NB Police Phones Are “Down” 24 – 48 Hours

Citizens on the Village Alert System received the following message Monday, July 6, 2020 at 10.54 am:

North Baltimore Citizens on the Village Alert System (sign-up on www.northbaltimore.org) received the following message Monday, July 6, 2020 at 10.54 am:

Police phone lines are down for the next 24 – 48 hours. A Temporary Police phone line is available for non-emergencies:

419-408-2506 – for NON – EMERGENCIES

Please call 911 for emergencies!

Official Minutes from Village Council Meetings.

May 2020 minutes from Village Council Meetings…….

Here are the latest Village Council meeting  minutes received from the Village Clerk, Kathi Bucher :

 

VILLAGE OF NORTH BALTIMORE COUNCIL MEETING May 5, 2020 MINUTES

 

I.             Pledge of Allegiance

Mayor Goldner called the meeting to order at 6:15 PM and led the Pledge of Allegiance.

II.          Roll Call:

Mayor Janet Goldner-Here, Matt Beegle-Here, Tim Engard -Here, Mike Julien- Here, Aaron Patterson-Here, Mike Soltis- Here, Leisa Zeigler-Here, Student Representative- Mali Combs-absent

Clerk Kathi Bucher- Present, Legal Counsel-Joel Kuhlman-Present

 Motion to excuse Ms. Combs, made by Mr. Patterson. Second by Mr. Beegle. All approved.

 III.       Approval of the Minutes:

Motion to approve the minutes from the April 14 meeting made by Mr. Patterson. Second by Ms. Zeigler. All approved.

Motion to approve the minutes from the April 21 meeting made by Mr. Patterson. Second by Ms. Zeigler. All approved.

IV.             Public Participation:

None

 Letters and Communications:

Mr. Patterson wanted to know if there had been any interest in the open council seat. There have been three. He was approached by Dino Woodruff who was questioning the Eagles water bill as it was very high. Running water upstairs.

 

Mr. Soltis curious about how we can support the restaurants in town/shut down the street and have an open restaurant. Are restaurants interested?  Had a resident ask about the town lights, cars going way too fast down the street.  Lights are owned by the Village, AEP and Hancock Wood. Maybe children signs posted. What about the street plan? Send out a copy of the plan so residents know. Mr. Julien suggested to do a five-year program.

 Administrative Reports:

Finance Officer:  Webinar on utility software that is better and cheaper. Stimulus money has been received.  One thousand dollars from our insurance company. Workers comp will be sending out reimbursements. The 200 Block funding has been identified. Sick leave act applies 80 extended hours for employees. Mr. Patterson was curious if there have been any issues with the water bills due to the COVID? A few aren’t paying, no late fee but most are paying.  Maybe set something up for those who wish to donate and help can.

 

            EMS Chief:    

Fire Chief:                   everyone staying healthy

Police Chief:

Utility Director:          follow up on the water bill; meeting tomorrow

DPW Superintendent: meeting tomorrow     

Village Administrator: OPWC-Ord tonight on the agenda; NRG-Prebid meeting is scheduled for May 26; ED-property on Quarry looking at financial assistance; DRP-downtown installation of lights, arms etc. CSX- still nothing; OEPA-water compliant reports working with Dan; AEP- agreed manhole construction for 25 year- then pay. Quarry Road- who’s responsible?

Clerk:  nothing; was asked to find out about meetings where council members can learn more on legislation.  Mr. Kuhlman said there is a Lawyer one in November in Dublin. It is three days.  Really good.

Appointed Legal counsel:  nothing going on at this time

Mayor:  Memorial Day has been cancelled. There will be something virtual.  There was no Arbor Day as it was too wet. Gazebo and trees are being planned for the sewer department area. Upcoming meetings were discussed.

Standing Committees:

            Economic and Community Development (Ms. Zeigler)

Ms. Zeigler sat in on the software meeting. It is user friendly. Maybe have another meeting so others can       take part in it. Mr. Soltis was asking once the roads are done the buildings are still the same. He knows of areas that have redone store fronts. Look into a grant, Chamber, owners and Village get involved.

Public Safety (Mr. Soltis)

            Street parking, remove the cars from the street, sweeping and plowing. Apartment             residents are parking on Main Street.         

            Personnel, Policy and Ordinance Review (Mr. Julien)

Add the unusual circumstances page to the from of the policy books.  Put this on the next meetings agenda. All members go over this in small sections.

            Public Works (Mr. Beegle)

Nothing. Mention of the 200 Block businesses having sidewalks done at the cost offered to the Village.

            Public Utilities (Mr. Patterson)

            Nothing          

            Finance and Technology (Ms. Engard)

            Nothing

  • New Legislation, Resolutions, Motions or Business

Mr. Patterson made a motion to read Ordinance 2020-17 by number and title only for its first reading, suspend the second and third reading. Second by Mr. Engard. All approved.

Ordinance 2020-17 read by number and title only by the mayor.

ORDINANCE 2020 – 17     AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE VILLAGE ADMINISTRATOR TO ENTER INTO AN AGREEMENT WITH PETERMAN ASSOCIATES INC. FOR THE PURPOSE OF PROVIDING DESIGN PLANNING, COST ESTIMATING, AND PERIODIC CONSTRUCTION OBSERVATION FOR A NEW UV DISINFECTION SYSTEM AT THE WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT AT A COST NOT TO EXCEED $20,760 AND TO DECLARE AN EMERGENCY

Amend wording to director.

Mr. Patterson made a motion to adopt with amendment. Second by Ms. Zeigler. All approved.

Mr. Patterson made a motion to read Ordinance 2020-18 for its first reading, suspend the second and third readings.  Second by Ms. Zeigler. All approved.

Ordinance 2020-18 read by number and title only by mayor.

ORDINANCE 2020 – 18     AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE VILLAGE ADMINISTRATOR TO ACCEPT THE BID SUBMITTAL FROM B&J CONCRETE AND CONSTRUCTION OF TOLEDO, OHIO AND TO ENTER INTO A CONTRACT FOR THE PURPOSE OF ROAD RECONSTRUCTION AND INSTALLING SIDEWALKS FOR THE 200 BLOCK OF NORTH MAIN STREET AND TO DECLARE AN EMERGENCY

 Mr. Patterson made a motion to adopt as an emergency. Second by Ms. Zeigler. All approved.

 IX.             Second Reading of Ordinances and Resolutions

None

 

  1. Third Reading of Ordinances and Resolutions

Mr. Beegle made a motion to read Ordinance 2020-07 by for its third reading. Second by Mr. Engard.

Ordinance 2020-07 read by number and title only by the mayor.

ORDINANCE 2020 – 07   AN ORDINANCE APPROVING THE EDITION AND INCLUSION OF CERTAIN ORDINANCES AS PARTS OF THE VARIOUS COMPONENT CODES OF THE CODIFIED ORDINANCES OF THE VILLAGE OF NORTH BALTIMORE, OHIO.

        

            Mr. Patterson made a motion to adopt. Second by Mr. Julien. All approved.

 

Mr. Beegle made a motion to read Ordinance 2020-08 by number and title only for its third reading. Second by Ms. Zeigler. All approved.

            Ordinance 2020-08 read by number and title only by the mayor.

 

ORDINANCE 2020 – 08   AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE VILLAGE

ADMINISTRATOR TO ADVERTISE A REQUEST FOR STATEMENT OF QUALIFICATIONS FROM QUALIFIED CONSULTANTS TO PROVIDE PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING SERVICES FOCUSED ON WATER, WASTEWATER, ENVIRONMENTAL AND TRANSPORTATION RELATED CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS

         

Mr. Julien made a motion to adopt. Second by Ms. Zeigler. All approved.

  1. Other New Business

Tables

         XII.    Other Old Business

            Nothing

 Payment of the Bills

Ms. Zeigler made a motion to pay the bills in the amount of $208,457.73. Second by Mr. Patterson. All approved.

 Adjournment

Mr. Patterson made a motion to adjourn. All approved                                                                                 
   Kathi R. Bucher, Clerk

 

COUNCIL MEETING, May 19 MINUTES

 I.             Pledge of Allegiance

 Mayor Goldner called the meeting to order at 6:15 PM and led the Pledge of Allegiance.

II          Roll Call:

 Mayor Janet Goldner-Here, Matt Beegle- absent, Tim Engard -Here, Mike Julien- Here, Aaron Patterson-Here, Mike Soltis- Here, Leisa Zeigler-Here, ST REP- Mali Combs-absent

Clerk Kathi Bucher- Present, Legal Counsel-Joel Kuhlman-Present

Motion to excuse Mr. Beegle and Ms. Combs made by Ms. Zeigler. Second by Mr. Patterson. All approved.

III.       Approval of the Minutes:

Ms. Zeigler made a motion to approve the minutes from May 5. Second by Mr. Patterson. All approved.

IV.             Public Participation:

COVID

  1. Letters and Communications:

-Opening of the Park? Plan to open June 1.

-Memorial Day- churches to ring bells at 9; video to follow; put a candle on your porch for the day in remembrance of all Veterans.

-Water on Gillette- still an issue; low spot in his yard

-Text on dumping into the Rocky Ford- test to be done, July 1 they have someone coming in to check, allowed 4x’s per year to dump and we are within the EPA guidelines

 Administrative Reports:

Finance Officer:  Gas tax down; EMS billing down, runs are down; we are balanced. There will be a public hearing on June 23 at 6:15 for the JEDD. Regular meeting to follow. Money from this should be earmarked

COTW-raises, not done yet COVID hit

             EMS Chief:    

Fire Chief:

Police Chief:                                       nothing

Utility Director:

DPW Superintendent:

Village Administrator:

OPWC- preconstruction meeting- Columbia Gas is redoing lines around the 200 block. NRG-project has been extended. ECD- Mr. Dickerson will have a report in June. UV-onsite review and assessment has started. JEDD- Public meeting June 24. June 1 Mr Beegle is done, three interested candidates

Clerk:  nothing

Appointed Legal counsel:  billing hours down; be aware abuse reports are down, with no one out and about

Mayor:  nothing

  • Standing Committees:

             Economic and Community Development (Ms Zeigler)

                        Nothing

Public Safety (Mr. Soltis)

                        Nothing          

            Personnel, Policy and Ordinance Review (Mr. Julien)

                        Policy manuel-page to adopt on unusual circumstances

            Mr. Julien made a motion to adopt. Second by Mr. Patterson. All approved.

            Public Works (Mr. Beegle)

                        Nothing

            Public Utilities (Mr. Patterson)

                        Executive session at the end  

            Finance and Technology (Ms. Engard)

                        Nothing

  • New Legislation, Resolutions, Motions or Business

Mr. Patterson made a motion that Ordinance 2020-19 be read by number and title only for its first reading, suspended the second and third reading. Second by Mr. Engard. All approved.

Ordinance 2020-19 read by number and title only by the mayor.

ORDINANCE 2020 – 19   AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE VILLAGE ADMINISTRATOR TO ENTER INTO AN AGREEMENT WITH CT CONSULTANTS, INC. FOR THE PURPOSE OF PROVIDING CONSTRUCTION ADMINISTRATION AND RESIDENT PROJECT REPRESENTATION FOR THE NORTH MAIN STREET PHASE 2 RECONSTRUCTION PROJECT AND TO DECLARE AN EMERGENCY.

Mr. Patterson made the motion to adopt as an emergency. Second by Ms. Zeigler. All approved.

 IX.             Second Reading of Ordinances and Resolutions

None

 Third Reading of Ordinances and Resolutions

None

  1. Other New Business

Nothing

         XII.    Other Old Business

            Nothing

 Payment of the Bills

Ms. Zeigler made a motion to pay the bills in the sum of $133,441,21. Second by Mr. Engard. All approved.

Motion to move into executive session by Mr. Patterson Second by Mr. Engard at 7:17pm. All approved.

Return to regular session at 7:27 pm.

 Adjournment

Mr. Patterson made a motion to adjourn. All in favor- everyone                                    
  Kathi R. Bucher, Clerk

 

 

 

    

 

 

AG Yost Urges Ohioans to Exercise Their Rights

Do you know someone who received notices regarding overpayment of unemployment compensation benefits?

(COLUMBUS, Ohio) — Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost is urging all Ohioans who have received notices regarding overpayment of unemployment compensation benefits to appeal their cases if they believe the notices were sent in error. 

“It’s no secret that despite the state’s Herculean efforts, it was crushed with the unprecedented volume of new claims flooding in simultaneously,” Yost said. “We will aggressively pursue any cases of fraud, but we want to make sure any non-fraudulent cases referred to us for collection have been thoroughly reviewed and appealed as is your right.”

Ohioans have 21 days to file their appeal online, via fax, or through mail from the date the notice was sent. Do not let the clock run out on your right to appeal. The Attorney General’s collections team will carefully review post adjudicated cases to ensure taxpayers and their dollars are fairly protected.

For information about the appeals process and how to apply visit www.unemployment.ohio.gov.

BVHS Weekend Column: Lyme Disease

The risk of getting Lyme disease from a tick bite is very low (about 1 in 100) if the tick is removed before it is engorged…..

LymeDisease, by  Jeffrey Eiden, MD, Family Medicine, Putnam County Primary Care



It is tick time again! Along with the warmer weather that gets us outside, hiking and tromping through the woods, comes the risk of exposure to ticks. When we think of ticks, we often think of Lyme disease. Here is a brief review of what you should know about ticks, preventing and treating tick bites, as well as some information about Lyme disease.

A tick is a small arachnid that is a parasite. Ticks require the blood of another organism to survive. They attach to a host, often a mammal, feed on blood, detach and repeat when they need another meal. Not all ticks carry diseases, but some do. There are 16 known human diseases transmitted by ticks. The best approach is to avoid ticks if possible or at least remove them soon after they attach.

Ticks are most active during warm weather. They are most often in wooded or brushy areas or in high grass. Be aware that you might encounter ticks when in this type of area. If you venture into an area that is likely to have ticks present, you should consider using a tick repellent. Most insect repellents also repel ticks. The recommendation is to use an insect repellent that contains DEET. Clothing, boots and tents can also be pre-treated with 0.5% permethrin which also repels ticks. Limiting exposed skin by covering it with clothing and by tucking pants into socks keeps ticks from finding a place to attach.

If a tick does attach, it is best to remove it as soon as possible. Get in the habit of checking for ticks after spending time outdoors. Look for ticks on clothes and shoes. Check pets also, as ticks can attach to them and then gain access to your home. It is also wise to bathe or shower within two hours of returning inside and to check over all your skin to be sure there are no ticks attached. Children should be thoroughly checked by parents.

When a tick is found on skin, remove it. The best way to remove a tick is to grasp it firmly with fine-tipped tweezers and pull away from the skin. It works best if the tip of the tweezers is as close to the skin as possible. Steady pressure should remove the tick. Avoid twisting or jerking. If the tick does not come off in one piece, remove the pieces left behind if possible. There are some “tricks” for removing ticks that are passed around, including using a match or nail polish. These do not work. Use the tweezers and pull.

Suppose you do find a tick that has attached to your skin. Remove it as above. Do not panic but do be alert for any signs or symptoms of tick-borne illness. These would include fever, chills, muscle aches and in some cases, rash. If any of these symptoms develop, contact your primary care provider for instructions.

Shifting to Lyme disease, the risk of getting Lyme disease from a tick bite is very low (about 1 in 100) if the tick is removed before it is engorged. This is why it is so important to find and remove ticks as soon as possible.

There is consideration for using a single dose of antibiotic to prevent Lyme disease after a tick bite, but this is only recommended in specific situations. The tick would need to be identified as a deer tick, as this is the only type of tick known to transmit Lyme disease. Deer ticks have black legs, which distinguishes them from other types of ticks. The tick should have been attached for 36 hours or more, as indicated by time since exposure or degree of engorgement. The antibiotic should be given within 72 hours of tick removal. The tick bite should have occurred in an area where at least 20% of ticks are infected with the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. This is an issue in parts of New England and parts of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Minnesota and Wisconsin. In Ohio, although we have deer ticks and some carry Lyme disease, we are not yet at area with this level of tick infection.

Another approach to preventing full-blown Lyme disease is to treat at the first sign of a rash that indicates possible infection. This rash is distinctive. It occurs at the site of the tick bite and is salmon to red-colored and circular. One-third of the time, it can have a clear area in the center that makes it look like a bull’s eye or target. The rash, called erythema migrans, tends to expand outward over several days, getting larger and larger. If you have had a tick bite and develop this type of rash where the bite occurred, you should call your primary care provider and be evaluated. Treatment at this point would typically be with a course of an antibiotic like doxycycline, amoxicillin or cefuroxime.

Lyme disease is caused by the body’s immune response to the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. The symptoms are divided into different phases, based on length of time since initial infection. The early localized phase of Lyme disease is usually about 7-14 days after the tick bite. It is characterized by the rash of erythema migrans, and symptoms typical of a viral infection, such as fatigue, fever, headache, muscle or joint pain and swollen lymph nodes. The symptoms are not often severe.

The early disseminated phase of Lyme disease occurs days to weeks after the tick bite and is caused by the spread of bacteria through the bloodstream, leading to inflammation in the affected area. There can be involvement of the heart or nervous system. Symptoms of infection in a particular organ are not common, but can be severe.

In addition to early symptoms, there can be a late phase of Lyme disease. This most commonly is seen as inflammation affecting the joint and muscles and happens in 80% of people who did not receive treatment with antibiotics for their early infection. Late Lyme disease can also cause neurologic symptoms, but this is rare.

Post-Lyme disease syndrome is a group of symptoms that can occur chronically after treatment for Lyme disease. The symptoms seen with this are headache, fatigue and joint pain. Because these types of symptoms are common, some people worry that they have post-Lyme disease syndrome even when they do not have a history of having had Lyme disease. It is not helpful to treat the post-Lyme disease syndrome with antibiotics, and it gradually resolves.

The diagnosis of Lyme disease is made based on history of possible exposure to ticks, characteristic signs and symptoms, and the finding of antibodies to Lyme disease on blood testing. The blood tests are not always helpful and should be ordered by a physician/provider after consultation and interpreted considering the patient’s story and symptoms.

As in so many medical conditions, prevention is key and early detection/treatment is the next best option. Watch out for ticks! But get outside and enjoy the warm weather whenever you can. Doctor’s orders. J

 

 

 

Continental Structural Plastics to Host Hiring Event at NB Facility

Carey facility also hiring for production workers….

 

Auburn Hills, Michigan – July 1, 2020 — As the automotive industry returns to full production, Continental Structural Plastics (CSP) is in need of production associates at both its North Baltimore, and Carey, Ohio, locations.  On Tuesday, July 7, the North Baltimore location will be hosting a hiring event for production associates. This is an opportunity to be hired on-the-spot, and earn up to $15.82 per hour, full-time. After 90 days of probation, benefits are offered including medical, dental, vision, and a 401K matching plan.

The North Baltimore hiring event will take place at the CSP North Baltimore facility, 100 S. Poe Road, North Baltimore, Ohio, from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.  Snacks and refreshments will be provided.  Applicants must wear closed-toe shoes, and should bring their resumes and valid driver’s license.  Interviewing will be done on the spot.  To ensure safety, this event will be conducted outside the plant in a tent.

Carey Position Details

CSP is also seeking production associates for the Carey, Ohio, facility. These positions pay $14.50 per hour, plus applicable shift differential for 2nd and 3rd shift associates.  All associates receive a .50 cent per hour increase after the completion of 720 hours, and will earn the top rate in 36 months.

Employees are eligible for full benefits including tuition reimbursement, life insurance and a 401k matching plan after 90 days of employment. The Carey Human Resources team will be conducting onsite interviews for immediate placement. Please apply in person at 2915 County Highway 96, Carey, Ohio.

What’s Required?

Continental Structural Plastics is an innovative, full-service Tier One supplier with a global presence and an emphasis on developing lightweight technologies for the transportation industries. CSP offers employees the opportunity to join a leading-edge company within the composite material industry and enjoy the benefits offered by a growing company in North America and internationally.

Responsibilities of the North Baltimore and Carey positions include:

  • Finishing
  • Sanding
  • Deflashing
  • Machine/press operation
  • Quality control
  • Use of hand and power tools

Eligibility requirements for positions include:

  • Must be able to work overtime when required.
  • Must have a GED or high school diploma.
  • Successfully complete a background check and drug screen.
  • Prior manufacturing experience (preferred); be able to work in a manufacturing setting that includes noise, dust, odor and high temperatures in some are

HANCOCK COUNTY: Highway construction update

Know Before You Go! download the OHGO app or visit OHGO.com

For the Week of July 6, 2020

LIMA, Ohio (July, 2020) The following construction projects are anticipated to affect highways in Hancock County next week. All outlined work is weather permitting.


i-75 small web 

INTERSTATE 75 PROJECTS

I-75 Widening and Reconstruction in the city of Findlay: The project to reconstruct and widen I-75 through the city of Findlay beginning just south of Harrison Street/County Road 144, which is just south of the U.S. Route 68/state Route 15 interchange, to the County Road 99 interchange, is entering its fourth and final year. Beaver Excavating, Canton, serves as the general contractor. Visit the project page for more information. Estimated completion: Fall 2020

CONTINUING IMPACTS

  • Construction on the following ramps will continue until late fall.
    • I-75 northbound to U.S. 68/state Route 15
    • I-75 northbound to Lima Avenue
    • S. 68/state Route 15 to I-75 southbound
    • Lima Avenue to I-75 southbound
    • Detour: I-75 to the state Route 12 back on I-75 southbound.
  • Between the south end of the project to the U.S. 68/state Route 15 interchange, all four lanes will continue to travel the southbound side until late summer. Two lanes will be maintained in both directions the majority of the time.

 

Interstate 75 between Napoleon Road and state Route 235, just south of the village of Beaverdam to three miles north of the village of Bluffton, in Allen and Hancock counties, will experience lane restrictions and ramp closures for paving and reconstruction through November 2020. Shelly Company, Findlay is the general contractor. Visit the project page for more information.

NEW IMPACT

  • Bentley Road entrance ramp to I-75 southbound will close July 6 for five days.
    • Detour: I-75 north to SR 103 to I-75 south (see map).
  • Bentley Road exit ramp from I-75 northbound will close July 6 for five days.
    • Detour: I-75 north to SR 103 to I-75 south to Bentley road (see map).
  • SR 696 exit ramp from I-75 southbound will close July 6 for 14 days.
    • Detour: I-75 south to Bluelick Rd. to I-75 north to SR 696 (see map).

UPCOMING IMPACT

  • SR 696 entrance ramp to I-75 southbound will close July 12 for 14 days.
    • Detour: I-75 north to SR103/Bentley Rd. to I-75 south (see map).

CONTINUING IMPACTS

  • Lane restrictions will occur between Napoleon Rd. and SR 235.
  • At SR 696 at Beaverdam one lane of I-75 southbound traffic is shifted onto the northbound side of the highway.

U.S. 68 sign 

U.S. 68 PROJECTS

U.S. 68 at state Route 15, south of the city of Findlay, closed March 16 for approximately four months for a bridge deck replacement. Ramps at the interchange will remain open. Work is being performed by Vernon Nagel, Inc., Napoleon. Visit the project page for more information.

CONTINUING IMPACTS

  • CR 8 and CR 180 will be limited to right turns only at their intersections with SR 15. Through traffic on the county roads will not be able to cross SR 15. Traffic will not be able to turn left onto or off SR 15.
  • SR 15 will be maintained under the bridge. Periodic lane closures may be necessary.
  • S. 68 Detour:
    • U.S. 68 northbound traffic will be detoured onto SR 15 eastbound to SR 37 to SR 15 westbound back to U.S. 68.
    • Main Street southbound traffic will be detoured onto U.S. 68 north/SR 15 west to I-75 northbound to SR 12 to I-75 southbound back to U.S. 68 (see map).
    • S. 68 southbound traffic will not be impacted.

U.S. 68 within the village of Arlington

U.S. 68 from the bridge over Buck Run to just north of Wardwell Street, within the village of Arlington, will close May 4 for approximately four months for a reconstruction project.  

U.S. 68 between Liberty Street and the southern corporation limit, within the village of Arlington, will close May 18 for approximately four months for a reconstruction project.  

Local access will be maintained throughout both projects. Helms and Sons Excavating, Findlay, serves as the general contractor. Visit the project page for more information.

CONTINUING IMPACT

  • Northbound detour: U.S. 30 to SR 235 to I-75 back to U.S. 68.
  • Southbound detour: SR 15 to U.S. 23 to U.S. 30 back to U.S. 68 (see maps).

U.S. 68 resurfacing, between the city of Findlay in Hancock County and the city of Kenton in Hardin County, excluding the villages of Arlington and Dunkirk began Mar. 30. Traffic will be maintained through the work zone. Strawser Construction Inc., Columbus, serves as the general contractor. Estimated completion: Fall 2020. Visit the project page for more information.

 


State Route 37 between State Route 15 and U.S. 30, south of Findlay, will be restricted through the work zone for pavement repairs. The work is being performed by the ODOT Hancock County maintenance garage.

State Route 37 over Lynn Creek, between Township Road 149 and Township 147, just south of Riverdale High School will close July 13 for approximately 30 days for a culvert replacement. Miller Contracting Group, Inc., Ottoville, is the general contractor.

UPCOMING IMPACT

  • Detour: SR 103 to U.S. 23 to U.S. 30 back to SR 37 (see map).


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Know Before You Go!

For more detailed traffic information, and to get personalized traffic alerts for your commute, download the OHGO app or visit OHGO.com.

Wood County Parks Are Open

+ Parks open daily 8:00 am – 30 min. past sunset.
+ Restrooms are open. Please wear a mask inside.

  JULY 2020

We hope you are well and enjoying nature.
Parks are open daily 8:00 am until 30 minutes past sunset.
 
Bring your own water. We recommend a reusable water bottle.
 
In-person Program Guidelines:
Please do:
+ Register first at wcparks.org.
+ Wear a mask to programs.
+ Bring a water bottle with you.
+ Be courteous to others.
+ Wash hands frequently.
+ Let us know if you cannot attend.
 
– Do not attend if you are feeling unwell, or caring for a sick person.
 
We respectfully ask that you wear a mask to programs.
Thank you! Be well.
 
 
Buckwheat Planting
 
Sunday, July 5; 2 sessions
Carter Historic Farm
18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green
 
Watch historic equipment in action! Learn how buckwheat was planted using an early wooden 1900s grain drill. Leader: Chris Dauer
Photo by: Tony Everhardt.
Free Program
 
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
 
1:00 – 2:00 pm
 
 
Archery Skills:
The Complete Archer
 
 Arrowwood Archery Range
11126 Linwood Road, Bowling Green
 
Transform into an arrow-slinging archer! This program includes two sessions for the novice archer. Get the tools to safely navigate the range, become familiar with basic archery equipment and start working on precision and accuracy. Leader: Bill Hoefflin
Free Program
 
Tuesday, July 7; 6:30 – 8:30 pm
 
Thursday, July 9; 6:30 – 8:30 pm
 
 
Summer Science: Watersheds
 
Wednesday, July 8;
11:00 am- 12:30 pm
Teleconference
 
Join us for a teleconference lesson about watersheds. We will learn how water travels through our watershed and what it could be carrying with it. Leader: Nicole Sarver
Free Program
 
 
 
Hiking for Health
 
Friday, July 10; 10:00 – 11:30 am
Cricket Frog Cove
14810 Freyman Road, Cygnet
 
Join a naturalist for exercise and the wonder of watching the seasonal changes. The hikes will offer a true mind-body connection. Sign up for one week or all three. Leader: Jim Witter
Free Program
 
 
 
Top Rope Climbing
 
Saturday, July 11; 9:00 – 11:30 am
Sawyer Quarry Nature Preserve
26940 Lime City Road, Perrysburg
 
Did you know that there is a place for outdoor climbing in Wood County? Join Wood County Parks for an adventure at Sawyer Quarry Nature Preserve. Learn the basics of top-rope climbing from the adventure staff and try your hand at the walls in the quarry. All equipment is provided by Wood County Parks. The program is designed for ages 14 and up. Please register all individuals attending.
Program fee: $15.00
or, $10.00 for Friends of the Parks members.
Leader: Thomas Worsham
 
 
 
River Wading
 
Saturday, July 11; 2 sessions
Buttonwood Recreation Area
27174 Hull Prairie Road, Perrysburg
 
Get up close and personal with the life in the Maumee River as we explore some of its runs, riffles and pools. We will be in the water exploring with our hands and nets so wear quick drying clothes and footwear that can get wet and stay attached to your feet. Kids must be 8 years or older. Program cancelled in the event of high water.
Leaders: Bill Hoefflin and Nicole Sarver
Free Program
 
10:00 – 11:30 am
 
12:30 – 2:00 pm
 
 
Seed Starting Kits
 
Saturday, July 11; 1:00 – 3:00 pm
Carter Historic Farm
18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green
 
Growing plants is a great way to get connected to nature! Kids can stop by the farm to pick up a small amount of seeds, planting material and instructions on how to get their plants started. Once sprouted, we encourage you to send photos of the growing plants to Carter Historic Farm! Recommended for children ages 5-10. Leader: Stephanie Ross
Free Program
 
 
 
Explore the Wetlands
 
Tuesday, July 14; 2 sessions
W.W. Knight Nature Preserve
29530 White Road, Perrysburg
 
Search for macroinvertebrates, frogs and other creatures in and around the wetland. Learn how this ecosystem impacts our lives and how to contribute to good water quality.
Leader: Jim Witter and Nicole Sarver
Free Program
 
9:00 – 10:00 am
 
10:30 – 11:30 am
 
 
Top Rope Climbing for Kids
 
Thursday, July 23; 6:00 – 8:30 pm
Sawyer Quarry Nature Preserve
26940 Lime City Road, Perrysburg
 
Learn the basics of top-rope climbing from the adventure staff and try your hand at the walls in the quarry. All equipment is provided by Wood County Parks. The program is designed for ages 8-13. Please register all individuals attending the program, and limit spectators to one guardian per climber.
Leader: Thomas Worsham
Program fee: $15.00
or, $10.00 for Friends of the Parks members.
 
 
 
Scarf Weaving Kits for Kids
 
Saturday, July 25; 1:00 – 3:00 pm
Carter Historic Farm
 
Weaving is a useful and fun skill anyone can learn, even kids! Visit Carter Historic Farm to pick up a weaving kit with directions to make a yarn scarf. Once finished, we encourage you to send photos of the finished product to Carter Historic Farm! Leader: Corinne Gordon
Free Program
 
 
 
Composting 101 Series
 
Sunday, July 26; 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Carter Historic Farm
18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green
 
Join us for part 2 of our composting journey that will take place throughout the summer, and watch as our compost transforms into an organic “black gold” for plants to thrive in! You will learn the fundamentals of composting, various forms of composting, how to make a successful compost and why composting is important for the environment. This will be a hands-on event for those interested in getting a little dirty, but you are welcome to simply observe as well. Attending all 3 sessions is encouraged but not required.
Leader: Stephanie Ross
Free Program.
 
 
 
Paddle Through the Past
 
Friday, July 31; 6:00 – 8:30 pm
Orleans Boat Launch
 
Lead by historic interpreters Taylor Moyer and Craig Spicer, you’ll see the Maumee River through the eyes of those who came before. Explore the river by canoe, discovering how the river was significant to Native Americans, European settlers and to the formation of the culture we know today. A canoeing safety and skills session will precede the trip. Discover our roots with this Wood County Bicentennial Series program, offered in conjunction with Henry County Historical Society.
Leader: Craig Spicer
Program fee: $20.00
 
 
Status Update:
 
+ Parks open daily 8:00 am – 30 min. past sunset.
+ Restrooms are open. Please wear a mask inside.
+ Playgrounds are open. Please wash hands immediately before & after use.
+ Please observe 6-10 feet of social distancing.
+ Indoor facilities are closed.
+ Facility rentals are cancelled through August 2. 
+ Bring water. Water fountains are off.
+ Volunteering has resumed for self-guided activities only.
 
Carter Historic Farm
 
See what’s summer is like in a Depression-era farm by following the Facebook page.

Loretta L. Campbell, 79

Passed away on Thursday,
July 2, 2020….

Loretta L. Campbell, 79, of Findlay, passed away at 3:06am on Thursday,
July 2, 2020, at the Bridge Hospice Care Center, Findlay. She was born on
October 10, 1940, in Haneytown, Ohio to the late Fred and Ethel (Cole)
Herringshaw. She married Richard Campbell on February 21, 1959, and he
survives. 



Loretta is also survived by her daughters: Dayle Spoon of Fostoria and
Tamora (Dave Unverferth) Campbell of Van Buren; son, Lonnie Campbell of
North Baltimore; grandchildren: Travis Campbell of Findlay and Stephanie
(Aaron) May of Pandora; great-granddaughters: Natalie Long, Preslie May,
and Taylie May; and her sister, Shirley Brown of Florida. 

She was preceded in death by her grandson, Thaddeus Campbell; brothers:
Merl, Kenneth, Melvin, Fred, Chuck, and Edward Herringshaw; and sisters:
Dorothy Hosler, Virginia Richmond, Ida Hemler, and Mary Shepherd. 

A funeral service will be held at 1:00pm on Tuesday, July 7, 2020, at
SMITH-CRATES FUNERAL HOME, North Baltimore, where visitation will be held
for 2 hours (11:00am-1:00pm) prior to the service. Burial will be in
Weaver Cemetery, Bloom Township. Memorial donations may be made to a
charity of the donor’s choice. Online condolences may be expressed at
www.smithcrates.com.

Donald E. Evans, Sr., 63

Passed away on Thursday, July 2, 2020….

Donald E. Evans, Sr., 63, of North Baltimore, passed away at 7:40 a.m.,
Thursday, July 2, 2020, at the Bridge Hospice Care Center, Bowling Green.
He was born on September 14, 1956, in Bowling Green to the late Harold and
Mary (Wilhelm) Evans.  He married Lesa Clark on May 25, 1979, and she
survives. 



Don is also survived by his sons: David (Kristi) Clark of Bowling Green,
Donald Evans, Jr. of North Baltimore and Jacob (Crystal) Evans of
Rochester Hills, MI; daughters: Mary (Tom) Wolff of Bairdstown, TN and
Corrine Evans of Toledo; brother, Jim Evans; sisters: Joan Boyer of Lucky,
OH, Mary Ann Evans of VA and Lois Toesing of Woodville, OH; grandchildren:
Simon Lashway, Lennox Clark and Elijah Clark. 

He was preceded in death by a brother, Glenn Evans. 

All services will be private.  Arrangements are entrusted to SMITH-CRATES
FUNERAL HOME, North Baltimore. 

Memorial contributions may be made to a charity of the donor’s choice.
Online condolences may be made at www.smithcrates.com.

Don’t Drink and Drive

All too often 4th of July festivities turn tragic on the nation’s roads…..

Americans love to celebrate the 4th of July with family, friends, food, and fireworks. But all too often the festivities turn tragic on the nation’s roads. This American holiday is also one of the deadliest holidays of the year due to drunk-driving crashes.



Over the 4th of July holiday period in 2018 (6 p.m. July 3 to 5:59 a.m. July 5):

  • 193 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes. 40% (78) of those fatalities occurred in alcohol-impaired crashes. This compares to 2017 when 38% of the July 4 holiday period fatalities occurred in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes.
  • 71% of those who died in alcohol-impaired crashes were in a crash involving at least one driver or motorcyclist with a BAC (Blood Alcohol Content) of .15 or higher

Keep your 4th of July celebrations safe by designating a sober driver, not driving distracted, and always wearing your seatbelt.
 
For More Information:

  • Lt. Angel Burgos, Ohio State Highway Patrol: 419-352-2481
  • Sandy Wiechman, Safe Communities Coordinator: 419-372-9353 or swiechm@bgsu.edu