Ruth Jane Roberts Day Held at NB Library

The Children’s Room of the North Baltimore Public Library has been named for Mrs. Ruth Jane Roberts….

Despite a day of multiple storms and tornado sirens, the North Baltimore Public Library hosted Ruth Jane Roberts Day on Wednesday, June 5th. The evening was set aside to honor Ruth Jane Roberts who the children’s collection is named for and to continue our 100th Birthday Celebration.  Bounce houses, balloons, activities and treats were enjoyed by all ages. The festivities were moved inside due to the rain. 

At the party it was announced that the Children’s Room will now also be named for Mrs. Ruth Jane Roberts in addition to the Children’s Collection that currently bears her name.

Ruth Jane Roberts Day….

 

Refreshments for All…

 

Young and Old alike enjoyed the adventures….

 

Ruth Jane Roberts Day at the NBPL…
Celebrating the 100th anniversary of the fabulous North Baltimore Public Library….

 

The Roberts Family was on hand for the Celebration…


We would like to thank the Robert’s family for all of their contributions to the North Baltimore Public Library both past and present.  We appreciate everyone that came out to celebrate with us as well as those that helped with the activities.

 

 

A Sweet, Summery Treat

Watch the video to see how to grill fresh pineapple………


(Family Features) The grill isn’t just for hamburgers and hot dogs. Try a different way to eat pineapple this summer by grilling it and pairing with a lime dip for a tasty delight.

Find more recipes for summer at Culinary.net.

Watch video to learn how to make this recipe!


Grilled Pineapple with Lime Dip

  • 1          pineapple
  • 1/4       cup brown sugar
  • 2          tablespoons lime juice
  • 3          tablespoons honey

Lime Dip:

  • 8          ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 1/2       cup plain yogurt
  • 3          tablespoons honey
  • 2          tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2          tablespoons lime juice
  • 2          teaspoons lime zest
  1. Peel pineapple; cut into wedges.
  2. In resealable plastic bag, combine brown sugar, lime juice and honey. Add pineapple wedges, seal bag and turn to coat. Refrigerate 1 hour.
  3. To make Lime Dip: In small bowl, beat cream cheese until smooth. Beat in yogurt, honey, brown sugar, lime juice and lime zest. Cover and refrigerate.
  4. Heat grill to medium heat.
  5. Remove pineapple wedges from plastic bag; discard marinade. Grill pineapple wedges, covered, 3-4 minutes on each side, or until golden brown.
  6. Serve with Lime Dip.

SOURCE:
Culinary.net

WC Humane Society Summer Fun(draiser)

Saturday, July 20……..cornhole, music with live bands, adoptable animals….

 Coming Soon: The third show for the Mewvement & Subwoofers: WCHS Concert Series. This is a great fundraiser that includes live entertainment, drink specials, raffles, showcase of adoptable animals and a cornhole tournament. We are hoping to fill all 25 open slots for the cornhole tournament teams for a fun summer event. 

Registration form for the cornhole tournament

 

If you have any questions in regards to the event please do not hesitate to contact the Wood County Humane Society

 

Quilters Meeting on Monday

Anyone interested in quilting is welcome to attend….

Ohio Star Quilters of Findlay will meet on Monday, June 24, 9:30 am in  Findlay at St. John’s Lutheran Church, 1701 Tiffin Avenue. 

The day begins with the business meeting followed by Show and Tell.

Anyone interested in quilting is welcome to attend.  Questions regarding the Ohio Star Quilters Club may be directed to Pat Czaplicki at
567-250-8537. 

NB Alumni Dinner is July 26

Annual Dinner event expecting to sell out. All are welcome! Get your reservations in ASAP.

The annual North Baltimore Alumni Association dinner is planned for Friday, July 26th, at the NB American Legion. This is the evening before the Good Ole Summertime Festival in NB, on Saturday.

This year there will not be a featured speaker, allowing those in attendance to have more time for socialization. 

Also, seating is limited to only 200 people. Please get your reservations turned in early so you don’t get shut out.

This years scholarship recipients of the North Baltimore Alumni Association $750.00 award  are Christina Morales and Sierrah Johnson, from the NBHS Class of 2019. They will be present to receive their checks.

Here are the details for the event:

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact any member of the Committee on the above insert.

See an additional post here on TheNBXpress about the Good Ole Summertime Golf Tournament, which is on Saturday morning, after this Friday night event. The golf tourney is sponsored by the NB Alumni Association ans helps fund the scholarships awarded each Spring. Donations for the scholarship fund are also welcome to be mailed in with your dinner reservations.

 

8 Recipes to Take Summer Gatherings to the Next Level

Host a brunch, relax by the pool or throw a backyard bash……


(Family Features) The summer months offer seemingly endless opportunities to enjoy the warm weather with friends and family. Serving crowd-pleasing foods and drinks can go a long way toward a successful gathering, whether you’re hosting a brunch, relaxing by the pool or throwing a backyard bash.

Regardless of the occasion, a store like ALDI has everything you need to savor summer, including entertaining items and high-quality ingredients, without the premium price tag. When you make this one-stop shop your destination for summer essentials, you can get more of what you love for less.

Find more seasonal recipe ideas like these appetizers, main dishes, desserts and drinks at ALDI.us.

Grilled Avocados with Vegetable RelishBoost a favorite summer flavor like avocado by using your grill. Start by slicing the avocados and removing the pits before grilling flesh-side down. Fill with a vegetable relish mixture of tomatoes, bell peppers and onions then sprinkle with feta cheese.

Citrus Popping Kale SaladThis light and refreshing salad is a perfect make-ahead meal-starter. Made with a quinoa base, the combination of kale, mangoes, cranberries, toasted almonds and crumbled goat cheese provides a unique mix of flavors.

Grilled Strip Steak Skewers with Pear SlawSkewers are a summertime favorite that can be easily customized to meet the tastes of your guests. This version features steak marinated in a soy sauce mixture, cooked on a grill pan and served over a bed of cabbage, carrots, radishes, onions and julienned pears.

Grilled Pear and Apple Pork TenderloinCombining a sweet yet savory glazed pork tenderloin with a side of fresh apple and pear (or peach) wedges, this simple dish is an ideal accompaniment to a day or night spent dining al fresco.

Frozen Greek Yogurt with BlueberriesSummer calls for frozen treats, and you can put a healthier spin on dessert by substituting frozen yogurt for ice cream. Just blend blueberries, lemon juice and vanilla with Greek yogurt and freeze for a perfect indulgence on a warm afternoon.

Freezie Fruit PopsMix and match assorted fruits like kiwi, strawberries, grapes, blueberries, pineapple, peaches and more with fruit juices. Once mixed, freeze to create healthy fruit pops. For a grown-up version, substitute wine for the juice.

Very Berry Chiller with Lemonade Ice CubesWhen looking for a way to cool off on a hot summer day, reach for a combination of classic summer flavors. Freeze lemonade overnight in an ice cube tray then drop the cubes in a pitcher of blended blueberries, strawberries, blackberries and raspberries for a sweet, refreshing beverage.

SanGritaA refreshing twist on a traditional Spanish punch, this adults-only beverage calls for blending frozen lime bars with sangria and garnishing with strawberries and blueberries to your liking.

SOURCE:
ALDI

Wood Soil & Water Conservation District Prevent Plant Cover Crop Program

Producers who were unable to plant their corn or soybeans should contact the district about adding cover crops to their fields.

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio  –  The Wood Soil and Water Conservation District is announcing a prevent plant cover crop program for cost share on cover crops.  Producers who were unable to plant their corn or soybeans should contact the district about adding cover crops to their fields.

Kris Swartz, Wood SWCD board supervisor, thinks cover crops are the clear winner for the situation.  Cover crops are a good agronomic practice; they hold the soil and nutrients that have already been applied. Cover crops support the soil health initiative as well.  

Follow Wood Soil & Water Conservation District on Facebook, go to www.woodswcd.com, visit the district office at 1616 E. Wooster St. Suite 32 Bowling Green, OH, or call 419-354-5517#4 for assistance in selecting your cover crops and enrolling in the program. 

Get Grilling with Fresh Ingredients

Home cooks can quickly put grilled family meals together…..


(Family Features) Grilling season provides ample opportunities to put flavorful fare on the table, but it doesn’t have to be a lengthy cooking process. By planning ahead, having the right equipment on-hand and using ready-to-go ingredients, home cooks can quickly put family meals together.

With an option like Smithfield Marinated Fresh Pork, which is perfectly seasoned and ready to throw on the grill, you can have a delicious meal ready in 30 minutes or less. Available in a variety of flavors and quality cuts, it’s ideal for grilling, roasting or sauteing any night of the week. To get ready for your next grilling occasion, try something new like Grilled Pork Kebabs with Tzatziki Sauce or Grilled Pork and Potato Planks.

To help make this a successful grilling season, visit SmithfieldGetGrilling.com for more grilling tips and a chance to win $5,000.

Grilled Pork Kebabs with Tzatziki Sauce

Prep time: 25 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Serves: 6

  • 1          Smithfield Roasted Garlic & Herb Pork Loin Filet, cut into 1 1/4-inch cubes
  • 3          small zucchini squash, cut into 1/2-inch thick slices
  • 2          large red bell peppers, cut into 1 1/4-inch pieces
  • 1          large red onion, cut into 1 1/4-inch wedges
  • bamboo skewers, soaked in water 30 minutes
  • olive oil
  • 2          medium cucumbers, peeled
  • 1          clove garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2    cups whole milk Greek yogurt
  • 1/2       lemon juice
  • 2          teaspoons chopped fresh dill weed
  • 1/2       teaspoon sea salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • chopped fresh parsley
  1. Heat grill to 375° F. Alternately thread fresh pork cubes, zucchini, peppers and onions onto bamboo skewers. Brush kebabs lightly with olive oil.
  2. In food processor, process cucumbers and garlic until finely chopped. Drain liquid from cucumbers. Stir cucumbers with yogurt, lemon juice, dill, sea salt and pepper. Refrigerate until ready to use.
  3. Grill fresh pork skewers approximately 10 minutes, turning occasionally, until char marks form and pork is cooked through.
  4. Garnish skewers with parsley and serve with tzatziki sauce for dipping.

Grilled Pork and Potato Planks

Prep time: 5 minutes
Cook time: 22 minutes
Serves: 4

  •             Nonstick cooking spray
  • 2          Smithfield Roasted Garlic and Cracked Black Pepper Pork Tenderloins
  • 2          pounds Yukon Gold or red potatoes, cut lengthwise into 3/4-inch-thick slices
  • 2          tablespoons canola oil
  • 3/4       cup shredded reduced-fat or regular sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1/2       cup sour cream
  • 1/4       cup finely chopped green onions
  1. Heat charcoal or gas grill to medium; spray grates with nonstick cooking spray. Grill tenderloins until internal temperature reaches 150° F, turning occasionally, about 20 minutes.
  2. Brush both sides of potato slices with oil; grill 15-20 minutes until just tender, turning occasionally. Remove potatoes and pork from grill.
  3. Top potatoes with cheese, sour cream and onions. Serve with tenderloins cut into 1/4-inch thick slices.

SOURCE:
Smithfield

4 Stealthy Ways to Keep Your Family Healthy

Consider these stealthy tips to sneak more healthy habits into your family‚Äôs lifestyle…..


(Family Features) Living a healthy lifestyle takes effort and diligence, but with common stressors of day-to-day life, health can take a backseat to jobs, social engagements and tempting treats. While adopting more healthful habits may not be top-of-mind for your family, there are some simple and sneaky ways to incorporate them into your family’s routines.

Consider these stealthy tips to sneak more healthy habits into your family’s lifestyle. For more information about creating healthy habits for your pet as well, visit Greenies.com.

  1. Take a Day Trip – Take your family – and your dog – on a visit to a local farmers’ market to take advantage of in-season finds, like fresh, colorful fruits and vegetables. They might think it’s just a fun excursion, but it can actually be an engaging and educational activity that exposes them to the vibrancy and flavor of in-season fruits and vegetables and the nutrients they can add to their diets.

  1. Incorporate Sneaky Snacks – Get creative with everyday snacks to find healthy additions and alternatives. Try adding veggies in your family’s smoothies, such as spinach or carrots, or toast up some granola with honey to cure a sweet and crunchy craving. Don’t forget to include your furry friends in snack time. Treats like GREENIES Dental Chews are enjoyable snacks that can help your pup improve his or her oral care without even knowing it. Pets think they’re just enjoying a tasty treat, but they’re also cleaning their teeth, helping to maintain healthy gums and freshening breath. As an added bonus, they’ll get vitamins and nutrients to support a healthy lifestyle.

  1. Have Fun with Your Meals – Get your family members involved in the kitchen to help prepare nutritious meals and introduce them to good-for-you flavors and recipes. A meal-prepping session can help teach them to enjoy and appreciate healthy ingredients, while learning the process of preparing a healthful meal. While your family interprets the meal as a fun activity, you can reinforce the importance of being conscious of what you’re putting in your body.

  1. Stay Active – Find outdoor activities that you and your family (pets included) can enjoy for regular exercise. Walking your furry friend, playing catch or checking out a new park are easy ways to spend quality time with the family, while sneaking exercise into your day. Plus, bringing your pet along can help him or her expel energy for better behavior at home.

Photos courtesy of Fotolia

SOURCE:
Mars Petcare

BVHS Weekend Column: Skin Cancer

In the summer, many people look forward to spending time under the energizing sunrays….

Skin Cancer, by Jay Alammar, MD, Surgical Associates of Northwest Ohio

Jay Alammar, MD

The skin is the largest organ of the body, and skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States regardless of age, race or skin color. The disease incidence is reaching an epidemic level. Over 5.5 million cases of skin cancer are diagnosed each year, and approximately 15,000 people die each year from this disease. The current estimate is that 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. The US average annual cost of treating skin cancer is about $8 billion. Considering this enormous cost in lives and health care dollars, increasing awareness about prevention, early detection and prompt treatment of skin cancer is crucial.

Skin cancer has two major categories:

  1. This type is the cause for 4 percent of skin cancers, making it the least common. However, it is the most aggressive type and is responsible for the most deaths from skin cancer. 85 percent of melanoma cases are related to exposure the sun UV radiation. 
  2. Non-melanoma. This type causes 95 percent of skin cancers, 90 percent of which are cases related to exposure to UV radiation.

There are two main types of non-melanoma cancers:

  1. Basal cell cancers. These account for 75 percent of cases, and that number is slow growing Fortunately, basal cell cancers are easily treated, and the majority are curable if detected early and never metastasize.  
  2. Squamous cell cancers. These account for 20 percent of cases and are more aggressive than basal cell cancers. Squamous cell cancers could involve lymph nodes and may metastasize if not treated promptly.

 

Those who have blue or green eyes, red or blond hair, fair skin that freckles or burns easily, a history of sunburns at any age, a history of excessive sun exposure, and/or a history of tanning bed use are at greater risk for skin cancer. Those who possess these risk factors should be diligent in performing a monthly skin self-exam and a yearly clinical exam by a physician, and they should be familiar with the ABCDE of skin cancers.

A= Asymmetry (any irregularly shaped mole)

B= Borders (moles with jagged edges)

C= Color (moles with color variation)

D= Diameter (moles with diameter greater than the third of an inch or 7 mm)

E= Evolution (moles that have changed in size, shape or color)

Knowing the ABCDE of skin cancers may save your life or the life of a loved one. If you or anyone you know has a skin growth that matches any of the above criteria, show it to a primary care provider.

In the summer, many people look forward to spending time under the energizing sunrays. However, please remember that UV light secondary to sun exposure is the greatest modifiable skin cancer risk factor. Seek shade when the sunrays are strong, cover up when there is no shade, always wear sunscreen (greater than SPF 15), wear sunglasses and wide brim hats, do not forget to protect children, and avoid tanning beds and tanning supplements.

Fortunately, skin cancer is one of the most preventable and easiest to treat of all cancers. Raising awareness about the harms of unprotected sun exposure and encouraging sun-safe habits will undoubtedly save many lives. In addition, raising awareness about early detection makes treatment more curative and less disfiguring.

Honor History and Its Lessons

Whatever the basis for your interest in looking back in time, there are many ways you can honor and develop a deeper understanding of history.


(Family Features) The reasons for understanding the past are plentiful. Historical knowledge may illuminate the moments that shaped a loved one’s life or simply satisfy a curiosity about events and people that occupied a different place in time. A look into yesteryear can help make sense of the world today or even foreshadow happenings well into the future.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Whatever the basis for your interest in looking back in time, there are many ways you can honor and develop a deeper understanding of history. It’s just a matter of finding the method that fits your interests best.
Visit a museum or historical monument. These locations are rife with information, and often artifacts, that bring the past to life. You can find museums for all types of topics and interests, some with broad information about an event or subject and others that tell a story from a particular vantage point. Monuments offer a similar glimpse at the past, but they generally serve as physical markers of a particular place or event. This means you can stand exactly where the nation’s forefathers stood as they fought for liberation from British soldiers or take in the same sights as the pioneers who ventured west along a wagon trail.

Explore written accounts of history. Historical books lend a diverse perspective on history, from factual accounts of times and places to personal narratives that let you experience exceptional moments through the eyes of someone who was there. For example, “Sacred Duty: A Soldier’s Tour at Arlington National Cemetery” from publisher Harper Collins paints an inspiring portrait of Arlington National Cemetery’s elite Old Guard unit, as well as telling the story of U.S. Senator Tom Cotton’s time as a platoon leader there. America’s oldest active-duty regiment, dating back to 1784, The Old Guard conducts daily military honor funerals on the 624 rolling acres of Arlington. Readers have the opportunity to immerse themselves in the honor and the challenges of duty at the nation’s most sacred shrine. Learn more or order online at HarperCollins.com.

Let elders tell their tales. Though much of recent history is heavily documented, there’s no comparison to hearing first-hand how a person felt and thought as those historical moments unfolded. War stories, memories of childhood, tales from the first time driving a car – these are all experiences that looked very different a generation or two ago. Use special occasions and family gatherings to encourage the elders in your life to tell their stories and make notes or record those memories to cherish years into the future.

Research your family tree. No history is as personally relevant as your family tree. Your ancestors hold the answers to exactly why you look like you do, and maybe even why you act certain ways. Online services make it easy to begin piecing together relations that date back generations.

Visit a cemetery. You may think of a trip to a cemetery as purely a chance to pay your respects to the departed. While visiting grave sites of loved ones you’ve lost and leaving flowers or other trinkets are common practices, you can also learn a great deal from a cemetery. Looking for surnames you recognize may alert you to members of your family tree you never knew or seeing dates etched in the stones may help you piece together bits of family history.
Digging into the past may be entertaining, insightful, inspiring or all of the above. You may be surprised by all you can uncover once you get started.

SOURCE:
Harper Collins