DIY Halloween Box Costume for All Ages

Supplies like cardboard boxes, tape and felt are all you need to piece together this DIY Halloween Llama Boxtume and celebrate the season in style…….

 

(Family Features) Candy, pumpkins and costumes are some of the most popular traditions of the Halloween season. This year, rather than searching store aisles for the perfect getup, consider using boxes from your latest deliveries and other items you have on-hand to create a one-of-a-kind DIY costume, or “boxtume.”

Supplies like cardboard boxes, tape and felt are all you need to piece together this DIY Halloween Llama Boxtume and celebrate the season in style. Since it can be as simple or elaborate as you’d like, the customizable nature of the costume allows your personality to shine.

With many households across the country already taking advantage of Amazon Prime’s unlimited fast, free shipping and streaming, your next costume idea could be just one click away. Boxtumes can be made alone, with kids or even as group costumes, meaning the possibilities are nearly endless. If you’re feeling extra crafty, try your hand at upcycling boxes to craft other custom Halloween items, such as treat containers, spooky centerpieces and decorations.

Share your creativity online using #Boxtumes, and find more inspiration and step-by-step guides at amazon.com/boxtumes2018.

DIY Halloween Llama Boxtume

Project courtesy of CraftyChica.com

Supplies:

  • 1 large Amazon smile box
  • 1 medium Amazon smile box, divided
  • 1 long box
  • Duct tape
  • Masking tape
  • Hot glue
  • Scissors
  • Felt or fabric
  • Ping pong balls
  • Craft paint brushes
  • Paint
  • Cardboard
  • Faux fur (optional)
  • Straps (optional)
  1. Using large box, medium box and long box, build foundation of llama. Use duct tape and masking tape to attach long box to side of large box and piece of rolled medium box to top of long box then use hot glue to secure.
  2. Using scissors and fabric, cut out ears and leave long area to glue to back of head and inside neck of box to help make stronger.
  3. Cover llama with fabric and hot glue in place.
  4. Use ping pong balls or cardboard for eyes and using craft brush, paint on eyelids, lashes and pupils.
  5. Cut small pieces from cardboard to make teeth. Use felt shapes to form nose and lips.
  6. Use felt to decorate sides and neck.
  7. Add personal touches as desired, such as faux fur on head, straps to wear your boxtume over shoulders or darker colored felt for accents.

SOURCE:
Amazon

Quilters to Meet

Monday, October 22, 9:30 am in Findlay ….

Ohio Star Quilters of Findlay will meet on Monday, October 22, 9:30 am in  Findlay at St. John’s Lutheran Church, 1701 Tiffin Avenue.

The day begins with the business meeting followed by Show and Tell.

Anyone interested in quilting is welcome to attend.  Questions regarding the Ohio Star Quilters Club may be directed to Tina Wood at 419-348-4247.

Freshen Up Holiday Entertaining

Add tasty, crunchy GRAPES to seasonal dishes…………

(Family Features) The holiday season is typically marked by gatherings of friends and family. Whether you’re hosting overnight guests, drop-in visitors or an important seasonal meal, taking a fresh approach to the menu can make the get-together more special.

As you prepare for the festivities, consider recipes that feature healthy ingredients such as versatile California grapes, which come in three vibrant colors – red, green and black – and can add a palate-pleasing crunch and plenty of taste to everything from main dishes to sides and even desserts. Heart-healthy grapes are also perfect on their own as a snack and their natural beauty can help enhance any table as an edible garnish or fresh centerpiece.

Using grapes as a featured ingredient in your holiday dishes can provide a fresh twist on seasonal dishes, such as this Grape Dutch Baby or these Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Grapes and Balsamic Glaze. For dessert, use the natural sweetness of grapes to create a smooth Grape Caramel Sauce that can be served as a topping for ice cream or other seasonal desserts.

Seasonal Entertaining with Grapes

While the beautiful, vibrant colors of grapes can add visual interest to recipes, they can also serve a variety of purposes when hosting:

  • Grapes can make for easy decorations when placed in bowls, on platters or draped from a cake plate.
  • Grapes can be “frosted” with sugar, spices and chopped nuts then served as a finger food or used as a garnish to decorate cakes, cookies, puddings, mousses and other seasonal desserts. Simply dip grape clusters in liquid gelatin then roll in your desired mixture.
  • Grapes make for a quick and easy hostess gift. Wrap multi-colored grape clusters in tissue paper then place them in a basket or tin tied with ribbon.

Find more holiday recipes at GrapesfromCalifornia.com.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Grapes and Balsamic Glaze

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4

  • 1          pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved lengthwise
  • 2          tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • pinch of salt
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1          cup red California grapes
  • 2          tablespoons ready-to-use balsamic glaze
  1. Heat oven to 450° F.
  2. On baking sheet, toss sprouts with olive oil, salt and pepper, to taste, until sprouts are well-coated. Roast until deep golden brown, about 17-20 minutes, turning sprouts halfway through roasting. Stir in grapes and roast 3-5 minutes. Transfer to bowl and drizzle with glaze or drizzle platter with glaze and pile sprouts on top.

Nutritional information per serving: 150 calories; 3 g protein; 20 g carbohydrates; 7 g fat (42% calories from fat); 1 g saturated fat (6% calories from saturated fat); 0 mg cholesterol; 30 mg sodium; 4 g fiber.

Grape Caramel Sauce

Prep time: 5 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes
Servings: 6

  • 1          pound green or red California grapes, divided
  • 1          tablespoon lemon juice
  • 3/4       cup sugar
  • 1/4       cup water
  • 1/3       cup heavy cream (optional)
  • large pinch of salt
  • ice cream
  1. In blender or food processor, combine 12 ounces grapes with lemon juice and puree. Set aside. Coarsely chop remaining grapes.
  2. In medium saucepan, combine sugar and water then bring to boil, stirring a few times. Simmer without stirring, brushing down sides of pot with brush dipped in water if crystals start forming. When mixture has turned deep, golden brown, remove from heat and whisk in pureed grapes until smooth sauce has formed. Turn on heat and simmer until mixture has reduced by one-third and forms smooth caramel sauce. Whisk in cream and salt; stir in chopped grapes and serve over ice cream.

Nutritional information per serving of sauce: 200 calories; 40 g carbohydrates; 5 g fat (22% calories from fat); 3 g saturated fat (14% calories from saturated fat); 15 mg cholesterol; 60 mg sodium; 1 g fiber.

Grape Dutch Baby

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4

  • 3          large eggs
  • 2/3       cup all-purpose flour
  • 2/3       cup low-fat milk
  • 1/2       teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/2       teaspoon salt
  • 5          tablespoons unsalted
  • butter, divided
  • 2          cups red California
  • grapes, halved
  • 2          tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1/8       teaspoon cinnamon (optional)
  • confectioners’ sugar
  1. Heat oven to 450° F. Put large (10-inch) cast-iron or ovenproof skillet in oven.
  2. With electric mixer on high speed, beat eggs until frothy then beat in flour, milk, vanilla and salt, and beat until smooth, about 1 minute (batter will be thin). Remove skillet from oven and add 2 tablespoons butter, swirling to cover pan. Pour in batter and return to oven. Bake until puffed and golden brown, 14-19 minutes.
  3. While pancake is baking, in another skillet over high heat, melt remaining butter and add grapes, brown sugar and cinnamon, if desired. Cook until grapes are heated through and sugar has melted. Spoon grapes over pancake, sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar and serve.

Nutritional information per serving: 280 calories; 6 g protein; 22 g carbohydrates; 18 g fat (58% calories from fat); 10 g saturated fat (32% calories from saturated fat); 180 mg cholesterol; 380 mg sodium; 1 g fiber.

SOURCE:
California Table Grape Commission

Blanchard Valley Hospital to Host “Living with Chronic Back Pain” Presentation

Attendees will learn about the options individuals with chronic back pain have to help reduce or eliminate their pain….

Blanchard Valley Hospital (BVH) will host “Living with Chronic Back Pain,” part of the “Live and Learn” series, to educate the community about methods of coping with chronic back pain. This event will be held on Tuesday, November 6 from 12 to 1 p.m. in the Marathon Auditorium of BVH and led by Panagiotis Bakos, MD from Blanchard Valley Pain Management and John Ogden, MD, a neurosurgeon from Neurosurgical Associates of Northwest Ohio.

Dr, Bakos

A boxed lunch will be provided and seating is limited. RSVP is required by Tuesday, October 30 and can be made by calling 419.423.5551 or emailing events @bvhealthsystem.org.

Dr, Ogden

Attendees will learn about the options individuals with chronic back pain have to help reduce or eliminate their pain. A question and answer session will follow the presentation.

 

Dr. Bakos completed a fellowship in Pain Management at the New England Medical Center/Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts and is board certified.

 

Dr. Ogden completed medical school at The University of Arizona College of Medicine in Tuscon, Arizona. He fulfilled his internship and neurosurgery residency at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio.

Eyeing Better Vision

9 tips to maintain eye health……..

(Family Features) When considering making changes to positively impact your well-being, many aspects of health may jump to the forefront, from taking care of mental and emotional health to ensuring a well-maintained body from head to toes. However, one sometimes overlooked area is your eyes and the importance of vision care.

Despite nearly 4.2 million Americans over the age of 40 suffering from impaired vision, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, it’s an aspect of daily health that is sometimes neglected.

Photo Courtesy of Getty Image

To better care for your eyes, consider these tips that put the focus back on eye health:

Schedule an exam
While focusing on enhancing care for your eyes is a productive idea regardless, it’s also important to have your vision and eye health checked regularly by a professional. This can help detect diseases and conditions that cause vision loss and blindness, many of which show little or no symptoms in the early stages, and a doctor can help create a care plan that preserves your eye health.

Understand your family history
Genetics can play a major role in eye health, so talk to family members about their vision history. If anyone has been diagnosed with a disease or condition that impacts their eyesight, knowing can help determine if you are at a higher risk for developing a hereditary trait.

Use proper lighting
While there are many everyday ways to maintain eye health and function, there is one simple yet overlooked way to take care of your sight: reducing eyestrain.

While three out of four Americans suffer daily from eyestrain, according to an online survey conducted by Russell Research, some people may not realize the lighting they use at work and home may be contributing to the problem.

One way to achieve a reduction in eyestrain is to use indoor lighting such as the OttLite Wellness Series, a line of lamps that closely matches the spectrum of natural daylight to reduce eye fatigue and eyestrain by 51 percent. The line includes four models featuring stylish designs with ClearSun LED technology, high-quality diffusers for clear illumination and multiple brightness settings, all intended to help reduce eyestrain by providing “good” lighting, which means providing enough natural daylight-quality illumination to see clearly without being blinded by excessively high light levels or glare.

The lamps also feature adjustable necks and shades to help direct light to fully illuminate an intended area and adjust for glare from reflective surfaces and smart features like USB ports to conveniently charge your devices. Find more information at OttLite.com.

Clean contact lenses
If you wear contacts, make sure to take proper precautions, which includes cleaning and rinsing each time you wear and remove the lenses. When cleaning, use cleaners approved by an eye doctor, and don’t wear lenses longer than recommended.

Maintain overall health
Living a healthy lifestyle overall can have a positive impact on your eye health, too. For example, maintaining a healthy weight can help avoid risks like diabetes, which can lead to vision loss from diabetic eye disease or glaucoma. In addition, eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables aids eye health, along with fish high in omega-3 fatty acids.

Wear sunglasses
Overexposure to the sun’s ultraviolet rays can increase the risk of age-related macular degeneration and blurred vision. It’s important to protect the eyes from harmful UV rays when you’re outside by wearing sunglasses that block out 99-100 percent of UV-A and UV-B radiation.

Shield your eyes
While sunglasses help block out the sun, protective eyewear like safety glasses and goggles can help shield the eyes while conducting physical activities like yard work or playing sports. Be sure to use safety glasses specifically intended for the use you’ll wear them for, as some varieties are designed for certain activities.

Limit evening screen time
The blue glare from traditional lighting and electronics (TV, cell phones, computers, tablets) used before bed may disrupt sleep patterns and circadian rhythm, and may even lead to sleep disorders, depression, cancer and cardiovascular disease.

Take a break
Your eyes work hard when you put extended focus on a computer screen or other activity. Take periodic breaks to avoid eye fatigue. Try the 20-20-20 rule: every 20 minutes, shift your gaze to something 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds.

Optimal Eye Health

Your eyes are your window to the world, so protecting your eye health is an essential component of your overall wellbeing. Symptoms like headaches and drowsiness can be signs of eyestrain, a feeling of discomfort caused by issues like poor lighting.

Keep your eyes in optimal condition and avoid problems like eyestrain by ensuring you’re utilizing proper lighting within your home and workspaces. Natural daylight renders colors most accurately, which offsets the potential mood and energy level impact that occurs when you’re not able to perceive colors correctly.

However, when natural light isn’t practical while working at a desk or reading inside, rely on lamps that simulate natural light and have a high Color Rendering Index, such as those from the OttLite Wellness Series, which use diffusers to evenly distribute illumination and protect against glare with dimmable options for users if a lower light level is necessary. To find more information, visit OttLite.com.

Don’t Skip the Eye Doctor
If you’re having trouble with your vision, don’t hesitate to set up an appointment with an eye doctor. These symptoms specifically, according to the Centers for Disease Control, are reasons to see a doctor as soon as possible:

  • Eye pain
  • Decreased vision
  • Double vision
  • Draining
  • Redness
  • Flashes of light
  • Floaters, or tiny specks that appear to float
  • Halos appearing around lights

 

SOURCE:
OttLite

Keep Pets Safe this Halloween

Just like with children, there are safety issues to consider when costuming your pets…….

(Family Features) Halloween isn’t just for humans; four-legged friends have plenty of opportunity to get in on the fun, too. However, it’s important to take some pet precautions that allow the whole family to enjoy the holiday safely, as the costumes and excitement can be overwhelming and some of the candy is even dangerous.

As you’re filling the candy buckets and assembling the perfect costumes, be sure to heed these tips from the experts at PetSmart for a Halloween filled with pet-friendly fun:

Out and about
Make sure pets have proper identification by microchipping and registering your pet’s microchip, and keeping identification and registration tags on their collars. This is especially important around Halloween, when open doors offer more opportunity for escape.

If your pet will be joining the family while trick-or-treating, be sure they are visible to motorists by using a reflective collar, harness or leash.

Costume concerns
Just like with children, there are safety issues to consider when costuming your pets. Not all dogs like wearing clothes and some may become stressed or agitated while wearing a costume or sweater. However, many dogs just need a little coaxing and positive reinforcement.

  • Start with a simple accessory, like a bandana, working your way up to a costume.
  • Make sure costumes include eye and ear holes, and if they don’t, consider removing whole portions of the costume to ensure your pet’s ability to see, hear and breathe. Make sure there isn’t anything that could be a tripping hazard. Also, be sure to check the costume for little parts within biting or chewing distance.
  • Dogs can overheat easily, so ensure your dog’s clothing is not too bulky or heavy if the weather is warm.
  • In the end, the top priority should be your pet’s comfort level.

Hazardous food and decorations
“It’s fun to include our pets in our celebrations, but it’s also important to be aware of the dangers associated with Halloween to ensure their safety,” said Jennifer Freeman, DVM, PetSmart’s resident veterinarian and pet care expert. “Keep chocolate and candy out of paws’ reach. Xylitol, a sugar substitute found in candy, gum, mints and baked goods, is toxic to pets and can cause liver damage.”

Keep the Halloween fun going by establishing some rules for your family and any guests joining the festivities:

  • Xylitol can be extremely dangerous to pets, even in small amounts. Just 1/8 teaspoon can cause dangerously low blood sugar in dogs and 1/2 teaspoon can cause liver damage. If xylitol is consumed by your pet, take him or her to a veterinarian immediately.
  • Natural stimulants in chocolate can cause a range of symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea and abnormal heart rhythm.
  • Raisins may cause a toxic reaction in dogs from vomiting to kidney failure.
  • Cellophane, plastic and paper from candy wrappers and lollipop sticks can cause gastrointestinal upset.
  • As an alternative to sharing dangerous snacks, stock up on some seasonal dog-friendly treats and set out a pet-specific bowl.

Seasonal decorations can also pose a threat:

  • Fall decorations like jack-o’-lanterns can cause gastrointestinal upset.
  • Glow sticks can cause irritation, agitation and vomiting.
  • Hot wax and flames from candles can potentially burn your pet’s nose, tongue or tail.

Don’t forget the fun
Despite some concerns, Halloween can still provide fun moments for your pet:

  • Take your dog along for trick-or-treating.
  • Allow your four-legged friend to greet trick-or-treaters at the door.
  • Encourage friends to dress up their pets and join the festivities.

Find more tips and tricks for keeping your pets safe this Halloween at PetSmart.com.

SOURCE:
PetSmart

Tinkle Time?

Waking up to go to the bathroom multiple times per night? It’s not because you’re ‘getting old’…………

(Family Features) It’s a common misconception: the older you get, the more frequently you need to use the bathroom at night. Did you know waking up more than once per night to urinate is a medical condition known as nocturia? Shockingly, 64 percent of American adults do not know.

A recent Harris Poll of more than 2,000 U.S. adults, endorsed by The Simon Foundation for Continence, National Association for Continence (NAFC) and the Prostate Conditions Education Council (PCEC), found that approximately one-third of them suffer from nocturia. Nocturia, which forces individuals to get up more than once per night to urinate, is a leading cause of sleep loss and can put one’s health at risk.

“Before receiving treatment for nocturia, I typically wound up making five trips to the bathroom each night, which I knew wasn’t normal,” said Jack Fagan, a 67-year-old resident of Sewell, NJ. “Treatment has made a noticeable impact on my quality of sleep. I find myself more refreshed and have the energy to enjoy time with family and friends.”

Most people living with nocturia (72 percent) reported they are negatively impacted by the condition at night; 43 percent of whom have trouble falling back to sleep, 12 percent indicated they wake up their partners and 10 percent expressed nervousness about tripping or falling while walking to the bathroom. The impact of nocturia-induced sleep loss can be wide-ranging, affecting physical and mental health. Sixty-one percent of nocturia sufferers experience daytime issues as a result of nighttime urination, including: drowsiness, irritability and reduced productivity and concentration.

Sixty-six percent of nocturia sufferers surveyed have never discussed their symptoms with a healthcare professional; half of respondents reported they thought it was a normal part of aging, and 27 percent believed nothing could be done to remedy the problem.

“We see patients who have suffered with nocturia for many years, as it slowly progresses from getting up twice to over four times per night to urinate,” said Roger Dmochowski, M.D., a nocturia sufferer and professor within the department of urologic surgery at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. “In my personal and professional experience, nocturia can have serious implications for an individual’s emotional state and daily life, due to sleep disruption, if not diagnosed and treated. Up until recently, we didn’t have effective treatments.”

For more information on nocturia, visit www.whatisnocturia.com, or  www.simonfoundation.org/nocturia.

The Harris Poll survey was funded by Avadel Pharmaceuticals and Serenity Pharmaceuticals.

SOURCE:
JPA Health Communications

“Commenting” on NBX Articles Has Returned!

Readers of TheNBXpress.com have been wondering where the comments from the readers have gone or how they might contact NBX or submit stuff. Good News….

Readers of TheNBXpress.com have been wondering where the comments from the readers have gone or how they might contact NBX or submit stuff. Good News….

As always you can still email: editor@thenbxpress.com!

But once again, at the bottom of most of our articles will be a spot to submit a comment, information or question. YOU WILL BE REQUIRED to enter your COMPLETE and FULL NAME, ie. “Chip Dimund” / “cdimund@email.com”. We will not accept nicknames, acronyms, etc. 

We reserve the right to not post any comment that does not include the complete name and valid email.

Or, if you don’t email – include text/phone number in the comment. WE WILL NOT SPAM YOU!!! But we WILL likely try to contact you to verify your submission and identity.

If you are not willing to put your name to your submission, we sure aren’t willing to post it under ours…

TheNBXpress.com is a privately operated community website serving North Baltimore and the SouthWood, including the Rocky Ford Development Area in northern Hancock County. NBX is operated by JP and Sue Miklovic, NB natives and current residents.

Questions, photos and stuff can also be submitted to:

editor@thenbxpress.com

You can call NBX at 419-581-9629 (please leave a message – we will get back to you).

THANK YOU FOR VIEWING TheNBXpress.com!!!

NB Library Offers Fall Canvas Painting Class

Class is October 18. Pre-register by Monday, Oct. 15……

The North Baltimore Public Library is offering a Fall Canvas Painting Project for adults with local artist Erika Miklovic. The class will be held on Thursday, Oct. 18 at 6 pm in the Wolfe Community Room at the NB Library.

With Erika’s guidance, you can create a personal canvas (11 by 14 inch) version of her fall tree painting! Pre-register and pay a fee of $15 (cash only, please) at the Main Desk of the NB Library by Monday, Oct. 15. The funds will go directly towards your supplies.

Tips for Turning History into Your Story

October is National Family History Month……

(Family Features) If you have ever thought about exploring your family history, now can be the perfect time as October is National Family History Month. To get started, these four simple tips can help you unlock new understanding and make meaningful connections. You can also consider sharing these tips with loved ones so they can join in on the fun, too.

Call Your Family
In almost every family there is someone who knows all about the familial tree and history. You might be unsure of the exact date your grandparents were married, but someone else may know. Building knowledge of your family history can be an excuse to call your mom, your grandma or even your great aunt. They likely have stories and photos you don’t have and would likely be willing to share them.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Start a Family Tree
Starting a family tree can be the next step to learning about your family history. Building out your tree online can be simple with a service like Ancestry, which has been turning history into your story by transforming names into family and distant places into home for more than three decades. With more than 20 billion records and 3 million family history subscribers, the service provides all the information and tools you need in one place to make discovery fun and easy. Enter what you know about yourself, your parents, your brothers and sisters then add your grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins. If you aren’t sure about dates and places, make an educated guess then upload photos and stories.

Message Cousins
As you continue to explore your family tree, you may find other relatives have already researched pieces and parts of your family tree. Maybe a fourth cousin has your common great-grandparents in their tree with photos and stories about their lives. Find out what other information they might know or share what you know about your branch of the family tree.

Take a DNA Test
DNA testing has revolutionized the way people discover family history. With a service like AncestryDNA, you become part of a genetic network that includes more than 10 million people. In addition to providing ethnicity estimates, the service also compares your DNA to the people in the network and matches you to anyone sharing enough DNA with you to point to a recent common ancestor within the last 8-10 generations. To make those connections even easier to find, attach that family tree you built to your DNA results, and find more information at Ancestry.com.

 

SOURCE:
Ancestry