Improvements for Independence

Home modifications and repairs can help everyone, especially older adults and people with disabilities, maintain an independent lifestyle and prevent accidents…………………

Modifications to make your home more accessible

(Family Features) Being safe and comfortable at home is a large part of living well. Home modifications and repairs can help everyone, especially older adults and people with disabilities, maintain an independent lifestyle and prevent accidents.

Many older adults prefer to stay at home for as long as possible, but too often don’t think about whether their homes will meet their needs as they age. Making improvements for independence before they are needed is a good way to ensure that a home is ready for aging in place. Forward-thinking improvements may also help prevent falls, which often cause the need for long-term care.

Many changes, such as adding grab bars in bathrooms, can be done without a major redesign or full-blown renovation. Depending on your circumstance, it may also make sense to consider things like widening doorways and lowering countertop heights for someone who uses a wheelchair.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Improvements for Independence

Here’s how you can get started:

Home assessment
Before making any changes, assess the entire home. This checklist can help identify areas that might need improvement. Everyone has different needs, but in general, a “no” answer may be cause for action.

  • Are exterior walkways and entrances well-lit?
  • Is there a step-free entrance to the home?
  • Are entrance doors easy to lock, unlock, open and close?
  • Does the main floor include a kitchen, bedroom and full bathroom?
  • Are doorways wide enough for someone using a wheelchair, walker or service animal?
  • Are hallways, staircases, bathrooms and the kitchen well-lit?
  • Is wall-to-wall carpeting secure and in good condition?
  • Are area rugs secured to the floor with grips?
  • Are walkways free from obstructions and hazards like cords and furniture?
  • Do stairways have sturdy handrails on both sides?
  • Can bathroom and kitchen cabinets be easily reached?
  • Is there a step-free shower entrance?
  • Are grab bars available in or near the shower and toilet?
  • Do showers have non-slip mats or adhesive strips?
  • Will smoke detectors provide visual as well as audio alerts?
  • Are telephones and emergency supplies easily accessible on all floors?

Cost and contractors
Minor improvements can cost between $150-$2,000, and major renovation costs vary depending on the job. However, many contractors offer reduced rates or sliding-scale fees based on income and ability to pay. Public and private financing options may also be available.
If hiring a professional, remember to get a written agreement with specific tasks, a timeline and cost estimate. Make sure the contractor is licensed, bonded and insured for the specific type of work.

More information about home modifications, including financial assistance, can be found at eldercare.gov.

 

SOURCE:
Administration for Community Living

Culture and Society Forum Series to begin September 27

Registration is encouraged and entitles participants to a packet of supplemental readings for each talk………..

Bowling Green, OH (September 21, 2017) – The 2017 “Culture and Society Forum” showcases innovative, interdisciplinary research being done by the faculty and staff of Bowling Green State University. This series is a collaboration between the Wood County Committee on Aging and the Institute for the Study of Culture and Society at BGSU. In this series, attendees will have access to humanities research and information on various topics in a similar vein as with our “Great Decisions Series” earlier this year, and will offer an opportunity to engage in intellectual conversations on a variety of subjects in the humanities. All of these events are free and open to the public.

 

Events in this series include:

 

“America’s Most Unjust Export: Considering Justice and Prisons in a Global Context”

Baz Dreisinger, Professor of English, John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Tuesday, September 27, 4:30 p.m.

206 Bowen-Thompson Student Union (Theater)

(This talk was rescheduled from Spring 2017.)

 

 

“Tales of Wa (Harmony) and Woe:  Japanese Organizational Culture and the Production of Science and Technology”

Walter Grunden, Associate Professor of History

Wednesday, October 4, 2:30 p.m.

Wood County Senior Center (305 N. Main St, Bowling Green, OH)

Grunden is a 2017-2018 ICS Faculty Fellow.

 

“Women at Work: Gender in Popular and Material Culture”

Radhika Gajjala, Professor of School of Media & Communication and American Culture Studies

Susannah Cleveland, Head Librarian, Music Library and Bill Schurk Sound Archives

Nancy Down, Head Librarian, Browne Popular Culture Library

Michelle Sweetser, Head Librarian and University Archivist, Center for Archival Collections

Wednesday, October 11, 2:30 p.m.

228 BTSU (Multi-purpose Room), BGSU

 

“More than Mexico’s Robin Hood: Political, Cultural and Gendered Meanings of the Legendary Chucho el Roto”

Amy Robinson, Associate Professor, World Languages and Cultures

Wednesday, October 18, 2:30 p.m.

Wood County Senior Center (305 N. Main St, Bowling Green, OH)

Robinson is a 2017-2018 ICS Faculty Fellow.

 

 

“‘12th & Clairmount’: Documenting the Detroit Riots 50 Years Later”

Thomas Castillo, Assistant Professor of Film

Brian Kaufman, Documentary Filmmaker

Wednesday, October 25, 2:30 p.m.

228 BTSU (Multi-purpose Room), BGSU

A film screening of “12th & Clairmount” will be held at 6:30 p.m. in room 206 of the Bowen-Thompson Student Union after this presentation. Synopsis: In late July 1967, a police raid of a Detroit bar turned into one of the nation’s deadliest riots. In his new documentary, “12th and Clairmount,” filmmaker Brian Kaufman brings together home movie footage from local Detroiters, as well as new interviews, to take a fresh look at life in Detroit before, during and after those violent events. Kaufman is executive video editor of the Detroit Free Press and an Emmy-winning videographer. The documentary is produced by the Free Press in collaboration with Bridge Magazine and WXYZ-TV.

 

Parking information can be found at http://www.bgsu.edu/parking. Registration is encouraged and entitles participants to a packet of supplemental readings for each talk, so please call 419-353-5661 or 800-367-4935 or e-mail programs@wccoa.net today!

 

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

Silver Sneakers classes are being held at the Wood County Senior Center

Classes held on Friday mornings………….

Bowling Green, OH (September 11, 2017) – The Wood County Committee on Aging is holding ongoing Silver Sneakers exercise classes at the Wood County Senior Center at 305 N. Main Street in Bowling Green! Two classes are available and looking for more participants!

 

The Silver Sneakers Strength & Balance Class is a low-impact class to build muscle strength and increase flexibility, held Fridays from 9-10 a.m.

 

The Silver Sneakers Chair Yoga Class is a gentle class incorporating flow with breath and movement for increased strength, better concentration, and reduced joint strain, held Fridays from 10-11 a.m.

 

Both classes are being taught by certified instructor Cheryl Rogers and are FREE for Silver Sneakers Members. Non-members may also attend for a fee of $3 per class.

 

For more information about these opportunities, call the Wood County Committee on Aging’s Programs Department at (419)353-5661 or (800)367-4935, or e-mail programs@wccoa.net.

 

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

The Risk of Aging

With age come new vulnerabilities that can make any of us susceptible to elder abuse, says AMAC
‘It is no longer unusual for us to live to be as old as 80, 90 and 100 years or more’

With age come new vulnerabilities that can make any of us susceptible to elder abuse, says AMAC
‘It is no longer unusual for us to live to be as old as 80, 90 and 100 years or more’
WASHINGTON, DC, Aug 18 – Reports of physical and financial abuse of the elderly are on the rise throughout the country.  It’s a crime that, experts say, is largely underreported.  But, a new light needs to be shed on this dirty little secret, says Dan Weber, president of the Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC].
“Older Americans are easy targets in most cases.  Many of them depend on caregivers for survival and that makes them beholden and vulnerable.  It also can make them reluctant to let anyone know what is happening to them.  You’d think that friends and family would be the first to notice that an aging neighbor or relative is being abused.  But, the sad fact is that in too many cases it is a family member or a friend that is perpetrating the abuse.”
It’s up to “those of us with a conscience,” says Weber, to root out any instances of ill treatment.   The alarming truth is that for each case of abuse that is reported there are dozens more that are not.
The Elder Justice Roadmap project, supported by the Departments of Justice and Health and Human Services, has a broad-ranging definition of elder abuse: “physical, sexual, or psychological abuse, as well as neglect, abandonments, and financial exploitation of an older person by another person or entity, that occurs in any setting (e.g. home, community, or facility), either in a relationship where there is an expectation of trust and/or when an older person is targeted based on age or disability.”
If you suspect that someone whom you know is the victim of abuse, check it out.  Signs of physical abuse are obvious.  They include unexplained injuries including new bruises and abrasions.  If you notice that an aging relative or friend is making too many trips to the bank or is suddenly running up mysterious charges on a credit card, he or she may be a victim of fraud.  And, if you notice unusual weight loss or curious behavior, they could be signs of neglect or emotional abuse.
Nursing homes get most of the blame for elder abuse.  But in too many cases, according to the National Center on Elder Abuse, the perpetrators are family members.
“Elder abuse is a much too pervasive problem in America where three and a half million men and women celebrate their 65th birthdays each and every year.  And, where each year more people live longer than ever before.  It is no longer unusual for us to live to be as old as 80, 90 and 100 years or more these days thanks to healthier lifestyles and the miracle of modern medicine.  But, with age come new vulnerabilities that can make any of us susceptible to the crimes of angry and greedy predators.  And, that’s why it is up to younger friends and family – those who truly care – to keep a watchful eye open for anomalies that indicate older loved ones may be victims.”
ABOUT AMAC
The Association of Mature American Citizens [http://www.amac.us] is a vibrant, vital senior advocacy organization that takes its marching orders from its members.  We act and speak on their behalf, protecting their interests and offering a practical insight on how to best solve the problems they face today.  Live long and make a difference by joining us today at http://amac.us/join-amac.

Take a Holistic Approach to Retirement Planning

Experts generally concur that it’s never too early to begin planning for retirement, but depending on your stage of life, your approach may vary………

(Family Features) Although retirement is a milestone for all working adults, decades of hard work may not pay off if you haven’t planned for your financial needs once a regular paycheck stops coming.

According to research by the Insured Retirement Institute (IRI), millions of Baby Boomers stepping into their retirement years have unrealistic expectations and lack a full understanding of the danger of running out of money during retirement. However, the challenges do not stop with Baby Boomers. A recent study indicated 47 percent of Gen-Xers and more than half of Millennials believe a secure retirement is beyond their reach.

“Most people recognize the need to grow their wealth before retirement, but getting there isn’t always a clear path,” said Cathy Weatherford, IRI president and CEO. “Starting early and taking a holistic approach to financial planning is truly essential for a safe and dignified retirement.”

Experts generally concur that it’s never too early to begin planning for retirement, but depending on your stage of life, your approach may vary. Consider this advice from the experts at IRI to get on a path toward financially secure retirement.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Student
Forming good money habits can set you up for a lifetime of success. An act as simple as putting spare change in a jar can help you start saving. Talk to adults you trust about how to create a budget and work toward a financial goal. Auto insurance and cell phone bills are important expenses to factor into your budget.

Building a career
Once you have a solid budget, stick to it and set aside some money to save. Compound interest adds up over time and the earlier you start compounding, the better. Credit will also start to play more of a factor in your life, as major expenses like buying a house or car, or starting a business rely greatly on your credit.

Mid-career
At this stage, your employer may offer a retirement savings plan. Whether you have various investments to manage or not, you should start to look at your building your portfolio and retirement plan. This mid-career life stage is a good time to set a retirement savings goal, and now is also the time to consider hiring a financial advisor.

A professional can help you explore less understood but worthwhile approaches to holistic retirement planning such as annuities. Annuities are essentially insurance contracts that come in different types and offer several options to meet a variety of financial objectives. They are a guarantee of income as you age.

Late career
At this stage, you probably have a better idea as to when you will be able to retire, but it’s important to review your savings on an annual basis and make adjustments, if needed, to stay on track. As you approach retirement, you’ll want to research Social Security, Medicare and long-term care options to ensure you have a comprehensive view of your future finances.

Ready for retirement
If you haven’t already done so, the time has come to better research your Social Security benefits (and when it’s best to start accessing them), Medicare coverage and long-term care options. This is the time to start making some choices, such as whether you will downsize your home and how to eliminate as much debt as possible. One of the more complex aspects surrounding retirement can be determining which of your accounts to tap and in what order, and a professional can help guide you.

Explore more resources and tools to aid your retirement planning at retireonyourterms.org.

 

SOURCE:
Insured Retirement Institute

Class Reunion Planned for Saturday, July 29th

60th Class Reunion for NBHS Class of 1957

The North Baltimore Class of 1957 will hold their 60th Class Reunion this Saturday July 29th , at 5 pm.  The Class Reunion will be held at the Liberty Township Fire Hall,  7692  County Road 140 Findlay.

There were 42 in our Graduating Class! Reservations may be called in to Sondra (Freeland) Baumgardner 419 722 2224 or Bonnie (Whipple) August 419 348 8005 . Other members of the 60th celebration committee are Beverly ( Blackman) Birchfield and Mary (Julien) Gonyer.

WCCOA receives National Accreditation

The Wood County Committee on Aging is commended for its vision, collaborative relationships, outreach programs, wide range of health and fitness programs, quality inclusion programs, and support groups programming…….

The Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. has received Accreditation status for the period of 2017-2022, by the National Council on the Aging / National Institute of Senior Centers (NISC).  Accreditation was awarded at the recent conference of the NCOA/NISC held in Oak Brook, Illinois.  Paul Dauch, WCCOA’s Food Service Manager was present to accept the plaque recognizing the accreditation status.

Left to right: Lynn Fields Harris, Chair NISC Leadership Council; Paul Dauch, WCCOA Food Service Manager; Jim Firman, President/CEO National Council on Aging

WCCOA was honored to be recognized as Ohio’s first accredited senior center in 2001 and just the 25th nationwide of the 15,000 senior centers in the United States.   The 2017 Accreditation status is the fourth time WCCOA has achieved this elite status.

 

Accreditation is unique to the senior center field and demonstrates outstanding leadership and commitment to quality programs and services to older adults.  The Wood County Committee on Aging is commended for its vision, collaborative relationships, outreach programs, wide range of health and fitness programs, quality inclusion programs, and support groups programming.  NISC peer reviewer, Christine Beatty, Director of the Madison Senior Center in Madison, Wisconsin, notes the prominent role the WCCOA holds throughout Wood County.

 

The WCCOA is a nonprofit organization serving older adults throughout Wood County.  The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. is to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.  For more information WCCOA’s programs and services, contact 419.353.5661, or 1.800.367.4935, or visit our website at www.wccoa.net

 

Wood County Committee on Aging invites community input in planning new Wood County Senior Center Building

The first session will be held on Tuesday, June 20 at 1:30 p.m. and the second session will be held on Tuesday, June 27 at 6:30 p.m…….

Bowling Green, OH  – The Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA) will be hosting two community input sessions that will aid in the design of the new Wood County Senior Center facility.

 

The first session will be held on Tuesday, June 20 at 1:30 p.m. and the second session will be held on Tuesday, June 27 at 6:30 p.m. Both sessions will be held at the Wood County Committee on Aging, located at 305 N. Main Street, Bowling Green, OH and will be open to the public. Please join us to assist in planning our future facility!

 

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

TODAY Summer Picnic at Briar Hill H. C.

North Baltimore’s Briar Hill Health Campus INVITES YOU to the Summer Picnic, with FREE food, entertainment and activities for all ages!

North Baltimore’s Briar Hill Health Campus INVITES YOU to the Summer Picnic, with FREE food, entertainment and activities for all ages!

This FREE Community Event will by Thursday, June 15, from 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm, at the health campus, at 600 Sterling Drive, out on Briar Hill Rd. (SR 18 East).

Live entertainment by East of Cheyenne will be provided.

Call 419-257-2421 for more information!

Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. to hold Retreat

Friday, June 23, 2017 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. held at the 577 Foundation……

Bowling Green, OH (June 9, 2017) – The Wood County Committee on Aging (WCCOA) will be holding a  Retreat entitled “Project Wisdom” on Friday, June 23, 2017 from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. It will be held at the 577 Foundation, located at 577 East Front Street in Perrysburg, OH. The event is sponsored by StoryPoint Senior Living.

 

  • The morning will begin with registration and light refreshments at 8:30 a.m.
  • At 8:45 a.m. will be a Chair Yoga and Meditation session led by certified instructor Kelsey Knoop, a senior at Bowling Green State University.
  • At 9:30 a.m. will be “Wellness, Purpose & Abundance with Young Living Essential Oils,” a talk that will include information, instructions, and samples covering the uses of essential oils. Led by Karen Glassford, a graduate of Bowling Green State University and of “Executive” rank with Young Living.
  • At 10:45 a.m., Guest Speaker Barb Roose will share about how we can plant seeds of happiness and joy in our lives. Even if you’re navigating tremendous personal challenge, Barb will equip you with a simple, practical exercise you can do each day that will allow happiness to flourish in any season of your life. Barb Roose is a speaker and author from the Toledo area. She has a passion for helping people activate and elevate their leadership gifts at the highest levels. She served on staff at CedarCreek Church in Perrysburg, OH for 14 years, most recently as the Executive Director of Ministry. Prior to CedarCreek, Barb was an award-winning pharmaceutical sales representative and non-profit executive director.
  • Lunch will be at noon, provided by Kingston of Perrysburg.
  • At 1:15, participants will have a choice of either having some quiet time to journal and explore the grounds, or join Becky Laabs for “Nurturing Your Creative Side,” which is a session on how creativity can enhance multiple aspects of your life.
  • Closing for the day is at 2:30pm, where participants will receive flowers and gift bags sponsored by StoryPoint Senior Living.

 

Seating is limited to 25 individuals. Cost to register is $15. For further details or to register, please contact the Programs department at WCCOA by calling (419) 353-5661 or (800) 367-4935, or by e-mailing programs@wccoa.net. When registering, please specify your choice of session: “Nurturing Your Creative Side” or “Journaling/Strolling the Grounds”. Vegetarian lunch options are available upon request.

 

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

WCCOA receives grant award

Subaru Share the Love Event ® helps deliver nutritious meals and compassion to Wood County’s seniors……….

 

Bowling Green, OH, May , 2017 – Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc.(WCCOA) is proud to announce that a grant award in the amount of $4,537.41 has been received for our partnership with local Subaru dealerships.  Employees from LaRiche Subaru, in Findlay, and Yark Subaru, in Toledo, assisted with the delivery of home delivered lunches during the 2016 holiday season.  For the ninth straight year, Subaru has donated $250 for every new vehicle sold or leased to the customer’s choice of participating charity through this event and Meals on Wheels America (MOWA) members, like WCCOA, received a share of the revenue raised by Subaru in their state.

 

“I am proud to say this is the sixth year WCCOA has partnered with area Subaru dealerships for this event.  With the help of Subaru and MOWA we are able to raise awareness of the importance of a hot, nutritious meal to our older, frail clients.  These meals and drivers provide nourishment and happiness to the older adults we serve,” said Angie Bradford, WCCOA’s Director of Food Service.

 

“It is a true testament to the value of Meals on Wheels and the strength of our nationwide network that Subaru of America and its customers choose to give back to this vital service year after year,” said Ellie Hollander, President and CEO, Meals on Wheels America. “Since its inception, Share the Love has helped deliver more than 1.4 million meals to seniors served by Meals on Wheels.”

 

“We at Subaru are thrilled to support our national and hometown charity partners for the ninth consecutive year,” said Alan Bethke, Senior Vice President of Marketing, Subaru of America Inc. “Through the Share the Love platform we are proud to continue our commitment to the causes our customers care about most and look forward to exceeding a grand total of $90 million donated through this initiative.”

 

 

For more information, visit www.mealsonwheelsamerica.org/sharethelove.

 

About Wood County Committee on Aging

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 

For information on meals, programs, or services please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

 

About Meals on Wheels America

Meals on Wheels America is the oldest and largest national organization supporting the more than 5,000 community-based programs across the country that are dedicated to addressing senior isolation and hunger. This network exists in virtually every community in America and, along with more than two million staff and volunteers, delivers the nutritious meals, friendly visits and safety checks that enable America’s seniors to live nourished lives with independence and dignity. By providing funding, leadership, education, research and advocacy support, Meals on Wheels America empowers its local member programs to strengthen their communities, one senior at a time. For more information, or to find a Meals on Wheels provider near you, visit www.mealsonwheelsamerica.org.

Poetry Contest Winners proclaimed in a countywide event entitled, “Powerful You”

Twelfth annual contest…………………

Bowling Green, OH (April 28, 2017) –The Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. held its twelfth annual poetry banquet and drew in fifteen entries from all over Wood County. The theme this year was “Powerful You.” The poems reflected the individual’s personal feelings about power, having it, or the lack thereof. We were looking for poetry that, in some way, shows the scope of power of members of Wood County citizens as they continued to live their lives.

A celebration for the entries and recognition of the winners took place on Monday, April 24 at 4 p.m. at the Wood County Senior Center. The declared winner was Marilyn Lott, author of “Family.” The second place winner was Patti Brown from Bowling Green, Ohio with her poem entitled, “Numbers Have Power.”

When asked about judging the Poetry Contest, Bowling Green State University General Studies Writing Instructor Chad Michael Van Buskirk commented, “Judging the poetry contest was a wonderful opportunity to engage with the fascinating and meaningful experiences and insights of our community’s older adults. The pieces submitted remind us that thoughts of memory, desire, loss, and resilience are perennial. Reviewing the submissions is always an enjoyable, enlightening process.”

The Wood County Committee on Aging would like to extend a sincere thank you to all of the entries for their contributions to the contest. The contest committee would like to extend a special thank you to Bowling Green State University for assisting with the judging of the entries. To read the winning poems visit our blog at http://woodcountycommitteeonaging.blogspot.com 

Editor’s note: We are posting the First place and Second place winning entries here for you to enjoy, also an entry that came from North Baltimore resident Larry Slaughterbeck.

Family

By: Marilyn Lott

*FIRST PLACE WINNER*

What’s in Joy????Who’s Scared????What’s in Anger????What’s Fear????
Happiness and friendsNervous and curiousScreams of tearsSadness, Confusion????
Thoughts bubbling highWonders fill the mindsCries of a hurt heartA big bubble of what????
Because in my sisters joybecausebecauseBut
I see her fun.My sister is scaredIn my brother’s angerIn my cat’s fear
In my sisters joyI see her cries.I see red.I see a dash.
I feel happy.My sister is scaredIn my brother’s angerIn my cat’s fear
In my sisters joyShe feels trapped.I hear “mom!!!!”I hear the meow.
I touch her fear.My sister is scaredIn my brother’s angerIn my cat’s fear
In my sisters joyI touch sister power.I touch tears.I touch the scared ball
I taste her love.My sister is scaredIn my brother’s angerof fluffiness.
In my sisters joyI hear the butterfliesI feel sad.In my cat’s fear
I smell that she will alwaysin her stomachIn my brother’s angerI taste the love.
Be my sister.My sister is scaredI smell that in different
I smellways
Nervousness!!!!Will always smell Joy.
Who knows whatWhat’s happiness???When you think of love
excitement is????Joy and loveWhat do you think
Happy??? Joy???Playing with friendsof????
Wonders of excitementbecauseSadness, Cuteness
becauseIn my mom’s happinessYour Mom or Dad?
In my dad’s excitementI feel great.In my love I have my
I see a tractorIn my mom’s happinessFamily.
Waiting for him.I see a smile.Who do you love???
In my dad’s excitementIn my mom’s happiness
I hear “Brilliant!”I touch our relationship.
In my dad’s excitementIn my mom’s happiness
I taste our love.I smell something good
In my dad’s excitementbaking
I smell we’rein the oven.
Never going
To be apart.

Numbers Have Power

By Pattie Brown

*SECOND PLACE WINNER*

When I look in the mirror I see seventy-four staring back at me.

Time seems to move faster with each passing day.

My quick motion has been replaced with a slow pace.

I no longer worry about things I can’t control.

Laughter comes easier when I don’t take life too serious.

I can now laugh when my moth disconnects with my mind.

I see my gray hair, sagging skin, dark spots and wrinkles

as my rewards for living a productive life.

With each passing year I have acquired more understanding,

compassion and patience for who I am.

I wake up each morning grateful I still have the motivation

and discipline to meditate and exercise daily.

As my number increases I will continue to live, give, love

and laugh as long as my journey endures.

 

 

THREE QUARTERS

By Larry E. Slaughterbeck

In our small town

She was known as an old maid.

Early in the twentieth century

She was known as the prettiest girl

In our small town.

AS the cascading years followed her youth

Her siblings married and raised families

She cared for her elderly parents and babysat

In our small town.

Every Sunday she would be found in the last row of church

Where she was baptized and confirmed as a child

She would bake beans for funeral dinners

On Sunday mornings arrive as the opening hymn was sung

And every Sunday quietly place three quarters in the offering plate

Leave as the closing hymn was sung.

Adorned in a dress she had sewn and later buried in

In our small town.

Then only last Sunday in the offering place,

Beneath the offering envelopes

Lay three quarters.

The scripture lesson that Sunday spoke of another Sarah.