyn Swope

Find a Book

In Honor of: Cheryl’s 30 Years of Service

Given by: Jodi Karhoff

The Little Reindeer

In Honor of: Cheryl’s 30 Years of Service

Given by: Jodi Karhoff

The Stranger

In Memory of: Barbra Green

Given by: E.A. Powell Staff

My Absolute Darling

In Memory of: Ruth Derrick

Given by: NBHS Class of 1949

Mind Game

In Memory of: Ruth Zeigler Derrick

Given by: Dr. Ralph Haven Wolfe

Hangman’s Sonnett

In Memory of: Ruth Derrick

Given by: Margaret McGrain, John McGrain

The Store

In Memory of: Ruth Derrick

Given by: Margaret McGrain, John McGrain

Artemis

In Memory of: Ruth Derrick

Given by: NBHS Class of 1949

Power & Empire

In Memory of: Ruth Derrick

Given by: NBHS Class of 1949

 

North American Hummingbirds: An Identification Guide

In Memory of: Pat Swope

Given by: Northwest Ohio Pioneer Club

Floret Farm’s Cut Flower Garden: Grow, Harvest, & Arrange Stunning Seasonal Blooms

In Memory of: Patricia Swope

Given by: Denise & Jill Green

Urban Jungle: Living & Styling with Plants

In Memory of: Patricia Swope

Given by: Eric & Marta Crow

I’d Rather Be Reading

In Memory of: Alva Bhaer

Given by: Dr. Ralph Haven Wolfe

Grandfathers Are Part of the Family

In Memory of: Alva Bhaer

Given by: Dr. Ralph Haven Wolfe

Volunteer Engagement 2.o: Ideas & Insights Changing the World

In Memory of: Kevin Powell

Given by: NB Historical Society Tuesday Volunteers; Gwenn Mauk, Margaret Bobb, Janice Emahiser, Pam Seiler, Jim Kuhlman, Larry Slaughterbeck, Paula Miklovic, and Phyllis Mercer

Snickerdoodle Takes the Cake

In Honor of Powell Cafeteria Staff: Tammy, Lisa Cara, Carrie, Kelsie, & Pam

Presented by: Pam Cheney in Honor of Christmas

Hug

In Memory of: Henleigh Engard

Given by: Hugs & Kisses, Love Grandpa Dan and Grandma Jean

Findlay I – 75 Reconstruction Winter Work Schedule

…significant work will occur over the winter, when weather permits. Two lanes of traffic on Interstate 75 will continue to be maintained the majority of the time…

The year 2017 presented the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) with the opportunity to improve one of the area’s most valuable assets as the reconstruction and widening of Interstate 75 through Findlay and Hancock County began.

The project began in March.

Click to ENLARGE

“We accomplished what we hoped to in the first year of the project, even with weather setbacks, which included significant rainfall and flooding of some areas of Findlay and of the Interstate 75 project area,” said Kirk Slusher, ODOT District 1 deputy director.

The most notable change for motorists is the new pavement they’re driving on in the southbound direction.

“In mid-December, we switched traffic onto new pavement in the southbound direction and eliminated the contraflow lane through much of the project for the winter,” said Slusher.

Elimination of the contraflow lane, which crossed one lane of southbound traffic onto the northbound side, will aid ODOT maintenance crews in removing snow from the interstate. It is also necessary so that the next phase of interstate demolition can occur throughout the winter.

The contraflow pattern on Interstate 75 southbound will continue through the winter from U.S. 68/state Route 15 to the Lima Avenue/county Road 313 overpass, he said.

Below are some facts and stats that tell the progress of the project’s first year. To see a video recap of the project’s first year, click here.

  • The reconstruction of the Harrison Street bridge is nearing completion and is anticipated to reopen to traffic early in 2018.
  • The first phase of the reconstruction of the bridge on Interstate 75 over the Blanchard River is complete and is now supporting Interstate 75 southbound traffic.
  • The first phase of demolition of the bridge on Interstate 75 over the Norfolk Southern railroad is complete.
  • The southbound entrance and exit ramps at both the State Route 12 and U.S. 224 interchanges were reconstructed and reconfigured.
  • The installation of a sizeable water line on the west side of the interstate near the Blanchard River is complete.
  • Approximately 63 percent of the earth work on the project is complete with 628,000 cubic yards of earth moved.
  • Approximately 45 percent of the foundation and post work for the noise walls is complete. It is anticipated that setting of wall panels will begin in February.
  • Approximately 35 percent of the existing pavement on Interstate 75 has been removed, which equates to about 84,000 square yards.

In addition, the installation of a steel arch beneath Interstate 75 over an abandoned railroad bridge north of the Blanchard River was completed. The arch provides for the continued flow of water beneath the bridge to help alleviate the area’s propensity to flood.

Significant work was also completed on the new, reconfigured interchange at U.S. 68/state Route 15. The abutments for the new structure are nearing completion and some of the beams for the new flyover ramp are set. The flyover ramp will replace the existing and much maligned loop ramp and will connect Interstate 75 southbound traffic to U.S. 68/State Route 15 and Lima Avenue.

Slusher said significant work will occur over the winter, when weather permits. Two lanes of traffic on Interstate 75 will continue to be maintained the majority of the time while construction continues. Some occasional nighttime closures will occur.

Work will include the following:

  • Removal of existing pavement on Interstate 75
  • Demolition of the existing bridges over the Blanchard River, and abandoned railroad for phase two of their reconstruction
  • Completion of fencing and guardrail work on the Harrison Street bridge with an anticipated opening in early 2018
  • Construction of the bridges and ramps at the U.S. 68/State Route 15 interchange
  • Construction of noise walls

The $113 million project reconstructs and widens approximately five miles of Interstate 75 from just south of the Harrison Street overpass to the county Road 99 interchange north of Findlay. The project also includes the replacement of all mainline bridges on Interstate 75, replacement of the Harrison Street overpass, the redesign and reconstruction of the interchange between U.S. 68/state Route 15 and Interstate 75, and the redesign and reconstruction of the interchange with U.S. 68/state Route 15 at Lima Avenue.

The entire reconstruction project is expected to be completed in August 2020. Beaver Excavating, Canton, serves as the general contractor on the project.

The Ohio Department of Transportation maintains the state’s largest man-made asset – the transportation system. ODOT’s mission is to provide the safe and easy movement of people and goods from place to place. As a $2.8 billion per year enterprise, ODOT invests the bulk of its resources in system preservation through maintenance, construction and snow and ice operations

BROWN, PORTMAN URGE TRADE RELIEF FOR OHIO WHIRLPOOL WORKERS

Senators Urged International Trade Commission to Rule in Favor of Workers, Now Pressing Lighthizer to Stand Against Unfair Competition………………..

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Sens. Sherrod Brown (D-OH) and Rob Portman (R-OH) successfully urged the International Trade Commission (ITC) to rule that workers at Whirlpool’s Clyde, OH plant had been hurt by unfair washing machine imports by Samsung and LG. In October, the ITC made a determination of injury, and then presented a list of recommended remedies to Ambassador Lighthizer. As Ambassador Lighthizer considers those recommendations, the Senators are asking he make a strong recommendation to President Trump that will provide broad relief for the U.S. washing machine industry in response serial trade violations by companies like LG and Samsung.

 

“We are pleased to see the ITC find that there has been injury in this case, and that the ITC agreed that there should be no product exclusion as part of the remedy,” said the Senators in a letter sent this week ahead of today’s USTR hearing. “These findings form the basis of a strong remedy that helps American workers and communities, like Clyde, continue to grow, and we believe that with the inclusion of the above recommendations, this global safeguard action will be a success. Ultimately, a strong remedy in this case – one that embraces the aforementioned recommendations – will provide the level playing field that lets American companies, and workers, compete, and win.”

 

The case sought broad relief for the U.S. washing machine industry in response to the pattern of violations by companies like LG and Samsung who’ve repeatedly exported their washers to the U.S. at unfair prices. Today, Ambassador Lighthizer is holding a hearing to determine what remedies should be put in place to give the domestic industry the relief they need from unfair washer imports. He will then make a recommendation on those remedies to the President.

 

Brown andPortman and both testified at ITC on behalf of Whirlpool, and urged ITC to take make a positive ruling.

 

Since 2012, Ohio’s Senators have fought against these unfair trade practices that have harmed Whirlpool, and most recently helped secure relief in a case against washing machine imports from China.

 

Brown and Portman worked to get the Leveling the Playing Field Act signed into law in June 2015, restoring strength to antidumping and countervailing duty statutes that allow businesses and workers in the United States to petition the Commerce Department and the ITC when foreign producers sell goods in the U.S. below market price or receive illegal subsidies. The law led to key wins for Ohio steel companies in major trade cases last year on cold-rolled, hot-rolled, and corrosion-resistant steel, including U.S. Steel, Nucor, ArcelorMittal, and AK Steel, which together employ more than 8,200 Ohio workers.

 

Read the full letter below and here.

Dear Ambassador Lighthizer,

We write to you to share our perspective on the International Trade Commission’s (ITC) recommendation in Investigation No. TA-201-76, Large Residential Washers. As you consider the ITC’s recommendation, we wanted to provide an Ohio viewpoint in the case.

As you may know, one of the petitioners in this case is Whirlpool, which manufactures washing machines at their facility in Clyde, Ohio. In 2008, Whirlpool took a bold step and stopped sourcing its washers from its overseas facilities. That same year Whirlpool invested $100 million in its Clyde plant. Today, Whirlpool is an intrinsic part of Clyde. Scott Black, Clyde’s Mayor – who met his wife at the Whirlpool factory – is adamant: “Without Whirlpool being here, Clyde would still be a village and not a city.” Thanks to the best workforce in the world and cutting edge technology this plant produces every large residential washer sold by Whirlpool in the United States. Every four seconds a high-quality machine comes off the assembly line.

Unfortunately, Whirlpool’s investment in Ohio and the United States has been threatened by unfairly imported washing machines from overseas. We both have been very active in the series of trade cases filed, and won, by Whirlpool over the years and know that a strong remedy in this global safeguard case is vital for securing a level playing field in this industry.

Mindful of the need for a strong remedy, we are concerned that the ITC’s recommendation is insufficient to provide meaningful relief to domestic washer manufacturers and the thousands of workers they employ. We believe that a full remedy in this case involves three components.

First, it must include a fifty percent tariff on washer imports. The current tariff rate quota which provides zero to twenty percent duties on the first 1.2 million units is insufficient at curbing the flood of unfair washing machine imports that we have seen for years. We believe a fifty percent tariff on all imports will go a long way to slowing the flow of these unfair products.

Second, the global safeguard remedy must apply to the Republic of Korea. Unfortunately the need for the current global safeguard action is the result of unfair trade practices on the part of two foreign producers – Samsung and LG – who manufacture their machines in the Republic of Korea. To exclude exports from this country is to create a loophole large enough to eviscerate the effectiveness of this section 201 remedy.

Third, we recommend that you call for a quota on covered parts such as tubs, drums, and cabinets. This will assist in making the remedy effectual and complete.

We are pleased to see the ITC find that there has been injury in this case, and that the ITC agreed that there should be no product exclusion as part of the remedy. These findings form the basis of a strong remedy that helps American workers and communities, like Clyde, continue to grow, and we believe that with the inclusion of the above recommendations, this global safeguard action will be a success. Ultimately, a strong remedy in this case – one that embraces the aforementioned recommendations – will provide the level playing field that lets American companies, and workers, compete, and win. Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Continuum of Care Wood County (CoCWC) Addressing Housing Struggles and Homelessness in Wood County

“Neighbor to Neighbor: Let’s Talk about Housing Struggles in Wood County”

Continuum of Care Wood County (CoCWC), a coalition of local agencies, churches and individuals addressing housing struggles and homelessness in Wood County, will be hosting community conversations throughout Wood County: “Neighbor to Neighbor: Let’s Talk about Housing Struggles in Wood County”. The purpose is to gather information on affordable housing in the community including barriers and successes to securing and maintaining housing.

 

Community Conversations targeting southern Wood County will be held in the Wolfe Community Room of the North Baltimore Public Library, 230 North Main Street on Wednesday, January 17 at 10:30 am and on Thursday, January 18 at 6:30 pm.

 

Community Conversations will also be held at the Custar Legion Hall, 9155 Custar Road, Custar on Wednesday, January 24 at 10:30 am and on Thursday, January 25 at 6:30 pm. Refreshments will be served. Everyone is welcome to join the conversations.

 

Esther Nagel and Mike Soltis will be leading the conversations in the Wolfe Community Room. Esther and Joyce Walker will be leading in Custar. Questions? Contact Esther Nagel at 419-575-4624 or gnagel@woh.rr.com.

Reminder: Christmas Tree Recycling in NB

Wood County Parks Christmas Tree Recycling until January 31st at the following locations: 

Christmas Tree Recycling – Wood County Area

Are you wondering what to do with that Christmas tree after the holidays?  The Wood County Park District will be accepting Christmas trees through January 31, 2018 for recycling.

Please make sure all decorations, including tinsel, have been removed.

Please look for signs indicating where to drop your tree off at the following Wood County Parks across the county:

Christmas Tree Recycling until January 31st at the following locations:

W.W. Knight Nature Preserve, 29530 White Road, Perrysburg

Otsego Park, 20000 West River Road, Bowling Green

Park District Headquarters, 18729 Mercer Road, Bowling Green

William Henry Harrison Park, 644 Bierley Avenue, Pemberville

North Baltimore Depot of Slippery Elm Trail, 218 E. Broadway, North Baltimore

This is a free service. Please remove all decorations, tinsel and lights prior to drop-off.

Lutheran Church News for January 7

“Where Are You Coming From?” is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic on Sunday, January 7………….

St. Luke’s Lutheran Church, North Baltimore

“Where Are You Coming From?” is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic at St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in North Baltimore on Sunday, January 7 at 10:15 a.m. The congregation will observe the Epiphany of Our Lord, and remove Christmas decorations following worship.

During worship, the 2018 Church Council will be installed.

Sunday School for all ages begins at 9:00 a.m.

=========================================================

St. John’s Lutheran Church, McComb

“Where Are You Coming From?” is Pastor Ralph Mineo’s sermon topic at St. John’s Lutheran Church in McComb on Sunday, January 7 at 8:00 a.m. The congregation will observe the Epiphany of Our Lord.

Sunday School begins at 9:15 a.m. A joint adult Sunday School is with the McComb United Methodist Church.

Village Holds First Council Meeting of 2018

New starting time of 5:30pm for all three monthly meetings this year………………………

by Sue Miklovic

The Village Council of North Baltimore held their first meeting of 2018 last Tuesday, January 2, at the new starting time of 5:30pm. Village Administrator Allyson Murray was excused from the meeting due to illness. Clerk Kathi Bucher was absent and Becky Walter filled in.

The first order of business was the swearing in of the four recently elected members. New, first time members are Matt Beegle and Tim Engard. Art Patterson was re-elected to another term. Aaron Patterson had previously served, but took a break, and then ran again last fall and was elected.

Councilman Aaron Patterson being sworn in to office by Mayor Janet Goldner
Councilman Matt Beegle being sworn in to office by Mayor Janet Goldner
Councilman Tim Engard being sworn in to office by Mayor Janet Goldner
Councilman Art Patterson being sworn in to office by Mayor Janet Goldner. He was also selected to be President of the Village Council.

Next, an election for the President of Council was held by the members. Art Patterson was unanimously chosen.

Administrative reports were submitted by all department heads. Only Police Chief Baer was present. He presented his business card with his personal phone number to all the new council members and invited them to “Please, call or text me anytime”

Aaron Patterson asked of the EMS report, “I don’t see the number of missed calls on this report”. “There aren’t any,” replied Chief Baer. ” Council President Art Patterson added, “We have not missed any calls for many months”. Councilman Aaron Patterson replied,” That is amazing. Great job!”

The Mayor said everyone should have a 2018 Schedule of Village Services in their current water bill.

Councilman Ty Carles reminded all members to complete their mandatory Sunshine Law training. Councilman Aaron Patterson asked if text messages were included  as communication. Mayor Goldner replied,”Yes, that’s public record if you are discussing village business.” Village Legal Counsel Joel Kuhlman confirmed and added, “I have several topics to share (in the future) and that is one of them on the list”

Mayor Goldner also appointed the following Committee Assignments: (Chairperson in parentheses)

Public Safety- (Art Patterson) Tim Engard, Leisa Zeigler
Finance and Technology-(Matt Beegle) Ty Carles, Art Patterson
Public Works-(Aaron Patterson) Matt Beegle, Art Patterson
Public Utilities-(Tim Engard) Leisa Zeigler, Ty Carles
Economic and Community Development-(Leisa Zeigler,) Matt Beegle, Aaron Patterson
Personnel,Policy, and Ordinance Review-(Ty Carles) Tim Engard, Aaron Patterson

There were no reports from any of the standing committees.

NBHS Student Representative to Council, Dalton Teaford addressed the council concerning the reciting of The Pledge of Allegiance, which begins all council meetings. The members thanked him for enlightening them.