Make Room for New Favorites on the Grill

By mixing and matching traditional grilled classics with options that have a variety of textures and flavors, you can shake up your at-home menu…

(Family Features) Whether firing up the grill for a pool party, barbecue or even just a weeknight meal, one thing’s for sure: summertime means grilling season. Grilling takes many forms and flavors from casual favorites like burgers and hot dogs to flame-kissed vegetables and the artistry of a perfectly done steak. However, the possibilities don’t end there.

By mixing and matching traditional grilled classics with options that have a variety of textures and flavors, you can shake up your at-home menu and add new favorites to your routine this grilling season.

One ingredient to consider adding to your repertoire is Mrs. T’s Pierogies, which are available in 14 flavors. They’re stuffed with creamy mashed potatoes, cheesy goodness and other big, bold flavors, and you can grill them right alongside your favorite barbecue fare. Consider these tips from grilling expert Susie Bulloch of “Hey Grill Hey” to add some new sizzle to your grill this summer by using pierogies.

  • Use good cooking oil to create a crispy exterior. Olive, avocado or canola oil can handle the heat of the grill.
  • Try two-zone cooking. Start by cooking on the low-temperature side of the grill (known as indirect cooking) to slowly heat from frozen. Then move to the hot side of the grill (direct) to add a crisp texture and achieve a golden brown exterior.
  • Add layers of texture. With a soft interior and crispy exterior, pierogies pair well with juicy, chewy protein and a flavorful sauce, enhancing their texture and flavors. You can create these layers with a recipe like Grilled Pierogies with Steak and Chimichurri.
  • Don’t be afraid of color. Grilled to golden brown with aesthetic grill marks, you can add an extra crunch and boost of flavor.

Find more grilling recipes and ideas at mrstspierogies.com.

Grilled Pierogies with Steak and Chimichurri

Recipe courtesy of Susie Bulloch of “Hey Grill Hey”

Pierogies:

  • 1          package Mrs. T’s Classic Onion Pierogies
  • 1-2       tablespoons olive oil

Tri-Tip Steak:

  • 1          teaspoon salt
  • 1          teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2       teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/2       teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1          tri-tip steak (2-3 pounds)

Chimichurri Sauce:

  • 1          cup fresh Italian parsley, packed
  • 1/4       cup fresh cilantro
  • 1/2       cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/3       cup red wine vinegar
  • 3-4       garlic cloves, peeled
  • 1          teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1          teaspoon salt
  • 1/2       teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
  1. To prepare Pierogies: Toss pierogies in olive oil.
  2. To prepare Tri-Tip Steak: In small bowl, combine salt, pepper, onion powder and garlic powder; season steak on all sides.
  3. To make Chimichurri Sauce: In food processor, pulse parsley, cilantro, olive oil, vinegar, garlic, red pepper, salt and black pepper until well combined but small pieces of herbs remain. Pour into serving bowl, cover and refrigerate until ready to use.
  4. Heat grill to 400° F for two-zone cooking. Grill steak over direct heat 3-4 minutes per side.
  5. After flipping steak, place pierogies over indirect heat.
  6. Close grill lid and cook 3-4 minutes.
  7. Move steak to indirect heat and move pierogies to direct heat.
  8. Remove from grill when pierogies are golden brown and steak is cooked to preferred doneness. Allow steak to rest before slicing.
  9. Layer one pierogy, one slice steak and drizzle of chimichurri sauce to assemble each bite.

SOURCE:
Mrs. T’s Pierogies

Home Decor 101

Decorating with bold colors…

(Family Features) From dark and moody to vibrant and bold, colorful design is gaining favor among homeowners ditching safe, neutral palettes to create more daring, dramatic spaces.

Decorating with deeply saturated colors can be intimidating. Explore these ideas to welcome more bold colors into your home and create inviting spaces for living and entertaining.

Walls of color
Say goodbye to beige and embrace the bold color trend by enhancing walls with hues that make a statement. The trick is to avoid making colors so loud that the space loses its stylish appeal. Bold doesn’t necessarily mean bright, so look for muted variations of the shades you prefer. Also remember that when it comes to design, there is such a thing as too much. If painting all the walls in a space will close it in or make it feel lost in the dark, try adding color in more subtle ways, such as an accent wall (or two), or painting the ceiling as your accent. Another option for implementing vibrant wall color: stick to smaller rooms, where the bold look is less likely to be overwhelming.

Illuminate color with natural light
When decorating with statement colors, remember that lighting can make a significant difference in the overall aesthetic. In addition to lighting fixtures, be sure to incorporate plenty of natural light to bring out the best in those bold hues.

To bring natural light deeper into the space, consider skylights as an option with a solution such as Velux No Leak Solar Powered Fresh Air Skylights, which can bathe the space in natural light and open to bring in fresh air. Another smart way to capture natural light is by installing an option like Sun Tunnel skylights. With their low-profile design, they create a sleek appearance, and installation is also quick and easy. Learn more at whyskylights.com.

Bold furnishings
An often overlooked but essential component of design is the furniture. Creating a colorful, inviting room doesn’t stop with the walls and floors; what’s in the room can bring the colors to life. Think of the space and all its contents, not just the architectural components, as your canvas for creating the space you envision. If you’re hesitant to invest in a pricy couch in a trendy hue, a compromise might come in the form of a richly colored accent table or chair.

Creative cabinetry
Traditional wood grain cabinetry sometimes gives way to far more creative color schemes in kitchens and bathrooms. While white is still a popular choice, and can even be considered bold in the right setting, true color on cabinets is also gaining traction among homeowners. With the right backsplash, countertops and flooring, you can safely install cabinets in a uniform color throughout the kitchen, but another on-trend option is to reserve the color for an island base or just one wall of cabinets. You could even mix and match colors on the tops and bottoms. Detail elements like the hardware provide another opportunity for a bold look. You can enhance the room’s design with standout pulls that lend extra vibrance to the space.

Fabric with flair
Textiles provide nearly unlimited options to balance a bold design. Using lighter fabrics for elements such as draperies, upholstery, rugs and decorative pillows can soften the feel of a room with bold tones. Look for subtle patterns that pull in hints of the deeper hue to bring the look together, or simply coordinate shades from complementary color families.

Unexpected Pops of Color
Designers often talk about adding pops of color to bring together a palette, but there are no real rules about where those color enhancements can or should be. Introducing vibrant color in unexpected places can be an especially impactful way to stylize a room.

One example is with a skylight blind, which provides a decorative element while also allowing for light control. If you prefer a trendy option like combining dark colors with metallic accents, consider options such as a metallic gold skylight blind from Velux to connect to the room decor below. More than 80 color and pattern choices heighten the drama of a skylight blind, and you can choose from features like room darkening, light filtering and Venetian-style blinds to add function as well.

SOURCE:
Velux

Special Notice: Ohio State Highway Patrol -VOTE for Vehicle

OSHP Looks to Regain ‘Best Looking Cruiser’  in Nationwide Contest

COLUMBUS – The Ohio State Highway Patrol needs your help to regain the title of “Best Looking Cruiser.” The American Association of State Troopers’ (AAST) annual Best Looking Cruiser Contest began on July 15 and will end at 3 p.m. on July 30.

This year the voting will be done through Survey Monkey. Once you’re on the page, scroll to the bottom and then choose Ohio in the drop down menu. You can vote once from each device.

Go to https://bit.ly/2kbibqv and vote for your Ohio State Highway Patrol! 

SUDDEN OAK DEATH CONFIRMED IN OHIO

How To Report Possible Infected Plants

(REYNOLDSBURG, Ohio) – The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA), in coordination with USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS), has detected sudden oak death caused by Phytophthora ramorum on rhododendron plants shipped to Walmart and Rural King stores throughout the state. Both retailers have agreed to initiate a voluntary recall of plants from their stores.

Sudden Oak Death

It was recently confirmed that Ohio is one of several Midwest states that have received infected plant material. Approximately 1,600 rhododendron plants from the infected nursery were shipped to Ohio retailers. This shipment went to at least 17 other states.

Gardeners and homeowners who have recently purchased a rhododendron from Walmart or Rural King should monitor the plant for signs of disease, including leaf spots and shoot dieback. It is also advised that Ohioans who purchased rhododendrons or lilac plants from these stores between March and May of this year to dispose of them to prevent further spread of the disease. Plants can be destroyed by burning, deep burial or double-bagging the plant, including the root ball, in heavy duty trash bags for disposal into a sanitary landfill (where allowable).

Consumers should not compost or dispose of the plant material in municipal yard waste. Garden tools used on any affected plants should be sanitized with bleach or 91% (or higher) alcohol before they are used again.

Click here to report possible infected plants.

5 Ways to Prepare for a New Furry Companion

More than 6.5 million animals enter U.S. shelters every year and nearly half of them get adopted….

(Family Features) Bringing home a new furry friend can spark joy while adding new routines for the whole family. When adding a pet to a household, it’s important to take into consideration the type of companion, a pet’s life stage, size and how to select a veterinarian.

Seeking out materials to help you become a better pet parent can make the transition a bit smoother. For example, WALTHAM Brand’s Pocket Book of Responsible Pet Ownership outlines how new pet parents can care for a pet’s medical, dental, nutritional, social and behavioral needs.

When preparing for a furry companion, keep these tips in mind, and find more information at pedigree.com and sheba.com.

           

  • Research the pet well in advance of picking him or her up so you understand the breed’s energy levels, temperament, trainability and other traits that fit your lifestyle. After all, adding a pet should be mutually beneficial and the right fit for the family.

  • Consider adoption. More than 6.5 million animals enter U.S. shelters every year and nearly half of them get adopted. Shelters can be a source for neutered, vaccinated and trained pets in need of a home.

“We know there are countless animals in shelters, and we are committed to spreading awareness for shelter dogs in need of forever homes,” said Bo Segers, associate general counsel for Mars Petcare Americas and president of PEDIGREE Foundation Board of Directors. “Adoption is a great option to consider and can change not only an animal’s life, but your own.”

 

Before a shelter visit, take a look at an adoption questionnaire to get a sense of how to best prepare and create a smooth transition for a new pet.

  • Review available medical records to ensure your prospective pet is healthy and up to date on vaccinations. Request a health report from the shelter at the time of adoption to learn about any health or behavioral issues you should be aware of.

  • Consider your home environment. Think about your lifestyle routines and how they align with a pet’s well-being – specifically take into account both physical surroundings and social interactions. When bringing a pet home, gradually introduce him or her slowly to different areas then expand the accessible spaces. If possible, bringing the pet’s former bedding and toys can help him or her more quickly adapt to the new surroundings.
Photos courtesy of Fotolia
  • Establish regular mealtimes. Setting feeding times for furry friends can help create new routines for the whole family. Consider feeding your pet in the same location and similar times each day to minimize stress or conflict that may arise around feeding. One wet cat food to consider is SHEBA PERFECT PORTIONS, an option to help introduce your feline to meaty and seafood flavors. Because they’re appropriately sized for each meal, even the youngest family members can learn about pet responsibilities.

Photos courtesy of Fotolia

SOURCE:
Pedigree
Sheba

Grief Trails

Program for grieved children, with horses…

 

 Notification of a hands-on horse program for children, working through grief:

Date: Friday, August 9, 2019

Time: 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Location: Challenged Champions

                11913 County Road 6

                Ottawa, Ohio 45875

Registration due: August 1, 2019

Although children may appear to be less affected by the death of a loved one, there are many questions, fears and worries as they attempt to make sense of the loss and deal with the changes.

Grief Trails is a program that allows children, ages 6-12 years old, to learn about the importance of communicating their emotions and needs to others while working hands-on with gentle horses.

The children come together with their peers in an encouraging environment and participate in activities that will help them express their feelings, learn effective communication tools and have fun at the same time.

Bereavement Coordinator, Kristi Beall, along with trained volunteers, guide the children through conversation, horseback riding and creating keepsakes. This year, participants will learn to “Be Your Own Superhero” as they explore how to take care of themselves in the ups and downs of grief. This event is being offered through Bridge’s Group S.T.A.R. (Special Times Always Remembered) at no cost to the family, with all materials provided.

For more information and registration forms, please call Bridge Bereavement Services at 419.423.5351 or email bridge@bvhealthsystem.org. Registration for this event is required by August 1, 2019.

Simple Summer Dessert

Watch video to see how to make recipe!

(Family Features) Enjoy your summer with fresh fruit like strawberries in this Easy Strawberry Shortcake recipe.

(Family Features) Enjoy your summer with fresh fruit like strawberries in this Easy Strawberry Shortcake recipe.

Find more dessert recipes at Culinary.net.

Watch video to see how to make recipe!

Easy Strawberry Shortcake

Recipe courtesy of Pillsbury

  • 1          can (5-8) Pillsbury flaky buttermilk biscuits
  • 2          tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1/4       cup sugar

Strawberry mixture:

  • 3          cups fresh strawberries, sliced
  • 1/3       cup sugar

Whipped cream:

  • 1/2       cup whipping cream
  • 2          tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4       teaspoon vanilla
  1. Heat oven to 375° F.
  2. Separate biscuits. Dip tops and sides of biscuits in melted butter. Dip biscuits, covering tops and sides, in sugar. Place sugar-side up on ungreased baking sheet. Bake 13-17 minutes, or until golden brown.
  3. To make strawberry mixture: In medium bowl, mix strawberries and sugar. Set aside.
  4. To make whipped cream: In small bowl, beat whipping cream and sugar until soft peaks form. Add vanilla and beat into mixture.
  5. On plate, split biscuits and put dollop of whipped cream mixture on bottom half of biscuit. Add strawberry mixture. Replace biscuit top and dollop with whipping cream.

SOURCE:
Culinary.net

2019 July Wood County Park District Programs

Adventurer’s Nature Camp, Farm Camp, more……

Adventurers Farm Camp
(11 – 12 yrs)
 
Monday – Friday, July 15 – 19;
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Carter Historic Farm
18331 Carter Road, BG
 
Experience the summer life of old-time play and homestead chores for children growing up on a 1930s farm. Whether feeding the livestock, baking Dutch oven cookies, tending the vegetable patch, or playing ringolevio in the woodlot, campers will learn about the reward of farm work and the joy of outdoors play. 
Program fee: $60, scholarships available
 
 
 
Adventurers Nature Camp
(11 – 12 yrs)
 
Monday – Friday, July 15 – 19;
1:00 – 4:00 pm
W.W. Knight Nature Preserve
29530 White Road, Perrysburg
 
Prepare for adventure! Campers engage in outdoor activities such as archery, canoeing, and rappelling at different parks throughout the week. Each day has a different natural science theme that is highlighted by educational and recreational activities. 
Program fee: $60, scholarships available
 
 
 
Trail Tikes Summer Camp
(5 – 6 years)
 
Monday – Friday, July 15 – 19;
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
W.W. Knight Nature Preserve
29530 White Road, Perrysburg
 
Campers enjoy a short story about nature that sets the theme for the rest of the day’s fun and learning activities. Taking a nature hike, creating art, and learning about our local outdoor world and what calls it home are all part of this camp for young ones! 
Program fee: $60, scholarships available
 
 

Chowline: No such thing as male and female bell peppers

Peppers are easily grown, can be prolific producers, and can be grown in a variety of colors, shapes, and flavors.

I saw a link on Facebook saying that male bell peppers have three bumps on the bottom and are better for cooking, while female bell peppers have four bumps and are sweeter and better for eating raw. Is that true?

No. 

Although the myth that bell peppers are either male or female continues to spread, bell peppers do not have genders. 

According to the myth, “male” bell peppers have three lobes and are more bitter, while “female” bell peppers have four or more lobes, have more seeds, and are sweeter to eat. 

However, bell peppers grow from flowers that have both male and female parts. The peppers, which are the fruits of a pepper plant, each contain ovaries that produce the seeds inside the peppers. Each pepper is produced through self-fertilization. The seeds are formed in each pepper after pollination, with those seeds then able to form new pepper plants.

Peppers are warm-season vegetables and are part of the Solanaceae or Nightshade family, along with tomatoes, eggplants, and potatoes, according to Growing Peppers in the Home Garden, a recent Ohioline fact sheet.

Ohioline is Ohio State University Extension’s free online information resource and can be found at ohioline.osu.edu. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.

Peppers are easily grown, can be prolific producers, and can be grown in a variety of colors, shapes, and flavors. For instance, green bell peppers are green when they are in their immature stage. Bell peppers that ripen on the plant longer will develop a red, orange, yellow, or purple color. 

Just like many other fruits and vegetables, the degree of sweetness is generally a factor of how ripe the fruit or vegetable is. Bell peppers start out green, then ripen to yellow, then orange, then red, and in some cases turn purple. Thus red, orange, yellow, and purple bell peppers are generally sweeter than green bell peppers. And the lobes on peppers are determined by growing conditions and genetics, so they don’t indicate the sweetness factor of the pepper in any way.

Bell peppers are an excellent, healthy dietary option. They are a great source of vitamins A and C, and beta-carotene. They also provide essential minerals including iron, copper, zinc, potassium, manganese, magnesium, and selenium. And they are a great-tasting, low-cost vegetable. 

Chow Line is a service of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@osu.edu.

Invite the Outdoors In

In the United States, 63% of survey participants said they average one hour or less a week in nature…..

(Family Features) Despite the comfort and convenience it affords, modern society is contributing to a vanishing relationship with the natural environment. However, there are plenty of ways to bring nature indoors to reap the benefits of an earthy connection inside your home.

According to a survey commissioned by the Velux Group, a gap is growing between the time Americans spend outdoors and the time they’d like to spend in nature.

In the United States, 63% of survey participants said they average one hour or less a week in nature, but 88% agreed they would like to spend more time. In addition, the majority of respondents said they believe nature, daylight and fresh air have a positive impact on stress levels, and most also agreed those factors have a positive impact on mental well-being.

“Exposure to nature such as trees, plants and views of open spaces has been found to improve the cognitive ability to focus and read social cues,” said Arie Greenleaf, associate professor of counseling at Seattle University. “Even ADHD symptoms in children are mitigated by views of and interactions with nature in a host of different ways. Worker productivity, how people feel about the work they do and the level of engagement, improves with a view of nature.”

Despite ample research demonstrating the benefits, the study revealed a common theme, with 85% of participants believing they spent more time in nature as children than children do today. That’s a trend that translates into adult habits, too.

“With work and family responsibilities, we can’t always fit spending time outside into our busy schedules, effectively making us the indoor generation,” said Peter Foldbjerg, head of Daylight, Energy and Indoor Climate for The Velux Group. “One thing we can do is improve how our homes connect to nature: From houseplants and nature-inspired art to skylights and screened porches, there are a wide variety of options for creating nature connections in the place we spend most of our time – our homes.”

Learn how to bring more nature into your home with these decorating and design ideas:

Houseplants
Living plants not only add a touch of the outdoors, but they also help clean the air inside your home. In smaller spaces, even a few pots of herbs can add a refreshing touch of nature. If flat surfaces and floor space are at a premium, get creative with your wall space and incorporate shelving and wall-mounted planters.

Sunshine and fresh air
Whether it’s from windows or skylights, bringing natural light and fresh air inside can keep your space fresh and inviting. There are scientifically proven correlations between natural light exposure and mood, as well as your body’s ability to maintain its circadian rhythm. Refreshing the air in your home can help eliminate volatile organic compounds, pet dander and microparticles from cooking and cleaning.
If your home is lacking in natural light, a skylight may be easier to add than a window, and skylights bring in twice as much light as vertical windows; their angle allows more of the sun’s rays to reach farther into the room. Some skylights, including many offered by Velux, also offer venting options that can contribute to cleaner air.

Nature-inspired art
Studies have shown that simply viewing photos or paintings of nature scenes has mental and physical benefits. You can also use decorative mirrors to reflect natural light and make a space feel larger and brighter.

Botanically inspired patterns
Look to pillows, area rugs and wallpaper to incorporate patterns inspired by flowers, foliage or landscapes outside. These decorative elements can boost your spirits and create a welcoming environment indoors by reflecting the outdoor world.

Natural materials
Sisal rugs and baskets, wood planking and stone countertops or side tables can add texture and a touch of the natural world to your interiors. These materials let you incorporate nature into your design aesthetic with natural textures that not only look stylish but feel great, too.

Connect with Nature at Work

If you work outside your home, at least a third of your day may have you stuck inside an office. Make your work environment more appealing with these ideas that let you embrace nature even while you’re on the clock.

  • Incorporate natural life with a desk plant. You may feel more refreshed by that touch of green, and it helps clean the air around you, too.
  • Find the sunlight. Today’s offices actively promote free-range working, so find a sofa near a window and get your best work done there. Or spend a few hours working outside each day. If your office design is behind the times, take a daily walk outside during your lunch break.
  • Surround yourself with natural materials. Transform your desk-scape with a bamboo monitor stand, stone smartphone holder or woven seagrass inbox.
  • Trick the senses with natural soundscapes. Earbuds are a must in today’s open-plan offices. Instead of playing music, escape with nature-inspired tunes like rain, wind in the trees or forest birds.
  • Select art influenced by Mother Nature. Decorate with nature-inspired art, whether it’s photos of landscapes or a sunflower print.

Find more ideas for integrating the outdoors into your home design at whyskylights.com/outside-in.

SOURCE:
Velux

Keeping livestock nourished despite hay shortage

While humans can live reasonably OK without much fiber, which just passes through our bodies, cattle cannot…..

COLUMBUS, Ohio—Less salad, more carbs and proteins.

That’s counter to what many say is right for our diet. But for cows and other livestock, that’s the direction in which their diets are likely to shift. Farmers are trying to keep their animals well fed amid a Midwest shortage in hay and other grasses grown for livestock to eat.

“They have to start cutting back right now,” said Bill Weiss, dairy nutritionist with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

Cutting back doesn’t mean the animals will have to eat less. It means they might need to eat more alternatives to the higher amounts of fiber they typically get.

So, for example, if hay, which is high in fiber, normally makes up about half the diet for a dairy cow or other animal, some of that hay could be substituted with, say, cottonseed — what’s left of a cotton plant once the cotton fibers are removed, Weiss said.

Farmers might also feed their livestock additional grain (protein and carbohydrates) and less of the fibrous (saladlike) portions of various plants, Weiss said.

“It’s what we have to do,” he said.

Before making any changes in what their animals are fed, livestock owners should consult with a nutritionist, Weiss said.

While humans can live reasonably OK without much fiber, which just passes through our bodies, cattle cannot. They need it. About one-third of their diet should be fiber, which provides them energy and keeps their digestive systems healthy.

Many farmers across Ohio are considering different diet options for their livestock because the state’s hay supply is the lowest since the 2012 drought, and the fourth lowest in 70 years. And the persistent spring rain during Ohio’s wettest yearlong period on record did not allow much hay to be cut in time for it to be the highest quality.

Dairy cows are particularly affected. Most dairy farmers feed their cows large amounts of corn silage, which is made by chopping the entire corn plant and letting it ferment in a silo. But the wet spring has delayed or prevented the planting of corn, a key ingredient in a lot of livestock feed. So, with fewer corn acres expected to be planted and an already low supply of hay, farmers are scrambling to plant other crops to feed their animals, such as cool-season grasses including oats and cereal rye.

“Timing is critical here,” Weiss said.

Some of the options being considered for animal feed are grasses such as sorghum and sorghum-sudangrass, and other warm-season summer annuals. If planted soon, they can be harvested September through early October and then fed to animals.

“These feed options are not as nutritious as conventional ones,” Weiss said. “But we can make them work.”

Farmers wanting to plant summer annuals to feed their livestock need to do so before July 15 in order to have enough of a warm growing season to grow and to be able to harvest before frost arrives, said Mark Sulc, a CFAES forage specialist.

Other cool-season crops can be planted a little later, starting the last week of July and into August, Sulc said. These include oats and spring triticale, which will be ready for harvest starting in early October and into November. Oats and spring triticale can also be planted in mixtures with cereal rye, which has the advantage of being able to survive the winter and will produce animal feed early next spring.

Since many farmers will be planting these annual crops for the first time this year, it’s critical for growers to know the requirements for each type to produce sizeable yields, Sulc said.

The flurry of planting annual crops for livestock feed “will help the shortage, but it’s not going to solve it completely,” he said. “We can’t grow enough this year to supply the entire demand. That’s why we need to consider alternative fiber sources.”

For more information on forage options, visit go.osu.edu/forages.

To learn about the various requirements for each forage option, visit go.osu.edu/forageguide.