WCCOA Holding Virtual Silver Sneakers classes

Silver Sneakers is a health and fitness program designed for older adults…..

Bowling Green, OH (September 17, 2020) – The Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA) is hosting Silver Sneakers exercise classes virtually using the Zoom platform. The classes, taught by Certified Instructor Sheila Brown, are held on Mondays and Wednesdays at 10:00 a.m. Sessions begin Monday, October 19 and Wednesday, October 21. Sessions are $15 for the six-week session and free to Silver Sneakers Members.

Silver Sneakers is a health and fitness program designed for older adults. Classes are designed for seniors of all fitness levels and led by trained instructors, with the goal to keep you strong in body, mind and spirit. Regular physical activity keeps your heart, brain, bones, muscles and joints healthy. If you have a chronic condition like arthritic, diabetes, or osteoporosis, safe exercise can help you feel better. Plus, staying social is vital to good health.

 Please contact the Programs Department of WCCOA to register by calling 419-353-5661 or 1-800-367-4935, or by e-mailing programs@wccoa.net  Payment and waiver can be mailed or dropped off to the Wood County Senior Center, 305 North Main St., Bowling Green, Ohio 43402. 

WCCOA is looking for Caregiver Nominations for Golden Care Awards!

The virtual ceremony will be held on Zoom on Tuesday, November 24 at 2:00 p.m.

Bowling Green, OH (September 15, 2020) – The Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA) will be collaborating with Bowling Green Manor, Briar Hill Health Care Campus, Bridge Home Health and Hospice, Brookdale of Bowling Green, Perrysburg Commons Retirement Center, and Wood Haven Health Care to host the Golden Care Awards in honor of National Caregivers Month. The virtual ceremony will be held on Zoom on Tuesday, November 24 at 2:00 p.m.

A caregiver is someone who provides direct care and tends to the needs of an older adult. This event will recognize the caregiving heroes in our communities and one winner will be awarded in each of the following categories:  

  • Caregivers working in a facility or home care setting (Medical or Professional Staff)
  • Caregivers working in a facility or home care setting (Support Staff: volunteer, companion caregiver, housekeeper, dietary, salon, activity, maintenance personnel)
  • COVID Champions who have been working on the front lines during the pandemic
  • Community Caregiver (nominated by any community member or a facility)

Nominated “Caregiver Heroes” must have been working in a facility/home care setting, or an active caregiver for a family member, friend or neighbor within the last year. Self-nominations will not be accepted. It is encouraged that the person nominating the caregiver provides a thorough explanation of why the nominee is an outstanding caregiver. The panel of judges will base their decisions on the written information provided on the nomination form.  

Nomination forms are available online at www.wccoa.net/activities/special-events or by mail, and the deadline for submissions is Monday, October 19. Submit fillable PDF nomination forms and a JPEG photo of the nominee to programs@wccoa.net  A 30-second video nomination may be sent in lieu of a written nomination. Information may also be submitted to the WCCOA Dropbox by request. These materials will be used to create a video honoring the nominees.  All nominees will receive a certificate, flower, event brochure and their laminated nomination form.

For more information, contact the Wood County Committee on Aging’s Programs Department through the above e-mail or by calling 419-353-5661 OR 800-367-4935.

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

WCCOA Offering Educational Opportunities

And More Through Virtual Learning Academy……

 Wood County, OH (September 18, 2020) – The Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA) is offering various educational and enrichment opportunities through their new LivelyU Virtual Learning Academy (VLA). Virtual programs that fall under this umbrella will be recorded and accessible on the agency website and YouTube channel for participants unable to attend the live program.

The aim of the LivelyU VLA is to reduce social isolation, encourage active engagement, and enhance older adults’ abilities to remain at home while Wood County Senior Centers remain closed. LivelyU VLA is planned to continue after centers have opened as well. Sessions will focus on providing up-to-date information on various topics including public health, nutrition, financial planning, book clubs, cultural programming, caregiver education and more.

If you are interested in joining LivelyU VLA programming, contact the Programs Department at 419.353.5661 or 800.367.4935 or email programs@wccoa.net  Past programs can be viewed at http://wccoa.net/video-library/

 

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

Prevent Blindness Supports National Falls Prevention Awareness Day on Sept. 22

An older Ohioan falls every two minutes on the average, resulting in an injury every five minutes, six emergency department visits and one hospitalization each hour………

 
Columbus, OH (September 16, 2020) Marking the beginning of fall, the Ohio Affiliate of Prevent Blindness (PBO) and Ohio’s Aging Eye Public Private Partnership are supporting National Falls Prevention Awareness Day on Sept. 22. The goal is to bring attention to this serious issue that is the leading cause of injury-related hospitalization and death among Ohioans age 65 and older. 
 
An older Ohioan falls every two minutes on the average, resulting in an injury every five minutes, six emergency department visits and one hospitalization each hour, and three deaths each day. The number of fatal falls among older Ohioans has increased more than 167 percent since 2000.
 
Unfortunately, those with impaired vision are more likely to experience falls and injuries. According to a 2016 study by the Centers for Disease Control and prevention (CDC), 52% of Ohio adults age 65 or older with severe vision impairment fell at least once in 2014 as compared with 28% of those without severe vision impairment. Visual impairment, which can include decreased visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, depth perception, and/or visual field, influences the risk of falls. Vision impairment can affect balance. It also increases the risk of tripping or misjudging steps, stairs or curbs.
 
Based on data from the 2014 “Vision Problems in the U.S.,” 1.4 million Ohioans age 40+ have vision problems that, if not corrected or treated, could lead to vision loss including age-related macular degeneration, cataract, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. Over 170,000 are blind or visually impaired. Another 2 million Ohioans have myopia or hyperopia that is correctable with a simple pair of eyeglasses, but some do without vision correction due to challenges with cost or transportation for doctor appointments. The number of Ohio residents with impaired vision, including blindness, could double in the next three decades.
 
Prevent Blindness supports the Ohio Department of Aging’s STEADY U Ohio’s falls prevention program 10 Big Steps to Prevent Falls!  
 
STEADY U Ohio, offers the following tips to stay active and healthy to prevent falls:
 
  • Get your vision and hearing checked annually and update your eyeglasses.
 
  • Simple exercise, like walking or swimming at least 15 minutes a day can help build muscle strength and improve balance, which can prevent falls.
 
  • Find a good balance and exercise program, like tai chi, to build balance, strength, and flexibility. Select a program you like and take a friend.
 
  • Regularly review your medications with your doctor or pharmacist for side effects that may increase your risk of falling.
 
  • Slow down and think through the task you are performing. Be mindful of possible falls risks and act accordingly.
 
  • Drink 6-8 glasses of non-alcoholic liquids each day to prevent low blood pressure, fatigue and confusion.
 
  • Eat a well-balanced diet with a variety of vegetables and calcium-rich foods like yogurt, cheese, milk, orange juice, tofu and calcium-fortified cereals to promote your health.
 
Consult with your doctor before beginning any new exercise routine or program.
 
 “Because people with vision impairments are more than twice as likely to fall as those without, keeping a regular schedule of eye examinations with an eye care professional can help avoid debilitating falls in the future,” said Sherry Williams, President & CEO of the Ohio Affiliate of Prevent Blindness. “We hope that by alerting the public to the dangers of falls, as well as educating them on ways to avoid them, we can help prevent unnecessary injuries. And, maintaining healthy vision is one way to accomplish this!”
 
For more information about National Falls Prevention Awareness Day or general eye health, please contact Prevent Blindness at (800) 301-2020 or visit pbohio.org.
 
About Prevent Blindness
Founded in 1908, Prevent Blindness is the nation’s leading volunteer eye health and safety organization dedicated to fighting blindness and saving sight. The Ohio Affiliate of Prevent Blindness serves all 88 Ohio counties, providing direct services to more than 1,400,000 Ohioans annually and educating millions of consumers about what they can do to protect and preserve their precious gift of sight. For more information or to make a contribution, call 800-301-2020. Visit us on the web at pbohio.org, Facebook at facebook.com/pbohio/, or Twitter at twitter.com/PB_Ohio .

Ohio Department of Aging challenges Ohioans to take 10 BIG Steps to Prevent Falls

One in four Ohioans over age 65 will fall this year. Sept. 21-25 is Falls Prevention Awareness Week…..

Columbus, Ohio – The Ohio Department of Aging has a friendly challenge for all older Ohioans: take 10 BIG Steps to Prevent Falls during Fall Prevention Awareness Week, Sept. 21-25, 2020.

“One in four Ohioans over age 65 will fall this year. That fall can have long-ranging impacts on the individual as well as their family and community,” said Ursel J. McElroy, director of the department. “There are simple things all Ohioans can do right now to decrease their risk of a life-changing fall.”

10 BIG Steps to Prevent Falls is part of the department’s STEADY U Ohio falls prevention initiative. The week-long campaign pairs five free, daily, online learning opportunities with five personal action steps to promote different aspects of falls prevention. Each day, participants will learn about a unique topic from falls prevention and other experts. Then, they will be provided with a checklist, planning template, or other activity to apply the information to their daily lives.

Individuals can learn more, register for online learning opportunities, and download related personal action items on the STEADY U Ohio web page.

The 10 BIG Steps to Prevent Falls:

Monday, Sept. 21: Know your falls risk factors

Step 1:    Learn about the factors that increase your risk of falling and steps to reduce your risk.

Step 2:    Complete a falls-risk self-assessment and discuss the results with your family and care providers.

Tuesday, Sept. 22: Exercises to reduce your falls risk

Step 3:    Learn about exercises and other physical activity that can reduce your risk of falling.

Step 4:    Create a personal exercise plan and try a new exercise.

Wednesday, Sept. 23: Fall-proof your home

Step 5:    Learn how to identify and remove falls risks in and around your home.

Step 6:    Complete a home hazard walk-through and checklist.

Thursday, Sept. 24: Eat well to prevent falls

Step 7:    Learn how a healthy diet can help lower your risk of falling.

Step 8:    Create a meal plan to prevent falls.

Friday, Sept. 25: Talk with your health care providers

Step 9:    Learn how to talk to your doctor and other health care providers about falls.

Step 10: Complete a medication inventory and discuss it with your health care provider or pharmacist.

Since September 2013, the Ohio Department of Aging’s STEADY U Ohio initiative has helped older adults, families, caregivers, professionals, and community leaders understand and recognize age-related factors that increase the risk of falling and fall-related complications. Individuals and organizations can find falls prevention information and resources at www.steadyu.ohio.gov.

About ODA – The Ohio Department of Aging serves and advocates for the needs of Ohioans age 60 and older, as well as their families, caregivers and communities. Programs include home and community based long-term supports and services, as well as initiatives to promote health and wellness throughout the lifespan. Visit www.aging.ohio.gov.

WCCOA : Not opening Yet….

WOOD COUNTY Home delivery will continue…..

The Ohio Department of Aging released the guidelines for reopening senior centers throughout the State of Ohio on Friday, September 11, 2020. 

Based upon the requirements / guidelines which must be satisfied in order to reopen the senior centers operated by the Wood County Committee on Aging, it has been determined that the Wood County senior centers will not reopen on Monday, September 21, 2020 as announced by Governor DeWine.

Current requirements / guidelines released by the Ohio Department of Aging in collaboration with the Ohio Department of Health require the following to occur prior to reopening:

  • Requires testing of all senior center staff and volunteers (initial baseline and at least once every other week thereafter).
  • Requires strategic testing of participants with an initial baseline and at least once every other week thereafter.  Note: this is still being clarified as to how many people and demographics.
  • The State will support the training of the WCCOA registered nurse to conduct the testing (for staff, volunteers, and identified participants, supply nasal test kits, lab capacity, baseline and repeat testing).
  • All services will be by appointment only once we have satisfied the requirements to reopen.

Based upon the restrictions put in place by the State of Ohio, all WCCOA Senior Center locations (Perrysburg, Rossford, Walbridge, Grand Rapids, Pemberville, Wayne, North Baltimore, and the Wood County Senior Center in Bowling Green) will remain closed to the general public through Monday, November 2, 2020.   The Wood County Committee on Aging will continue working with our local Wood County Health District to ensure our ability to reopen safely.

 WCCOA will continue to offer our modified services during this time.

 On-line programming is being offered via the WCCOA Facebook page and the Zoom meeting platform.  For a schedule of these programs and/or additional information, please contact Programs@wccoa.net or by calling the office at 419.353.5661 or 1.800.367.4935.

 We are also encouraging the older adults who participate at the Senior Center congregate dining sites to take advantage of home delivered meals during this time.  If you are a Wood County resident (age 60+), in need of home delivered meals or other assistance, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging at 419.353.5661 or 800.367.4935 or via email at WCCOA@wccoa.net .

  About The Wood County Committee on Aging:

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net

Statewide campaign aims to lower risk of a life-changing tumble

Ohio Department of Aging offers learning opportunities, personal challenges to help older Ohioans take 10 BIG Steps to Prevent Falls….

Columbus, Ohio – The Ohio Department of Aging, through its STEADY U Ohio falls prevention initiative, will celebrate September 21-25, 2020, as Falls Prevention Awareness Week by encouraging older Ohioans to take 10 BIG Steps to Prevent Falls.

“Falls are a serious concern for older adults. They are the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal injuries among Ohioans age 65 and older,” said Ursel J. McElroy, director of the department. “Yet, falls are not a normal part of aging and most falls can be prevented. 10 BIG Steps to Prevent Falls aims to give all older Ohioans and their families tools to lower their risk.”

Each day, the department and its falls prevention partners will host a web-based learning opportunity on a different aspect of falls prevention. Each learning opportunity will be paired with a personal challenge or other activity to apply the lessons learned to the individual’s home, health, and habits.

Individuals can learn more about all 10 steps, register for webinars, and download related assessments, plans, and checklists on the STEADY U Ohio web page.

The 10 BIG Steps to Prevent Falls:

Monday, Sept. 21: Know your falls risk factors

Step 1:    Learn about the factors that increase your risk of falling and steps to reduce your risk.

Step 2:    Complete a falls-risk self-assessment and discuss the results with your family and care providers.

Tuesday, Sept. 22: Exercises to reduce your falls risk

Step 3:    Learn about exercises and other physical activity that can reduce your risk of falling.

Step 4:    Create a personal exercise plan and try a new exercise.

Wednesday, Sept. 23: Fall-proof your home

Step 5:    Learn how to identify and remove falls risks in and around your home.

Step 6:    Complete a home hazard walk-through and checklist.

Thursday, Sept. 24: Eat well to prevent falls

Step 7:    Learn how a healthy diet can help lower your risk of falling.

Step 8:    Create a meal plan to prevent falls.

Friday, Sept. 25: Talk with your health care providers

Step 9:    Learn how to talk to your doctor and other health care providers about falls.

Step 10: Complete a medication inventory and discuss it with your health care provider or pharmacist.

Since September 2013, the Ohio Department of Aging’s STEADY U Ohio initiative has helped older adults, families, caregivers, professionals, and community leaders understand and recognize age-related factors that increase the risk of falling and fall-related complications. Individuals and organizations can find falls prevention information and resources at www.steadyu.ohio.gov.

Facts about falls in Ohio (according to data from the Ohio Department of Health):

  • One in four Ohioans age 65 and older will fall this year.
  • Older Ohioans account for a disproportionate share of fall-related injuries. While residents age 65 and older make up 17% of our population, they accounted for more than 87% of fatal falls in 2018.
  • An older Ohioan falls every minute on average, resulting in an injury every five minutes, an emergency department visit every seven minutes, two hospitalizations each hour, and three deaths each day.
  • In 2018, falls among older Ohioans resulted in 78,995 emergency department visits, 19,409 hospitalizations, and 1,309 deaths.
  • Falls account for 55.9% of fatal traumatic brain injuries among Ohioans age 65 or older and can lead to depression, loss of mobility, and loss of independence.
  • The number of fatal falls among older Ohioans increased 62% from 2007-2018.
  • The estimated total lifetime medical cost of falls (fatal and non-fatal) is $1.1 billion in Ohio. Add costs related to work loss and the total climbs to $2 billion.
  • One in three Ohioans age 65 and older living in the community fall each year. Yet, less than half talk to their doctors about their risks or history of falls.
  • In 2018, 61% of falls deaths among adults age 65 and older occurred in the home while 22% occurred in a residential facility, such as a nursing home.

About ODA – The Ohio Department of Aging serves and advocates for the needs of Ohioans age 60 and older, as well as their families, caregivers and communities. Programs include home and community based long-term supports and services, as well as initiatives to promote health and wellness throughout the lifespan. Visit www.aging.ohio.gov.

Tai Chi Anyone?

WCCOA to hold “Tai Chi for Arthritis & Fall Prevention” class…..

Bowling Green, OH (August 28, 2020) – The Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA) will be holding a Tai Chi for Arthritis and Fall Prevention class virtually using the Zoom platform. The class, taught by Certified Instructor Tammy Starr, will be held every Sunday from September 13 to October 18 at 2:30 p.m. This course lasts for six (6) weeks, and costs $15 to participate.

 

This CDC recommended evidenced-based program works through improving balance, confidence and muscular strength, all common causes for falls in older adults. The course is suited for those with perhaps some mobility deficits due to arthritis and/or those interested in maximizing balance.

 

Please contact the Programs Department of WCCOA to register by calling 419-353-5661 or 1-800-367-4935, or by e-mailing programs@wccoa.net  Payment and waiver can be mailed or dropped off to the Wood County Senior Center, 305 North Main St., Bowling Green, Ohio 43402. 

 

 

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

BBB ALERT! SOCIAL SECURITY IS NOT CALLING YOU!

Don’t give out your social security number………..

Consumers are getting slammed with fake phone calls from overseas criminals claiming to be the Social Security Administration.

    The calls go something like this:

    “This is the Social Security office. Your Social Security number has been compromised. The number has been used in a crime and it has been deactivated. If you are receiving Social Security benefits, they have been suspended. You must call us back immediately or a warrant may be issued for your arrest. You must call one of our agents back immediately.”

     The caller ID on phones often show area codes 623, 631, 443 or they may show “unknown”. None of these phone numbers are legitimate; they are “spoofed” and we believe the callers may be foreign, possibly from India or Pakistan.

    The latest large volume of these scam calls appear to be received in Lenawee County, Michigan; however consumers throughout our BBB 24-county service area of Ohio and Michigan also report receiving them constantly.

    Consumers who return the call are immediately asked for personal information, and to “verify their Social Security number” – giving it to the crooks. Often they are told that, to avoid legal prosecution, they need to buy a gift card or cash card at a local store, often for $100 or more, and give the card numbers to the “agent.”

Victims who fall for this scam may be called repeatedly and asked again for more money. Why the Social Security would need a gift card payment makes no sense.

    The criminals who make these calls concentrate on senior citizens. The majority of victims of such phone scams are 65 or older; but consumers of almost any age might fall for this racket.

    BBB emphasizes to all consumers; Social Security does not call. The idea that a SSN can be “deactivated” is ridiculous; but these callers are so aggressive that they can terrorize victims and trick them into giving out personal information or send money.

    Consumers who receive these calls can report them on BBB Scam Tracker. Most important, BBB urges anyone receiving these calls to just hang up and do not call them back or give them any personal information or money.

                                                                                             

 NOTE: The BBB is open and handling consumer questions, complaints and customer reviews through phone calls, email and live chat. Consumers checking out internet ads or having questions should call (419) 531-3116 or toll-free 800-743-4222. Internet questions should be directed to info@toledobbb.org and the BBB web site with live chat is www.bbb.org/toledo.

Alzheimer’s Virtual Community Forum Set for Toledo, Ohio

Join us on Wednesday, September 2, 2020 10:00am-11:30am for our first virtual Community Forum……

Toledo, OH –As the American population ages and becomes increasingly more diverse, the Alzheimer’s Association is committed to identifying and addressing barriers that may prohibit members of these diverse communities, particularly black/African Americans, from receiving important Alzheimer’s education and resources.

Join us on Wednesday, September 2, 2020 10:00am-11:30am for our first virtual Community Forum. This town hall style meeting will ask participants questions and gain answers about Alzheimer’s, discuss their experiences, learn about local resources, and more.

“We know that that black/African Americans are about twice as likely as white Americans to have Alzheimer’s or another dementia” says, Pam Myers, Program Director. “We also know that while black/African Americans are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than whites, they are less likely to have a diagnosis. A delay in diagnosis could mean that black/African Americans with Alzheimer’s and other dementias may miss the opportunity to make important legal, financial and care plans while they are still capable, and make their preferences known to their families.”  

Community Forums are hosted by the Alzheimer’s Association in communities across the country. Goals include listening to the experiences of the community related to Alzheimer’s and other dementias; identifying needs, gaps in resources and opportunities; and elevating awareness of the programs and services of the Alzheimer’s Association.

“We have held three successful in person Alzheimer’s Community Forums in the past 18 months in different parts of our service area” says Myers. “While all the forums had different feedback based on their unique community, we heard overarching community needs like more education and awareness about the disease. We really want to hear what our local black/African American community thinks about diagnosis, education, and resources.”

If you are part of the black/African American community in Toledo, and have an interest in or experience with Alzheimer’s or other dementias as it impacts your community – we want to hear from you. Business and community leaders, affected individuals, family members and caregivers, faith leaders, education leaders, hospitals, volunteer organizations, among many others, we invite you to attend.

The event is free; please register at (800)272-3900. Once you have registered, you will receive an email with log  in information for the event.

Alzheimer’s Association®

The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support and research. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. Visit alz.org or call 800.272.3900.

Pamela Myers, MAOM, BSN, RN| Program Director | Alzheimer’s Association

Northwest and Central Ohio | office: 419.537.1999 ext 9520 | cell: 567.302.3612 | pjmyers@alz.org | www.alz.org/nwohio | www.alz.org/centralohio

We offer free Helpline, Caregiver Support Groups, Early Stage Support Groups, Education programs, and Care Consultations. These services are available by phone or online during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

 



WCCOA: CARE COMPASS PROJECT TO CONTINUE VIRTUALLY

This project serves as a quarterly network gathering for caregivers. It is FREE but you need to Register…..

Bowling Green, Ohio (August, 2020) – The Care Compass project serves as a quarterly network gathering for caregivers. Care Compass is a place to gather together and obtain resources to make the journey of caregiving less stressful. The upcoming session, focusing on care choices, will be held virtually using Zoom on Wednesday, September 2 at 11:00 a.m.

Ann Schreiner, a regular participant of the Care Compass Project, is a caregiver for her 87-year-old mother who has mild dementia. Ann’s biggest hurdle to caregiving has been having patience and learning to respond with kindness when her mother is demanding and/or confused. “One Care Compass session in particular discussed being kind to yourself during these difficult situations”, Ann said. “It has been a great resource to connect with other people who are going through the same things.”

The Care Compass Project is free and open to all caregivers but requires pre-registration by calling 1-800-367-4935 or 419-353-5661 or by emailing programs@wccoa.net  Zoom login information will be given upon registration.

Lunch sponsored by Brookdale of Bowling Green will be delivered to your home by WCCOA to those Wood County residents registered for the session.

AGENDA:

11:00 a.m. Beth Boltz, Golden Care Partners and Katie Clark, Brookdale Senior Living will discuss the differences in home care and placement.

11:45 a.m. Missy & Len Kinor, Oasis Senior Care Advisors: “It’s okay to place your loved one.” Strategies on placement techniques and choosing the appropriate care level. 

The final Care Compass session for 2020 is scheduled for November 4.

The CARE Compass Project is sponsored and brought to the community by: Brookdale of Bowling Green, Wood County Committee on Aging, BGSU Optimal Aging Institute, Golden Care Partners, Ohio Living Home Health and Wood County Hospital.

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net

Multigenerational Living

DIY and home improvements for the expanding family…..

(BPT) – The American household is evolving. Traditional family households with parents and children up to 18 have transformed into a mix of various generations. The coronavirus pandemic has accelerated the growth of multigenerational households, including adults with boomerang children living at home after college, or aging parents living with them rather than at assisted living facilities.

While each household has its personal reasons for opting for a multigenerational structure, it’s a trend growing across cultures. One in five Americans live in a multigenerational household, according to the Pew Research Center, which defines multigenerational living as a home that includes two or more adult generations, or including grandparents and grandchildren younger than 25. As quarantine and social-distancing impacts continue, the number of families choosing multigenerational living is poised to grow.

As the pandemic has shifted the way a home functions in multiple ways, more people are putting time into home-improvement projects that help a home function well for everyone who lives there. This is particularly important for people transitioning to multigenerational households. Consider three steps to help improve multigenerational living:

Step 1: Expand living space

When someone moves in, it’s amazing how what used to feel like ample space can suddenly seem very cramped. Space becomes a premium and with lack of adequate space to read, watch TV or simply sit to rest, home stress levels can rise fast. That’s why you may want to consider ways to add common spaces, or transform the space you do have to accommodate more people.

Finishing a basement is a smart option if you have financial means. You might also finish attic spaces or add a shed with seating and electricity. Stylish room partitions or curtains can provide privacy and the feeling of a room if you don’t have money to invest in a larger home-improvement project. Finally, consider refreshing outdoor spaces with seating spots grouped throughout the yard to expand the property’s livable space and encourage people to enjoy the outdoors.

Step 2: Add a bathroom without costly demo

When the number of people increases in a home, the bathroom becomes a hot commodity. Whether it’s to put a bathroom closer to an aging parent’s bedroom or simply add a powder room in a nontraditional location to expand resources, consider affordable options such as macerating toilets and drain pumps from Saniflo. These above-floor plumbing options allow you to add a bathroom where no conventional, below-floor plumbing exists, so there’s no need to bust through concrete floors and compromise a home’s integrity.

This was the case for designer and home-décor blogger Kristine Abram who dreamed of adding a bathroom in the basement of her Ohio farmhouse-style home for her kids to use. Unfortunately, the slope of the land would not allow her to build a conventional bathroom with below-floor drainage. She researched alternatives and found the Saniaccess 2: a 1/2-horsepower macerator pump system used to install a half-bathroom (toilet and sink) up to 15 feet below the sewer line. Learn more at www.saniflo.com.

Step 3: Add and enhance entryways

With more people coming and going, entryways can become chaotic places in a home. If possible, consider refining the entry points to accommodate increased traffic and contain clutter. You may want to add benches and cubbies for each person’s personal items to help contain messes and prevent tripping hazards. Proper lighting, stable hooks and grab bars are also useful additions to accommodate multigenerational living.

Although you have a main entryway, you might also have other points of entry such as from the garage, the side or back of the home. Consider refreshing different entryways for different residents. For example, young adults just starting their careers may be coming and going a lot, so the door from the garage should be their main point of entrance. For aging parents with stability issues, the front entryway might be a good option, because it has railings and bright lighting. You can even change stairways into ramps if necessary.

Thinking strategically and making a few smart improvements, you can update your home so that it is comfortable for many people for many years to come.