Candidates Making Promises They Can’t Keep

OPINION: Dems give new meaning to the term ‘free for all’

OPINION: Dems give new meaning to the term ‘free for all’
by John Grimaldi, editorial contributor at
the Association of Mature American Citizens
 
Democratic presidential hopefuls are offering voters freebies galore as the 2020 Presidential Election gets under way. They’re promising free child care, Medicare for All and no-cost college educations. Do they think the electorate is made up of free-loaders who are ready and willing to trade their votes for all manner of giveaways?
 
One candidate threw his hat into the ring along with a truly cockamamie proposal that takes the cake. Granted, Andrew Yang is among the least known candidates, but when he announced that he was a candidate for the Democratic party’s nomination he did so with great fanfare and a proposal that he is unabashedly willing to pay cash for votes. 
 
In Yang’s own words: “As president, my first priority will be to implement the Freedom Dividend, a universal basic income (UBI) for every American adult over the age of 18: $1,000 a month, no strings attached, paid for by a new tax on the companies benefiting most from automation.” Check out his Web site.  
 
Think about it for a second. Yang is promising to use taxpayer money to give Americans, as a whole, some $200 billion a month with “no strings attached.” His largesse is fantastical and would cost an inconceivable $2.4 trillion a year.
 
It’s unlikely to happen but like Yang’s more high-profile competitors for the Democratic nomination, he is probably hoping that the voters won’t do the math.
 
Take the schemes being proposed by Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris and other progressives seeking the nomination, among them the notion of Medicare for All, as Sanders calls it. Voters would love it if they could get their health expenses paid for. But, nobody gets something for nothing. 
 
For example, it might appear that you’d be able to see your doctor for free and undergo expensive medical treatments at no cost under Medicare for All. However, several authoritative studies reveal the hefty price tag that comes with free medicine and medical services. 
 
Justin Haskins, at The Heartland Institute, put it this way in an article posted on the fox.com news site: “millions of middle-class earners would be hit particularly hard under ‘Medicare-for-All.’ For example, [income tax] filers earning $50,000 to $75,000 would likely need to pay on average $7,773 to $9,171 more in new taxes. Those families earning $75,000 to $100,000 would pay $12,612 to $14,880 more. Most households with more than $100,000 income would pay close to or more than $20,000 in additional taxes.”
 
In addition to the cost, the nation would be paying an additional price as the delivery of health care begins to deteriorate. Consider why many Canadians are willing to pay for U.S. doctor visits and treatments rather than take advantage of free care in their own country. It’s simply because they get better treatment south of the border and they don’t have to put up with long delays.
 
It seems that progressive presidential contenders are staying up nights trying to outdo each other by coming up with new promises of even more free stuff if only voters hire them to run the country.  

Social Security Matters

Ask Rusty – How Is My Benefit Amount Determined?

Social Security Matters
by AMAC Certified Social Security Advisor Russell Gloor
Association of Mature American Citizens     
 
______________________________________________________
 
Ask Rusty – How Is My Benefit Amount Determined?
 
Dear Rusty: I am 60 years old. I have worked full time since age 22. I am thinking about working part-time ages 62-65. When I start collecting my social security benefit sometime after age 65, will my monthly amount be based on only the last few years of my working? Can you please explain how my monthly amount will be determined? Signed: Planning My Future
 
Dear Planning: I admire that you’re thinking ahead to your retirement years and I’m happy to clarify this for you. Your Social Security benefit, when you claim it, will be based upon the highest earning 35 years of your lifetime working career (not only the last few years). To determine your benefit, Social Security will take your entire record of lifetime earnings, adjust each year for inflation, and select the 35 years in which you had the highest earnings. After totaling those years they’ll divide by 420 (the number of months in 35 years) to determine your “average indexed monthly earnings” (AIME). They then break your AIME into several parts (using what’s known as “bend points”) and then take a percentage of each part and add it up to arrive at what’s called your “primary insurance amount” or “PIA.” The “bend point” values change each year, but for 2019 they are $926 and $5583. To compute your benefit, the formula will take 90% of the first $926 of your AIME; 32% of your AIME between $926 and $5583; and 15% of any amount of your AIME over $5583. The product of those three computations are added together to arrive at your PIA. 
 
Your PIA is the amount you will get at your full retirement age, or your “FRA,” which for you (born in 1959) is 66 years and 10 months. If you claim any earlier than your FRA, your benefit will be reduced – about 29% less if claimed at 62. If you wait beyond your FRA the benefit will be more – 8% more for each year you delay, up to age 70 when maximum is reached. At age 70 your benefit will be about 25% more than it would be at your FRA. But a note of caution: any benefit estimates you have now from Social Security assume you’ll keep earning at your current level until you reach your FRA, so if you work part-time starting at age 62 your benefit amounts will be less than those shown in the current estimates.
 
Finally, the above applies to your own individual SS retirement benefit from your own lifetime work record. If you are married, and your PIA is less than 50% of your husband’s PIA, then you might also be eligible for a spousal boost from your husband. Or if you are the higher earner, your husband might be eligible for a spousal boost from you when you claim your Social Security benefit.
 
This article is intended for information purposes only and does not represent legal or financial guidance. It presents the opinions and interpretations of the AMAC Foundation’s staff, trained and accredited by the National Social Security Association (NSSA). NSSA and the AMAC Foundation and its staff are not affiliated with or endorsed by the Social Security Administration or any other governmental entity. To submit a question, visit our website or email us.
_______________________________________
 
The 2 million member Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC] [https://www.amac.us] is a vibrant, vital senior advocacy organization that takes its marching orders from its members. We act and speak on their behalf, protecting their interests and offering a practical insight on how to best solve the problems they face today. Live long and make a difference by joining us today athttps://amac.us/join-amac.

Congressional Record to Bonnie Knaggs

Bonnie recognized for years and years and years and years….

Bonnie Knaggs was honored by the House of Representatives, being entered into “The Congressional Record”.

CONGRATS Bonnie!!!

Bob Latta on Facebook:  “Marcia and I enjoyed the Good Ole Summertime Festival in North Baltimore today (July 27, 2019). While there, I had the opportunity to present a Congressional Record to Bonnie Knaggs, who recently retired as editor of the North Baltimore News. Thank you for more than a decade of service in journalism, Bonnie!”

[Extensions of Remarks]
[Page E854]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




 IN RECOGNITION OF THE CAREER AND SERVICE OF NORTH BALTIMORE'S BONNIE 
                                 KNAGGS

                                 ______
                                 

                          HON. ROBERT E. LATTA

                                of ohio

                    in the house of representatives

                         Friday, June 15, 2018

  Mr. LATTA. Mr. Speaker, I want to recognize the commitment and 
dedication of longtime reporter and editor, Bonnie Knaggs, who recently 
retired as editor of the North Baltimore News. Bonnie has dedicated 
more than half of her life to reporting the news and has done a 
wonderful job serving the North Baltimore community.
  A Bloom Township native and graduate of North Baltimore High School, 
Bonnie has been a village resident for 80 years. What initially began 
as a hobby taking picture out of her apartment windows soon 
transitioned into a career in newspapers. In 1959, Bonnie started work 
at North Baltimore News selling newspaper subscriptions before being 
named editor just six years later.
  Throughout her decades-long career, Bonnie has served as a 
bookkeeper, photographer, and reporter. Her work as editor for the 
newspaper helped ensure that residents could stay up-to-date on what 
was happening in their community.
  Bonnie helped cover some of the most important moments in her 
community including the installation of the first traffic lights and a 
massive fire at the Trout furniture building downtown. I want to thank 
her for her years of service to North Baltimore and wish her all the 
best in her well-earned retirement.

                          ____________________

Will Social Security Go Bust?

Social Security Matters – by AMAC Certified Social Security Adviser Russell Gloor

Social Security Matters
by AMAC Certified Social Security Advisor Russell Gloor
Association of Mature American Citizens     
 
___________________________
Ask Rusty – Will Social Security Go Bust?
 
Dear Rusty: I’m always hearing rumors of Social Security imploding – of people my age getting benefits but not the younger as they have time to do something else. I wonder if I file in December for 50% of my spouse’s benefit, and later, before I turn 70 and change to my own benefits, if SS goes bust will I lose what I would have been able to claim under myself? I understand that you would only be guessing to answer that. From what I’ve read, it seems that 20% reduction will be necessary across the board. I do not trust politicians who love to play Santa to get reelected. Signed: Untrusting Senior
 
Dear Untrusting Senior: As of right now, Social Security (SS) has about $2.9 trillion in reserves in its Trust Fund. Beginning probably in 2020, SS income will be less than needed to pay all benefits, and money will start to be withdrawn from the Trust Fund to meet benefit obligations. Current projections are that the Trust Fund reserves are sufficient to pay 100% of benefit obligations until 2035, at which time SS will only be able to pay out as much money as it brings in. According to projections, that would result in about a 21% cut in benefits for all beneficiaries. But those dire predictions are only valid if Congress does nothing to resolve Social Security’s cash flow deficit expected to start in 2020. 
 
The solutions for Social Security’s financial issues are very well known to Congress. What’s missing is a bipartisan agreement on the best way to resolve it. One side of the aisle wants to simply raise Social Security taxes (remove payroll caps and raise FICA contributions), while the other side prefers future program adjustments which deal with the reality that people are living much longer today than they did when SS was first enacted. Most pundits believe that Congress will eventually reach a compromise before the Trust Fund is depleted in 2035 requiring benefit cuts. After all, what politician who wishes to stay in Congress would want to be associated with reducing Social Security benefits for the very large and voting senior citizenry? 
 
To get to your specific question: There is no real danger of SS going “bust,” as in not being able to pay any benefits at all, so you’ll never “lose what I would have been able to claim under myself.” The worst-case scenario is that your age 70 benefit (which will be about 32% more than your age 66 benefit) might be reduced, but it would never be totally eliminated. The best-case scenario is that Congress puts the current vitriolic atmosphere aside and does their job to fix the problem before it’s a crisis.
 
The last time Social Security had a crisis of this nature was in 1983, and the Democratic-controlled Congress and the Reagan Administration worked together to enact a fix which lasted for decades (until now). It’s my sincere hope, and indeed my expectation, that a similar bipartisan effort will eventually take place to resolve Social Security’s financial issues for many decades to come. The Association of Mature American Citizens (AMAC) has developed a common-sense Social Security Guarantee proposal which has been presented to multiple Congressional representatives for consideration, and which would solve Social Security’s financial issues for generations. If you’d like to see that proposal feel free to go to this link: https://amac.us/social-security/. Will Congress act on this any time soon? I’m afraid that’s impossible to predict, but if history offers any insight it’s that they will probably act only when the crisis can no longer be ignored.
 
This article is intended for information purposes only and does not represent legal or financial guidance. It presents the opinions and interpretations of the AMAC Foundation’s staff, trained and accredited by the National Social Security Association (NSSA). NSSA and the AMAC Foundation and its staff are not affiliated with or endorsed by the Social Security Administration or any other governmental entity. To submit a question, visit our website or email us.

FCC Robocall Ruling Offers Hope

…in the meantime, just hang up on dodgy callers, says AMAC.

FCC robocall ruling offers hope; in the meantime,
just hang up on dodgy callers, says AMAC
Report shows 5 million seniors lose $27.4 a year to phone scammers
 
WASHINGTON, DC, July 8 — Seniors may get robocall relief if a new Federal Communications Commission [FCC] ruling prompts phone companies to implement technologies that automatically block them. Dan Weber, an advocate for older Americans, says the ruling is a step in the right direction.
 
The president of the Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC] reports that “while it is still early days, it appears the major phone service providers are ready to cooperate. It was good news when Verizon was quick to ‘welcome’ the ruling.”
 
Verizon issued a statement hours after the FCC announced its decision. In it, the company stated that it is “putting robocallers on notice. We’ve got their number and we’re taking big steps to stop them from doing what they’re doing.”
 
Meanwhile, Apple has announced a new software update will be available in the fall that can automatically block unwanted spam callers.
 
Weber says, however, that he is taking a wait and see attitude regarding these latest efforts to rein in phone scammers. “It’s a lucrative crime and the perpetrators are tech savvy enough to find new ways to prey on the elderly.”
 
He cites an article on the FCC ruling published by Politico, which noted that: “experts warn that callers slinging bogus tax bills and insurance schemes might still find a way to get through. Calls originating from overseas could present a technical challenge. And the measures are voluntary: phone companies won’t be required to take advantage of the call-blocking systems that the FCC is encouraging and could charge consumers fees for using them.”
 
Tech journalist and privacy advocate Paul Bischoff recently prepared an elder fraud analysis of phone scams targeting seniors for the technology research firm, CompariTech. The Bischoff report provides an eye-opening state-by-state assessment of elder fraud. He told AMAC that the FCC ruling to stop unwanted robocalls “is a step in the right direction but ultimately might not have the desired impact for consumers.”
 
The report revealed that seniors are primary targets for fraudsters accounting for 38% of scams and that there are an estimated 5 million cases of elder fraud annually resulting in $27.4 billion in losses.
 
“We are hopeful that the new focus on protecting the elderly from phone scammers will have a positive effect going forward. In the meantime, just hang up if a caller starts asking for personal information or makes threats. Don’t take their word for it if they say they are calling on official business. No official will ever ask for you to reveal account numbers, Social Security numbers, Medicare id’s over the phone.”

Ask Rusty – Age Seventy hasn’t yet applied for Social Security

You’ve already maximized your monthly Social Security benefit by waiting until age 70 to apply.

Ask Rusty – Age Seventy hasn’t yet applied for Social Security
 
Dear Rusty: How can I maximize my monthly Social Security benefit? I’m already 70 years old – almost 71 now. Signed: Ready to Apply.
 
Dear Ready to Apply: You’ve already maximized your monthly Social Security benefit by waiting until age 70 to apply. Age 70 is when you stop earning delayed retirement credits, which have boosted your monthly benefit amount by 32% over what you would have received at your full retirement age of 66, and by 76% over what you would have received if you had claimed benefits early at age 62. Your maximum Social Security benefit is reached in the month you turn 70 years of age, so you shouldn’t delay any longer. Since you’re now actually more than 70 (almost 71), you should immediately claim your Social Security benefit and you should also ask for 6 months of retroactive benefits, which SS will give you in a lump-sum. You can claim your benefits by contacting the Social Security office (find your local office at www.ssa.gov/locator) and making an appointment to apply for benefits, or you can apply online at www.ssa.gov. To apply online, you’ll have to first set up your personal “My Social Security” online account at www.ssa.gov, and then complete and submit your application online. You should specify your “benefit start month” as six months before the date you apply to get the retroactive benefits. 
 
If you are married, since you have not yet applied for benefits your wife is not yet receiving spousal benefits from your record. Assuming she has reached her full retirement age, her spousal benefit will be half of the benefit you were eligible to receive at your full retirement age, if that amount is more than she is entitled to on her own lifetime work record. If your wife was born on or before January 1st, 1954 she should contact your local Social Security office to file for her spousal benefit. If your wife was born January 2nd, 1954 or later, her spousal benefit should be automatically added to her own benefit when you claim, and she should not need to contact Social Security to apply. I encourage you both to claim these benefits as soon as possible, because each month you delay you are losing benefits which you are entitled to. This is true even if one or both of you are still working, because there is no penalty for working after you have reached full retirement age. And even if you’re still working and paying FICA taxes monthly, your benefit will not increase just because you are still paying into Social Security.
 
This article is intended for information purposes only and does not represent legal or financial guidance. It presents the opinions and interpretations of the AMAC Foundation’s staff, trained and accredited by the National Social Security Association (NSSA). NSSA and the AMAC Foundation and its staff are not affiliated with or endorsed by the Social Security Administration or any other governmental entity. To submit a question, visit our website or email us.

Ninth Annual ROAD SAFETY EDUCATION DAY Planned

Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., AARP and the City of Bowling Green present Road Safety Education: To Keep You Safe

The WCCOA is offering a Road Safety Education Day. Here are the details:

Bowling Green, OH (August 9, 2019) – Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA), AARP and the City of Bowling Green will present the ninth annual Road Safety Education: To Keep You Safe from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Friday, August 9 at the City of Bowling Green Facilities Building (located at
815 E. Poe Rd. in Bowling Green).

Participants are invited to drive in their personal vehicles to experience the following:
* Educational Seminars: Exploring Technology in Todays Vehicles, presented by Mike Brown, “New Laws, Road Rules, Traffic Safety and Crash Prevention…” The new drivers license requirements and when is it time to hit the brakes when driving? Brad Biller Retired BG Police Officer & Safe Communities of Wood County, Sandy Wiechman.

* CarFit: an educational program sponsored by AAA, AARP and AOTA that offers older adults the opportunity to check how well their personal vehicles fit them. AAA will be topping off fluid levels in your vehicle and will conduct an internal audit of your vehicle.
* Booths: Valvoline, AARP, Kingston of Perrysburg, AAA, Mobility Works, WSOS Transportation Coordination, State Farm Insurance & more will have booths providing information and services to guests. Adaptive vehicle equipment, local resources, transportation, refreshments, raffle prizes and much more!

Lunch will be provided and is sponsored by the Wood County Beef Producers.

According to the Insurance Information Institute, not only are Americans over the age of 65 a higher percentage of drivers on the road than ever before, they also suffer one of the highest rates of fatalities – second only to that of young adults. In 2015, older adults accounted for 14.9% of all traffic fatalities.

As Wood County adults age and changes occur in their vision and other capabilities, opportunities such as this one will help to keep those senses sharp and everyone safe.

Reservations are required by contacting WCCOA
at (419) 353-5661,
(800) 367-4935 or by emailing : programs@wccoa.net.

For more information from the Insurance Information Institute, please visit
http://www.iii.org/issue-update/older-drivers.

WCCOA GOVERNING BOARD SEEKS NOMINEES FOR BOARD

The Governing Board sets policies and conducts the affairs of the Wood County Committee on Aging…..

Wood County Seniors and Community Leaders are encouraged to become a candidate to serve on the WCCOA Governing Board for a two year term beginning January 1, 2020. Candidates must be Wood County residents and at least 60 years old or community leaders. There are five elected positions open. If you are interested, or know someone who might be, please go to the website at www.wccoa.net to download a nomination form, or contact the Wood County Senior Center at 419-353-5661 or 1-800-367-4935. Completed forms must be returned to the Nomination Committee Chair, WCCOA, 305 North Main Street, Bowling Green, Ohio 43402 on or before August 9, 2019.

The Governing Board sets policies and conducts the affairs of the WCCOA. Board members are expected to attend the monthly Board meeting and to serve on at least one committee. Other important Board responsibilities include:

 

  • Support the WCCOA mission, strategic planning goals and program activities.
  • Maintain fiduciary responsibility, including establishing a budget, assuring legal needs are met, and providing stability and viability of the WCCOA.
  • Attend monthly Governing Board meetings held the second Wednesday of each month.
  • Attend an Orientation Session for new Board members.
  • Financially contribute to fund-raising campaigns and the Friends of WCCOA based on personal ability.
  • Serve as an “ambassador” for WCCOA to the public at large, encourage understanding of agency programs and challenges, and stimulate participation of seniors 60 and older.

Elections will take place in November with installation in December and the first board meeting in January, 2020.  If you have questions feel free to contact Sue Hart-Douglas, WCCOA Nominating Committee Chair at the previously given address.          

###

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

Website: www.wccoa.net

Social Security Questions?

Ask Rusty – Couple with Age Difference Planning Benefits

Ask Rusty – Couple with Age Difference Planning Benefits
 
Dear Rusty: I am nearing my full retirement age of 66 and given the differences in age of my wife and I, and the retirement benefits we will each receive; I was wondering what the best options are for us claiming SS and when. I am 65 and will turn 66 (my full retirement age) in September and my benefit then will be $2347/month as per the latest estimate on the SSA website. My Wife is currently 58 years old. Her full retirement age is 67, which will be in January 2028. Her estimated SS benefit at full retirement age will be $2498/month. I have read some things regarding being able to defer one of the benefit payments and receive the other (higher) amount based on certain criteria. I’m not sure if it would apply or be of benefit to us but was wondering if it would. I am looking for the best options to receive the most in benefits that would apply to us. Signed: Planning Ahead
 
Dear Planning: I think you’re referring to the “restricted application” which can be used to collect spousal benefits while allowing your own to grow, but I’m afraid that is not something you can take advantage of. It’s an option not available to your wife because her birth year is after the cutoff imposed for that option by the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015, and it’s not available to you because your wife isn’t yet eligible to collect Social Security on her own work record.
 
You have the option to take your full benefits in September at your full retirement age (FRA) or, if it’s financially feasible, you may also choose to delay past your FRA to claim. If you delay past your FRA you’ll earn Delayed Retirement Credits (DRCs) of 2/3rds of 1% per month of delay (8% per year of delay) up until age 70 when your benefit would be 32% more than it will be in September. Whether that’s a good choice for you depends upon how badly you need the money right now, and your health and expected longevity. If you enjoy at least average longevity (mid-80s) then you’ll get the most in cumulative lifetime benefits by waiting until age 70 to claim.
 
Your wife cannot collect Social Security benefits until she reaches age 62 in 2023. If she claims at that time she’ll be automatically deemed to be filing for both her own SS retirement benefit and any spousal benefit she might be due from your record. However, given the benefit estimates you’ve shared she’ll not be eligible for a spousal benefit from you (nor will you be eligible for benefits from her). Spousal benefits are only paid if 50% of the higher earner’s benefit at FRA is more than the lower earner’s FRA benefit amount. Since neither of you will be eligible for a spousal benefit, your wife should also consider delaying past her full retirement age if her personal and financial circumstances at the time permit. To do so, she will gain 24% more benefit at age 70 than she would get at her full retirement age of 67.
 
So, for both of you to achieve the most you can get, the longer you both delay past your respective full retirement ages the more your benefit will be, up to age 70 when the maximum is reached. Since your wife won’t reach her FRA until January 2028 but will be eligible to apply for benefits in 2023, be aware that if she applies before her FRA her benefit will be reduced (according to the number of months before her FRA that she applies), and that if she starts her benefits before her FRA and continues to work, she’ll be subject to Social Security’s earnings limit. The earnings limit changes annually, so I can’t tell you what it will be in 2023, but it will be more than the 2019 limit of $17,640. 
 
This article is intended for information purposes only and does not represent legal or financial guidance. It presents the opinions and interpretations of the AMAC Foundation’s staff, trained and accredited by the National Social Security Association (NSSA). NSSA and the AMAC Foundation and its staff are not affiliated with or endorsed by the Social Security Administration or any other governmental entity. To submit a question, visit our website or email us.

WCCOA Cholesterol Clinics

You must be a resident of Wood County and 25 years of age or older…..

Wood County, Ohio – The Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. is currently scheduling their cholesterol screening clinics for July.  You must be a resident of Wood County and 25 years of age or older.  The cost is $20 for those 60 and over, $25 for those 25-59.

These screenings require an appointment and pretest instructions.

The screening panel includes:  Total Cholesterol, HDL (good cholesterol), LDL (bad cholesterol), Triglycerides, Total Cholesterol/HDL ratio and a blood glucose level.  Results will be immediately available and discussed with clients by a Registered Nurse.

Bowling Green Senior Center:  9:00 am to 11:00 am

  • July 10, 2019
  • July 19, 2019
  • July 23, 2019

 Wayne Senior Center 9:30 am to 11:30 am

  • July 12, 2019

 Perrysburg Senior Center 9:30 am to 11:30 am

  • July 18, 2019

 

To schedule an appointment, please call 1-800-367-4935 or 419-353-5661  and ask for the Social Services Department. 

 About the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc

The Wood County Committee on Aging was founded in September of 1973, as is dedicated to the planning and development of programs and services that will allow older adults of  Wood County to remain as independent as possible for as long as possible. As Ohio first nationally accredited senior center, the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc is working to encourage older adults to enjoy, enrich and explore this season of life.  

Care Compass Project: Navigating the Caregiving Continuum Seminar

CARE Compass is place to gather together and obtain resources to make the journey of caregiving less stressful….


May 29, 2019 – The CARE Compass project will serve as a quarterly network gathering for caregivers. CARE Compass is place to gather together and obtain resources to make the journey
of caregiving less stressful. This upcoming session will be held on June 5 at First Christian Church, 875 Haskins Road, Bowling Green, from 11am-1pm.

AGENDA:
11 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Occupational Therapy from Ohio Living Home Health will discuss transitional phases of mobility. The session will cover the following; when would you need to use a walker, cane, wheelchair; how to measure the height of the assisted devices properly;
where is the best place to purchase one or get one loaned to you; learn some important exercises to prevent falls and aid in maintaining balance.

11:45 a.m – 12:15 p.m. Lunch sponsored by Brookdale of Bowling Green

12:15 p.m. – 1 p.m. Presentation provided by Lindsay Watson, University of Toledo Medical Center a Senior Behavioral Specialist. This presentation will introduce the concept of behavior mapping (a system of connecting different behaviors and with their meanings and reactions),ways to identify causes of behaviors, solutions and ways to avoid adding additional medications. There will be time allotted for questions and answers.

The Care Compass Project free and open to all caregivers but requires pre-registration by calling 1-800-367-4935, 419-353-5661 or emailing programs@wccoa.net. Those wanting to learn about caregiving are welcome and those who are currently caregiving are encouraged to bring their care recipients. Separate caregiving sessions are provided during the training session to those community members in need of care.

The CARE Compass Project is brought to the community by: Brookdale of Bowling Green,Wood County Committee on Aging, BGSU Optimal Aging Institute, Golden Care Partners, Ohio Living Home Health and Wood County Hospital. Caregivers are also encouraged to join the Facebook Community: facebook.com/WoodCountyCareGiverCircle for an ongoing support community.

WCCOA to host a day retreat entitled, “Project Wisdom”

Held at the 577 Foundation…

Bowling Green, OH (May 29, 2019) – The Wood County Committee on Aging (WCCOA) will be holding a Retreat entitled “Project Wisdom” on Friday, June 14, 2019 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. It will be held at the 577 Foundation, located at 577 East Front Street in Perrysburg, OH. The event is sponsored by several community partners; lunch will be provided by StoryPoint Senior Living, and snacks and flowers will be provided by the Kingston Healthcare Company.

 The morning will begin at 8:30 a.m. with registration and light refreshments will be provided by Kingston of Perrysburg.
 At 8:45 a.m. will be “Gassho Meditation and Chair Yoga” session led by certified instructor Anya Light. Gassho is a Japanese meditation technique, originating from the Reiki system of energy healing. We will perform Gassho and then flow into a series of seated yogic postures. No experience with yoga or meditation needed—come as you are!
 At 9:30 a.m. a learning session on Befriending Your Body with Reiki. In this presentation, Anya Light will offer an introduction to the Reiki system of energy healing. We will learn about various ways we can befriend our bodies through loving, compassionate attention. Anya Light, PhD, is an intuitive life coach, Reiki master, yoga instructor, and poet. She is author of Opening Love: Intentional Relationships & the Evolution of Consciousness. Currently, she is writing a book about healing trauma through spiritual practice. You can visit Anya at her healing practice in Grand Rapids, OH.
 At 10:30 a.m., Guest Speaker Dr. Judith Jackson May will present “Leadership in your own life…What does that look like? When people talk about leadership, they the focus is most often on others–how leaders serve them, empower them and motivate them. What if we turn the tables, though? What if instead of thinking about leadership in relation to others, we concentrate on the leadership we can take within our own lives? What would that look like? Judith Jackson May, Ph.D., Associate, Professor of Educational Administration and Leadership Studies at BGSU
 Lunch will be at noon, provided by StoryPoint Senior Living.

 At 1:15, participants will have a choice of two options:

o The first is a look at Unique India Textile blocks will be used for ink wooden blocking. This technique will be used on reusable canvas bags. Learn how to do create using this new technique all the while enjoying chia tea and gaining valuable information on how you can integrate Holistic health into your life. Choose this option to create your own sample! o Lia Ricci, is a Clinical Holistic Health Practitioner and Holistic Life Coach o Practicing in Bowling Green, Ohio. She studied Clinical Aromatherapy, Energetic Healing, Clinical Hypnotherapy, Medical Herbalism, Neuro Linguistic Programming, Clinical Reflexology & Touch for Health Kinesiology. Ms. Ricci is a Reiki Master and graduate of New York City’s Lincoln Recovery Center’s Acu Detox Specialist o Certification program. Choose this option to create your own sample!

o The second option is a Watercolor Painting Exploration with Marybeth Lengel. Relax while creating your own unique nature based watercolor picture. Enjoy time for meditation, relaxation and sharing with others.

 Closing for the day is at 2:30pm, where participants will receive flowers and gift bags sponsored by Kingston of Perrysburg. There will also be an evaluation of the day submitted by participants to improve future events!

Seating is limited to 25 individuals. Cost to register is $15. Participants are recommended to bring comfortable walking shoes, to dress in layers so as to adjust for indoor temperature variation, and to be ready to engage, relax, and meet new people! For further details or to register, please contact the Programs department at WCCOA by calling (419) 353-5661 or (800) 367-4935, or by e-mailing programs@wccoa.net. When registering, please specify your choice of session: A – Ink Wood Blocking with Lia Ricci, Asherah’s Garden, Bowling Green, Ohio OR B – Watercolor Exploration with Marybeth Lengel. Vegetarian lunch options are available upon request.

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.