Keeping livestock nourished despite hay shortage

While humans can live reasonably OK without much fiber, which just passes through our bodies, cattle cannot…..

COLUMBUS, Ohio—Less salad, more carbs and proteins.

That’s counter to what many say is right for our diet. But for cows and other livestock, that’s the direction in which their diets are likely to shift. Farmers are trying to keep their animals well fed amid a Midwest shortage in hay and other grasses grown for livestock to eat.

“They have to start cutting back right now,” said Bill Weiss, dairy nutritionist with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

Cutting back doesn’t mean the animals will have to eat less. It means they might need to eat more alternatives to the higher amounts of fiber they typically get.

So, for example, if hay, which is high in fiber, normally makes up about half the diet for a dairy cow or other animal, some of that hay could be substituted with, say, cottonseed — what’s left of a cotton plant once the cotton fibers are removed, Weiss said.

Farmers might also feed their livestock additional grain (protein and carbohydrates) and less of the fibrous (saladlike) portions of various plants, Weiss said.

“It’s what we have to do,” he said.

Before making any changes in what their animals are fed, livestock owners should consult with a nutritionist, Weiss said.

While humans can live reasonably OK without much fiber, which just passes through our bodies, cattle cannot. They need it. About one-third of their diet should be fiber, which provides them energy and keeps their digestive systems healthy.

Many farmers across Ohio are considering different diet options for their livestock because the state’s hay supply is the lowest since the 2012 drought, and the fourth lowest in 70 years. And the persistent spring rain during Ohio’s wettest yearlong period on record did not allow much hay to be cut in time for it to be the highest quality.

Dairy cows are particularly affected. Most dairy farmers feed their cows large amounts of corn silage, which is made by chopping the entire corn plant and letting it ferment in a silo. But the wet spring has delayed or prevented the planting of corn, a key ingredient in a lot of livestock feed. So, with fewer corn acres expected to be planted and an already low supply of hay, farmers are scrambling to plant other crops to feed their animals, such as cool-season grasses including oats and cereal rye.

“Timing is critical here,” Weiss said.

Some of the options being considered for animal feed are grasses such as sorghum and sorghum-sudangrass, and other warm-season summer annuals. If planted soon, they can be harvested September through early October and then fed to animals.

“These feed options are not as nutritious as conventional ones,” Weiss said. “But we can make them work.”

Farmers wanting to plant summer annuals to feed their livestock need to do so before July 15 in order to have enough of a warm growing season to grow and to be able to harvest before frost arrives, said Mark Sulc, a CFAES forage specialist.

Other cool-season crops can be planted a little later, starting the last week of July and into August, Sulc said. These include oats and spring triticale, which will be ready for harvest starting in early October and into November. Oats and spring triticale can also be planted in mixtures with cereal rye, which has the advantage of being able to survive the winter and will produce animal feed early next spring.

Since many farmers will be planting these annual crops for the first time this year, it’s critical for growers to know the requirements for each type to produce sizeable yields, Sulc said.

The flurry of planting annual crops for livestock feed “will help the shortage, but it’s not going to solve it completely,” he said. “We can’t grow enough this year to supply the entire demand. That’s why we need to consider alternative fiber sources.”

For more information on forage options, visit go.osu.edu/forages.

To learn about the various requirements for each forage option, visit go.osu.edu/forageguide.

4 Tips for Peak Pet Fitness

Fresh air and exercise can do wonders for your pet….


(Family Features) Sunny days, aromatic flowers and warm temperatures are a few of summer’s most adored qualities. Getting outside to enjoy the sunshine isn’t something only humans love – pets often do, too.

Whether romping through a local dog park or sniffing around the neighborhood, fresh air and exercise can do wonders for your pet. Pairing exercise with a nutritious diet can keep your pet happy and healthy.

Consider these tips to keep your fur pal in tip-top shape, inside and out, and visit IAMS.com to learn more about how you can ensure your pet is receiving the tailored nutrition he or she needs.

  1. Explore the Neighborhood – Exploring the great outdoors is something dogs can enjoy, so give them the opportunity to take a walk around the neighborhood and take in the surroundings. Your daily walks help keep you and your dog active, so adding in extra steps when you can is beneficial to both of you. In fact, studies show people who exercise with their pets get more physical activity on average than non-pet owners.

  1. Provide a Healthy Diet – An easy way to encourage holistic health is to provide nutrition that’s tailored to your pet’s unique needs. For example, IAMS dog and cat food options allow pet owners to choose diets specifically created for their fur friends, based on their age, size, dietary needs and breed type, for a few of the most popular breeds. Not all pets are built the same, so it’s important to feed them according to their specific needs.

  1. Experience Nature – If you’d like to adventure farther with your pet, try bringing him or her along for a hike for more rigorous physical activity. Along with the exercise, it provides an opportunity to experience new places and meet other pets and pet parents along the trail.

  1. Make Playtime a Priority – A simple game of fetch or cat and mouse is a way for your pet to get the exercise he or she needs. Whether inside or outside, playing with your pet gets the blood pumping and helps him or her stay fit. While active playtime can be physically beneficial for your four-legged companion, the mental stimulation can also help increase his or her sharpness and overall well-being.

Photos courtesy of Fotolia

SOURCE:
Mars Petcare

FCC Robocall Ruling Offers Hope

…in the meantime, just hang up on dodgy callers, says AMAC.

FCC robocall ruling offers hope; in the meantime,
just hang up on dodgy callers, says AMAC
Report shows 5 million seniors lose $27.4 a year to phone scammers
 
WASHINGTON, DC, July 8 — Seniors may get robocall relief if a new Federal Communications Commission [FCC] ruling prompts phone companies to implement technologies that automatically block them. Dan Weber, an advocate for older Americans, says the ruling is a step in the right direction.
 
The president of the Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC] reports that “while it is still early days, it appears the major phone service providers are ready to cooperate. It was good news when Verizon was quick to ‘welcome’ the ruling.”
 
Verizon issued a statement hours after the FCC announced its decision. In it, the company stated that it is “putting robocallers on notice. We’ve got their number and we’re taking big steps to stop them from doing what they’re doing.”
 
Meanwhile, Apple has announced a new software update will be available in the fall that can automatically block unwanted spam callers.
 
Weber says, however, that he is taking a wait and see attitude regarding these latest efforts to rein in phone scammers. “It’s a lucrative crime and the perpetrators are tech savvy enough to find new ways to prey on the elderly.”
 
He cites an article on the FCC ruling published by Politico, which noted that: “experts warn that callers slinging bogus tax bills and insurance schemes might still find a way to get through. Calls originating from overseas could present a technical challenge. And the measures are voluntary: phone companies won’t be required to take advantage of the call-blocking systems that the FCC is encouraging and could charge consumers fees for using them.”
 
Tech journalist and privacy advocate Paul Bischoff recently prepared an elder fraud analysis of phone scams targeting seniors for the technology research firm, CompariTech. The Bischoff report provides an eye-opening state-by-state assessment of elder fraud. He told AMAC that the FCC ruling to stop unwanted robocalls “is a step in the right direction but ultimately might not have the desired impact for consumers.”
 
The report revealed that seniors are primary targets for fraudsters accounting for 38% of scams and that there are an estimated 5 million cases of elder fraud annually resulting in $27.4 billion in losses.
 
“We are hopeful that the new focus on protecting the elderly from phone scammers will have a positive effect going forward. In the meantime, just hang up if a caller starts asking for personal information or makes threats. Don’t take their word for it if they say they are calling on official business. No official will ever ask for you to reveal account numbers, Social Security numbers, Medicare id’s over the phone.”

A Sweet Superfruit for Summer Meals

Tou can eat fresh cherries straight out of hand as a snack…….

(Family Features) From backyard barbecues and family picnics to a bright addition to seasonal recipes, sweet cherries not only provide a boost of flavor but also pack a punch when it comes to nutrition, helping keep you and your family healthy during busy summer months.

Cherries can help reduce inflammation and lower blood pressure as well as relieve stress and gout, and can improve sleep quality.

The perfect time to take advantage of the goodness of Northwest-grown  or Michigan grown sweet cherries is through August. Eat fresh cherries straight out of hand as a snack, bake them into a pie or pair with ice cream for a sweet summertime treat.

The rich fruitiness of sweet cherries helps blunt the sharp edge of dried fruit in a quick and easy Cherry Sauce recipe. Low in sugar and versatile, this sauce can be used as a base ingredient for cocktails, a glaze for meats, a spread for sandwiches, a topping for yogurt and more. Add some ginger or orange peel to complement your menu and you may have a new, nutritious summer favorite. Or, for a sweet, simple snack, use cherries to make an appetizer like Cherry Bruschetta.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Find more recipes and ways to use cherries at nwcherries.com.

Cherry Sauce

Servings: 16

  • 3/4       cup water
  • 3/4       cup maple syrup
  • 4          cups fresh Northwest-grown sweet cherries
  • 4          cups dried cranberries
  • 4          peels (2 inches each) fresh ginger (optional)
  • 3          tablespoons citrus zest (optional)
  • black pepper (optional)
  • fresh herbs (optional)
  • raspberries (optional)
  1. In medium saucepot, add water, syrup and sweet cherries. Bring to simmer, stirring occasionally and more frequently as sauce begins to form.
  2. Add cranberries; continue stirring. Once reduced, remove from heat and add fresh ginger, citrus zest, black pepper, fresh herbs and raspberries, if desired.
  3. Cool 30 minutes-1 hour before transferring to wider, shallow pan for speed cooling.
  4. Once cooled, store refrigerated in airtight container up to 2 weeks.
Photo courtesy of Northwest Cherry Growers

Cherry Bruschetta

Servings: 6

  • 18        slices (1/2-inch thick) small baguette-style bread
  • 1          tablespoon olive oil, divided
  • 1 1/2    cups pitted Northwest fresh sweet cherries, coarsely chopped
  • 1/4       cup chopped cilantro
  • 1/4       cup diced yellow sweet pepper
  • 2          tablespoons finely chopped green onions
  • 2          tablespoons lime juice
  • 1          teaspoon grated lime peel
  • 1/2       teaspoon garlic salt
  • 1/4       teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 2          ounces fresh mozzarella cheese
  • 1          tablespoon thinly sliced fresh basil
  1. Heat oven to 350° F.
  2. Arrange baguette slices on cookie sheet and toast one side 5 minutes. Turn slices, brush with 1/2 tablespoon olive oil and bake 5 minutes.
  3. Combine cherries, cilantro, sweet pepper, green onions, lime juice, lime peel, garlic salt, pepper and remaining olive oil; mix well.
  4. Top each baguette with thin slice cheese, 1 tablespoon cherry mixture and sprinkle of basil. Serve warm or cold.

SOURCE:
Northwest Cherry Growers

Make Sense of Your Travel Preferences

People are united by a common desire to travel with friends and family…..


(Family Features) Seasoned travelers know that no two trips are exactly the same, even when revisiting the same location. The weather changes, your personal life and perspective evolve and any combination of factors makes each experience unique. However, if you’re like most travelers, your preferences guide your journeys no matter how far you venture from home.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

According to a survey of American travelers from vacation rental app and website Vrbo, people are united by a common desire to travel with friends and family. In fact, 52% of respondents said a family vacation is their reason for travel in 2019, and more people said they will travel with a group of four or more this year than last year. That’s where the generational similarities end, however.

Determining where to go and what you’ll do depends quite a bit on your age. Your stage of life significantly impacts the places you dream about visiting, the reasons you travel and what you look for when you get there, according to the survey.

What to look for in a destination
Your definition of a dream vacation is likely to shift along with variables like your life stage, income and available free time. Limitations in any of those areas may make a certain destination a far-off dream during one stage of life but an attainable retreat during another.

The disparity between dream and reality signals that barriers of time and money are the deciding factors for whether Americans will take that dream vacation. This holds true for every age group, although millennials (37%) are more likely to go into debt for travel than Generation Xers (27%) and baby boomers (15%).

Reasons for traveling
Relaxation is a primary reason for traveling, which can help you disconnect from the stress of daily life and reconnect with family and friends. Whether it’s curiosity or a much-anticipated trip to celebrate a special occasion with a family member, many trips have a specific purpose. Understanding why you want to travel can make it much easier to plan.

Although younger travelers are most likely to make exploration a priority on their journeys, the Vrbo survey revealed that travel isn’t always about adventure, as 20% of travelers ages 35-54 are likely to travel for a special occasion like a birthday or anniversary. In addition, only 6% of baby boomers said they would travel for a hobby or activity like skiing, surfing or hiking, compared with 23% of millennial respondents.

Amenities that matter
The amenities you can access during your getaway may vary greatly depending on where you go and the type of trip you plan. From electronics and fully stocked kitchens to swimming pools and pet-friendly features, plenty of options are available to help ensure your perfect vacation lodging includes all the amenities you require.

If you’re like most travelers, keeping connected is a major requirement. In fact, 75% of respondents listed access to the internet via WiFi as an important amenity when traveling, outranking traditional must-haves like TV and air-conditioning, according to the survey.

Amenities like WiFi aside, accommodation preferences reflect the starkest generational differences among American travelers. Millennials (71%) are most likely to consider unique lodging options such as boats or treehouses. They also represent the age group most likely to take into account design and architecture when choosing a place to stay. Generation Xers voiced the strongest preference for having ample space for everyone in the party. For baby boomers, more than other age groups, noise level is important when selecting lodging.

Find getaway accommodations perfect for every stage of life at vrbo.com.

SOURCE:
Vrbo

Summer Wine Savvy

3 ways to upgrade your summer sipping routine….

(Family Features) Rosé slushies. Spiked seltzers. Boozy ice pops. Has young adults’ quest for the next party gimmick led to soulless substitutes for real, quality wines?

It’s not hard to find wines with well-balanced natural flavors, according to Leslie Sbrocco, author of “The Simple and Savvy Wine Guide.” She recommends looking for wine from different international regions, like Wines of Sicily, which guarantee value and quality, and are made from more than 400 wineries across the island.

Sbrocco also recommends these wines and entertaining tips to make your spread the center of the party for all the right reasons. 

  • Bring a balanced red to the barbecue. It’s an art to craft a truly balanced wine that needs nothing more to be enjoyed than a wine opener and an open mind. In fact, Sicilian red wines are crafted to be as lively and bold as the island itself. The icon of Sicilian wine-making and hero red grape, Nero d’Avola, balances elegance with drinkability and can range from royal ruby with aromas of strawberry and sour cherry to a more full-bodied red with sweet spices and cocoa. Whether it’s a ribeye or a spicy rack of ribs, Nero d’Avola can elevate a weeknight summer dinner on the patio to an elegant event.
  • Freshen up summer whites. Grillo, Sicily’s most famous indigenous white grape, with an aromatic bouquet and lively citrus notes, is like a pair of fresh linen pants. When paired with delectable bites like bruschetta, ceviche or a well-crafted charcuterie board, Grillo pulls out the salinity and savory notes that come from grapes grown in close proximity to the Mediterranean Sea. The other predominant yet fuller-bodied white wine grape from Sicily is Catarrato. With notes of ripe citrus and herbal flavors, it makes for a delicious counterpart to a seasonal vegetable spread.
  • Act like a sommelier. Frappato, Sicily’s cult-favorite answer to pinot noir – served chilled – is an upgrade to the ubiquitous rosé routine. It’s easy to pronounce and even easier to pair with light summer fare like these simple-to-make Open-Faced BLT Sandwiches. With its fruit-forward, lighter style, Frappato is a sommelier’s secret weapon that many people classify as pinot noir’s cool cousin. Pouring this sets the tone for even your most sophisticated set of friends.

For more food and wine pairings, visit winesofsicily.com.

Open-Faced BLT Sandwiches

Prepare an easy, seasonal appetizer with fresh produce from your local farmer’s market. Take this summertime classic sandwich up a notch by topping it with capers and pairing it with a chilled Grillo or Frappato from Sicilia DOC.

Recipe courtesy of Wines of Sicily
Servings: 4

  • 6-8       strips bacon
  • 1          loaf country bread
  • 1          cup arugula leaves
  • 1          cup cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1          tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, plus additional to drizzle
  • 1          tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • kosher salt
  • ground pepper
  • capers
  1. Heat oven to 375° F.
  2. Place bacon on baking sheet and bake 15-20 minutes depending on thickness of bacon. Remove bacon from oven and transfer to paper towels to drain.
  3. Using bread knife, slice bread 1/3-inch thick into single-serving slices; toast lightly.
  4. Add arugula leaves and cherry tomatoes to medium bowl. In separate bowl, whisk olive oil and balsamic vinegar; add to tomatoes and arugula, and gently toss to coat.
  5. To assemble, drizzle olive oil on one side of toasted bread. Arrange arugula, bacon and tomato mixture on top. Finish each sandwich with sprinkle of salt, ground pepper and a few capers.

SOURCE:
Wines of Sicily

Pique Your Culinary Curiosity with These Trends

Even if you take your hectic lifestyle in stride, chances are it affects your eating habits to some extent.


(Family Features) Forget the rules and restrictions. Today’s food trends are about enjoyment and simplicity, from decadent flavors your taste buds can’t wait to explore to convenient packaging that makes it incredibly easy to eat no matter where or when you make time to dine.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Whether you’re a foodie keeping tabs on the latest culinary trends or an everyday eater with a dose of culinary curiosity, these trends can give you something to chew on.

Unique Herbs and Spices
Most often associated with salad dressings and hummus as a flavor additive, tahini has stepped beyond just savory foods and has found its way into many new dishes, including desserts and cocktails. From ice cream and milkshakes to muffins, cookies and other baked goods, this toasted ground sesame seed spread used in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cuisine can also be added as an alternative to nearly any dish that calls for peanut butter.

On the Go
For most people, a busy day is just part of the program. Even if you take your hectic lifestyle in stride, chances are it affects your eating habits to some extent. Fortunately, you’re not alone and conveniently packaged foods can make eating on the go tasty and enjoyable. The options are even crossing into areas traditionally reserved for a sit-down meal, such as Aunt Jemima’s Pancake on the Go Cups, which offer a soft and fluffy texture like the typical pancake in Chocolate Chip or Buttermilk & Maple flavors. They’re surprisingly simple to prepare; just add water, stir and microwave for a pancake in a cup that you can enjoy from anywhere. Learn more at auntjemima.com.

Ugly Eats
Save your judgment for someplace else; ugly produce is actually in vogue. A growing number of chefs and brands are promoting recipes made with ugly foods – usually produce that is perfectly useful and edible but likely to be overlooked at the store due to a physical imperfection. Think oddly shaped tomatoes or a smaller melon than you might not normally choose. Often those options are offered at a discount and it’s a savvy way to reduce food waste.

Hot and Spicy
Palettes are growing ever-adventurous, and that means flavors that pack a strong punch are gaining traction. If you’re not sure your taste buds are up to the challenge, try adding some spice to a familiar dish like rice or pasta. For example, you can find a spicy take on Rice a Roni, Pasta Roni and Quaker Instant Grits with Jalapeno Cheddar varieties, which include cheddar cheese and real jalapeno bits that leave lingering heat. Include these as the perfect side for your next taco night or try in place of mashed potatoes for an extra kick. Find more spicy ideas for dinner at ricearoni.com.

Move Over, Meat
Opting for more plant-based foods in place of meat no longer means forgoing those flavors and textures. While not a completely new trend, plant-based and blended burgers and sliders have become more mainstream and found places on menus at restaurants nationwide with more people (even non-vegans) searching for a break from meat or ways to add flavors like mushrooms into meals and snacks.

Salty-Sweet Flavors
Sweet-meets-salty combos are hardly new, but products featuring this blend are showing up in more and more places, including at the breakfast table. Sea salt is a perfect match for the sweetness of chocolate or caramel; it adds a rich depth of flavor that strikes a balance between too sweet or too salty. Start the day off with an option like Quaker’s Cocoa & Sea Salt Instant Oatmeal, which contains 100% whole grains, no high-fructose corn syrup, no artificial preservatives, no artificial sweeteners, no artificial flavors and no added colors. Explore additional ideas to sweeten your breakfast plans at quakeroats.com.

SOURCE:
Aunt Jemima
Rice a Roni
Quaker Oats

Ask Rusty – Age Seventy hasn’t yet applied for Social Security

You’ve already maximized your monthly Social Security benefit by waiting until age 70 to apply.

Ask Rusty – Age Seventy hasn’t yet applied for Social Security
 
Dear Rusty: How can I maximize my monthly Social Security benefit? I’m already 70 years old – almost 71 now. Signed: Ready to Apply.
 
Dear Ready to Apply: You’ve already maximized your monthly Social Security benefit by waiting until age 70 to apply. Age 70 is when you stop earning delayed retirement credits, which have boosted your monthly benefit amount by 32% over what you would have received at your full retirement age of 66, and by 76% over what you would have received if you had claimed benefits early at age 62. Your maximum Social Security benefit is reached in the month you turn 70 years of age, so you shouldn’t delay any longer. Since you’re now actually more than 70 (almost 71), you should immediately claim your Social Security benefit and you should also ask for 6 months of retroactive benefits, which SS will give you in a lump-sum. You can claim your benefits by contacting the Social Security office (find your local office at www.ssa.gov/locator) and making an appointment to apply for benefits, or you can apply online at www.ssa.gov. To apply online, you’ll have to first set up your personal “My Social Security” online account at www.ssa.gov, and then complete and submit your application online. You should specify your “benefit start month” as six months before the date you apply to get the retroactive benefits. 
 
If you are married, since you have not yet applied for benefits your wife is not yet receiving spousal benefits from your record. Assuming she has reached her full retirement age, her spousal benefit will be half of the benefit you were eligible to receive at your full retirement age, if that amount is more than she is entitled to on her own lifetime work record. If your wife was born on or before January 1st, 1954 she should contact your local Social Security office to file for her spousal benefit. If your wife was born January 2nd, 1954 or later, her spousal benefit should be automatically added to her own benefit when you claim, and she should not need to contact Social Security to apply. I encourage you both to claim these benefits as soon as possible, because each month you delay you are losing benefits which you are entitled to. This is true even if one or both of you are still working, because there is no penalty for working after you have reached full retirement age. And even if you’re still working and paying FICA taxes monthly, your benefit will not increase just because you are still paying into Social Security.
 
This article is intended for information purposes only and does not represent legal or financial guidance. It presents the opinions and interpretations of the AMAC Foundation’s staff, trained and accredited by the National Social Security Association (NSSA). NSSA and the AMAC Foundation and its staff are not affiliated with or endorsed by the Social Security Administration or any other governmental entity. To submit a question, visit our website or email us.

5 Tips for Moving with a Pet

Moving with a pet requires careful planning to help ensure a smooth transition for the whole family…..


(Family Features) Whether it’s across the street or across the country, moving can be a stressful and chaotic time for your family. This can be especially true for your four-legged family members, who don’t understand what’s happening. Detailed planning and foresight can help alleviate some of the hassle and make relocating a more positive experience for everyone.

“Moving with a pet requires careful planning to help ensure a smooth transition for the whole family,” said Dave Bradey, vice president of people and organization at Mars Petcare North America. “As someone who recently moved with two dogs, I can’t tell you how valuable it is to have access to pet-friendly public areas throughout the moving process. Mars Petcare is committed to encouraging cities to create more pet-friendly public spaces, like parks and rest stops, which can help make moving with a pet easier and more enjoyable. Our four-legged friends should be welcome wherever we are.”

Consider these tips to help make your move with your pet as smooth as possible, and visit BetterCitiesForPets.com for more information on making pets happy, healthy and welcome everywhere.

  1. Check In with Your Vet – Ahead of a move, schedule an appointment with your veterinarian to ensure your pet is healthy and up-to-date on all vaccines. While you are there, ask for a copy of your pet’s records and get recommendations for a veterinarian’s office closer to your new home. If your pet has an ID microchip, be sure to update your new address and contact information.

  1. Research Your New Neighborhood – Before relocating to your new home, research the pet policies and amenities your new town may have. Cities can require pet registration or special collar tags to help keep your pets safe. Municipalities often list the dog parks or public spaces online where pets are welcome, on or off the leash. If your new town is lacking pet-friendly places, visit BetterCitiesForPets.com to find ways to help your city become more welcoming to furry friends.

  1. Pack a Pet Bag – Amid all the packing supplies, it can be easy to lose track of your pet’s belongings. Instead of digging through boxes to find his food once dinnertime rolls around, pack a travel bag for your pet, so food and bowls are easily accessible. Keep a few of your pet’s favorite items, like toys and blankets, on-hand in the car to help reduce nervousness during travel.

  1. Take a Room-by-Room Tour – Once you arrive at your new home, introduce your pet to his new environment, one room at a time. Giving your pet free rein of a new house right away can be overwhelming and confusing, so plan a slower approach to ensure your pet gradually adjusts. Start in one main room, and once your pet seems comfortable, move onto the next room and repeat the process throughout the whole home. In seemingly no time, your pet will claim his favorite spot in the new space.

Photos courtesy of Fotolia

  1. Give Extra Love and Attention – As exhausted as you may be at the end of moving day, don’t forget to show your pet some extra love. Consider a reward like PEDIGREE DENTASTIX Treats to show your understanding for what your pet has gone through. As a bonus, the oral care treat will help clean your dog’s teeth, giving him a bright smile to make new friends in the neighborhood. Your pet may also need time to adjust to a new environment and may be looking for familiar day-to-day structure. Keeping a normal routine and paying close attention to your pet can help prevent unnecessary stress.

SOURCE:
Mars Petcare

New Carey Medical and Diagnostic Center Community Open House

Community open house on Wednesday, July 31 from 4 pm to 6 pm in Carey……

 The recently-constructed Carey Medical & Diagnostic Center will be hosting a community open house on Wednesday, July 31 from 4 pm to 6 pm. The new address of the facility is 930 Sheriden Drive (Carey). The general public is cordially invited to tour the facility, meet the providers and care team and learn about future health offerings of the center.

Carey Medical Center

 

This very special program will feature a welcome by BVHS President and CEO, Scott Malaney and additional remarks by Kelly Shroll, president of Blanchard Valley Medical Practices. The first 300 attendees to complete a tour of the new facility will receive a commemorative gift. A Carey Chamber of Commerce ribbon cutting will immediately follow.

For more information, please email events@bvhealthsystem.org or call 419.423.5551.

Opinion: Alzheimer’s disease: more needs to be done

“Your parents, grandparents and even you are at risk considering the fact that 10,000 Americans turn 65 each and every day…”

Alzheimer’s disease: more needs to be done, says AMAC
Finding solutions need to be a priority for all Americans
 
WASHINGTON, DC, July 5 — June was Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month but, says senior advocate Dan Weber, “it’s not enough to be aware that it is a devastating, deadly infirmity. It is imperative that we raise our voices in support of decisive action to offer real support for its nearly six million victims and their caregivers.”
 
In a statement backing legislative efforts focused on Alzheimer’s, the president of the two-million-member Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC] urges Congress to put political differences aside and get cracking on new legislation that could make a difference.
 
“It was heartening to see the House, the Senate and President Trump on the same page when the BOLD [Building Our Largest Dementia Infrastructure] legislation was enacted on New Year’s Day. The BOLD Infrastructure for Alzheimer’s Act provides $100 million dollars to fund new and potentially more effective ways to treat the disease and provide aid for besieged caregivers. But it is clearly not enough when we are at war with a disease that is spreading at such a dangerously fast pace.”
 
Two additional Alzheimer’s bills have been introduced in Congress.  The Younger-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Act expands the availability of resources to younger seniors suffering from Alzheimer’s and other dementias, resources that are currently available only to patients over 60 years of age. The Improving HOPE for Alzheimer’s Act would expand comprehensive Alzheimer’s disease care planning services for patients.
 
“Both merit attention by lawmakers in a timely fashion.”
 
Weber says that more needs to be done to stop what is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. and which targets the nation’s fastest growing population — senior citizens. He cites Alzheimer’s Association statistics showing that the overwhelming majority of victims are seniors. Nearly one-million older Americans between 65 and 74, 2.5 million between 75 and 84 years of age and 2.1 million over 85 have the disease. “Your parents, grandparents and even you are at risk considering the fact that 10,000 Americans turn 65 each and every day, a growth rate that will continue for ten or more years, according to theCensus Bureau.
 
And, adds Weber, if that is not enough for lawmakers to get together and provide support and solutions, consideration needs to be given to the financial impact the disease is having on the economy. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, it’s is the most expensive illness plaguing America today. It is costing more than cancer and heart disease. 
 
The Association estimates that Medicare and Medicaid will spend $195 billion on Alzheimer’s in 2019 and that by 2050 the disease will cost these two agencies $770 billion.  To learn more and join the fight to end Alzheimer’s, visit alz.org/advocacy.