Whistle Stop Inn Building Changes Hands

The former Whistle Stop Inn restaurant in Downtown North Baltimore Ohio has finally changed hands, having been on the market nearly 5 years.

The former Whistle Stop Inn restaurant in Downtown North Baltimore Ohio has finally changed hands, having been on the market for nearly 5 years.

CGBARR LLC . (address returns to Jac & Dos, Arlington Ohio) is the new owner of the property. According to Village Historian, Bonnie Knaggs, the folks that purchased the building are not sure of their plans for the name eatery or the menu/theme. They hope to open by the late spring of 2019.

A “pod” and dumpster have been placed at the rear of the building, in preparation for beginning the renovations.

This is yet another positive for North Baltimore, of late, with expansions at most of NB’s manufacturing plants, along with plans and money to improve the NB Downtown Business District and the plans developing for the Northpointe logistics park west of town adjacent to the CSX yard.

Much more to come on all of this…

Briar Hill to Host “Homemade Soup Sale” Fundraiser

To benefit the North Baltimore Fire Department …..

The Briar Hill Health Campus is hosting a Homemade Soup sale to benefit the North Baltimore Fire Department .

Orders must be placed by  Monday, October 22th. Soup can be picked up  on Saturday, October 26th.

Here is the information:

The 16 ounce containers of soup are $5.00 each and are available  in these flavors: Chicken Noodle; Bean; Beef Veggie. Delivery is available on orders of at least $25.oo

Freshen Up Holiday Entertaining

Add tasty, crunchy GRAPES to seasonal dishes…………

(Family Features) The holiday season is typically marked by gatherings of friends and family. Whether you’re hosting overnight guests, drop-in visitors or an important seasonal meal, taking a fresh approach to the menu can make the get-together more special.

As you prepare for the festivities, consider recipes that feature healthy ingredients such as versatile California grapes, which come in three vibrant colors – red, green and black – and can add a palate-pleasing crunch and plenty of taste to everything from main dishes to sides and even desserts. Heart-healthy grapes are also perfect on their own as a snack and their natural beauty can help enhance any table as an edible garnish or fresh centerpiece.

Using grapes as a featured ingredient in your holiday dishes can provide a fresh twist on seasonal dishes, such as this Grape Dutch Baby or these Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Grapes and Balsamic Glaze. For dessert, use the natural sweetness of grapes to create a smooth Grape Caramel Sauce that can be served as a topping for ice cream or other seasonal desserts.

Seasonal Entertaining with Grapes

While the beautiful, vibrant colors of grapes can add visual interest to recipes, they can also serve a variety of purposes when hosting:

  • Grapes can make for easy decorations when placed in bowls, on platters or draped from a cake plate.
  • Grapes can be “frosted” with sugar, spices and chopped nuts then served as a finger food or used as a garnish to decorate cakes, cookies, puddings, mousses and other seasonal desserts. Simply dip grape clusters in liquid gelatin then roll in your desired mixture.
  • Grapes make for a quick and easy hostess gift. Wrap multi-colored grape clusters in tissue paper then place them in a basket or tin tied with ribbon.

Find more holiday recipes at GrapesfromCalifornia.com.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Grapes and Balsamic Glaze

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4

  • 1          pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved lengthwise
  • 2          tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • pinch of salt
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1          cup red California grapes
  • 2          tablespoons ready-to-use balsamic glaze
  1. Heat oven to 450° F.
  2. On baking sheet, toss sprouts with olive oil, salt and pepper, to taste, until sprouts are well-coated. Roast until deep golden brown, about 17-20 minutes, turning sprouts halfway through roasting. Stir in grapes and roast 3-5 minutes. Transfer to bowl and drizzle with glaze or drizzle platter with glaze and pile sprouts on top.

Nutritional information per serving: 150 calories; 3 g protein; 20 g carbohydrates; 7 g fat (42% calories from fat); 1 g saturated fat (6% calories from saturated fat); 0 mg cholesterol; 30 mg sodium; 4 g fiber.

Grape Caramel Sauce

Prep time: 5 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes
Servings: 6

  • 1          pound green or red California grapes, divided
  • 1          tablespoon lemon juice
  • 3/4       cup sugar
  • 1/4       cup water
  • 1/3       cup heavy cream (optional)
  • large pinch of salt
  • ice cream
  1. In blender or food processor, combine 12 ounces grapes with lemon juice and puree. Set aside. Coarsely chop remaining grapes.
  2. In medium saucepan, combine sugar and water then bring to boil, stirring a few times. Simmer without stirring, brushing down sides of pot with brush dipped in water if crystals start forming. When mixture has turned deep, golden brown, remove from heat and whisk in pureed grapes until smooth sauce has formed. Turn on heat and simmer until mixture has reduced by one-third and forms smooth caramel sauce. Whisk in cream and salt; stir in chopped grapes and serve over ice cream.

Nutritional information per serving of sauce: 200 calories; 40 g carbohydrates; 5 g fat (22% calories from fat); 3 g saturated fat (14% calories from saturated fat); 15 mg cholesterol; 60 mg sodium; 1 g fiber.

Grape Dutch Baby

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes
Servings: 4

  • 3          large eggs
  • 2/3       cup all-purpose flour
  • 2/3       cup low-fat milk
  • 1/2       teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/2       teaspoon salt
  • 5          tablespoons unsalted
  • butter, divided
  • 2          cups red California
  • grapes, halved
  • 2          tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1/8       teaspoon cinnamon (optional)
  • confectioners’ sugar
  1. Heat oven to 450° F. Put large (10-inch) cast-iron or ovenproof skillet in oven.
  2. With electric mixer on high speed, beat eggs until frothy then beat in flour, milk, vanilla and salt, and beat until smooth, about 1 minute (batter will be thin). Remove skillet from oven and add 2 tablespoons butter, swirling to cover pan. Pour in batter and return to oven. Bake until puffed and golden brown, 14-19 minutes.
  3. While pancake is baking, in another skillet over high heat, melt remaining butter and add grapes, brown sugar and cinnamon, if desired. Cook until grapes are heated through and sugar has melted. Spoon grapes over pancake, sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar and serve.

Nutritional information per serving: 280 calories; 6 g protein; 22 g carbohydrates; 18 g fat (58% calories from fat); 10 g saturated fat (32% calories from saturated fat); 180 mg cholesterol; 380 mg sodium; 1 g fiber.

SOURCE:
California Table Grape Commission

Chowline: Some Synthetic Food Flavoring Additives Banned

The flavorings, many of which are used in many brands of chewing gum, candy, breakfast cereals, beer, packaged ice cream and some baked goods, were removed from the FDA’s approved usage list based on the findings of several studies…….

What are synthetic food flavoring additives and why have some of them banned from use?

The Food and Drug Administration announced last week that it was banning the use of seven commonly used synthetic food-flavoring additives that have been linked to the development of cancer in laboratory studies of animals.

The flavorings, many of which are used in many brands of chewing gum, candy, breakfast cereals, beer, packaged ice cream and some baked goods, were removed from the FDA’s approved usage list based on the findings of several studies. Those findings were used as the basis of petitions asking the government to stop allowing the synthetic food flavoring additives to be used in food, the government agency said.

The petitions were generated from several groups including the Consumers Union, the Center for Science in the Public Interest, the Center for Environmental Health, the Breast Cancer Fund and the Center for Food Safety, FDA said.

While the flavoring were previously approved as safe to use in food during the 1960s based on research done during that time, new data now suggests otherwise.

The banned flavorings include: synthetically-derived benzophenone, ethyl acrylate, eugenyl methyl ether (methyl eugenol), myrcene, pulegone, and pyridine and are often used to imitate the flavor of cinnamon, citrus and natural mint.

However, the FDA said that, although those synthetic flavorings have been banned, the agency “has concluded that these substances are otherwise safe.”

“The synthetic flavoring substances that are the subject of this petition are typically used in foods available in the U.S. marketplace in very small amounts and their use results in very low levels of exposures and low risk,” FDA said in a statement. “While the FDA’s recent exposure assessment of these substances does not indicate that they pose a risk to public health under the conditions of their intended use, the petitioners provided evidence that these substances caused cancer in animals which were exposed to much higher doses.”

So why would the FDA revoke the usage of these flavorings by food manufactures if they don’t pose a high health risk when used in low amounts to flavor food?

The FDA is required by law to remove any food additive that has been shown to cause cancer in animals or humans, due to the Delaney Clause of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. That 1958 clause requires that FDA cannot approve the use of any food additive that has been found to induce cancer in humans or animals at any dose.

As a result of the directive from FDA, food manufactures will have 24 months to, “identify suitable replacement ingredients and reformulate their food products,” FDA said.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@osu.edu.

Boy Scouts Organize Food Drive to Benefit Local Food Pantries

Wood County residents are asked to leave their donation on their front porch by 9:00 a.m. on Saturday, October 27, 2018. …..

Wood County, Ohio, October 11, 2018 – In the spirit of the Boy Scouts of America promise, “to do a good turn daily” and “to help other people at all times,” the Erie Shores Council of the Boy Scouts of America will organize their annual “Scouting for Food” non-perishable item food drive in Wood County (Ohio) during the week of October 20-27, 2018.

Scouting for Food is the Boy Scouts of America’s longest running nation-wide service project to help stop hunger. It began as one Scout’s service project in St. Louis, MO in 1985 and was nationally adopted in 1988.

Twenty-five units comprised of Cub Scout Packs, Boy Scout Troops, Exploring Posts, and Venture Crews located in Wood County will partner with Girl Scouts USA to distribute informational tags by October 20th. The tags will include the local unit serving your area and a list of acceptable donation items. Wood County residents are asked to leave their donation on their front porch by 9:00 a.m. on Saturday, October 27, 2018. The items will be picked up and delivered to food pantries and shelters located in Wood County.

Scouting for Food is supported by Frisch’s® Big Boy® Restaurants of NW Ohio and also Keystone Press.

 

The week of October 20-27, 2018 non-perishable food items can be dropped off at the Wood County locations of Frisch’s® Big Boy® Restaurants to include Wooster St. and Main St. in Bowling Green, Route 20 in Perrysburg and Woodville Rd. in Northwood.

About the Erie Shores Council of the Boy Scouts of America:

Under the leadership of approximately 2,500 adult volunteers, the Erie Shores Council provides a values-based, character education program for youth in our community, including Cub Scouts (K-5th grades), Boy Scouts (6th-12 grades). In addition, Erie Shores Council offers Exploring and Venturing which are co-ed programs for youth 14-20 yrs. old who seek opportunities to “explore” fields of career interest or wish to participate in high “adventure” activities.

Erie Shores Council owns two camps, Camp Miakonda in Sylvania, OH and Pioneer Scout Reservation near Pioneer, OH, which provide outdoor education and camping experiences for Scouts and non-Scouts alike.

To learn more, call 419.241.7293, or go to www.erieshorescouncil.org.

NB Butcher Shop Specials at Custom Cuts 10/9

Senior Citizens Tuesdays 10% OFF Any Purchase – From the Farm to the Freezer – Custom Cuts will cut whatever you want!

Come on out!!!

Senior Citizens Tuesdays
10% OFF Any Purchase


From the Farm to the Freezer –
Custom Cuts wi
ll
cut whatever you want!

Get 2 FREE Chicken Leg Quarters with any $25 purchase!

It’s time to FILL YOUR FREEZER
LOCALLY 
Raised & Grain Fed
BEEF and PORK

Beef sides or Quarters
$2.75 lb
(processing included)

Hogs – Whole or Half
$1.50 lb
(processing included)
((smoking is extra))

– CALL FOR DETAILS –
– 419-257-3529 –

Ground FRESH Daily!
85% Lean Ground Beef
$4.79#
———-
USDA Choice Boneless
English Chuck Roast – $5.49

USDA Choice Beef Cube Steaks – $4.99#
———————–
Assorted Bone-In Chops – $2.29#

Pork Steak – $2.79#

Pork Cutlets – $3.99

All Natural
Boneless Chicken Breasts
$2.89#

All Natural Keystone Canned
Beef & Pork
$7.99 28 oz. can

All Natural Keystone Canned
Chicken
$6.89 28 oz. can

————
NEW Breakfast Bundle
5# Hickory Smoked Bacon – sliced & wrapped to your order
5# Whole Hog Bulk Sausage – Mild – Salt & Pepper – Plain
5# Breakfast Ham Steaks – sliced & wrapped to your order
1 – dozen FRESH BROWN EGGS
All for ONLY – $59!!!
(Bundles MADE FRESH when ordered – call today to have yours ready when you get there…)

DEER PROCESSING
TAG & Deposit
Required!

We accept
Credit – Debit – EBT

Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month

Six traditional recipes to enjoy….

Try these authentic and traditional recipes to celebrate Hispanic heritage with flavor

(Family Features) From secret recipes handed down for years, to the everyday café con leche, milk has always been a part of traditional Latin American food. Hispanic Heritage Month, which lasts through mid-October, is a perfect opportunity for families to embrace and celebrate the culture, impact and contributions of generations of Hispanic Americans.

Food is deeply rooted in Hispanic culture, and real dairy milk is a key ingredient in many popular dishes. Milk brings flavor to traditional foods and provides a simple way to get families essential nutrients they need.

Try these six traditional recipes to enjoy during this festive time with the flavors of Hispanic culture with milk. Visit MilkLife.com for additional recipe inspiration and tips from experts.

Queso Fundido with Chorizo – An excellent appetizer or side dish, authentic Mexican Queso Fundido with Chorizo is a staple for your celebration as a delicious, crowd-pleasing snack. Serve with corn tortillas and it will be the star of your next fiesta!

Conchas – These traditional Mexican sweet breads get their name from their round shape and unique, striped “shell-like” topping. Topped with layers of vanilla and chocolate, these rolls have just the right amount of sweetness to enjoy during breakfast paired with an 8-ounce glass of milk or café con leche.

Arepas – Chef Lorena Garcia offers her take on this easy and versatile Venezuelan specialty. Made with nutrient-rich milk and shredded cheese, you can serve these alone, filled with your favorite veggies or topped with an egg for more protein at breakfast, lunch or dinner.

“Café con Leche” Rice Pudding – Inspired by one of the most popular desserts in Latin American culture, this rice pudding gets kicked up a notch, flavored with strong Cuban espresso and topped with a bitter chocolate cream. This comforting and simple dessert is guaranteed to satisfy any sweet tooth.

Milk-Braised Pork Loin with Sour Orange and Mashed Plantains – Spice up your family dinner with this recipe for flavorful pork cooked in milk. The delicious aromatics of white wine, garlic, orange peel and the sweetness of the milk make for a vibrant and tender dish that is sure to excite your taste buds.

Coquitos – From food blogger and Youtuber Lily Ramírez comes a delicious Venezuelan dessert for all fans of coconut! These quick and easy treats combine sweetened coconut and milk to create bite-sized coconut balls with flavors you simply cannot beat.

SOURCE:
MilkPEP

Switch Up Your Game Day Menu

Homemade Pizza with Ranch Dressing?………..

(Family Features) Burgers and dogs may be typical game day grub, but a lineup that never changes can get tiresome a few weeks into the season. Infuse new energy and homemade favorites into your game day menu so you can enjoy great games and good eats for a winning combination.

Explore new flavors. Add variety by building your meal around a different main dish, like ribs or pulled pork instead of burgers. Or invite guests to get in on the action and offer a DIY pizza or taco bar with a wide range of toppings for the ultimate custom plate. Then adapt your side dishes to fit the theme, like adding a barbecue spice seasoning to your party mix, for example, or offering a chipotle-style dip for veggies and chips.

Add an unexpected twist. If you prefer a more traditional menu, there’s no reason to abandon all your favorite game day fare. Instead, reimagine a popular dish with a special or unexpected ingredient. For example, this recipe features a homemade pizza topped with creamy ranch dressing. An option like Litehouse Homestyle Ranch has no artificial colors, flavors or preservatives, no high fructose corn syrup and is gluten free. The dressing is a versatile addition to your game day spread since you can use it to top off everything from pizza and fries to tacos, burgers and more. For easy serving, look for the 20-ounce squeeze bottle, or opt for a glass jar or dip tub, whichever your recipe requires.

Don’t forget dessert. A good game requires lots of savory, hearty foods, but by the fourth quarter, you’re likely to start craving sweet victory and a sweet treat to go along with the win. Easy individual desserts are a great bet, that way you can grab a quick bite and get back to the screen before you miss any action. Think along the lines of finger foods like marshmallow cereal bars, brownies and cookies to offer a little something for everyone.

Find more ideas for your game day gathering at LitehouseFoods.com.

Homemade Pizza Recipe

Total time: 45 minutes
Serves: 4

  • 1          ball pizza dough (store-bought or homemade)
  • 1          jar pizza sauce
  • pepperoni (optional)
  • sausage (optional)
  • ham or Canadian bacon (optional)
  • black olives (optional)
  • mushrooms (optional)
  • peppers (optional)
  • 1          package (8 ounces) fresh mozzarella, shredded
  • 1          squeeze bottle (20 ounces) Litehouse Homestyle Ranch dressing
  1. Heat oven to 425° F.
  2. Prepare dough by pressing it onto a pizza pan or pizza stone. Spread pizza sauce over crust and top with pepperoni, sausage, ham or Canadian bacon, black olives, mushrooms and peppers, if desired. Sprinkle cheese evenly over top of pizza. Bake 20-30 minutes.
  3. Top with ranch dressing before serving.

Note: Toppings can be substituted as desired.

SOURCE:
Litehouse Foods

Chocolate Silk Pie

Watch the video of how to make this delicious pie!

 

Calling all chocolate lovers!!!  Not only is the pie rich with chocolate, it is easy to make when you need a quick dessert.  Try this recipe and more dessert recipes at culinary.net.


Chocolate Silk Pie

  • 1 (9 inch) unbaked pastry shell
  • 1 (7 ounce) jar marshmallow creme
  • 1 cup (6 ounces) semisweet chocolate chips
  • 1/4 cup butter, cubed
  • 2 ounces unsweetened chocolate
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream, whipped

Topping:

  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream
  • 2 tablespoons powdered sugar
  • Chocolate shavings, optional
  1. Preheat oven to 450°. Line pastry shell with a double thickness of heavy-duty foil. Bake 8-10 minutes. Remove foil. Cool on a wire rack.
  2. Meanwhile, in a heavy saucepan, combine marshmallow creme, chocolate chips, butter and unsweetened chocolate.
  3. Cook and stir over low heat until chocolate is melted and mixture is smooth. Cool. Fold in whipped cream then pour mixture into crust.
  4. Topping:  in a large bowl, beat cream until it begins to thicken. Add powdered sugar; beat until stiff peaks form. Spread over filling.
  5. Refrigerate at least 3 hours before serving. Garnish with chocolate shavings if desired.

Watch video of how to make this delicious pie!

Recipe adapted from Taste of Home

SOURCE:
Culinary.net

Chowline: Temp of 165 F Needed for Chicken

To Prevent Foodborne Illness…..

Does chicken have to be cooked to one uniform temperature, or can it be eaten like steak — rare, medium rare, medium or well done?

Great question, considering that American consumers eat more chicken than any other meat, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

However, unlike steak, all chicken dishes should be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees F to ensure that they are cooked thoroughly enough to kill any pathogens that could cause a foodborne illness, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It’s best to use a food thermometer placed in the thickest part of the chicken to make sure it is cooked to a safe internal temperature of 165 degrees F.

Raw chicken can be contaminated with the bacterial pathogens Campylobacter, Salmonella and Clostridium perfringens, the CDC says. So if you eat undercooked chicken or other foods or beverages contaminated by raw chicken or its juices, you could get a foodborne illness.

In fact, about 1 million people get sick from eating poultry that’s contaminated with harmful pathogens every year, according to CDC estimates.

To lessen your risk of developing a foodborne illness when cooking or eating chicken, the CDC recommends:

  • When shopping, place any packages of raw chicken into a disposable bag before putting it in your shopping cart or refrigerator to prevent raw juices from getting onto other foods.
  • Wash your hands with warm soapy water for 20 seconds before and after handling raw chicken.
  • Use a separate cutting board for raw chicken.
  • Never place cooked food or fresh produce on a plate, cutting board or other surface that held raw chicken.
  • Wash cutting boards, utensils, dishes and countertops with hot soapy water after preparing chicken and before you prepare the next item.
  • If you think the chicken you are served at a restaurant or anywhere else is not fully cooked, send it back for more cooking.
  • Refrigerate or freeze leftover chicken within 2 hours or within 1 hour if the temperature outside is higher than 90 degrees F.

It’s also important to remember that you shouldn’t wash raw chicken before cooking it. Rinsing or washing chicken doesn’t kill any pathogens that may be on the chicken. But when you wash or rinse raw chicken, you are likely splashing chicken juices that can spread pathogens in the kitchen and contaminate other foods, utensils and countertops, the CDC says.

This is a problem because pathogens such as Campylobacter and Salmonella can survive on surfaces like countertops for up to 32 hours, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@osu.edu.