Keep Cool on the Grill

Refreshing, dairy-infused dishes for warm days

(Family Features) Keep your kitchen cool and comfortable with grilled meals that banish the heat to the outdoors. Crisp, fresh greens and a perfect blend of spices and savory ingredients make each of these refreshing dishes perfect solutions for toasty days.

Featuring ingredients across the food groups, these dairy-fueled recipes from Milk Means More are ideal for well-rounded meals filled with nutritious flavor. Zesty mustard, spicy Sriracha and rich buttermilk lend a marinated flavor upgrade to traditional grilled chicken, while homemade pesto, fresh corn and ham create a perfect harmony for a cheesy grilled pizza. Or make a salad the star of your dinner table with a simply seasoned sirloin steak, plenty of veggies and a tart twist on a creamy dressing made with yogurt and milk.

Find more refreshing meal solutions at milkmeansmore.org.
Grilled Buttermilk Chicken

Grilled Buttermilk Chicken

Recipe courtesy of Lori Yates of Foxes Love Lemons on behalf of Milk Means More
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 16 minutes
Servings: 4

  • 1 1/2    cups buttermilk
  • 1          tablespoon mustard powder
  • 1          tablespoon Sriracha
  • 2          teaspoons minced garlic
  • 2          teaspoons paprika
  • 4          chicken drumsticks, bone in, skin on
  • 4          chicken thighs, bone in, skin on
  • vegetable oil, for grill
  • 1/4       cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 1         lemon, cut into wedges (optional)
  1. In medium bowl, whisk buttermilk, mustard powder, Sriracha, garlic and paprika.
  2. Place chicken in large zip-top bag; pour buttermilk mixture over chicken. Seal bag and refrigerate 2 hours or overnight.
  3. Heat outdoor grill for direct grilling over medium heat. Remove chicken from marinade, shaking off excess; discard marinade. Lightly oil grill grates. Transfer chicken to grill and cook, turning occasionally, 16-18 minutes, or until internal temperature reaches 165° F.
  4. Transfer chicken to serving platter. Sprinkle with parsley and serve with lemon wedges, if desired.

Grilled Steak Salad with Chive Yogurt Dressing

Grilled Steak Salad with Chive Yogurt Dressing

Recipe courtesy of Kirsten Kubert of Comfortably Domestic on behalf of Milk Means More
Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Servings: 6

Dressing:

  • 1          cup plain yogurt
  • 3          tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice (3 small limes)
  • 2          tablespoons milk
  • 2          tablespoons chopped fresh chives
  • 1          clove garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1/4       teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/8       teaspoon black pepper

Steak:

  • 1          teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4       teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/4       teaspoon granulated garlic
  • 20        ounces boneless petite sirloin steak

Salad:

  • 3          cups baby spinach
  • 3          cups chopped romaine lettuce hearts
  • 1/2       cup sweet red pepper rings
  • 1/2       cup sweet yellow pepper rings
  • 1          cup avocado chunks
  • 1/4       cup thinly shaved red onion
  1. To make dressing: In blender, combine yogurt, lime juice, milk, chives, garlic, salt and pepper. Blend on low until smooth consistency forms and chives are completely incorporated. Transfer dressing to jar with tight-fitting lid and refrigerate until serving.
  2. Heat grill to medium.
  3. To prepare steak: Combine kosher salt, black pepper and granulated garlic to create rub. Sprinkle half of seasoning mix over one side of steak, pressing it into meat. Repeat with remaining seasoning on opposite side of steak.
  4. Grill steak over direct medium heat to desired level of doneness, approximately 4-5 minutes per side for medium pink center. Remove steak from grill and let rest 7-10 minutes on cutting board.
  5. To make salad: Toss spinach and romaine on large platter. Scatter red and yellow peppers, avocado and onion over greens. Slice grilled sirloin thinly against grain. Arrange meat slices along center of salad.
  6. Drizzle dressing over salad just prior to serving.

Grilled Pizza with Arugula Pesto, Corn and Ham

Grilled Pizza with Arugula Pesto, Corn and Ham

Recipe courtesy of Rachel Gurk of Rachel Cooks on behalf of Milk Means More
Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Servings: 6

Arugula Pesto:

  • 2          cups fresh arugula, tightly packed
  • 1          clove garlic
  • 1          tablespoon lemon juice
  • pinch red pepper flakes, (optional)
  • 1/3       cup shredded Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2       cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • salt, to taste
  • pepper, to taste

Grilled Pizza:

  • 2          tablespoons flour, divided
  • 1          pound pizza crust dough (at room temperature if using refrigerated dough)
  • vegetable oil, for grill
  • 1/2       cup Arugula Pesto
  • 1/2       cup part-skim ricotta cheese
  • 1/2     cup diced deli ham
  • 1/2-3/4             cup fresh corn kernels (about 1 cob)
  • 1/4     cup thinly sliced red onion
  • 1/4     cup shredded Parmesan cheese
  1. Heat grill to medium heat (350-400° F).
  2. To make Arugula Pesto: In food processor, combine arugula, garlic, lemon juice, red pepper flakes and Parmesan. Pulse until combined then, with food processor on, drizzle in olive oil until pesto forms, scraping down sides as needed. Taste and season with salt and pepper, to taste.
  3. To make Grilled Pizza: Flour pizza dough lightly and stretch or roll to about 1/2-inch thickness (14-16-inch diameter).
  4. Sprinkle remaining flour on large rimless baking sheet, pizza peel or pizza stone. Transfer dough to baking surface.
  5. Clean grill grate and grease with oil-soaked paper towel and tongs. Slide dough off baking surface onto grill. Cover and cook until dough is bubbling on top and golden brown on bottom, 2-3 minutes.
  6. Carefully flip dough over using peel or tongs. Remove crust from grill to add toppings. Spread Arugula Pesto over dough. Top with ricotta, ham, corn kernels, onion and Parmesan. Return pizza to grill, cover and cook until toppings are heated through and bottom of crust is crispy, 5-7 minutes.
  7. Remove from grill, slice and serve.

SOURCE:
United Dairy Industry of Michigan

Diversify Your Dinner Menu

From sandwiches to salads, the versatility of an ingredient like veal can help you build out a full menu….

(Family Features) Crafting quick, easy, nutritious meals is one of the most common goals for home chefs, yet it may sometimes be difficult to keep the menu feeling fresh and new.

By introducing a variety of ingredients, you can broaden the horizons of your family’s dinner options.

For creative, simple, tasty family meals, consider these globally inspired recipes that highlight inventive ways to incorporate veal as a satisfying main ingredient in nearly any dish. From sandwiches to salads, the versatility of an ingredient like veal can help you build out a full menu with a wide array of protein-rich dishes. With recipes like these, veal can become a staple on your family’s weekly menu.

Visit vealmadeeasy.com for additional recipes and complete nutrition information.

Classic Veal Parmesan Sandwiches

Prep time: 10 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Serves: 6

  • 6          veal cutlets (3 ounces each)
  • salt, to taste
  •             ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1/2       cup all-purpose flour
  • 1          egg wash
  • 1          cup breadcrumbs
  • 1          cup vegetable oil
  • 12        tablespoons tomato sauce
  • 3          tablespoons Parmesan cheese, grated
  • 6          slices provolone cheese
  • 6          slices mozzarella cheese
  • 6          sub rolls
  1. Heat oven to 350° F.
  2. Pound each veal cutlet between sheets of parchment or plastic wrap until 1/4-inch thick.
  3. Blot veal dry. Season each cutlet with salt and pepper, to taste. Dredge veal in flour; shake off excess. Dip in egg wash and dredge in breadcrumbs.
  4. In large skillet over medium heat, heat about 1/8-inch oil to about 350 F. Working in batches, add breaded veal to hot oil and pan fry first side until golden brown and crisp, about 2 minutes. Turn once and pan fry second side until it reaches internal temperature of 160 F, about 1-2 minutes.
  5. Drain on paper towels or wire rack set over baking sheet.
  6. Add 2 tablespoons tomato sauce to each veal cutlet and sprinkle 1/2 tablespoon Parmesan cheese on top. Add one slice provolone and mozzarella cheese to each cutlet.
  7. Place veal parmesan in oven 2-3 minutes, or until the cheese begins to melt and veal is hot.
  8. Add veal to sub rolls and serve.

Nutrition information per serving: 45 g protein; 55 g carbohydrate; 7 g fiber; 11 g fat; 7 g saturated fat; 145 mg cholesterol; 908 mg sodium.

Veal Za’atar Flatbreads

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 25 minutes
Serves: 4

  • 1/4       cup za’atar seasoning
  • 3          tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1          package (10 ounces) flatbreads
  • 1          onion (4 ounces), finely chopped
  • 1/2       pound ground veal
  • 1/4       cup crumbled feta cheese
  • 1          tomato (6 ounces), cored and chopped
  • chopped parsley, for garnish
  1. Heat oven to 425° F. In small bowl, combine za’atar seasoning and 2 tablespoons olive oil.
  2. Spread about 1 tablespoon za’atar mixture on each flatbread. Arrange flatbreads on large baking sheet; set aside.
  3. In 10-inch skillet over medium heat, heat remaining olive oil. Cook onion 4-5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add veal and cook 4-5 minutes until no longer pink, stirring to break up meat.
  4. Remove skillet from heat; stir in feta cheese. Spoon 1/4 veal mixture onto each flatbread. Sprinkle each flatbread with tomato. Bake 8-10 minutes, or until hot. Sprinkle each flatbread with parsley.

Nutrition information per serving: 17 g protein; 40 g carbohydrate; 19 g fat; 5 g saturated fat; 45 mg cholesterol; 760 mg sodium; 1 g fiber; 5 g total sugars; 10% DV calcium; 15% DV iron.

Mediterranean Grilled Salad

Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Serves: 4

  • 1          large orange (12 ounces)
  • 1/2       cup Italian salad dressing
  • 1          teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1          veal cutlet (12 ounces), pounded to 1/4-1/8-inch thick
  • 1          bulb fennel (7 ounces), trimmed, halved and cored
  • 1/2       small red onion (1 1/2 ounces), thinly sliced
  • 1 1/2    cups cooked farro
  • 2          cups packed baby arugula (about 3 ounces)
  • 1          head radicchio (4 ounces), cored and torn (about 2 cups packed)
  • 1/2       cup toasted hazelnuts, chopped
  • 1          ounce Parmesan cheese
  1. Grate 1/2 tablespoon zest from orange; reserve orange. Stir zest into salad dressing.
  2. Use knife to remove skin and pith from orange. Use knife to cut between fruit and membrane to release each orange section. Squeeze membrane to extract 1/4 cup juice; reserve juice and orange sections.
  3. In bowl, whisk reserved orange juice, mustard and salad dressing. Remove 1/4 cup dressing to re-sealable food storage bag. Add veal cutlets to dressing in bag. Re-seal bag and turn several times until veal is coated with dressing; set aside.
  4. Prepare grill or heat grill pan over medium-high heat on stovetop. Remove veal cutlets from dressing; discard dressing. Grill veal cutlets 5-6 minutes, turning once. Remove cutlets from heat. Place on cutting board and cut into bite-size pieces.
  5. Thinly slice fennel halves and place in bowl. Add red onion, farro, arugula and radicchio; toss. Add veal, orange sections, reserved salad dressing and hazelnuts.
  6. Draw blade of vegetable peeler across surface of cheese to make thin ribbons. Toss to coat with dressing. Divide salad among four bowls.

Nutrition information per serving (about 2 cups): 30 g protein; 36 g carbohydrate; 17 g fat; 3 g saturated fat; 50 mg cholesterol; 560 mg sodium; 6 g fiber; 9 g total sugars; 3 mg iron; 539 mg potassium.

Veal, Spinach and Tomato Arepas

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes
Serves: 4

  • 1/2       pound veal cutlets
  • 1          teaspoon cumin
  • 1/2       teaspoon chili powder
  • 1 1/2    tablespoons olive oil
  • 2          green onions (1 ounce each), sliced
  • 1          clove garlic, minced
  • 1          can (10 ounces) diced tomatoes and green chilies
  • 1/8       teaspoon salt
  • 2          cups packed baby spinach (about 2 1/2 ounces)
  • 4          arepas (5 inches in diameter)
  • 1/4       cup crumbled queso blanco cheese (1 ounce)
  1. Pound veal cutlets into 1/4-1/8-inch thickness; cut into 1-inch strips. Place in bowl and toss with cumin and chili powder.
  2. In 12-inch, nonstick skillet over medium heat, heat olive oil. Cook veal strips 1-2 minutes. Remove veal to plate; keep warm. In same skillet over medium heat, cook green onions and garlic 2-3 minutes. Add tomatoes and salt; over high heat, heat to boil. Reduce heat to low; simmer 5 minutes until slightly reduced.
  3. Stir in spinach. Cook 3-4 minutes, or until spinach wilts and is tender. Return veal to skillet; heat through.
  4. To serve, heat skillet or griddle over medium heat. Toast arepas on each side until lightly browned and heated through, turning once.
  5. Cut each arepa in half horizontally. Top bottom half of each arepa with veal mixture. Sprinkle each with cheese; replace arepa tops.

Nutrition information per serving (1 arepa): 15 g protein; 12 g carbohydrate; 14 g fat; 5 g saturated fat; 50 mg cholesterol; 450 mg sodium; 2 g total sugars; 10% DV calcium; 10% DV iron.

SOURCE:
North American Meat Institute

4 Ways Kids can Benefit from Growing Up With Pets

No matter what may be going on in a child’s life, a pet can be there through highs and lows as a constant friend…..

(Family Features) Pets can make an impression on every member of the family, but the bond between a child and a pet can become a special one with lifelong effects. From increased physical activity to a positive impact on confidence and social skills, there are many ways younger family members can benefit from growing up alongside a furry friend.

These are a few ways kids can learn from growing up with a pet, courtesy of the CESAR® brand, and you can find more at Cesar.com/firstdayfriends.

  1. Increased Physical Activity – Whether taking a walk or playing fetch, pets provide unique opportunities for children to engage in physical activities, both indoors and out. As a bonus, encouraging children to expel energy alongside their pets can tire out both rambunctious parties, which can benefit the whole family.

  1. Empathy and Companionship – No matter what may be going on in a child’s life, a pet can be there through highs and lows as a constant friend. Research shows a pet can help reduce stress and moderate its impact. Having a companion animal like a cat or dog may provide the secure attachment and emotional support a child needs. This impact can also be seen through the CESAR brand’s First Day Friends program, which celebrates the benefits of the human-animal bond in the classroom.
Photos courtesy of Fotolia
  1. Improved Social Skills and Self-Esteem – Kids with pets tend to have greater self-esteem, less loneliness and enhanced social skills, according to a study from the WALTHAM™ Centre for Pet Nutrition. Moreover, simply owning a pet can help facilitate conversation between children who may find social settings difficult, ultimately learning to form bonds and friendships with their peers.

  1. Responsibility – Pet ownership can help teach kids about responsibility and caring for another living being. Feeding, cleaning, walking and grooming are all activities that appropriately aged children can do with the help of an adult. With single-serving dog food options, it can be easy to teach children about their pets’ mealtime routines, including how much and how often to feed them. To make it even more special, the CESAR Home Delights™ line offers recipes modeled after a meal you might serve at your own table, so children can enjoy “sharing” their meals with their dogs.

SOURCE:
Mars Petcare

Knowledge is Power

Understanding the rights of nursing home residents…

(Family Features) An estimated 1.4 million older adults and people with disabilities live in nursing homes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If a nursing home participates in Medicare or Medicaid – and most do – it must meet requirements “to promote and protect the rights of each resident.”

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

This means nursing homes are required to care for their residents in a way that enhances the quality of life for residents, respects their dignity and ensures they are able to make choices for themselves.

Established by federal law, the “Residents’ Bill of Rights,” states if you live in a nursing home, you are entitled to rights including:

  • The right to be fully informed in a language you understand of all aspects of your residency.
  • The right to participate in all aspects of your care.
  • The right to make independent choices based on your needs and preferences.
  • The right to privacy and confidentiality.
  • The right to safe and appropriate transfer and discharge, including the right to appeal decisions.
  • The right to visits from friends, family, providers and other people of your choosing.
  • The right to participate in social, religious and community activities.
  • The right to organize and participate in resident groups, often called resident councils.
  • The right to complain without fear of repercussions.
  • The right to be free from discrimination.
  • The right to be free from abuse, neglect and restraint.
  • The right to adequate medical care and treatment.
  • The right to get information about alternatives to nursing homes.

Some states have laws and regulations that establish additional rights for nursing home residents. Some states also guarantee a similar set of rights for people who live in assisted living or similar settings.

Every state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam have an advocate, called a Long-Term Care Ombudsman, for residents of nursing homes, board and care and assisted living facilities and similar residential care facilities. These advocates work to resolve problems affecting residents’ health, safety, welfare and rights. Residents, their families and others have the right to contact their local Ombudsman program to help them understand their rights, learn about community resources and work through problems.

For more information on these rights, and to find your local Ombudsman program, visit acl.gov/ombudsman. The website also provides information on other programs and services available to help older adults and people with disabilities who need help with daily tasks, like getting dressed, bathing or cooking, to receive this support in their own homes. These programs can help delay or avoid nursing home care, guide nursing home residents looking to transition back into the community and support family members serving as caregivers.

SOURCE:
Administration for Community Living

“Jesus Loves Me”

A devotion from Pastor Ralph J. Mineo….

Charlie Brown, the well-known comic strip character, always seems to get the short end of the stick. Life is often unfair for poor Charlie Brown.

One day, he and Peppermint Patty were having a conversation. Patty was lamenting: “I need to talk to someone who knows what it’s like to feel like a fool, someone who knows what it’s like to be humiliated, someone who’s been disgraced, and degraded, someone who’s been there.”

In the final panel of the comic strip, there are no words. Charlie Brown simply had his arm around Patty’s shoulder. He’s been there. He understands.

The New Testament letter to the Hebrews teaches: “Jesus can help us in our sufferings, because of what he suffered.” Many religious leaders and average people of his day considered Jesus to be a complete fool, a blasphemer. Eventually, he was humiliated, disgraced, degraded, and crucified as a common criminal.

Jesus was always connected to the Father, even in suffering (especially in suffering). In the letter to the Hebrews, Jesus is called “the pioneer of our faith.” Not only did he endure the worst for us, he paved the way for us in dealing with suffering, by holding fast to faith.

In comparison to our sufferings, we can, with certainty, say about Jesus: he’s been there! Jesus understands.

We need never be alone in our suffering. Jesus offers a loving arm around our shoulder, no matter how bad life gets. Jesus offers grace, healing, forgiveness, love for our heart, body, mind, soul.

Do you need some comfort today? Do you someone to lean on? Do you need someone who’s been there?

If so, turn to Jesus Christ, the one who is already turning to you! You can always count on him to be there. Nothing can separate you from his love. Jesus is there right now for you!

Let us proclaim this truth every day: Jesus loves me! Jesus loves me! Jesus loves me!


St. Luke’s Church Worship News

Message titled “Listening to the Voice of Jesus”

St. Luke’s Lutheran Church, North Baltimore
Sunday, May 12, 2019, 10:15 a.m.

Pastor Ralph Mineo will offer a message titled “Listening to the Voice of Jesus” based on John 10:22-30.  Worship will include a celebration of baptism. 

Sunday School for all ages begins at 9:00 a.m.   

Please join us as we continue our celebration of the Easter Season.

Planning for the Future

Taking inventory of your financial health…


(Family Features) Only 28% of Americans are financially healthy, according to the U.S. Financial Health Pulse. Most others will have difficulty reaching long-term financial goals and are more vulnerable to the threat of financial shocks, such as car trouble, unforeseen medical bills or job loss.

Regardless of income or wealth, the road to financial health – how you are able to manage your day-to-day financial life while building for the future – can be a lifelong journey. What you do today can build toward or detract from your long-term resilience and ability to pursue opportunities. Whether you want to take that dream vacation, prepare for retirement or save for college, financial health takes effort to build.

“An overwhelming majority of the country is experiencing financial challenges that have lasting effects on people’s lives, on their ability to weather the inevitable ups and downs and on their chances to pursue their dreams,” said Jennifer Tescher, CEO of the Center for Financial Services Innovation (CFSI), the nation’s authority on consumer financial health. “Each year, CFSI and MetLife Foundation join forces on #FinHealthMatters Day to highlight the importance of financial health, especially for the 180 million people who are financially vulnerable.”

These questions can serve as a starting point to take inventory of your financial health:

  1. Are you spending less than you make? Regardless of your income level, it can be difficult to get ahead if you’re among the 47% of Americans that are spending more than or equal to what they earn, according to the U.S. Financial Health Pulse. The ability to manage cash flow directly affects your ability to build savings and deal with unexpected expenses.
  2. Do you pay your bills on time and in full? Falling behind on bills, including credit card payments, can be a significant hindrance to improving your financial health. If all your bills seem to come due at the same time each month or don’t appropriately align with paydays, consider staggering bills based on their priority level with rent and utilities taking precedence over any less necessary items like cable television or subscription services, which could even be eliminated altogether. The ability to keep up with payments shows how well you’re able to manage cash flow and daily financial obligations.
  3. Do you have sufficient liquid, short-term savings? The ability to draw on savings is important for coping with unexpected expenses such as car repairs or medical bills or a setback such as being laid off from a job. Having six or more months of living expenses in savings is considered financially healthy, but 45% of Americans don’t have enough savings to cover even three months, according to the U.S. Financial Health Pulse. Try setting aside 5-10% of your monthly income to build up both your emergency fund and long-term savings account.
  4. Do you have appropriate insurance coverage? Along with sufficient liquid savings, having appropriate insurance can help you withstand an unexpected expense, such as the death of a loved one or a medical emergency. Shop around for the best rates and coverage on everything from homeowners and car insurance to life and disability policies.
  5. Do you plan ahead for expenses? Planning ahead shows you are future-oriented and proactively managing your financial situation, a behavior that is strongly correlated with financial health. Proper future planning behaviors include using a budget, coding expenses, setting up automatic savings transfers and using financial management apps, among other habits.

For more tips to focus on your future financial health, follow #FinHealthMatters on social media or visit cfsinnovation.org/news/finhealthmattersday.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

SOURCE:
Center for Financial Services Innovation

Take Music and Podcasts Everywhere You Go

An increasing number of smart devices designed for the home make it easy to listen to your favorite music and podcasts in every room.


(Family Features) Music is everywhere, and today’s tech-enabled world makes it easy to enjoy the sounds of your favorite artists and storytellers no matter where you go.

“In the connected world we live in, consumers want to be able to listen to their favorite music and podcasts wherever they are and however they choose to listen, whether that’s at home, in the car or on the run,” said Sten Garmark, vice president of product for Spotify.

Learn about the many ways you can access music and podcasts while on the go with these tips that can make it easy to bring your audio library with you from the family room, to the car, to the gym and virtually anywhere else life takes you:

At Home
Smart technology isn’t just for improving security or managing your home’s energy use. An increasing number of smart devices designed for the home make it easy to listen to your favorite music and podcasts in every room.

Smart speakers are a must for any music-lover’s home with a wide range of devices that come in all shapes and sizes. Whether it’s listening to Motown while you cook, turning up the jazz while you entertain or queuing up your favorite podcasts as you wind down for the night, smart speakers are equipped to stream all types of audio across your home. There are other sources for accessing your music, too. Smart TVs have become true information and entertainment hubs; going far beyond the music channels many cable and satellite providers offer, you can now access an array of apps, including streaming music, on many smart TV models. Another option: game consoles that integrate apps and features beyond their basic gaming function, such as streaming music for the best gaming soundtrack experience.

Also keep in mind that smart home hub capabilities often extend beyond simple device management, such as allowing you to use voice commands to play music and podcasts from streaming services.

In the Car
For most newer vehicle models, standard audio systems offer a wealth of handy music features like favorites lists, Bluetooth integration with your smartphone and access to various apps. Voice-activated controls even let you adjust volume and switch tracks while keeping your eyes on the road and hands on the wheel. Just say the word to turn up the volume on premade playlists such as “70s Road Trip” and podcasts like “The Joe Budden Podcast” with a streaming service like Spotify.

It’s no secret that there are dozens, if not hundreds, of apps designed to make driving easier and more enjoyable. You’re probably familiar with apps that provide directions or help you locate the cheapest gas nearby, but don’t overlook entertainment apps that can add a little fun to all that function.

If music apps like Spotify aren’t already integrated into your car’s audio system, you can access them through your smartphone then connect via an auxiliary cord or through Bluetooth with Apple CarPlay or Android Auto, which have in-car display options that make streaming audio simple and stress-free.

On the Run
One of the fastest growing tech segments is wearable technology, which spans everything from smartwatches to electronic devices integrated into clothing or shoes. Fitness enthusiasts may find that in addition to offering health and fitness functions, many of these devices are also able to stream music. Some wearables come with music apps pre-installed, but many also offer options to add your own custom app selections after purchase.

Streaming music directly from your smartphone’s built-in speaker is almost always an option as well, even without any other device. When you want or need to keep your music to yourself, wireless headphones are an increasingly affordable, hassle-free option. Simply pair the headphones with your smartphone for a private music experience even when you’re in a crowded place.

Explore more options to take your music everywhere you go at Spotify-Everywhere.com.

SOURCE:
Spotify

Pushing for a Strong Start for Babies

Science shows that human brains grow faster between the ages of 0-3 than at any later point in people’s lives……


(Family Features) More than 10,000 babies are born each day in the United States. Where they are born and where they live during the first years of their lives can make a difference in their chances for strong starts.

Science shows that human brains grow faster between the ages of 0-3 than at any later point in people’s lives, forming more than one million neural connections every second. Nurturing relationships, early learning experiences and good health and nutrition influence all areas of a child’s development, setting a strong foundation for the rest of his or her life.

According to the “State of Babies Yearbook: 2019,” published by Zero To Three, an early childhood development nonprofit organization, babies in many states face persistent hardships that undermine their ability to grow and thrive, such as staggering child care costs and lack of comprehensive paid family and medical leave.

“Families are struggling every day, in every state, and we are urging our leaders to act,” said Myra Jones-Taylor, chief policy officer of Zero To Three. “Most of our investments in early childhood start too late, at age 4 or older. By that time, some of the most important years of brain development have passed. Today’s babies become tomorrow’s workers, parents and leaders. Now is the time for policymakers on both sides of the aisle to make every baby a priority through policies built on the science of brain development and budgets that put babies and families first.”

To help ensure a brighter future for all babies, the organization is working with Congress through events like “Strolling Thunder” to help drive support for policies and programs that prioritize the needs of babies, toddlers and their families. Its policy agenda includes establishing a comprehensive national paid leave program that provides adequate time off to care for newborns or newly adopted children, and allows families to take leave if their child or another family member is experiencing a serious illness; expanding access to quality, affordable child care by increasing investments in the child care system while also working toward a comprehensive, long-term solution for working families; and increasing investments in programs that support babies’ healthy development, such as Early Head Start, and infant and early childhood mental health.

“As a director of an early childhood education program, I can speak firsthand to the struggle associated with providing high-quality care and education programs for young children while balancing that against what parents can reasonably afford to pay for child care,” said Jessica Carter, a “Strolling Thunder” parent from North Carolina. “As a mother of two, I can also speak firsthand to the fact that if I did not receive discounted tuition at my center, I would not be able to afford child care costs and would be forced to stay at home with my children. As a result, our family would not have affordable access to health care. Further, our children would not benefit from the social and educational benefits they receive in a group care setting.”

In order to help make babies a national priority, consider letting your policymakers know you care about the policies and programs babies need for strong starts to their lives, and join the team that’s fighting for their futures at thinkbabies.org/strollingthunder.

SOURCE:
Zero To Three

A Fast, Family-Friendly Dinner

Use on-hand ingredients for a quick-fix meal..


(Family Features) Between juggling the ever-shifting to-do list and busy weeknights, there’s not always time left in the day to comb through cookbooks to find the perfect recipe. Even with a potential meal plan in mind, life can get in the way, and running to the grocery store might not be a top priority.

For a quick meal without a lot of hassle, an option such as Eckrich Smoked Sausage can be paired with whatever you have in the refrigerator or pantry for a fast, foolproof meal the whole family can enjoy. Since it is pre-cooked, all you have to do is heat and eat, taking the guesswork out of cook time while offering a rich and savory protein option for a balanced and delicious meal.

With flavors and forms ranging from the Original Skinless Smoked Sausage Rope to spicy Jalapeno & Cheddar Smoked Sausage Links, a home-cooked breakfast, lunch or dinner is just moments away – no instructions or plans needed. You can be a rebel without a cookbook and deliver diverse and delightful meals for your loved ones, such as this Veggie Smoked Sausage Stir-Fry.

For more mealtime inspiration, visit Eckrich.com.

Veggie Smoked Sausage Stir-Fry

Cook time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4

  • 1          package Eckrich smoked sausage, sliced into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 4          servings premade white or brown rice
  • 1          tablespoon peanut oil
  • 1          bag (16 ounces) frozen stir-fry vegetable mix
  • 1          package stir-fry dry seasoning mix
  • 2          tablespoons honey
  • 1          teaspoon vinegar
  • 2          tablespoons sesame oil
  • toasted sesame seeds (optional)
  • sliced green onions (optional)
  1. In pan over medium-high heat, brown sausage; set aside.
  2. Heat white or brown rice according to package instructions.
  3. In same pan over medium-high heat, heat peanut oil and stir-fry vegetable mix. Add stir-fry dry seasoning mix, honey, vinegar and sesame oil.
  4. Divide rice, sausage and stir-fry mixture among four bowls.
  5. Sprinkle each with toasted sesame seeds and sliced green onions, if desired.

SOURCE:
Eckrich

Chowline: Drinking more water can mean less calories for some kids

The study found that about one in five of those youths said they didn’t drink any water on any given day.

I’m trying to incorporate more water into my kids’ daily meals. What are some ways to encourage them to drink more water?

According to a new study released this week in JAMA Pediatrics, drinking more water and fewer sugary drinks is associated with lower caloric intake in kids, teens, and young adults.                                                                                                                           

The study, which was released Monday, was based on data collected from 8,400 youths ages 2–19 nationwide. The data was reported in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveysfrom 2011–2012 and from 2015–2016. The youths reported whether they drank water daily, and they reported the number of sugar-sweetened beverages they routinely drank.

The study found that about one in five of those youths said they didn’t drink any water on any given day. Skipping water was associated with drinking an extra 100 calories per day from sugary drinks including sports drinks, juices, and sodas, the researchers found.

While the study’s researchers say that the data doesn’t prove causality, they do recommend that children and young adults drink water daily to help avoid consuming extra calories from sugary drinks.

Another reason why water and other nonsugary drinks are the best options for kids and young adults is that sugary drinks have been linked to a host of health problems in both children and adults. Cavities, obesity, heart disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, high cholesterol, and type 2 diabetes have all been associated with the consumption of sugary drinks. 

As such, the American Heart Association says that children and young adults shouldn’t consume more than 100 calories of added sugar per day. The group further recommends that children limit their consumption of sugary drinks to 8 ounces—less than one soda can—per week.

Also, according to the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, people should consume less than 10% of their daily calories from added sugars. That same source recommends that people either avoid sugar-sweetened drinks overall, or at the very least, limit the amount of sugary drinks they consume.

This is important considering that many youths are drinking too many sugary drinks on any given day. For instance, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics reports that about two-thirds of kids drink at least one sugary drink on any given day. Nearly 30% drink two or more sugary drinks per day, according to a January 2017 study.

So, how can you incorporate more nonsugary drinks such as water and milk into your children’s diets? Cincinnati Children’s Hospital offers these tips:

  • Limit their choices to water and milk.  
  • Have water or milk readily available to drink.
  • Drink water or milk yourself. That way, your children will be more likely to do so as well.
  • Add fresh fruits such as lemons, oranges, strawberries, kiwi, blackberries, or blueberries to your children’s water. You can add the fruits to the water for taste or freeze them in ice cubes to put into the water. 

Chow Line is a service of the The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC). Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@osu.edu.