Four things to consider when rescheduling elective surgery

Physicians are working to create the safest environment possible for you to have your needed surgery.

(BPT) – For the past few months, patients around the country have had to postpone elective surgery due to the COVID-19 pandemic. If you’re one of them, you’re probably wondering when you may hear from your doctor about rescheduling that surgery. As states begin easing restrictions, hospitals and clinics have been preparing to welcome patients back for procedures that can help relieve pain and improve their quality of life.

The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), in partnership with other medical associations, has developed a roadmap to help health care organizations safely resume elective surgeries.

“Physicians, hospitals and health systems are eager to resume elective surgeries, and patients are looking to have the procedures they planned before the pandemic put everything on hold,” said American Society of Anesthesiologists President Mary Dale Peterson, MD, MSHCA, FACHE, FASA. “Health systems can ensure these procedures resume safely by following ASA guidance.”

How will you know when it’s safe?

ASA’s checklist of safety measures can help ensure patients’ comfort in moving forward with surgery:

1. COVID-19 cases are decreasing

ASA and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) advise that it is safe to resume elective procedures when the number of new COVID-19 cases in the area has decreased every day for the last two weeks.

2. All patients are tested

Before you have surgery, you should be tested for COVID-19. Healthcare providers will also ask you if you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 in the past 14 days, or if you have experienced unexplained fever, cough, shortness of breath, chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat or loss of taste or smell in the last two weeks.

While it may be tempting to shrug off any symptoms or potential exposure, it is extremely important to be honest, for your safety and the safety of your surgical team. Patients who have viral infections — of any kind — are at higher risk for complications from surgery.

3. Your procedure will be performed in a safe environment

Surgical procedures are being performed in locations separate from where COVID-19 patients are being treated, such as an ambulatory care center or a different part of the hospital. Keeping surgeries separate from COVID-19 treatment areas protects both you and your surgical team.

4. Every facility has created a COVID-19 surgical care plan

ASA recommends that all health care facilities adopt COVID-19-related policies to address every stage of surgical care, from before the procedure through post-discharge care planning.

Physicians are working to create the safest environment possible for you to have your needed surgery. Keep in mind that in many areas, elective surgeries have not been performed for over a month, meaning that there will be a backlog, so it may take time to schedule your procedure.

Be informed about your upcoming surgery

Beyond COVID-19 safety, you can learn more about outpatient surgery and review Preparing for Surgery: an Anesthesia Checklist to be sure you are fully prepared for your long-awaited elective procedure.

 

 

 

WCCOA Centers Remain Closed Through June

WCCOA will continue to offer our modified services during this time including meal service…..

 

Based upon the directive from the State of Ohio, all WCCOA Senior Center locations (Perrysburg, Rossford, Walbridge, Grand Rapids, Pemberville, Wayne, North Baltimore, and the Wood County Senior Center in Bowling Green) will remain closed to the general public through Tuesday, June 30, 2020. 

 WCCOA will continue to offer our modified services during this time.

 

On-line programming is being offered via the WCCOA Facebook page and the Zoom meeting platform.  For a schedule of these programs and/or additional information, please contact programs@wccoa.net or call the office at 419.353.5661 or 1.800.367.4935.

 

WCCOA is reinforcing the importance of our participants remaining at home and avoiding large gatherings. We are also encouraging the older adults who participate at the Senior Center congregate dining sites to take advantage of home delivered meals during this time. If you are a Wood County resident (age 60+), in need of home delivered meals or other assistance, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging at 419.353.5661 or 800.367.4935 or via email at WCCOA@wccoa.net

 

WCCOA has put a plan in place for modified operations for services during the Coronavirus pandemic. 

This plan calls for the following:

  • Medical Escort will be provided on a case by case basis (but not for clients who are symptomatic of the virus).
  • All Senior Center locations will be closed to participants and the general public.
  • Home delivered meal service will continue.
  • All home delivered meal participants will receive one (1) hot lunch delivered daily and will be offered a weekly drop of seven (7) frozen meals to reheat for dinner.
  • Staff and volunteers who will be delivering home delivered meals will not be entering client homes unless absolutely necessary to make the delivery.  Staff / volunteers will also be instructed to remain at least 6-feet away from a client if they need to enter the residence.  The clients will be asked to have a table/surface near the inside of the door or on their front porch / in their garage for meals to be placed upon at delivering.  In order to assure that the client is well, the staff/volunteer will have a visual of the client or at minimum voice interaction through the door.

  

For those Wood County residents (age 60+) who do not currently frequent a Senior Center in Wood County and who opt to follow the recommendation to remain at home, avoiding crowds and public places, and who may find that they would benefit from participating in the home delivered meals programs, please call WCCOA at 419.353.5661 or via email at WCCOA@wccoa.net for additional information.

 

 

 

 

About The Wood County Committee on Aging:

 

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at 419.353.5661, 800.367.4935 or www.wccoa.net

 

Practical Tips for Caregivers Facing a Pandemic

Despite the good intentions of staying away, social isolation can be a real concern for seniors…..

(Family Features) Whether your role as a caregiver has you looking out for an elderly relative, children or both, chances are good that you’ve worried about how the COVID-19 pandemic may continue to affect your ability to provide necessary care.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Following the most up to date guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is the first step for caregivers who are looking after loved ones. As caregivers continue to adjust during the pandemic, keep these considerations in mind:

  • Contact health care providers to obtain extra necessary medications and stock up on over-the-counter drugs.
  • Monitor needed medical supplies related to a loved one’s condition or treatments (oxygen, incontinence, dialysis, wound care, etc.) and common supplies such as tissues and cough syrup.
  • Those with a loved one in a long-term care facility should inquire about any positive COVID-19 cases in the facility, testing procedures for the residents and staff members and be aware of the facility’s protocol if there is an outbreak or positive tests among residents and staff.

These additional tips can help caregivers reduce the pandemic’s impact:

Make backup plans. Most caregivers have plans in place for temporary assistance when things go awry, but COVID-19 is putting many of those short-term solutions to the test. It’s a good time to pull in additional resources so you have extra help waiting if someone you’re counting on falls ill or can’t fill in as planned. A meal delivery service may be a good option if grocery shopping and meal preparation continue to be affected.

Reduce exposure. Those who take care of loved ones in their homes or are regular care providers to family members and friends have concerns about exposing this vulnerable group to the virus. Many long-term care facilities have changed their visitation policies. You might be able to visit a loved one through a window, via a balcony or through video chat. It’s also important to minimize time spent out in the community where you could unknowingly contract the virus and pass it to a vulnerable loved one.

Shop smart. Because supermarkets and stores with goods identified as “essential” are still bustling with people, it’s important to minimize extra trips and wear a mask when in public. If possible, drop groceries and essentials at the door or arrange for delivery. In addition, some major pharmacies, where AARP members get special benefits on health, wellness and beauty purchases, have introduced special shopping hours for seniors and drive-thru shopping options to minimize person-to-person contact.

Reschedule wellness appointments. Not only are doctor’s offices short on resources, a waiting room can be filled with germs that may cause illness. Try to arrange for telephone or video-based appointments when possible and cancel any appointments that aren’t urgently necessary.

Keep germs away. Thorough handwashing with soap and water is critical. In addition to washing hands after eating and using the restroom, anyone entering and leaving the house should wash his or her hands. Also wipe down high-touch surfaces like doorknobs, remotes and phone keypads.

Combat boredom. Despite the good intentions of staying away, social isolation can be a real concern for seniors. Practicing social distancing is important for their health, but you can help keep them engaged by increasing phone, video and online interaction, and encouraging family and friends to do the same. If your loved one doesn’t already have a cell phone, contract-free plans are available with free activation and special rates for senior users. Many long-term care facilities also offer social distancing activities for residents.

Find more resources for caregivers at aarp.org/save.

SOURCE:
AARP Services, Inc.

WCCOA “CARE COMPASS PROJECT” TO CONTINUE VIRTUALLY

Remaining Care Compass dates for 2020 are scheduled for September 2 and November 4……

 

 

Bowling Green, Ohio (May 19, 2020) – The Care Compass project serves as a quarterly network gathering for caregivers. Care Compass is a place to gather together and obtain resources to make the journey of caregiving less stressful. The upcoming session will be held virtually using Zoom on Wednesday, June 3 at 11:00 a.m.

 

The Care Compass Project is free and open to all caregivers but requires pre-registration by calling 1-800-367-4935 or 419-353-5661 or by emailing programs@wccoa.net  Zoom login information will be given upon registration.

 

Lunch sponsored by Brookdale of Bowling Green will be delivered to your home by WCCOA to those Wood County residents registered for the session.

 

AGENDA:

11:00 a.m. Michelle Richards, OT will discuss how to avoid falls in the home. Falls put you at risk of serious injury. Prevent falls with these simple fall-prevention measures, from reviewing your medications to hazard-proofing your home.

 

11:45 a.m. Angie Holt-Parks, PTA with Progressive Therapy Alternatives, will discuss exercises and techniques on what to do when a loved one falls. Angie will provide an opportunity to gather information for a future balance screening.

 

Remaining Care Compass dates for 2020 are scheduled for September 2 and November 4.

 

The CARE Compass Project is sponsored and brought to the community by: Brookdale of Bowling Green, Wood County Committee on Aging, BGSU Optimal Aging Institute, Golden Care Partners, Ohio Living Home Health and Wood County Hospital.

 

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net

WCCOA Announces 2020 Poetry Contest Winners

Congrats to Carol, Larry( of NB) and Mary, 14th Annual Poetry contest winners!……

Bowling Green, OH (May 19, 2020) – The Wood County Committee on Aging is happy to announce the winner for the 14th Annual Poetry Contest along with the Honorable Mention and People’s Choice Awards!

 

Carol Kinsey from Bowling Green received first place with her poem entitled “Cancer Time Love”, winning a $50.00 gift card sponsored by Bowling Green Manor and BG Care Center. Honorable Mention was awarded to Larry Slaughterbeck of North Baltimore with the poem “A Christmas Morn Walk”. Public voting took place in April using the WCCOA Facebook and blog to select a People’s Choice Award winner. Mary Gambill from Pemberville received this award with her poem entitled “Persistence Until the Bitter End”. Congratulations to all of the winners and thank you to everyone that participated in this year’s contest. We received many fantastic entries and look forward to more next year.

 

All of the submitted poems can be read on the WCCOA blog at: https://woodcountycommitteeonaging.blogspot.com/

 

If you submitted a poem for the 2020 Poetry Contest and would like a printed booklet of this year’s submissions, please contact the Programs Department at 419-353-5661 or 800-367-4935 or email programs@wccoa.net

 

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net

 

WINNING POEMS ARE INCLUDED BELOW IN THEIR ENTIRETY:

 

Carol Kinsey, First Place

 

 

Cancer Time Love

By: Carol Kinsey, Bowling Rreen

Winning Poem!

 

I came to bed the other night

you were already sleeping

making little deeply-asleep noises.

I usually crawl under the covers

turning away from you

but tonight, this night

I turn toward you

put my arm quietly across your chest

not wanting to wake you.

Wanting to be near

be dear

but not wake you.

I may not always remember this exact moment

but I will know there were times

I quietly slipped into bed along side you

touched you softly

without you knowing

but felt by both or us.

Other nights will come

taking us closer and closer to a time

when there will be no more nights to come.

 

 

A Christmas Morn Walk

By: Larry E. Slaughterbeck, North Baltimore

Honorable Mention

 

No matter how fast our lives are moving;

Sometimes it is good to feel life plainly,

As on a Christmas morning walk.

A wintry wind moved gently among the branches,

The trees now asleep as I walked

On one of the shortest days of the year.

The quiet morning air was filled with snowflakes;

The sounds of the holiday season,

From a distant church’s bell tower.

A blue jay flew among the low lying bushes,

High in the sky, three skeins of honking geese

Flew at an angle.

A brisk north wind encouraged me to

Pull down my stocking cap.

 

Persistence Until the Bitter End

By: Mary Gambill, Pemberville

People’s Choice Award

 

Her struggles were real,

So she tried to stay strong,

So her body would heal,

But the battle raged on.

 

Her pain it prevailed,

She got very frail,

She walked with a cain,

To help with the pain.

 

The Kemo was rough,

She tried to stay tough,

All she could say,

Is enough is enough.

 

The pain got so bad,

She could no longer fight,

Her body was broken,

Words were left unspoken.

 

She lost a tough battle,

The journey was long,

She pushed very hard,

To try to live on.

 

Now she soars like an Eagle,

High up in the sky,

Looking down on her family,

Saying please do not cry.

“Welcome to Medicare” Webinars for Ohioans Turning 65

Webinar Events Start May 19, 2020.

 

COLUMBUS – Governor Mike DeWine and Department of Insurance Director Jillian Froment are pleased to announce a series of webinar events for Ohioans new to Medicare. These events will be conducted by staff from the Ohio Senior Health Insurance Information Program (OSHIIP) and will educate soon-to-be Medicare eligible Ohioans about their health insurance and prescription drug coverage options.

“This is an excellent opportunity for Ohioans who will be eligible for Medicare to familiarize themselves with the program and understand their options,” Governor Mike DeWine said. “We encourage Ohioans to participate in the webinars and use the resources provided by the Department of Insurance when determining the plan that is best for them.”

One popular vehicle in which our volunteers and staff serve Medicare consumers is through statewide in-person Welcome to Medicare events that start in May. This year, to ensure the health and safety of Ohioans, the Department is shifting to webinar-only events to assist Ohioans’ transition to Medicare.

Participants will receive the same detailed engagement from the Department’s team in an interactive setting with one-on-one follow-up opportunities, including for help with enrollment. A list of OSHIIP’s Welcome to Medicare webinars is available at www.insurance.ohio.gov, and staff can also be reached at 1-800-686-1578 and OSHIIPmail@insurance.ohio.gov. Ohioans who have enrollment questions can also call Medicare at 1-800-MEDICARE. In 2019, OSHIIP worked with hundreds of thousands of Ohioans during outreach events, one-on-one meetings, and over the phone helping consumers save nearly $30 million. Medicare experts from the department will cover topics such as Medicare Part A and B benefits, Part D prescription drug coverage, Medicare Supplement plans, Medicare Advantage plans, financial assistance, and key deadlines.

“The department is proud to offer these informational sessions,” said Froment. “It is our goal to have those approaching 65 and have Medicare questions come away from these webinars better prepared to select the best coverage that meets their financial and health needs.”

Social Security Matters

Having an online SS account doesn’t provide you with any benefit advantage, but it allows you to monitor your lifetime earnings record, get a replacement SS card if needed….

 
 
Rusty Gloor
 
Social Security Matters
by AMAC Certified Social Security Advisor Russell Gloor
Association of Mature American Citizens     
 
____________________________________________ 
Ask Rusty – About the “Earnings Test” and “Registering” with Social Security
 
Dear Rusty: Does tax filing status matter when calculating how much you can earn without a reduction in your monthly SS payout? My wife and I have filed a joint income tax return for years. My wife is working and I’m 62 and wondering – if I start drawing SS, does the earnings limit only relate to what I earn, or does it include what my wife earns as well? Is the earnings limit tied to our IRS filing status? I need to know if I should file my taxes as a single to be sure my wife’s earnings are not combined with mine to affect my Social Security payment. 
 
Also, I’ve read that it’s recommended to register online with SS if you’re 62. As I understand it, this should be done even if one’s not intending to start benefits yet. Is this true? What are the benefits for doing this? Does it make for a quicker start of payments once the election to start benefits is made? Would it help my wife should I die prior to starting my benefits? Signed: Wondering
 
Dear Wondering: Income tax filing status doesn’t matter when it comes to determining if your earnings from work exceed Social Security “earnings limit.” If you collect SS before you reach your full retirement age (FRA), your wife’s earnings from working will not be counted toward your personal SS earnings limit. The earnings test looks only at your personal earnings and, if you exceed the limit, SS will take back some of your benefits. But only your personal earnings – as reported on your W-2 or Self-Employment tax return – count. If you’re not working, then your Social Security benefits will not be affected by the earnings test, even if you file a joint return which has an Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) which is more than the annual earnings limit because your wife works. 
 
As for your second question: it is not necessary, nor would it gain you any advantage, to “register” with Social Security before you are ready to claim your benefits. Indeed, Social Security does not even provide you with a way to do that. What they do provide is a way for you to create your own personal “My Social Security” online account, which gives you access to all of the online features provided by the Social Security Administration, including allowing you to apply for your benefits online (the fastest way to claim) whenever you’re ready to do that. 
 
Having an online SS account doesn’t provide you with any benefit advantage, but it allows you to monitor your lifetime earnings record, get a replacement SS card if needed, and get estimates of your current and future Social Security benefits to help you decide when to claim. You can create your personal “My Social Security” account by going to www.ssa.gov/myaccount. They use a “two-factor” security process, which means you’ll not only need to set up a password but also a second way to confirm your identity (usually via a code sent to a text-enabled cell phone or your email account). But, even if you have this online account pre-established, your wife will still need to contact Social Security directly to claim her survivor benefit if you predeceased her. Survivor benefits must be applied for by the surviving spouse directly contacting Social Security. 
 
This article is intended for information purposes only and does not represent legal or financial guidance. It presents the opinions and interpretations of the AMAC Foundation’s staff, trained and accredited by the National Social Security Association (NSSA). NSSA and the AMAC Foundation and its staff are not affiliated with or endorsed by the Social Security Administration or any other governmental entity. To submit a question, visit our website (amacfoundation.org/programs/social-security-advisory) or email us at ssadvisor@amacfoundation.org.
_______________________________________
 
About AMAC 
The 2.1 million member Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC] www.amac.us is a vibrant, vital senior advocacy organization that takes its marching orders from its members. AMAC Action is a non-profit, non-partisan organization representing the membership in our nation’s capital and in local Congressional Districts throughout the country. And the AMAC Foundation (www.AmacFoundation.org) is the Association’s non-profit organization, dedicated to supporting and educating America’s Seniors. Together, we act and speak on the Association members’ behalf, protecting their interests and offering a practical insight on how to best solve the problems they face today. Live long and make a difference by joining us today at www.amac.us/join-amac.

Ohio Department of Aging launches free check-in service for older citizens

“Staying Connected” service open to Ohio residents age 60 and older

Columbus, Ohio – The Ohio Department of Aging (ODA) yesterday announced a free, daily check-in by phone service for Ohio’s older residents to ensure their well-being amid the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) public health emergency and beyond. The program was announced during Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine’s daily news conference.

The “Staying Connected” service is open to Ohio residents age 60 or older who have a valid phone number. Those living alone in the community are encouraged to consider enrolling.

“During a time when physical distancing has become necessary, we must create ways to maintain social connectedness,” said ODA Director Ursel McElroy. “The impact of isolation has been linked to higher risks for serious physical and mental conditions, so I am pleased we can provide these check-ins at a critical time.”

“Especially during this very challenging time, we encourage older Ohioans to sign up for the Ohio Department of Aging’s Staying Connected phone program. This program will help reduce isolation and support the health and wellbeing of older adults in our state,” said Robert Cornwell, Executive Director, Buckeye State Sheriff’s Association.

The automated service, which is available 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. seven days a week, contacts participants each day within a one-hour window selected by them during sign-up. After confirming the caller is OK, it offers to connect the caller with the local Area Agency on Aging for information about services or assistance.

If a participant does not answer after three attempts, a call is placed to an alternate contact, if one is on file. After multiple failed attempts to reach the participant and the alternate contact, a call is placed to the non-emergency services line of the local sheriff’s office.

Eligible Ohio residents can learn more, or sign up, by visiting www.aging.ohio.gov/stayingconnected or calling 1-833-ODA-CHAT (1-833-632-2428).

For more information on Ohio’s response to COVID-19, visit coronavirus.ohio.gov or call 1-833-4-ASK-ODH.

About ODA – The Ohio Department of Aging serves and advocates for the needs of Ohioans age 60 and older, as well as their families, caregivers and communities. Programs include home and community based long-term supports and services, as well as initiatives to promote health and wellness throughout the lifespan. Visit www.aging.ohio.gov.

Finally – Possible Game-Changer for Health Care…

Support for the Physicians Pro Bono Care act grows in the House; billions in savings expected once it becomes law, says AMAC

Support for the Physicians Pro Bono Care act grows in the House;
billions in savings expected once it becomes law, says AMAC
 
WASHINGTON, DC, May 8 — The Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC] reports that the Physician Pro Bono Care Act, introduced earlier this year by Rep. Dan Webster (R-FL) and Colin Peterson (D-MN), now has 25 co-sponsors. 
 
Bob Carlstrom, president of AMAC Action, says “The Physician Pro Bono Care Act is particularly important at a time when the government’s coffers are being depleted by the COVID-19 pandemic and so every billion dollars’ worth of savings counts.”
 
According to Carlstrom, individuals who cannot afford to see a physician tend to visit local ERs instead because the visits are covered by Medicaid and CHIP. “By offering physicians the opportunity to take a charitable tax deduction for seeing Medicaid eligible patients in their offices and clinics, instead of having to travel to a separate medical charity facilities, Medicare and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) could see billions of dollars in savings. The cost of the tax deduction pales in comparison to the level of Medicaid and CHIP reimbursements for the same services, particularly the costs for chronic care in ER visits – a 95% savings.” 
 
Just as important, Carlstrom notes, is that the bill would give needy patients the ability to choose their own doctors and to establish long-term patient-physician relationships. In addition, as co-sponsor Congressman Webster put it: “This bill removes government bureaucracy and red-tape that obstructs the patient-doctor relationship, and it expands access to doctors for some of the more vulnerable in our society.”
 
Medicaid spending has increased dramatically in recent years and it has put a strain on state and federal resources. Meanwhile, the CORVID-19 outbreak is bound to increase ER visits long term, greatly adding to the burden.
 
AMAC’s Carlstrom argues that the Physician Pro Bono Care Act “provides a genuine opportunity to lower state and federal governments Medicaid spending, with doctors helping to reduce the number of Medicaid and CHIP payouts by using the charitable tax deduction alternative. This simple tax deduction is self-executing in the normal tax filing processes of the physicians further decreasing their administrative costs, which are much higher in the Medicaid reimbursement processes. The bill does not prevent physicians or qualifying individuals from using Medicaid or CHIP, it simply adds an additional, more attractive option for low-income patients to receive localized healthcare services.”

Letter to the Editor

Wood County Committee on Aging Update…..serving over 800 Wood Co. Seniors daily….

Wood County Committee on Aging Update

Written by: Eric Myers, President

WCCOA Governing Board

Wood County, OH (April 30, 2020) – In this time of staying at home and social distancing, the Wood County Committee on Aging (WCCOA) has been kept very busy.  Although our eight sites around Wood County are closed, we have been able to maintain our staff and to make very effective use of their skills and expertise.  Not only have they been working on their own jobs, they have stepped into other roles and situations and have done a tremendous job.

Two questions face the WCCOA.  How do we foster resilience and how can we adapt rapidly?  The most obvious and biggest challenge has been the continuation of the program to provide meals to our clients throughout the county.  While congregate meals are currently not being served, the Production Kitchen is preparing and delivering between 750-800 home delivered meals daily, Monday through Friday. Each week the Kitchen sends out an average of 850 frozen meals for the weekend and evening meals of participants.  Because of supplier difficulties, the Production Kitchen has been making their own frozen meals. The regular routes now are approaching 45 clients each. With growing numbers of participants, three new routes have been created.  Staff members from the Wood County Senior Center have been delivering the new routes. 

Several weeks ago, the WCCOA pulled together staff and were able to create and deliver 11,200 shelf stable meals (two weeks’ worth of food and supplies for each of WCCOA’s 800 home bound clients.)  The overwhelming task was completed with help from local businesses, elected officials, the Ohio State Highway Patrol, the Wood County Sheriff’s Office, and the City of Bowling Green.  The preparation of the boxes, the filling of the boxes, and the delivery was completed with the cheerful assistance of all involved in record time.

The eight sites are currently closed and will remain closed at least until the end of May, but that does not mean the site managers have not been working.  Each site has or is continuing to edit site manuals and developed a Rural Route Directions Manual.  Each has done a deep cleaning of the site and organization the site.  Several site managers have also taken over delivering home delivered meal.

The Social Services staff have been continuing to provide the same services as before including medical transportation, calling new and continuing clients, and doing wellness checks.  They have also taken on added responsibilities such as completing home delivered meal routes and cleaning and sanitizing their work space.

The Programs staff has also been very busy.  Obviously face-to-face programs have been cancelled but the staff has been busy with developing at home newsletters, creating online programming using Zoom, and creating home activities for the seniors.  The staff is planning for the uncertain future looking to be creative.  As other staff members have done, they have assumed different roles to help the overall program by delivering meals, covering sites, and helping with the shelf stable meals.

While all of this has been going on, the actual construction of the new Wood County Senior Center has begun. Mosser Construction has been moving earth and making preparations for digging the basement. 

The employees at the WCCOA have continued to be resilient.  They have jumped into new roles serving the entire organization while continuing to fulfill their own specific job requirements.  The administration, supervisors, and staff are all to be commended for their positive attitudes and ability to adjust quickly to new situations.  They have stepped up to meet the challenge in these trying times, never forgetting the goal of serving the senior citizens of all of Wood County.  We are blessed to have them.

New Ohio “RONA” Guidelines Released Overnight

The new order, which incorporates the openings of businesses and services announced… READ THE ENTIRE Order here >

(COLUMBUS, Ohio)—Ohio Governor Mike DeWine today announced that the Ohio Department of Health has issued a “Stay Safe Ohio Order.”

The new order, which incorporates the openings of businesses and services announced as part of the Responsible RestartOhio plan, will replace the previous “Stay at Home” order, which expires at 11:59 p.m. tonight (April 30, 2020).

The “Stay Safe Ohio Order” is available on Ohio’s Coronavirus (COVID-19) website.

WCCOA Continues Modified Operations in May

All WCCOA Senior Center locations (Perrysburg, Rossford, Walbridge, Grand Rapids, Pemberville, Wayne, North Baltimore, and the Wood County Senior Center in Bowling Green) will remain closed to the general public through Friday, May 29, 2020….

Based upon information and directive from the State of Ohio available at this time, all WCCOA Senior Center locations (Perrysburg, Rossford, Walbridge, Grand Rapids, Pemberville, Wayne, North Baltimore, and the Wood County Senior Center in Bowling Green) will remain closed to the general public through Friday, May 29, 2020.  WCCOA will continue to offer our modified services during this time.

 

WCCOA is reinforcing the importance of our participants remaining at home and avoiding public gatherings (including Church, restaurants, and movies).  We are also encourage the older adults who participate at the Senior Center congregate dining sites to take advantage of home delivered meals during this time.  If you are a Wood County resident (age 60+), in need of home delivered meals or other assistance, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging at 419.353.5661 or 800.367.4935 or via email at WCCOA@wccoa.net you may also follow WCCOA on Facebook

 

WCCOA has put a plan in place for modified operations for services during the Coronavirus pandemic.  This is our starting point and will be modified as need arises or as recommended by the Wood County Health Department.

 

This plan calls for the following:

  • Medical Escort will be provided on a case by case basis (but not for clients who are symptomatic of the virus).
  • All Senior Center locations will be closed to participants and the general public.

      Home delivered meal service will continue.

  • All home delivered meal participants will receive one (1) hot lunch delivered daily and will be offered a weekly drop of seven (7) frozen meals to reheat for dinner.
  • Staff and volunteers who will be delivering home delivered meals will not be entering client homes unless absolutely necessary to make the delivery.  Staff / volunteers will also be instructed to remain at least 6-feet away from a client if they need to enter the residence.  The clients will be asked to have a table/surface near the inside of the door or on their front porch / in their garage for meals to be placed upon at delivering.  In order to assure that the client is well, the staff/volunteer will have a visual of the client or at minimum voice interaction through the door.

  

For those Wood County residents (age 60+) who do not currently frequent a Senior Center in Wood County and who opt to follow the recommendation to remain at home, avoiding crowds and public places, and who may find that they would benefit from participating in the home delivered meals programs, please call WCCOA at 419.353.5661 or via email at WCCOA@wccoa.net for additional information.

 

About The Wood County Committee on Aging:

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net