W.C. Senior Center “Groundbreaking” is Friday

New $8M facility to serve Wood County…..

Please join us as we launch the building project which will serve older adults throughout Wood County.

When:  Friday,  September  20,  2019 
at 10:30 a.m.

Where:  Wood County Committee on Aging  Wood County Senior Center building site,  140 South Grove Street, Bowling Green, Ohio 43402

The total cost of the project to build the new facility which will house the operations of the Wood County Committee on Aging (WCCOA) and the Wood County Senior Center is $8 million.

On February 26, 2018, then State Senator Randy Gardner and State Representative Theresa Gavarone announced that the project would receive $1.6 million from the 2018 State of Ohio capital appropriations budget.  The WCCOA Governing Board set a goal of $1.2 million for a capital campaign and will continue to accept donations after that goal is reached.  The balance of the project is financed by State Bank and Trust of Defiance.

This project is made possible by the efforts of the following:

  • State Senator – Theresa Gavarone
  • Chancellor of Ohio Higher Education – Randy Gardner
  • State of Ohio – 2018 State Capital Budget
  • Bowling Green State University – Optimal Aging Institute
  • Wood County Board of Commissioners
  • City of Bowling Green
  • Friends of WCCOA
  • State Bank and Trust of Defiance
  • MemoryLane Care Services
  • Duket|Architects|Planners
  • Mannik & Smith Group
  • Donors from throughout Wood County

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

“Healthy Living” Program in NB

The hour-long event will be at 6pm Friday September 20 at the Briar Hill Health Campus 600 Sterling Dr., NB

Alzheimer’s Association to Hold Educational Program on Healthy Living for Your Brain and Body: Tips from the Latest Research for the North Baltimore community

North Baltimore, OH – The Alzheimer’s Association Northwest Ohio Chapter will hold an educational program on the topic of healthy aging for all community members and those impacted by the disease.

The hour-long event will be at 6pm Friday September 20 at the Briar Hill Health Campus 600 Sterling Dr.

 

At any age, there are lifestyle habits we can adopt to help maintain or even potentially improve our health. These habits may also help to keep our brains healthy as we age and possibly delay the onset of cognitive decline.

To help people age well, the Alzheimer’s Association® is offering the Healthy Living for Your Brain and Body: Tips from the Latest Research program. This workshop covers four areas of lifestyle habits that are associated with healthy aging:

·       Cognitive activity.

·       Physical health and exercise.

·       Diet and nutrition.

·       Social engagement.

In each area, we will discuss what we know, drawing on current research, as well as what we can do — steps to take now to improve or maintain overall health in each area.

Healthy Living for Your Brain and Body: Tips from the Latest Research is designed for individuals of any age who are looking for information on ways to age as well as possible.

“We all want to age well” says Pam Myers, Program Director of the Chapter. “We have learned a lot on how to care for our hearts – it only makes sense now to also learn how to take care of our brain”.

Please register online at alz.org/nwohio or call 1-800-272-3900.

In the United States alone, more than 5 million individuals are living with Alzheimer’s and 16 million are serving as their unpaid caregivers. The disease is a global crisis that impacts numerous families right here in our community. However, no one has to face this disease alone or without information.

About the Alzheimer’s Association®

The Alzheimer’s Association is the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s.  For more information on the Alzheimer’s Association, call 1.800.272.3900, or visit alz.org.

WCCOA looking for participants for Finding Your P.L.A.C.E.

This project connects multiple generations in a Montessori School Environment.

WCCOA looking for participants for Finding Your P.L.A.C.E.

Bowling Green, OH (August 29, 2019) – The Wood County Committee on Aging (WCCOA) will be holding a project called Finding Your P.L.A.C.E. (Partnered Learning Activities & Connected Experiences). The sessions will be on the first and third Tuesdays of each month. Sessions dates are held on: Tuesdays, October 1, 15, November 5, 19 and December 3 from 9:30-11:30a.m. It will be held at the Montessori School of Bowling Green located at 515 Sand Ridge Rd.  

This project connects multiple generations in a Montessori School Environment. Participants involved in the project include Bowling Green State University Students, Upper Grade Montessori School Students, and community members diagnosed with mild-to-moderate memory loss. The cost of this event is $50 for 5 sessions.

Engagement includes:

  • Group movement exercise by Tammy Starr, PT
  • Classroom exploration & opportunities to reflect and share
  • Skills based on clients’ interests and abilities 
  • Activity kits provided for use at home
  • Caregiver support provided

Training for Caregivers will be held on Tuesday, September 24 from 9:30-11:30 a.m. at Montessori School, 515 Sand Ridge Rd., Bowling Green. Standard testing to assess participant’s abilities will be required to properly assign projects. Testing will take place on September 24 at 9:30 a.m. while caregivers are in the training session.  Additional training session will be offered as needed.

Note:  No medical staff will be present and personal care will not be provided. Facilities are available for caregivers to provide assistance. It is the discretion of WCCOA & Montessori School of Bowling Green to advise community members if they are eligible for this program.

For further details or to register, please contact the Programs department at WCCOA by calling 

(419) 353-5661 OR (800) 367-4935, OR by  e-mailing programs@wccoa.net

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

Medicare 101

Get educated on Medicare in Medicare 101!

Perrysburg, OH (September 4, 2019) – The Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. is working with the Ohio Senior Health Insurance Information Program (OSHIIP) to ensure our local seniors have all the information they need for this fall’s Medicare open enrollment.

A representative from OSHIIP will be presenting a talk at the Perrysburg Area Senior Center (140 West Indiana Avenue, Perrysburg) on Tuesday, October 1, 2019 at 1 p.m. Come learn about the recent changes to Medicare and how the October 15 to December 7 Medicare Annual Coordinated Election Period can work for you.

Attendees will also get tips on how to enroll for 2020 coverage in a Medicare prescription drug plan (Part D) and/or a Medicare health plan, and will be able to see if they qualify to save an average of $3,900 on their prescription drug costs!

No RSVP is needed for the presentation on October 1, 2019. Please contact the Social Services Department at the Wood County Senior Center by calling 419-353-5661 or 1-800-367-4935 if you have any questions. You may also contact OSHIIP directly at 1-800-686-1578.

 The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

Paying Income Taxes on Social Security Benefits

Ask Rusty – by AMAC Certified Social Security Advisor Russell Gloor

Social Security Matters
by AMAC Certified Social Security Advisor Russell Gloor
Association of Mature American Citizens     
 
__________________
 
Ask Rusty – Paying Income Taxes on Social Security Benefits
 
Dear Rusty: I understand that after I reach full retirement age, I no longer have a limit on how much I earn. I retired one year early (65), and am now 76, but I am still being taxed on a portion of my SS benefits. I am not working and making extra money. However, my wife is still working, and I get two small annuities per month. But when I file income tax I am told we made enough for me to be taxed on a portion of my Social Security benefit. I even checked to see if filing married but separate returns would help and it was not as good as joint returns. So maybe you can explain this to me. Signed: Taxpaying Senior
 
Dear Taxpaying Senior: I’m afraid you’re speaking of two different things. You are correct that once you reach your full retirement age there is no longer a limit on how much you can earn from working before your monthly Social Security benefit is reduced. But that is something totally different from paying income tax on your Social Security benefits. 
 
Social Security’s “earnings limit” looks only at your earnings from employment (or self-employment) to decide if they should take back some of your benefits before you reach your full retirement age. However, whether or not your Social Security benefits are taxable income is determined by your “combined income,” which includes your adjusted gross income as reported to the IRS, plus any non-taxable interest you may have had, plus 50% of your total Social Security benefits for the tax year. This is often referred to as your “modified adjusted gross income” or “MAGI” and it’s how the IRS determines if, or how much, of your Social Security benefit is taxable income. As a couple filing your income taxes as “married – filing jointly” if your MAGI is over $32,000 then up to 50% of your annual Social Security benefit amount is taxable, and if your MAGI is over $44,000 then up to 85% of your Social Security income becomes taxable. Note that the combined income levels are different, and lower, when you file your taxes individually.
 
The “earnings limit” is a rule imposed by Social Security to recover some benefits paid if the limit is exceeded due to your earnings from working. Taxation of Social Security benefits is done by the IRS (not Social Security) and it’s the IRS who determines if your Social Security benefits will add to your income tax burden. And while the Social Security earnings limit goes away once you reach your full retirement age, there is no such relief from the IRS at any age when it comes to paying income tax on your Social Security benefits.
 
This article is intended for information purposes only and does not represent legal or financial guidance. It presents the opinions and interpretations of the AMAC Foundation’s staff, trained and accredited by the National Social Security Association (NSSA). NSSA and the AMAC Foundation and its staff are not affiliated with or endorsed by the Social Security Administration or any other governmental entity. To submit a question, visit our website or email us.

WANTED: Caregiver Nominations!

WCCOA is looking for Caregiver Nominations for Golden Care Awards!….


Bowling Green, OH (September 5, 2019) – The Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., will be collaborating with Brookdale of Bowling Green, Perrysburg Commons, Bridge Home Health and Hospice, Kingston of Perrysburg, Bowling Green Manor and Bowling Green Care Center and Briar Hill Health Care Campus to host the Golden Care Awards in order to recognize the caregiving heroes in Wood County.

This event will recognize compassionate caregivers working in a facility or home care setting, as well as community caregivers. The reception and dinner will be held on Thursday, November 7 at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church (315 South College Dr., Bowling Green) from 6 to 8 p.m., with a ceremony at 6:30 p.m.

Nomination forms are available at all Wood County Senior Centers or on our website at www.wccoa.net, and the deadline is Friday, October 4, 2019. Nominated “Caregiver Heroes” must have been working in a facility/home care setting, been an active caregiver for a family member, friend or neighbor within the last year. A caregiver provides direct care and tends to the needs of an older adult. Self-nominations will not be accepted.

Nominees will be judged by the examples given in the following categories:
– Community Caregivers
– Medical Professionals (therapists, physicians, nurses, STNA care navigators, social workers)
– Agency Support Staff (volunteers, companion caregivers, housekeepers, dietary, salon, activity personnel, medical drivers)
It is encouraged that the person nominating the caregiver provides a thorough explanation of why they are outstanding caregivers. The panel of judges will base their decisions on the written information provided on the nomination form.

Return the completed nomination form with their photo to “Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc, 305 North Main St., Bowling Green, OH 43402” OR e-mail programs@wccoa.net
For more information, contact the Wood County Committee on Aging’s Programs Department through the above e-mail or by calling 419-353-5661 OR 800-367-4935.

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.
For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

WCCOA to hold “Matter of Balance” Classes

Targeted toward preventing falls…..

 Perrysburg, OH (August 27, 2019) – The Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA) will be holding a “Matter of Balance” course at the Perrysburg Area Senior Center (at 140 West Indiana Ave, Perrysburg– Schaller Building) every Tuesday from September 10 to October 29, from 10 to 12 p.m. This course lasts for six (6) weeks, and costs $15 to participate.

 

Are you experiencing a fear of falling? Are you limiting your activities due to this fear? Are you becoming physically weak? If you answered “yes” to any of these three questions, A Matter of Balance is for you! During this class participants will learn to view falls as controllable, set goals for increasing activity, make changes to reduce fall risk at home, and exercise to increase strength and balance. Participants will receive a manual for training purposes and a certificate upon completion of the course.

 

This course is sponsored by Aetna Better Health of Ohio.

 

Please contact the Programs Department of WCCOA to register by calling 419-353-5661 or 1-800-367- 4935, or by e-mailing programs@wccoa.net

 

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

Seek Outdoor Entertainment for Personal Satisfaction

The sights and sounds that go along with exploring somewhere new make it easy to enjoy spending time outside….

(Family Features) Making time to enjoy the outdoors is a simple way to boost your physical and mental well-being, no matter your age. Whether you venture out to the porch to watch the sunset or lace up your golf shoes for an afternoon on the course, there are plenty of ways you can take in some fresh air.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Going outside generally results in more physical activity than if you were to stay cooped up inside, and it’s an easy way to socialize and interact with others. It also plays an important part in maintaining your vibrancy.

Get inspired to spend some quality time outside with these ideas:

Take up a hobby. Planting a garden or tending a flower bed is terrific motivation to spend more time outdoors, and you’ll have the bounty of your work to enjoy, as well. Even a box garden designed for a smaller space requires regular care, so you’ll find yourself outdoors on a consistent basis nurturing plants to grow.

Take in a performance. Outdoor theaters offer numerous forms of entertainment from music concerts to plays. Before shopping for tickets, be sure to consider any discounts you might be able to use. For example, AARP members can find discounts on tickets for a wide range of events.

Increase your exercise. Even if you have some physical limits, keeping your muscles stretched helps maintain mobility. That might mean taking a walk or playing a round of golf. You could gather family or neighbors for a game of croquet or just move outdoors to do your daily stretches. Find a way to blend your daily exercise with the chance to get some fresh air for maximum benefits.

Go on a trip. The sights and sounds that go along with exploring somewhere new make it easy to enjoy spending time outside. Be sure to make plans for entertainment while you’re on the road, and rather than driving home in the dark or when you’re tired, consider making a hotel reservation through the AARP Travel Center. You might even consider organizing a weekend getaway with a partner or friend who shares your interest in discovering a new destination.

Enjoy a meal out. Dining al fresco is a treat when the weather cooperates, but you can incorporate a delicious meal as a bonus when you’re out and about even when the weather is less than ideal. You could opt to spend your wait time outdoors, or reward yourself after a walk with a special seafood, Italian or steak dinner. You might even pair the meal with a concert or a show for a truly enjoyable evening away from home.

Get creative when you think about how you’ll make more time to spend outdoors and remember that resources exist to assist with planning and saving money along the way. Learn more at aarp.org/memberbenefits.

SOURCE:
AARP Services, Inc.

Ways to Make the World a Better Place for Seniors

Educate yourself on issues that impact seniors and complete small acts of kindness for seniors in your life….

(Family Features) By 2050, the senior population (adults age 65 and older) will be more than double that of the world’s youngest citizens, and the number of people living beyond age 80 is expected to triple over the next 30 years.

As the aging population increases, some 11.3 million seniors are living alone, according to the Institute on Aging. In addition, women are twice as likely as older men to live by themselves.

Without proper support, seniors may face a wide range of issues including limited mobility, chronic conditions, improper nutrition and feelings of loneliness. For example, older adults can have problems chewing or may take medications which interfere with their appetites. However, research shows lack of companionship may be the biggest challenge.

In fact, an AARP survey found 1 in 5 adults over the age of 40 were “socially disconnected,” which can impact health. People who reportedly experienced loneliness and isolation had lower mental well-being scores, and those who were dissatisfied with their level of social engagement were more likely to report a decline in cognitive function, as well.

While anyone can benefit from a kind gesture, seniors are some of the most in-need members in many communities. There is likely a wide range of opportunities to enhance the lives of seniors in your area. Numerous programs and agencies exist to help you determine the best way to make a difference.

One example is Ready to Care, an initiative from Home Instead Senior Care that challenges people to complete weekly care missions. Each activity guides members through various ways to give to senior-related causes, learn about the aging crisis and issues impacting seniors, and serve seniors through small actions of kindness.

Most care missions are simple acts, such as opening a door, learning about Alzheimer’s or helping with a chore. Each week, a new mission is delivered to participants’ phones via text message.

Small gestures, like these simple acts of kindness, can go a long way toward improving a senior’s day.

Physical assistance: Most seniors are eager to retain their independence, but everyday tasks can pose fall risks or require exposure to harsh weather conditions that can be dangerous to older adults.

  • Offer to bring in the daily newspaper or mail.
  • Mow their lawn or offer to help with other yardwork.
  • Lend a hand in caring for pets, such as taking a dog for a walk or helping clean up waste from the yard.
  • Offer moral support and a sense of physical safety by volunteering to join them on a walk.

Social support: Loneliness is common among seniors, especially those who live alone. Show seniors in your area they have a meaningful place in the community and options for companionship.

  • Offer a friendly wave and say hello when you see them out.
  • Invite them to dinner, either at your home or at a restaurant.
  • Have your children or kids you know in the area draw pictures or write letters.
  • Make a date for an afternoon or evening of entertainment, such as cards, a movie or board games.

Practical solutions: For various reasons, some seniors may be unable to complete everyday tasks. Offer a helping hand in their daily routines when possible.

  • Lend your time to take them to run errands.
  • Deliver baked goods or a home-cooked meal to improve access to nourishing foods.
  • Help arrange for professional assistance and services, such as an audit to ensure homes are safe.

How You Can Help

Consider these simple ways you can help the aging population by taking action and learning about issues impacting seniors:

  • Lend your voice. Be an advocate for change in public actions and medical research for the aging society. If you’re an expert by experience, share your knowledge about senior-related issues and public policy measures.
  • Give from your heart. Less than 1% of charitable donations go to organizations that help seniors. Find senior-focused non-profits to give your next charitable donations to, such as one dedicated to raising awareness, inspiring change and accelerating progress in Alzheimer’s care and research.
  • Get prepared to care. Educate yourself on issues that impact seniors and complete small acts of kindness for seniors in your life. Sign up for weekly care missions and find additional information to better equip yourself to care for seniors at imreadytocare.com.
  • Give your time. Volunteer with local non-profit organizations that help seniors or offer support related to senior-affiliated issues.

To find more ways you can care for the seniors in your community, visit imreadytocare.com.

SOURCE:
Home Instead Senior Care

Candidates Making Promises They Can’t Keep

OPINION: Dems give new meaning to the term ‘free for all’

OPINION: Dems give new meaning to the term ‘free for all’
by John Grimaldi, editorial contributor at
the Association of Mature American Citizens
 
Democratic presidential hopefuls are offering voters freebies galore as the 2020 Presidential Election gets under way. They’re promising free child care, Medicare for All and no-cost college educations. Do they think the electorate is made up of free-loaders who are ready and willing to trade their votes for all manner of giveaways?
 
One candidate threw his hat into the ring along with a truly cockamamie proposal that takes the cake. Granted, Andrew Yang is among the least known candidates, but when he announced that he was a candidate for the Democratic party’s nomination he did so with great fanfare and a proposal that he is unabashedly willing to pay cash for votes. 
 
In Yang’s own words: “As president, my first priority will be to implement the Freedom Dividend, a universal basic income (UBI) for every American adult over the age of 18: $1,000 a month, no strings attached, paid for by a new tax on the companies benefiting most from automation.” Check out his Web site.  
 
Think about it for a second. Yang is promising to use taxpayer money to give Americans, as a whole, some $200 billion a month with “no strings attached.” His largesse is fantastical and would cost an inconceivable $2.4 trillion a year.
 
It’s unlikely to happen but like Yang’s more high-profile competitors for the Democratic nomination, he is probably hoping that the voters won’t do the math.
 
Take the schemes being proposed by Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris and other progressives seeking the nomination, among them the notion of Medicare for All, as Sanders calls it. Voters would love it if they could get their health expenses paid for. But, nobody gets something for nothing. 
 
For example, it might appear that you’d be able to see your doctor for free and undergo expensive medical treatments at no cost under Medicare for All. However, several authoritative studies reveal the hefty price tag that comes with free medicine and medical services. 
 
Justin Haskins, at The Heartland Institute, put it this way in an article posted on the fox.com news site: “millions of middle-class earners would be hit particularly hard under ‘Medicare-for-All.’ For example, [income tax] filers earning $50,000 to $75,000 would likely need to pay on average $7,773 to $9,171 more in new taxes. Those families earning $75,000 to $100,000 would pay $12,612 to $14,880 more. Most households with more than $100,000 income would pay close to or more than $20,000 in additional taxes.”
 
In addition to the cost, the nation would be paying an additional price as the delivery of health care begins to deteriorate. Consider why many Canadians are willing to pay for U.S. doctor visits and treatments rather than take advantage of free care in their own country. It’s simply because they get better treatment south of the border and they don’t have to put up with long delays.
 
It seems that progressive presidential contenders are staying up nights trying to outdo each other by coming up with new promises of even more free stuff if only voters hire them to run the country.  

Social Security Matters

Ask Rusty – How Is My Benefit Amount Determined?

Social Security Matters
by AMAC Certified Social Security Advisor Russell Gloor
Association of Mature American Citizens     
 
______________________________________________________
 
Ask Rusty – How Is My Benefit Amount Determined?
 
Dear Rusty: I am 60 years old. I have worked full time since age 22. I am thinking about working part-time ages 62-65. When I start collecting my social security benefit sometime after age 65, will my monthly amount be based on only the last few years of my working? Can you please explain how my monthly amount will be determined? Signed: Planning My Future
 
Dear Planning: I admire that you’re thinking ahead to your retirement years and I’m happy to clarify this for you. Your Social Security benefit, when you claim it, will be based upon the highest earning 35 years of your lifetime working career (not only the last few years). To determine your benefit, Social Security will take your entire record of lifetime earnings, adjust each year for inflation, and select the 35 years in which you had the highest earnings. After totaling those years they’ll divide by 420 (the number of months in 35 years) to determine your “average indexed monthly earnings” (AIME). They then break your AIME into several parts (using what’s known as “bend points”) and then take a percentage of each part and add it up to arrive at what’s called your “primary insurance amount” or “PIA.” The “bend point” values change each year, but for 2019 they are $926 and $5583. To compute your benefit, the formula will take 90% of the first $926 of your AIME; 32% of your AIME between $926 and $5583; and 15% of any amount of your AIME over $5583. The product of those three computations are added together to arrive at your PIA. 
 
Your PIA is the amount you will get at your full retirement age, or your “FRA,” which for you (born in 1959) is 66 years and 10 months. If you claim any earlier than your FRA, your benefit will be reduced – about 29% less if claimed at 62. If you wait beyond your FRA the benefit will be more – 8% more for each year you delay, up to age 70 when maximum is reached. At age 70 your benefit will be about 25% more than it would be at your FRA. But a note of caution: any benefit estimates you have now from Social Security assume you’ll keep earning at your current level until you reach your FRA, so if you work part-time starting at age 62 your benefit amounts will be less than those shown in the current estimates.
 
Finally, the above applies to your own individual SS retirement benefit from your own lifetime work record. If you are married, and your PIA is less than 50% of your husband’s PIA, then you might also be eligible for a spousal boost from your husband. Or if you are the higher earner, your husband might be eligible for a spousal boost from you when you claim your Social Security benefit.
 
This article is intended for information purposes only and does not represent legal or financial guidance. It presents the opinions and interpretations of the AMAC Foundation’s staff, trained and accredited by the National Social Security Association (NSSA). NSSA and the AMAC Foundation and its staff are not affiliated with or endorsed by the Social Security Administration or any other governmental entity. To submit a question, visit our website or email us.
_______________________________________
 
The 2 million member Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC] [https://www.amac.us] is a vibrant, vital senior advocacy organization that takes its marching orders from its members. We act and speak on their behalf, protecting their interests and offering a practical insight on how to best solve the problems they face today. Live long and make a difference by joining us today athttps://amac.us/join-amac.