6-State Trooper Project Focused on Move Over Law

Ohio troopers issued 546 Move Over citations…….

 

COLUMBUS – The Ohio State Highway Patrol joined forces with members of the 6-State Trooper Project enforcing and raising awareness about the Move Over law from July 18 through July 24. The high-visibility campaign included the Indiana State Police, Kentucky State Police, Michigan State Police, Pennsylvania State Police, West Virginia State Police, and the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

During the initiative, Ohio troopers issued 546 Move Over citations and educated motorists about the state’s Move Over law. The entire initiative issued over 1,000 Move Over citations across the six partnering states.

Ohio law requires all drivers to move over to an adjacent lane when approaching any vehicle with flashing or rotating lights parked on the roadside. If moving over is not possible due to traffic or weather conditions, or because a second lane does not exist, motorists should slow down and proceed with caution. The Move Over law now exists in all 50 states.

The 6-State Trooper Project is a multi-state law enforcement partnership aimed at providing combined and coordinated law enforcement and security services in the areas of highway safety, criminal patrol, and information sharing.

 

6 State -  Move Over

Gas Cap Testing and Replacement event scheduled in B.G.

Thursday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Woodland Mall….

Leaky gas caps contribute to local ozone pollution and lost fuel efficiency.

Anyone can get a no-cost test of their vehicle’s gas cap, and a free replacement cap if a leak is found, at an event Thursday offered by the Toledo Metropolitan Area Council of Governments (TMACOG).

Gas cap testing and replacement will take place Thursday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Woodland Mall in Bowling Green (1234 N. Main St.)

Leaky gas caps are a preventable cause of ozone pollution. Take this simple step to make sure your passenger car or light truck is not contributing to pollution. A broken or missing gas cap can also reduce fuel efficiency by 1-2 percent and cost you up to a full tank of gas each year.

Drive up to a TMACOG testing site, and staff will do a quick compression test to make sure your cap is sealed. If it’s leaking, you’ll get a replacement on the spot. Receive a bonus gift while supplies last.

Older vehicles are more likely to have a poorly sealed cap, but any vehicle could be leaking. A loose gas cap may trigger the check engine light, so if the light turns on randomly or right after filling up, you might need a new one.

TMACOG is a non-partisan regional planning partnership made up of voluntary members in northwest Ohio and southeast Michigan. Together, TMACOG members work on transportation, water quality, and other economic development endeavors that affect quality of life for everyone in our region. For more information, go to www.tmacog.org.

District Project Update

Utility work can impact water and sewer services in addition to roads throughout our service area (Rt. 235 and Rt. 613 near McComb)

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio, – The Northwestern Water and Sewer District (The District) delivers water and sewer services to over 20,000 customers in Wood, Henry, Sandusky, and Hancock counties.  Although many of our projects are performed underground, our utility work can impact water and sewer services in addition to roads throughout our service area. 

Lake Township: Water Tower
Through August 2022, crews will be constructing a 1.5-million-gallon elevated water tank near Lemoyne Road between Latcha and Hanley Roads.  Residents can expect additional construction vehicle traffic and possible shoulder restrictions in this area.  Project complete:  September 2022.  Project investment: $4 million.

McComb: Sanitary/Storm Sewer Replacement Project *UPDATE*

Through Augustintermittent lane restrictions and closures are possible on SR 235 between Perrin Avenue and Bond-Preble Street, and on SR 613 between SR 235 and Main Street for sewer replacement, paving and restoration.  Additionally, through August, intermittent closures are possible on Cora Street, between S. Main Street and just south of Bond-Preble Street for sewer work, paving and restoration. Closures will be announced.  Project complete: September. Project investment: $950,000.

Perrysburg Township: Sewer Lining
Through July, lane restrictions are possible in Perrysburg Township, on Mandell Road, Lime City Road, and Glenwood Road, between I-75 to SR 795, and in Perrysburg Heights for sewer rehabilitation.  MAP OF EXACT LOCATIONS. Project complete:  August.  Project investment: $1,230,000.

Rossford: Hawthorne Lane Waterline and Sewer Replacement Project
Through August, lane restrictions are possible on Hawthorne Lane and at the intersection of Jennings Road and Hawthorne Lane in Rossford for water and sewer line replacement.  Local access will be maintained.  Residents will be notified via door tag of possible service interruptions 48 hours prior to work on the service line.  All work is weather permitting.  Project complete: September 2021.  Project investment: $200,000.

Weston: Sewer Rehabilitation Project
Through August, lane restrictions and service interruptions are possible on Ohio Street, and Ash and Center Streets near Ohio Street.  This project will also include work in other areas in Weston but is expected to have a minimal impact on roads and sewer service.  Project complete:  August.  Project investment: $900,000.

District-Wide Hydrant Flushing
Through July, weekdays from 7:30 am until 4 pm, crews will be flushing hydrants in various locations in Lake Township, parts of Northwood, and the Village of Millbury.  Residents are advised to flush water from their taps if water becomes discolored.  For more information: 
http://www.nwwsd.org/what-we-do/water/water-facts/hydrant-main-line-flushing-info/

ODOT outlines 5 year plan to focus on walking and biking

Walk.Bike.Ohio plan developed with partners to examine and address challenges for walking and biking….

COLUMBUS – More and more Ohioans are walking and biking as a way to travel, either by choice or necessity. However, recent trends in safety, health, and demographics highlight the urgent need for safer, accessible, and more convenient options for walking and biking in communities across the state.

Bike Dayton

 In an effort to combat these trends and spur more strategic investment in infrastructure for pedestrians and bicyclists, the Ohio Department of Transportation is launching the first-of-its-kind Walk.Bike.Ohio plan. This plan was constructed based on input from local government partners, state agencies, and the public.

“Nearly one out of every 10 Ohio households does not have access to a motor vehicle, meaning active transportation options like walking and bicycling are necessary to meet basic needs,” said Gov. Mike DeWine. “When we ensure that walking and biking are safe, convenient, and accessible options – everybody wins. The Walk.Bike.Ohio plan puts us on the right path to do that.”

In Ohio, people walking and biking make up about 14 percent of all traffic deaths, despite making up just 2.6% of trips to work. Most notable is that not everyone is impacted equally, with high need populations and areas of the state experiencing a disproportionate amount (nearly double) of the severe pedestrian and bicycle crashes.

In 2020, there were 164 people killed and 469 people seriously injured while traveling along or across Ohio’s roadways on-foot. From 2019 to 2020 alone, pedestrian deaths increased by an astounding 30 percent. The most notable increases were at intersections with unmarked crosswalks (+600%), at unmarked, midblock locations (+84%), and in circumstances involving speed (+60%).

The Walk.Bike.Ohio plan is about more than just safety, it introduces a framework for advancing active transportation by documenting existing conditions, identifying roles and responsibilities of various partners, and outlining critical actions for ODOT to focus on over the next five years. 

“Although the publication of Walk.Bike.Ohio is a major milestone for Ohio, it is just the beginning of the work necessary to achieve our vision,” said ODOT Director Jack Marchbanks.

The plan was developed over two years and included dozens of meetings with key stakeholders and two public surveys. Stakeholders conveyed the need for improving mobility, safety, and quality of life, and for equitable investments in walking and bicycling infrastructure, maintenance, programs, and policies.

While Ohio may boast the nation’s eighth largest roadway network, ODOT found there is a need for improvement at the state, regional, and local level to develop bicycle and pedestrian networks, close network gaps, and address unsafe crossings and deficient or failing sidewalks.

“The development of Walk.Bike.Ohio has helped us to establish a statewide vision for walking and biking, informed by practitioners and the public. This plan outlines what ODOT will seek to advance over the next 5 years in order to improve walking and biking as a transportation option in Ohio,” said ODOT Active Transportation Manager Caitlin Harley.

An economic impact analysis completed as part of this effort found that existing trips by foot or bike can save Ohioans $12.7 billion in transportation and environmental costs over 20 years. If Ohio’s walking and biking rates increased by just over 1%, an additional $5 billion in cost savings is projected over the next 20 years.

In addition to economic benefits, connected active transportation networks can also play a role in improving Ohio’s ranking of 40th in the United States for overall health outcomes and 47th for health behaviors, which include obesity and physical inactivity.

Active transportation is also an opportunity to address growing mobility needs and preferences. In 1983, about 46 percent of 16-year old Americans had a driver’s license, according to the Federal Highway Administration. By 2014, that number had dropped to just over 24 percent. In Ohio, the number of 16 and 17-year old drivers fell from 84,985 in 2016 to 70,678 in 2020. Additionally, as the share of Ohio’s population over 65 continues to grow, more Ohioans may rely on or prefer transit and active transportation options.

The hope is that this plan will be a useful tool for decision-makers at all levels of government in Ohio as they look at ways to make the state more walkable and bikeable.

For more information on what ODOT will be focused on to support walking and biking in Ohio, check out the plan online.

BVMP: Patients Age 12 & Older Can Register for COVID-19 Vaccine

Appointments will take place at the Caughman Health Center….

Beginning Monday, July 19, COVID-19 vaccinations will be offered to patients of Blanchard Valley Medical Practices (BVMP) 12 years of age and older. Appointments will take place at the Caughman Health Center, located at 1800 North Blanchard Street, Suite 121 in Findlay.

Caughman Health Center, located at 1800 North Blanchard Street, Suite 121 in Findlay…..

Vaccination appointments are only open to those who are BVMP patients. Individuals can schedule by calling 419.427.0809, Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Vaccines will not be administered to any patients who do not meet the specific age guidelines. To become a BVMP patient, please call 419.422.APPT.

Appointments for the second dose will be made at the appointment, once the first dose is administered.

For more information on the COVID-19 vaccine, please visit bvhsvaccineconnect.com

2nd Quarter 2021 Wood Co. Fatal Data Review

Your child should always be secured in the proper restraint device for their age/weight/height……

Wood County Safe Communities announced that the Second Quarter 2021 Fatal Data Review Committee met on Wednesday July 14, 2021.  The following crash was reviewed:

  • 19234 Bradner Road
  • SR 65 and Wapakoneta Rd. has been put on hold until the next regularly scheduled meeting.

As a result of the review of this crash, the Fatal Data Review Committee would like to remind you that your child should always be secured in the proper restraint device for their age/weight/height.  The following is a list of best practices to remember:

  1. All infants and toddlers should ride in a rear-facing car safety seat (CSS) until they are 2 years of age or until they reach the highest weight or height allowed by the manufacturer of their CSS.
  2. All children 2 years or older, or those younger than 2 years who have outgrown the rear-facing weight or height limit for their CSS, should use a forward-facing CSS with a harness for as long as possible, up to the highest weight or height allowed by the manufacturer of their CSS.
  3. All children whose weight or height is above the forward-facing limit for their CSS should use a belt-positioning-booster until the vehicle lap-and-shoulder seat belt fits properly, typically when they have reached 4 feet 9 inches in height and are between 8 and 12 years of age.
  4. When children are old enough and large enough to use the vehicle seat belt alone, they should always use lap-and-shoulder seat belts for optimal protection.
  5. All children younger than 13 years of age should be restrained in the rear seats of vehicles for optimal protection.

If you are interested in learning what the Fatal Data Review Committee’s responsibilities and roles are, please email Sandy Wiechman, Safe Communities Coordinator.  We are always looking for additional members to join us for these quarterly meetings to review crashes in Wood County.

For More Information:

  • Sandy Wiechman, Safe Communities Coordinator: 419-372-9353 or swiechm@bgsu.edu
  • Lt. Scott Wyckhouse Ohio State Highway Patrol  419-352-2481

Wood County 2021 Clean Plate Awards  

Award recognizes excellent sanitation and food safety….

BOWLING GREEN — Wood County Health Department is pleased to announce the winners of the 2021 Clean Plate Award. Health Commissioner Benjamin Robison has presented the award in a video shown on the Health Department’s social media pages.

The video is available on Facebook and Twitter, and also at the following link via YouTube: https://youtu.be/fgDGHt8KjVg.  

The 2021 Clean Plate Award has been given to 48 licensed food facilities out of more than 800 in Wood County. These facilities have been dedicated to upholding excellent sanitation and food safety knowledge within their operation. Recipients receive a certificate of excellence and recognition of excellent performance in food safety from the Wood County Health Department.  The winners of the Clean Plate Award will also receive a decal to display at their facility. 

This is the 10th year that the Wood County Board of Health will present this award. Facilities that receive it meet requirements including: 

  • Up-to-date licensing 
  • Minimal violations during their inspections 
  • Staff who are well trained in food safety knowledge 
  • No confirmed complaints, foodborne illnesses or administrative hearings with the Health Department over the past 2 years. 

“We are always thankful for the food facilities that work hard to earn this recognition. This past year was a terrible year for our food facilities with shut-downs and staffing shortages due to the pandemic. Despite the unprecedented hard times, these facilities made food safety their number one priority,” said Lana Glore, Director of Environmental Health. 

This year’s recipients include: Bowling Green Manor, Bowling Green Middle School, Bowling Green High School, BP Woodville, Carolyn’s Personal Catering, Chilly Treats, Conneaut Elementary School, Crim Elementary School, Eastwood Middle School, Eastwood High School, Frank’s Fries #3, Frank’s Fries #4, Frank’s Fries #5, FUM Child Learning Center, Frobose Meat Locker, GLCAP Perrysburg – Rossford Early Childhood Center, Guac Shop, Kenwood Elementary School, Kingston Care Center of Perrysburg, Kingston Residence of Perrysburg, Local Roots Juice Company, Marco’s Pizza #8, Meijer Gas Station-Store #116, Meijer Gas Station-Store #211, Mike & AJ’z Ice Cream Shack, Myla Marcus Winery, Northwest Community Corrections Center, Northwood Schools, Pisanello’s Pizza,  Poppin’ George’s Kettle Corn of BG,  Porkbelly BBQ, Primrose School of Perrysburg, Rita’s Dairy Bar, Robert Bettinger Inc. (Nazareth Hall), Rossford School 6-12, Sundae Station, VFW Post 1148, Weenie Dawgs, Wood County Committee on Aging-Bowling Green, Wood County Committee on Aging-Grand Rapids, Wood County Committee on Aging-North Baltimore, Wood County Committee on Aging-Northeast, Wood County Committee on Aging-Perrysburg, Wood County Committee on Aging-Rossford, Wood County Committee on Aging-Wayne, Wood Lane School and Wood County Jail. 

Questions regarding the Clean Plate Awards may be directed to Lana Glore, Director of Environmental Health, at 419-354-2702 ext. 3244 or lglore@woodcountyohio.gov 

The mission of Wood County Health Department is to prevent disease, promote healthy lifestyles and protect the health of everyone in Wood County. Our Community Health Center provides comprehensive medical services for men, women and children. We welcome all patients, including uninsured or underinsured clients, regardless of their ability to pay, and we accept most third-party insurance. For more information, visit www.WoodCountyHealth.org. 

Common Causes for Breakdown

Be prepared when the unavoidable happens……

At some point, every driver needs to deal with a vehicle malfunction. Knowing the most common causes of vehicle breakdown can help you prepare.

Vehicles require hundreds of small components to run smoothly and efficiently. A major drawback of having so many parts is that if anything goes wrong—whether a lug nut comes loose or the fuel line tears—your car can malfunction. Be aware of the most common causes for vehicle breakdown; they can happen at any time, whether you take good care of your car or not. Know the problem areas and understand how to best mitigate the situation—or avoid it entirely.

Tire Troubles

Tire rubber is durable, and its design ensures it can stand up to trauma on the road, but at times the strain may be too much. Several different issues, such as a puncture that lets air escape or a pothole that damages the sidewall, can cause a tire to fail. Whatever the case may be, with enough pressure, blows to the rubber can lead to an air leak or an outright blowout.

How To Avoid Tire Failure

Evading sharp or jagged objects in the road isn’t always possible, but you should attempt to avoid deep potholes and debris when it’s safe to maneuver around them. You must also check the age of your tires to ensure they’re not past their recommended replacement date. You can find their manufacturing date labeled on the sidewall. 

Dead Battery

You need gasoline to power the engine, but the battery powers the electrical system, including your starter. With a dead battery, your vehicle isn’t going to go anywhere unless you tow it. A battery can fail if the connector points corrode or if you put too much strain on it. The most common way batteries die is when drivers accidentally leave their headlights on for extended periods. Luckily, to solve this, you just need to recharge your battery with jumper cables.

How To Avoid a Dead Battery

Always switch everything off as soon as you leave the car. Leaving any electric components on—not just the headlights—can drain the power and leave you with a dead battery. Have your mechanic check the connectors to ensure no corrosion is forming on the metal bits; once those go, your car won’t draw power as efficiently.

Engine Heat

Engines tend to produce a great amount of heat, which makes the threat of overheating a common possibility under certain circumstances. In these scenarios, it’s easy to know when your engine is hotter than it should be, as the dashboard will alert you to rising temperatures under the hood.

How To Avoid Rising Heat

If you live in climates where the average temperature is above 80 degrees Fahrenheit, always try to park your vehicle in the shade. On top of this, make sure you have sufficient coolant in the engine to reduce temperatures.

Know What To Do

You can’t always avoid breakdowns, but when they happen, you need to know how to prepare for a vehicle malfunction. Understand the causes of vehicular failure and be ready when the unavoidable happens.

ODNR Warns: Stay Safe on the Water

Know the Hidden Dangers of Boating….

 The Hidden Dangers of Boating
“Pay attention and know the rules. Things happen so fast on the water” 

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) is warning everyone about the hidden dangers that can occur during a day on the lake, stream, or river. Carbon monoxide poisoning and propeller strikes pose unseen risks for boaters. 

“These hazards are especially dangerous because people can’t see them coming,” said ODNR Director Mary Mertz.  “We have unfortunately had several recent incidents where carbon monoxide led to tragedy.  It’s situations like those that make us realize how safe we really need to be and we want to help people prepare for that.” 

Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas, making it hard to detect.  According to the most recent data from the Coast Guard it affected 31 people aboard boats, and of those people, five of them died from carbon monoxide poisoning in 2019. 

“Every year we see deaths caused by carbon monoxide on boats and it’s truly tragic,” said Captain Schaad Johnson of ODNR’s Division of Parks and Watercreaft. “These losses are often preventable if boaters are cautious and keep themselves and their children away from the dangerous exhaust coming from a boat’s engine.” 

Boaters should check that their vessel has carbon monoxide detectors. The CDC recommends taking several other precautions to help prevent a carbon monoxide buildup on your vessel: 

  • Properly install and maintain all fuel-burning engines and appliances. 

  • Educate all passengers about the signs and symptoms of CO poisoning. 

  • Swim and play away from areas where engines vent their exhaust. 

  • Watch children closely when they play on rear swim decks or water platforms. 

  • Never block exhaust outlets. Blocking outlets can cause CO to build up in the cabin and cockpit areas–even when hatches, windows, portholes, and doors are closed. 

  • Dock, beach, or anchor at least 20 feet away from the nearest boat that is running a generator or engine. Exhaust from a nearby vessel can send CO into the cabin and cockpit of a boat. 

You can read more about the dangers of Carbon Monoxide here

Another danger boaters may not think about is a propeller strike beneath the water’s surface.  A typical recreational propeller can travel from head to toe on an average person in less than one-tenth of a second. James Knipl of Toledo learned about the dangers of propeller strikes while on the Maumee River this Spring. He hopes no one has to learn the lesson about this hidden danger the way he did. 

“I was on the front of the boat when it was going full throttle and all of a sudden I was in the water,” Knipl said.  “My friend helped me get back on the boat and all I could see was blood.” 

The propeller struck James on his left arm, severing muscle and arteries.  His friends rushed him to the nearest docks while calling 911.  He was taken to the nearest hospital, but doctors say it could be years before he regains full use of his arm, if ever.  James now undergoes physical therapy two times a week. 

“The best advice I can give people is to pay attention and know the rules before you head out onto the water and any time someone falls in, put the boat in neutral,” Knipl said.  “I am an avid fisherman and after this I will never be able to step foot on a boat again.” 

Most propeller strikes are preventable if boaters take a few safety steps: 

  • Turn off the engine when passengers are boarding or disembarking. Propellers should not be spinning when a passenger is in a vulnerable situation. 

  • Prevent passengers from being thrown overboard accidentally. 

  • Never start a boat with the engine in gear. 

  • Never ride on a seat back, gunwale, transom, or bow. 

  • Make sure all passengers are seated properly before getting underway. Some operators cause injuries by putting the engine in gear while people are still swimming or diving from the boat. 

  • Assign a responsible adult to watch any children in the boat and sound the alarm if a child falls overboard. 

  • Maintain a proper lookout for people in the water. The primary cause of propeller strike accidents is operator inattention or carelessness. 

  • Slow down when approaching congested areas and anchorages. In congested areas, always be alert for swimmers and divers. 

  • Learn to recognize warning buoys that mark swimming and other hazardous areas. 

  • Keep the boat away from marked swimming and diving areas. Become familiar with the red flag with a white diagonal stripe and the blue-and-white “Alfa” flag—both signal that divers are down. 

For a list of safety devices you can use to avoid this kind of accident visit ohiodnr.gov

The ODNR Division of Parks and Watercraft provides exceptional outdoor recreation and boating opportunities by balancing outstanding customer service, education, and conservation of Ohio’s 75 state parks and waterways. 

The ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at ohiodnr.gov

District Project Update

Our utility work can impact roads throughout our service area…..

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio, – The Northwestern Water and Sewer District (The District) delivers water and sewer services to over 20,000 customers in Wood, Henry, Sandusky, and Hancock counties.  Although many of our projects are performed underground, our utility work can impact roads throughout our service area. 

Lake Township: Water Tower
Through August 2022, crews will be constructing a 1.5-million-gallon elevated water tank near Lemoyne Road between Latcha and Hanley Roads.  Residents can expect additional construction vehicle traffic and possible shoulder restrictions in this area.  Project complete:  September 2022.  Project investment: $4 million.

McComb: Sanitary/Storm Sewer Replacement Project *UPDATE*

Through July, intermittent lane restrictions and closures are possible on SR 235 between Perrin Avenue and Bond-Preble Street, and on SR 613 between SR 235 and Main Street for sewer replacement and paving.  Through July, intermittent closures are possible on Cora Street, between S. Main Street and just south of Bond-Preble Street for sewer work. Closures will be announced.  Project complete: September. Project investment: $950,000.

Perrysburg Township: Sewer Lining
Through July, lane restrictions are possible in Perrysburg Township, on Mandell Road, Lime City Road, and Glenwood Road, between I-75 to SR 795, and in Perrysburg Heights for sewer rehabilitation.  MAP OF EXACT LOCATIONS. Project complete:  August.  Project investment: $1,230,000.

Rossford: Hawthorne Lane Waterline and Sewer Replacement Project
Through August, lane restrictions are possible on Hawthorne Lane and at the intersection of Jennings Road and Hawthorne Lane in Rossford for water and sewer line replacement.  Local access will be maintained.  Residents will be notified via door tag of possible service interruptions 48 hours prior to work on the service line.  All work is weather permitting.  Project complete: September 2021.  Project investment: $200,000.

Weston: Sewer Rehabilitation Project
Through August, lane restrictions and service interruptions are possible on Ohio Street, and Ash and Center Streets near Ohio Street.  This project will also include work in other areas in Weston but is expected to have a minimal impact on roads and sewer service.  Project complete:  August.  Project investment: $900,000.

District-Wide Hydrant Flushing
Through July, weekdays from 7:30 am until 4 pm, crews will be flushing hydrants 
in various locations in Perrysburg Township.  Residents are advised to flush water from their taps if water becomes discolored.  For more information: http://www.nwwsd.org/what-we-do/water/water-facts/hydrant-main-line-flushing-info/

Wood Co. Update from “Safe Communities”

Don’t leave your life on the road – Buckle up, Hang Up, Heads Up…..

Safe Communities announced Thursday that there have been 5 fatal crashes in Wood County this year, the same amount at this time last year.

Wood County Safe Communities and the Ohio State Highway Patrol would like to remind you to always give 100% attention to your drive.

Distractions, speed, and inattention are the leading causes for crashes in Wood County to date this year.  Commercial Vehicles are involved in 11% of the total crashes. Of the 15 Motorcycle involved crashes this year, 14 were injury crashes with 8 of those being serious injury. 

Don’t leave your life on the road – Buckle up, Hang Up, Heads Up. 
 

For More Information:

  • Sandy Wiechman, Safe Communities Coordinator: 419-372-9353 or swiechm@bgsu.edu
  • Lt. Scott Wyckhouse Ohio State Highway Patrol  419-352-2481