WCCOA Job Posting – Medical Escort Driver (Full Time)

Medical Escort Driver for the Wood County Committee on Aging is a 40 hour per week position

WCCOA Job Posting

Medical Escort Driver (Full Time)

Medical Escort Driver for the Wood County Committee on Aging is a 40 hour per week position. Duties include: transporting older adults to and from medical appointments, assisting clients with scheduling of appointments, and maintaining up-to-date client records.

Qualifications:

High school diploma or GED equivalent. Must be proficient with basic computer use including Microsoft Office. Must possess proven organizational skills and be able to work independently or as an active team member. Minimum of 5 years driving experience with no moving citations/violations.

 Must have a proven record of working with older adults.  Be eligible for bonding and insurable under agency policy.  Possess a valid Ohio Driver’s license with proof of auto insurance. Meet the requirements contained in Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) 173-3-06.6 (B)(3). Must successfully complete background check.

Applications available at WCCOA, 140 S. Grove Street, Bowling Green, Ohio. Downloadable format available at www.wccoa.net   Completed applications must be accompanied by current resume and returned to the Manager of Human Resources.  Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

 The Wood County Committee on Aging, a non-profit organization, is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Cataract Surgery Saves An Avid Bowler’s Vision In Record Time

Better vision due to cataract surgery meant seeing lanes and pins clearly….

(NAPSI)—If you ever have trouble seeing your way clear to getting your eyes checked, here’s a case to consider: Genida White could tell her vision was gradually getting worse, but she rationalized away the need to see an ophthalmologist—a medical doctor who specializes in eyecare. She could still do all the things she enjoyed, such as bowling every Monday. But mostly, she was nervous to hear what the doctor would say about her eyes.

Her daughter provided the encouragement she needed, telling her about a radio advertisement she heard about free eye exams with EyeCare America. No more excuses; it was time for an appointment. While, unfortunately, Genida did receive the diagnosis she feared—she would need surgery to remove cataracts in both eyes—the results were brilliant. The improvement in her vision was swift and dramatic.

“I’d never had eye surgery before,” Genida said. “Before I knew it, it was over.”

Cataract Facts

A cataract is when your eye’s natural lens becomes cloudy. People with cataracts describe it as looking through a foggy window; vision is blurred and colors are dulled. About half of all Americans over age 75 have cataracts. As you age, you’re increasingly likely to develop cataracts.

Fortunately, cataracts are treatable. An ophthalmologist surgically removes the cloudy lens and replaces it with an artificial one. Cataract surgery is the most effective and most common procedure performed in all of medicine with some 3 million Americans choosing to have cataract surgery each year.

Thankful for sight-saving surgery

Within two weeks of calling EyeCare America, Genida had cataract surgery in both eyes—just in time to enjoy the Thanksgiving holiday. She was amazed at how simple it was to set up the initial eye exam with EyeCare America and at how quickly her vision was restored.

“Reading the eye chart was so bad at first,” recalls Genida. She could just barely read the last two lines of the eye chart during her initial eye exam with her ophthalmologist, Douglas Wilson, M.D. The day after surgery, Genida was able to read the whole way through the chart, top to bottom. “Dr. Wilson asked me, ‘Are you sure you couldn’t see before?!’ and I said, ‘Yes, I’m positive!’ It was amazing.”

Proof of her quick recovery was evident at the bowling alley, where Genida didn’t miss one Monday on the lanes.

Is EyeCare America right for you? 

If the cost of an eye exam is a concern, the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s EyeCare America program may be able to help. This national public service program provides eyecare through thousands of volunteer ophthalmologists for eligible seniors, 65 and older, and those at increased risk for eye disease, mostly at no out-of-pocket cost to the patient.

Learn More

To see if you or someone you care for qualify, visit www.aao.org/eyecare-america or follow @AcademyEyeSmart.

Better vision due to cataract surgery meant seeing lanes and pins clearly and so better bowling for one enthusiast.

Bring your own phone to save on wireless

Carriers today make it easy to switch…..

(BPT) – Taking your current phone with you when you switch wireless carriers — referred to as “bring your own phone (BYOP)” or “bring your own device (BYOD)” — is an increasingly popular option for those who simply don’t feel the need to buy a new phone. Today’s smartphones are so good, and so powerful, that they really don’t need to be replaced as often as in the past. Plus, it can save you lots of money.

Here are all of the things you’ll need to know to bring your own phone to the carrier of your choice, from unlocking your device to checking for compatibility to picking the right plan.

Make sure your phone is paid off

When considering bringing your phone to a new carrier, the first thing to make sure of is that you’ve fully paid for your device. Most carriers allow you to finance your phone via monthly installments, where the phone costs are incorporated into your monthly bill. It’s easy to forget that your bill is composed of both your plan and your phone costs.

Before switching, double-check your account to confirm your phone has been paid off in its entirety. In most cases, you can pay off the remaining balance of your phone in one lump sum, freeing you of any device-related contractual obligations with your current carrier.

Check that your phone is unlocked

The next thing to do is make sure that your device is unlocked — meaning it is no longer bound to its original carrier network. Phones aren’t always locked, but some are. The lock is a software code that’s put on the phone by the manufacturer per the requirement of the carrier that sells the device. The lock is meant to ensure that the phone can’t be used on any other operator’s network until a different software code is entered to unlock the device.

If you have a device that is locked, you can get it unlocked from your wireless carrier if you meet certain criteria, like having the device paid in full. If you meet these requirements, having your device unlocked can usually be done simply by making a call to your carrier’s customer service department and requesting it.

Checking your phone’s carrier compatibility

While most newer smartphones are compatible across networks, some older phones and devices are limited to operating on specific network technologies (CDMA or GSM). Depending on your phone’s age, make and model, you may need to narrow down your desired carrier list based on which ones support your mobile device.

To find out if your current device is compatible with your new carrier, perform an IMEI check. Most carriers have an IMEI checker on their websites, so you can input the number yourself and get your answer in mere seconds. The IMEI is a unique 15-digit ID number for your cell phone. You can find out your phone’s IMEI number by dialing *#06# on your device.

Find a better phone plan

Once you’ve confirmed that your new provider’s network is compatible with your phone, and that your phone is unlocked, switching is simple. You’ll get a SIM card from your new carrier, and insert it into the proper slot on your device. The process will vary depending on the type of device you have. SIM cards come in three different sizes (Nano, Micro and Standard) and the location of the SIM slot is not uniform, though most are located on the side of your phone.

Carriers today make it easy to switch. Consumer Cellular, for instance, provides both the SIM card and activation on their nationwide networks for free when you sign up using a compatible GSM phone. In addition, they offer no-contract monthly plans which include talk, text and data for as low as $20 a month.

Love your current phone, but not your current carrier? Fortunately, these days it’s easy to switch and save plenty of money by bringing your own phone along.

“Dynamic Balance Through Dance” movement class

WCCOA to hold a Zoom virtual Dance class series…..

Bowling Green, OH (April 21, 2021) – The Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA) will be holding a Dynamic Balance Through Dance movement class virtually using the Zoom platform. The class, taught by Certified Instructor Tammy Starr, PT., will be held on Wednesdays from April 14 to May 19 at 6:30 p.m. This course lasts for six (6) weeks, and costs $15 to participate.

Join in this class to work on range of motion, strength, balance, and functional movement and to have fun! Participants may sit or stand during the class. Proper shoes are recommended for safety. All you will need is a device with internet access and the downloaded version of Zoom. No workout equipment or prior experience is needed for participation in this class. Upon registration you will receive the Zoom meeting id and password.

Please contact the Programs Department of WCCOA to register by calling 419.353.5661 or 1.800.367.4935, or by e-mailing programs@wccoa.net  Payment and waiver can be mailed or dropped off to the Wood County Senior Center, 305 North Main St., Bowling Green, Ohio 43402. 

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

WCCOA Offers Diabetes Information Class

Advanced registration needed!…

 Wood County, Ohio – Diabetes Information Class to be held at the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc.  Join us every other Friday in May and June, starting May 14th 2021 from 12:30 until 2:00pm.  Dates will be 5/14, 5/28, 6/11 and 6/25/2021.  During this class we will cover general diabetes information including nutrition, label reading, exercise options, tips and more!  To be hosted by Denise Kaminski, RN, WCCOA.  Advanced registration required!!  Space is limited.  Please contact Denise Kaminski in Social Services for more information or to register at 419-353-5661 or 1-800-367-4935.

 About the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc

The Wood County Committee on Aging was founded in September of 1973, as is dedicated to the planning and development of programs and services that will allow older adults of  Wood County to remain as independent as possible for as long as possible. As Ohio first nationally accredited senior center, the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc is working to encourage older adults to enjoy, enrich and explore this season of life.  

 

WCCOA Senior Services Levy

To be placed on the November 2021 General ballot…..

The Governing Board of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA) took action today, Wednesday, April 14, 2021, to authorize WCCOA’s Executive Director, Denise Niese to request the Wood County Board of County Commissioners approve a tax levy to be placed on the November 2021 General ballot. The Wood County Committee on Aging is requesting the renewal of the current 0.7 mill levy, with an addition of 0.3 mills. In accordance with Ohio Revised Code, the term of the levy will be five years.

The WCCOA operates eight Senior Centers across Wood County providing essential services to older adults. WCCOA delivered 204,508 meals to homebound seniors in 2020 throughout the coronavirus pandemic. These deliveries also serve as an important daily safety check for the individuals enrolled. Once COVID restrictions are lifted by the State of Ohio, WCCOA will once again provide congregate meals at all eight of the Senior Centers.  In 2019 (pre-COVID) WCCOA  served 71,089 meals at the Centers. Nutritious, hot lunches provide one-third of the required daily dietary requirement our participants.

Additionally, WCCOA offers round-trip non-emergency medical escort (door through door service), loan of  durable medical equipment, social services support from WCCOA social workers and registered nurse,  wellness and educational programming, and opportunities for socialization.

This levy renewal with additional millage will ensure that the vital services that Wood County’s older adults have come to expect will delivered for years to come.

This is the first request for an increase in millage since November 2002, when the present 0.7 mill levy was passed by voters by 63.07%. Under Ohio law (ORC 319.301, enacted by HB 920 in 1976), property taxes are reduced so that the real property tax of the average homeowner for voted millage will not be increased as a result of reappraisals or updates. Due to this, the current 0.7 mill levy now collects at 0.57 mills. The requested renewal of the levy, with an additional 0.3 mills, will collect at an effective rate of 0.87 mills.  For an owner-occupied home valued at $100,000 the proposed millage will increase a property-owner’s annual taxes by $10.50.

During 2020 the Senior Services Levy supported 63% of WCCOA’s operating budget).  The requested renewal, with the addition of 0.3 mills, would generate $3.36 million annually.

8 Ways to Reach a Healthy Blood Pressure

Take all prescribed medications as directed and keep up your healthy lifestyle….

(Family Features) To take care of your heart, it’s important to know and track your blood pressure. Millions of Americans have high blood pressure, also called hypertension, but many don’t realize it or aren’t keeping it at a healthy level.

Photos courtesy of Getty Images

For most adults, healthy blood pressure is 120/80 millimeters of mercury or less. Blood pressure consistently above 130/80 millimeters of mercury increases your risk for heart disease, kidney disease, eye damage, dementia and stroke. Your doctor might recommend lowering your blood pressure if it’s between 120/80 and 130/80 and you have other risk factors for heart or blood vessel disease.

High blood pressure is often “silent,” meaning it doesn’t usually cause symptoms but can damage your body, especially your heart over time. Having poor heart health also increases the risk of severe illness from COVID-19. While you can’t control everything that increases your risk for high blood pressure – it runs in families, often increases with age and varies by race and ethnicity – there are things you can do. Consider these tips from experts with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s (NHLBI) The Heart Truth program:

  1. Know Your Numbers. Everyone ages 3 and older should get their blood pressure checked by a health care provider at least once a year. Expert advice: 30 minutes before your test, don’t exercise, drink caffeine or smoke cigarettes. Right before, go to the bathroom. During the test, rest your arm on a table at the level of your heart and put your feet flat on the floor. Relax and don’t talk.
  2. Eat Healthy. Follow a heart-healthy eating plan, such as NHLBI’s Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH). For example, use herbs for flavor instead of salt and add one fruit or vegetable to every meal.
  3. Move More. Get at least 2 1/2 hours of physical activity each week to help lower and control blood pressure. To ensure you’re reducing your sitting throughout the day and getting active, try breaking your activity up. Do 10 minutes of exercise, three times a day or one 30-minute session on five separate days each week. Any amount of physical activity is better than none and all activity counts.
  4. Aim for a Healthy Weight. If you’re overweight, losing just 3-5%  of your weight can improve blood pressure. If you weigh 200 pounds, that’s a loss of 6-10 pounds. To lose weight, ask a friend or family member for help or to join a weight loss program with you. Social support can help keep you motivated.
  5. Manage Stress. Stress can increase your blood pressure and make your body store more fat. Reduce stress with meditation, relaxing activities or support from a counselor or online group.
  6. Have a Healthy Pregnancy. High blood pressure during pregnancy can harm the mother and baby. It also increases a woman’s risk of having high blood pressure later in life. Talk to your health care provider about high blood pressure. Ask if your blood pressure is normal and track it during and after pregnancy. If you’re planning to become pregnant, start monitoring it now.
  7. Stop Smoking. The chemicals in tobacco smoke can harm your heart and blood vessels. Seek out resources, such as smoke free hotlines and text message programs,  that offer free support and information.
  8. Work with Your Doctor. Get help setting your target blood pressure. Write down your numbers every time you get your blood pressure checked. Ask if you should monitor your blood pressure from home. Take all prescribed medications as directed and keep up your healthy lifestyle. If seeing a doctor worries you, ask to have your blood pressure taken more than once during a visit to get an accurate reading.

To find more information about high blood pressure as well as resources for tracking your numbers, visit nhlbi.nih.gov/hypertension.

SOURCE:
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

How to Combat Social Isolation

A little creativity and a commitment to filling time productively can help reduce the strain of being alone….

(Family Features) Even before COVID-19 limited social contact with friends, family and colleagues, many adults experienced loneliness and depression due to limited contact with others. Now, a year after the pandemic forced many people into even greater levels of isolation, the issue of social isolation is especially prevalent in Americans over the age of 50.

Despite the physical implications of a global pandemic, research shows the mental health stakes are high, too. A nationwide survey, commissioned by Barclays, found that half of Americans over the age of 50 said the isolation from their friends and family has been more challenging than concerns over health risks they may face.

Social isolation has provided plenty of time for Americans to reflect on their priorities. The majority of Americans surveyed (90%) have re-evaluated their post age-50 goals and put spending more time with family at the top of their lists. In fact, the most common first thing 50-plus Americans will do once COVID-19 is over is to see and spend time with their families (41%).

“While restrictions are beginning to ease, many older adults are still isolated from friends and family, and that takes a toll on their mental well-being” said Lisa Marsh Ryerson, president of the AARP Foundation. “We must do all we can to help older adults, who have suffered greatly during COVID-19, strengthen the social connections that are so essential to their ability to lead longer, healthier lives.”

For example, AARP Foundation’s Connect2Affect platform equips older adults with the tools they need to stay physically and mentally healthy and connected to their communities. The AARP Essential Rewards Mastercard from Barclays is helping fund the foundation’s work to increase social connection with donations based on new accounts and eligible purchases, up to $1 million annually.

A little creativity and a commitment to filling time productively can help reduce the strain of being alone until it’s safer to resume social activities.

Photos courtesy of Getty Images

Use technology to connect with loved ones. Video chats and traditional phone calls can help you feel connected even when you can’t be together in person. While a drop-in call can be fun, consider arranging regular visits with kids and grandkids. If you schedule calls throughout the week, you’ll have something regular to look forward to and can benefit from a check-in that affirms everyone is healthy and safe.

Make time for physical activity. Staying closer to home may mean you’re not getting the exercise you once did, but it’s important for your health to stay active. Regularly using your muscles helps keep your body strong, and even light physical activity a few times each week can help keep your cardiovascular system fit for better heart health. Regular exercise can also provide a range of positive mental health outcomes, including reduced stress, anxiety and depression, and improved memory.

Volunteer in your community or consider virtual volunteering. Helping others is a way to release feel-good endorphins for yourself. While your limited social calendar may afford you some extra time, inquire with local nonprofits about how you can contribute to their causes. Especially as funding for charitable organizations has dropped, volunteers are still essential to most nonprofit organizations, whether the help comes in person or virtually. Even from a distance, you may be able to help with tasks like making calls to donors, assisting with mailings or planning fundraising campaigns.

Learn a new hobby or skill. Another way to fill your free time, and reap some positive energy, is to explore a new hobby or skill. The personal satisfaction of learning and focusing your mental energy on something that interests you can help offset the disappointment of being away from those you love.

Find more resources that support older adults at connect2affect.org.

SOURCE:
Barclays

Being 55+ Has Its Advantages

If you are one of these lucky ones—as in 55 or older—you may not realize that you are actually the envy of many…..

(NAPSI)—The 55-plus crowd is more active than ever, continuing to stay in the workforce longer, growing in numbers—to the tune of 73 million and counting—and exerting an even greater economic impact. In fact, 55+ers are responsible for over half of U.S. consumer spending, according to AARP, contributing to the huge upsurge in online spending during the pandemic.

If you are one of these lucky ones—as in 55 or older—you may not realize that you are actually the envy of many. People in this age group can save thousands of dollars a year on everyday goods and services so make sure you know about ALL of the discounts available to you.

Whether planning for long-term savings for retirement or for short-term expenses like a post-pandemic vacation, saving money is front and center in today’s world. The good news is that there are so many great discounts created just for you that it makes it easy to save tons by paying attention to where you’re spending your money each month.

Here are some “55 and over” discounts to be on the lookout for—that you might not know about:

•Auto insurance: Insurance companies sometimes offer discounts for good drivers over a certain age.

•Travel: It’s almost time to travel again so be sure to check for age-related discounts with major airlines, hotel chains, and rental car companies.

•Restaurants: Over 55? Ask about special days, nights or menu items at your favorite fast-food or fancy restaurant—even if it’s takeout.

•Wireless plans: Make sure that you are on a discounted 55+ plan—a failsafe way to save money each month.

Given that 55+ consumers are spending 30% more time on mobile devices than they did a year ago, having an affordable wireless plan that provides unlimited text, talk and data with additional valuable perks is huge. Take a look at T-Mobile’s 55+ plans that it offers to customers across the United States. Verizon and AT&T, on the other hand, only offer 55+ plans for customers who live in Florida (even though 92% of people in the United States who are 55 and older live outside of Florida). And T-Mobile recently announced that customers on a Magenta 55+ or Magenta MAX 55+ plan can have up to four voice lines on their account. 

Always pay attention to details when considering your choice in wireless plans. 

T-Mobile’s Magenta 55+ and Magenta MAX 55+ plans offer unlimited text, talk and data combined with:

•A guaranteed monthly rate that includes taxes and fees in the plan price—your price stays the same each month.

•Netflix on Us—Magenta 55+ plan includes Netflix on Us for families and its Magenta MAX 55+ plan includes Netflix Basic with one line or Netflix Standard with two lines.

•Scam Shield that helps protect people from phone scams, hacks and robocalls.

•Free stuff and discounts every Tuesday with T-Mobile Tuesdays.

•Unlimited texting and 2G data without roaming charges in 210+ countries & destinations. 

•America’s largest and fastest 5G network—which is like having WiFi on the road to send pics and stay connected. 

Added bonus: the MAX tier includes unlimited premium data, so you can’t be slowed down no matter how much data you use. 

It’s important to highlight that T-Mobile’s 55+ plans include Scam Shield because recently scammers have become even more aggressive, targeting people with phony COVID-19 vaccine information. Scam Shield protects its users against phone scams and robocalls—and it’s free for T-Mobile customers.

Learn More

For further information about the plans, visit www.t-mobile.com/55.

Article provided by T-Mobile, America’s supercharged Un-carrier.

 

Health Director Signs Amended Orders

Revisions on visitation with Nursing Homes and Assisted Living Facility Residents…..

 

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Ohio Governor DeWine announced today(Tuesday, 3/23) that Ohio Department of Health Director Stephanie McCloud has signed the following orders:

General visitation requirements for nursing homes and assisted living facilities remain the same, including the requirement that visitors schedule appointments in advance, are screened at the door, and wear masks. Changes to the orders include: 

  • Ohio is requiring that visitation be permitted whenever safety protocols can be met. Previously, visitation was permitted, not required.
  • Vaccinated residents may have physical touch with their visitor while wearing a mask. Previously, touch was discouraged.
  • Visits may occur in a resident’s private room, as opposed to the previous requirement of a separate visitation area.
  • 30 minutes should serve as the minimum amount of time for a visit. Previously, 30 minutes was the maximum time to visit.

The order also expands the circumstances in which compassionate care visits should be granted.

In addition, the order updates nursing home and assisted living testing requirements to require the facilities to test vaccinated staff once per week and unvaccinated staff twice per week. The previous order made no distinction between vaccinated or unvaccinated staff.

New Alzheimer’s Association Research: African Americans  Share Health Care Experiences

Disparity and Discrimination in Getting Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care…

Ernest Gragg is “a little stubborn” about things and fiercely independent, said her daughter Priscilla Robinson.

You can see it in how she lives her life. Ms. Gragg worked until she was 83 years old. A history and English teacher, she retired from teaching and then went to work again fluctuating from full-time to part-time to full-time again. Even after retiring at 83, she went back to work as a contract employee.

Pricilla Robinson and her mother Ernest Gragg


Today at 86, Gragg is showing signs of memory loss. A long-distance caregiver, Robinson said she talks to her mother every day- sometimes multiple times a day.

 “She admitted to me that she’s gotten turned around a few times driving,” Robinson said. Another concern: “She repeats herself over and over and over,” Robinson said. The family has voiced other concerns.

Robinson took her mother to the doctor to get checked for memory issues, but the doctor did not diagnose her with dementia and did not give any advice on how to handle the family’s concerns.

“They were a little cavalier in the way they handled my concerns,” Robinson said. “When you see her once every few months and I talk to her every day, I feel I know her better than the doctor knows her….If I went in and thought it was an ulcer, the doctor would tell you don’t eat this, do that. Why not for this issue?”

Karen D. Gorman Jones said when she first started noticing changes in her mother, her mother’s doctor would not even acknowledge her concerns.  Her mother changed doctors and the geriatric doctor told Gorman Jones that nothing was wrong with her mom, Inez Gorman. Less than a year later, Gorman Jones said, the diagnosis came – her mother had Alzheimer’s disease.

African Americans are disproportionately impacted by Alzheimer’s disease. Older African Americans are almost twice as likely as whites to get the disease. But new research findings also show they bear the brunt of health care disparity and discrimination in getting Alzheimer’s and dementia care.

Findings from two national surveys appearing in the Alzheimer’s Association 2021 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures report reveal that half of African Americans (50%) report they have experienced health care discrimination. More than 2 in 5 Native Americans (42%) and one-third of Asian Americans (34%) and Hispanic Americans (33%) likewise report having experienced discrimination when seeking health care.

In addition, half or more of non-White caregivers say they have experienced discrimination when navigating health care settings for their care recipient, with the top concern being that providers or staff do not listen to what they are saying because of their race, color or ethnicity.

“Despite ongoing efforts to address health and health care disparities in Alzheimer’s and dementia care, survey results show there is still a lot of work to be done,” said Carl V. Hill, Ph.D., MPH, Chief Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Officer, Alzheimer’s Association.

Eric VanVlymen, Ohio Regional Leader of the Alzheimer’s Association, said in Ohio, the Association is conducting community forums to get more insight into Ohioans’ experience. “We consistently say go to the doctor if you are noticing memory issues, but it is imperative that once people are there that people are diagnosed as early as possible and get the medical care needed.”

Robinson said in her case, she doesn’t think she was being discriminated against. The doctor just did not want to deal with it.

“It was not pushed to the back of the stove, it was pushed off the stove,” Robinson said. “The doctor was not helpful in addressing these things. All of these things are disheartening. I just feel it’s going to be a struggle.”

She continued, “Right now I don’t have anybody to help. Where do I start, what do I do, all of these things are of a concern to me.”

People with immediate concerns can call the Alzheimer’s Association’s 24/7 Helpline at 800.272.3900. The Alzheimer’s Association is helping to train primary care physicians to increase the accuracy and timeliness of diagnosis of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementia through an initiative called Project Echo®. Once enrolled, physicians can present cases and get coaching from a multidisciplinary clinical team of experts from around the country.

VanVlymen said current and future health care providers must be prepared to screen, diagnose and treat Alzheimer’s and dementia in racially and ethnically diverse older adults because by 2050, up to 39 percent of this older adult population will be non-White Americans.

“At the Association we are focused on working to understand how we achieve health equity in dementia because everyone deserves accurate and timely diagnosis and effective treatment,” VanVlymen said.

 

Tips on Getting an Alzheimer’s Diagnosis

  • If you, your parent or spouse is having memory issues, go see a doctor
  • If it is a parent or spouse, ask if you can attend the doctor’s appointment
  • Make sure that your loved one has signed paperwork to allow the doctor to share information with you.
  • Remember you are the best advocate for your loved one. If you are not satisfied with what the doctor is saying, keep asking questions or ask for a second opinion.
  • Contact the Alzheimer’s Association’s 24/7 Helpline at 800.272.3900. The Association can help educate you on the stages of the disease and do a care consultation for you and your loved one.

 

 

 

 

No “50 Year Club” this year

Group to disband….

Due to the recent passing of Cathy Eninger, who was spearheading the 50 Year Club for last few years, and the resignation of Larry Slaughterbeck  who assisted, the event is cancelled. 

The 50 Year Club was an annual luncheon meeting of NBHS Alumni who celebrated graduating 50 years and more. It is believed to have begun in 1965.