NB Custom Cut Specials

We have the deals for FRESH MEAT!!!

– SENIOR CITIZEN TUESDAY –
10% OFF ALL PURCHASES!!!

From the farms to the freezers –
We’ll cut whatever you want!

Let us cut your meat fresh!
NOT Pre-packaged!!

Beef Sides or Quarters – $2.75# –
Includes Beef – Cut – Wrap – Freeze

HOGS – Whole or Half – $1.45# –
Includes Pork – Cut – Wrap – Freeze

CALL FOR DETAILS!!!
419-257-3529

All beef bundles
all pork bundles
combo beef-pork bundles

call today!!!

Ground Fresh DAILY!
85% LEAN Ground Beef
– $4.79# –

1# packs
Whole Hog Sausage
Plain/Saft & Pepper/Mild/Southern
$3.29#

USDA Choice English Chuck Roast – $5.49#
Beef Cube Steaks – $4.99#
Boneless Pork Chops – $3.99#
Asstd. Bone-In Pork Chops – $2.89

Johnsonville Smoked Sausage – $2.99

Hickory Smoked Slab Bacon – $5.99# SLICED FREE

All Natural KEYSTONE (28 oz.)
Canned Beef & Pork – $7.99
Canned Chicken – $6.89

Walnut Creek Home Style Noodles
Thin- Medium – Wide
$2.49

Old Style Bologna – $5.49# GARLIC – $5.69
Ham & Cheese Loaf – $5.89#

Amish Cheese from Walnut Creek
Swiss – Colby – CoJack – Pepper Jack
$5.49#

We accept:
Credit – Debit – EBT

Fuel Your Morning with Protein-Packed Recipes

Overnight oats are popular for breakfast………….

(Family Features) As you prepare to take on the day, one of the most beneficial ways to energize yourself each morning is by fueling your body with the proper nutrients, including protein.

U.S. Ski & Snowboard Team High-Performance Dietitian Allen Tran works with top athletes and recognizes the key role protein plays in their diets. Developed by Tran, these breakfast recipes can provide the nutrition necessary for journeying through your day with energy and verve. Protein Waffles include Rockin’ Protein Builder for an easy boost of protein. The 12-ounce shakes, which are low in carbs and sugar, are made with fresh milk and have 30 grams of high-quality protein to help build muscle without a chalky after-taste.

If you’re looking to make healthier choices or live an active lifestyle and are short on time, a premade recipe may allow for additional productivity. Recipes that can be made in advance – like the night before – may aid your goal to consume necessary nutrients without putting a rush on your morning routine.

Chocolate Cherry and Banana Overnight Oats are made with Shamrock Farms Chocolate Milk and are a source of protein, calcium and vitamin D. Plus, they can be made in advance, allowing you to grab a healthy, ready-made breakfast to take on the go. Adding milk to your diet helps serve as a source of energy while building and repairing muscles.

Find more tips and recipes to help enhance your nutrition at shamrockfarms.net.

Chocolate Cherry and Banana Overnight Oats

Yield: 2 jars

  • 1/2       cup frozen dark sweet cherries
  • 1 1/2    cups old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1          container (12 ounces) Shamrock Farms Chocolate Milk
  • 1          ripe banana, sliced
  • 1          pinch salt
  1. In two mason jars, add 1/4 cup frozen cherries in each. In microwave, thaw 30 seconds.
  2. Divide rolled oats, milk, banana and salt between jars. Cover with lids and shake until combined.
  3. Store in refrigerator overnight or at least several hours.
  4. Serve cold or warm in microwave.

Protein Waffles

Yield: 8-10 waffles

  • 2          cups pancake mix
  • 2          large eggs
  • 1          container (12 ounces) Vanilla or Chocolate Rockin’ Protein Builder
  • 1/4       cup canola oil
  • 1/2       teaspoon cinnamon
  1. Heat waffle iron.
  2. Place pancake mix in bowl. In separate bowl, whisk eggs, protein shake and oil. Stir into pancake mix until just combined.
  3. Bake in waffle iron according to manufacturer’s directions until golden brown.

Tip: To freeze for later consumption, cool waffles on wire racks. Freeze between layers of waxed paper in re-sealable plastic freezer bag. In toaster oven or microwave, heat waffles until heated through.

SOURCE:
Shamrock Farms

Family-Favorite Comfort Foods

3 dairy-inspired dishes for weeknight dinners

(Family Features) Warm meals that come together quickly are a necessity for busy families, especially on weeknights filled with homework, practices, meetings and more. Serving up comfort foods that require less time in the kitchen make for more moments spent together at the table.

Hearty and satisfying, this Chicken and Wild Rice Soup can bring everyone together for a warm, soothing meal, while Cheesy Turkey Chili Mac makes for familiar fare enjoyed by adults and kids alike. For a rich, creamy, one-dish dinner solution, Pasta and Chicken in Garlic Cream Sauce requires less than 45 minutes of kitchen duty, making it an ideal weeknight family-favorite.

These dairy-fueled recipes from Milk Means More of Michigan can be part of a healthy diet that includes fruits, vegetables, grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy and a variety of protein foods.

Find more weeknight meal solutions at milkmeansmore.org.

Watch video to see how to make this delicious recipe!

Pasta and Chicken in Garlic Cream Sauce

Recipe courtesy of Milk Means More
Prep time: 30 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Servings: 8

  • 4          slices bacon, cut crosswise into 1/2-inch-wide pieces
  • 3/4       pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into 3/4-inch pieces
  • 10        ounces (about 4 cups) farfalle (bow tie) pasta
  • 2 1/2    cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 4          cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2    teaspoons dried Italian seasoning
  • 1/2       teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
  • 1          cup heavy cream
  • 1          cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 3          cups baby spinach leaves
  • 1          cup halved cherry tomatoes, for garnish
  1. Place removable pan inside programmable pressure cooker. Using saute function, cook bacon, uncovered, until crisp. Use slotted spoon to remove bacon from pan. Drain bacon on paper towels. Leave 1 tablespoon drippings in pan; discard remaining.
  2. Add chicken to bacon drippings in pan in two batches. Using saute function, stir-fry chicken 2-3 minutes, or until cooked through. Use slotted spoon to remove chicken from pan. Repeat until all chicken is cooked. Press cancel.
  3. Stir pasta, broth, garlic, Italian seasoning and pepper into drippings in pan. Secure lid and set pressure release to sealing function. Select high pressure setting and cook 5 minutes. Press cancel.
  4. Allow pressure to release naturally 5 minutes. Move pressure release to venting function to release any remaining steam. Remove lid.
  5. Stir cream into pasta mixture. Using saute function, cook and stir, uncovered, until boiling. Boil, uncovered, about 4 minutes, or until sauce generously coats pasta, stirring frequently. Press cancel. Stir in chicken and Parmesan cheese.
  6. Place spinach and bacon in large bowl. Pour pasta mixture over top. Toss until combined. Ladle into serving bowls. Top each serving with tomatoes.

Cheesy Turkey Chili Mac

Recipe courtesy of Milk Means More
Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Servings: 8

  • 1          tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1          pound lean ground turkey
  • 1          cup chopped onion
  • 1          can (15 1/2 ounces) kidney beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1          can (15 ounces) no-salt- added tomato sauce
  • 1          can (14 1/2 ounces) diced tomatoes with green chili peppers
  • 1 2/3    cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 1          tablespoon chili powder
  • 1/2       teaspoon garlic salt
  • 1/4       teaspoon pepper
  • 8          ounces (about 1 3/4 cups) elbow macaroni
  • 1/2       cup 2 percent or whole milk
  • 2          tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2          cups (8 ounces) shredded Mexican blend cheese
  • 3/4       cup plain fat-free Greek yogurt or sour cream
  1. Place oil in removable pan of programmable pressure cooker. Place pan in pressure cooker. Using saute function, heat oil until hot. Add turkey and onion. Cook, uncovered, about 5 minutes, or until turkey is no longer pink, stirring to break up. Press cancel.
  2. Stir in beans, tomato sauce, diced tomatoes, broth, chili powder, garlic salt and pepper. Stir in macaroni. Secure lid and set pressure release to sealing function. Select high pressure setting and cook 5 minutes.
  3. Allow pressure to release naturally 2 minutes. Move pressure release to venting function to release any remaining steam. Remove lid.
  4. Stir macaroni mixture. Whisk together milk and flour. Stir into macaroni mixture. Using saute function, cook and stir, uncovered, 1-2 minutes, or until boiling. Press cancel.
  5. Stir cheese into macaroni mixture until melted. Ladle into serving bowls. Spoon dollops of yogurt or sour cream on top.

Chicken and Wild Rice Soup

Recipe courtesy of Milk Means More
Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 1 hour

  • 1          cup shredded carrots
  • 1/2       cup finely chopped onion
  • 1/2       cup sliced celery
  • 2          cloves garlic, minced
  • 2          tablespoons butter or clarified butter
  • 4          cups chicken broth
  • 4          ounces (about 2/3 cup) wild rice, rinsed and drained
  • 1          teaspoon dried thyme leaves
  • 1/4       teaspoon salt
  • 1/4       teaspoon pepper
  • 12        ounces skinless, boneless chicken breast halves, cut into 3/4-inch pieces
  • 1          cup plain low-fat Greek yogurt
  • 2          tablespoons flour
  • 1/2       cup whipping cream
  1. In Dutch oven, cook carrots, onion, celery and garlic in hot butter about 2 minutes, or until tender, stirring occasionally.
  2. Stir broth, wild rice, thyme, salt and pepper into vegetable mixture. Bring to boil. Reduce heat. Simmer, covered, 40 minutes. Stir in chicken pieces. Return to simmer, covered, 10-15 minutes, or until rice is tender and chicken is done.
  3. In small bowl, whisk together yogurt and flour. Gradually whisk in cream. Stir into chicken mixture. Cook and stir over medium heat until boiling. Boil 1 minute. Ladle into bowls.

SOURCE:
United Dairy Industry of Michigan

Chow Line: Understanding the new food nutrition labels

The new labels are already on about 10 percent of food packages currently being sold….

What are some of the changes I can expect to see on the new food nutrition labels?

One of the biggest changes is a larger, bolder typeface for both calories and serving sizes. The typeface will be easier for people to see and read.

Source: US FDA Comparison of Old and New Food Labels

In 2016, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the updated food nutrition label design. According to the FDA, the new design was part of an effort to reflect updated scientific findings to help consumers make better-informed decisions about food choices and maintaining healthy diets.

While the new labels are already on about 10 percent of food packages currently being sold, the FDA is requiring food manufacturers with $10 million or more in annual food sales to have the labels on all of their products by next year. Manufacturers with less than $10 million in annual food sales will have until 2021 to put the new labels on all of their food products, the FDA said.

“The new label reflects updated scientific information, including our greater understanding of the links between diet and chronic disease,” the FDA said in a written statement. “It is also more realistic about how people eat today.” 

Another change you’ll see on the labels is more realistic serving sizes, with some packages listing nutrition information per serving as well as per package. For example, the FDA said that on a pint of ice cream, you will see calories and nutrients listed for one serving and for the whole container. (This provides more accurate information for those who, um, may have been known to maybe consume the entire pint in one session.)

The labels will also list added sugars, which are either added during the processing of foods or are packaged as such; free sugars, mono-sugars, and disaccharides; sugars from syrups and honey; and sugars from concentrated fruit or vegetable juices.

Vitamin D and potassium will also be added to the list of nutrients required on the labels, whereas Vitamins A and C are no longer required to be listed. However, manufacturers can still list Vitamins A and C if they wish.

The information on daily values for nutrients such as sodium, dietary fiber, and Vitamin D have been updated and are used to calculate the percentage of Daily Value (DV) that are on the labels. The percentage of DV provides nutrition information in the context of a daily diet based on 2,000 calories per day. 

Lastly, the new labels will no longer list calories from fats.

For more information on reading the new food labels, see ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/hyg-5586.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, orturner.490@osu.edu.

Custom Cut Meats in NB

Meat is good… I like meat!!!

– SENIOR CITIZEN TUESDAY –
10% OFF ALL PURCHASES!!!

From the farms to the freezers –
We’ll cut whatever you want!

Steaks – Chops – Roasts


Tell us what YOU want and we’ll HAND cut it FRESH!!!

“Tax Return Specials”

LOCALLY rAISED + GRAIN FED
FREEZER BEEF & pORK

Beef Sides or Quarters – $275# – Includes Beef – Cut – Wrap – Freeze

Pork Whole or Half – $1.45# – Includes Pork – Cut – Wrap – Freeze
CALL FOR DETAILS!!!
419-257-3529

All beef bundles
all pork bundles
combo beef-pork bundles
your choice
$199
call today!!!

Ground Fresh DAILY!
85% LEAN Ground Beef
– $4.79# –

1# packs
Whole Hog Sausage
Plain/Saft & Pepper/Mild/Southern
$3.29#

USDA Choice English Chuck Roast – $5.49#
Beef Cube Steaks – $4.99#
Boneless Pork Chops – $3.99#
Asstd. Bone-In Pork Chops – $2.89
Pork Cutlets – $3.99#

Walnut Creek Home Style Noodles
Thin- Medium – Wide
$2.49

We accept:
Credit – Debit – EBT

Shopping for Love

The grocery store rivals bars as being a good place to find someone “date-worthy.”


(Family Features) If you’re looking for love this Valentine’s Day, don’t forget the grocery store. You might just pick up a date and the ingredients for a successful date night.

According to a survey commissioned by ALDI, 32 percent of adults have gone on a date with someone they met at a grocery store or know somebody who has. In fact, the grocery store rivals bars as being a good place to find someone “date-worthy.” Visit aldi.us for more information.

SOURCE:
ALDI

Dessert Sale Benefit for NB Easter Egg Hunt

The sale is Feb. 14, from 10 am – 2 pm at the campus on Briar Hill Rd.


Briar Hill Health Campus North Baltimore is having a Valentine’s Dessert Sale to benefit the Annual NB Easter Egg hunt put on by the FOE #2633 Ladies Auxilliary.

The sale is Feb. 14, from 10 am – 2 pm at the campus on Briar Hill Rd.

Contact Crystal to donate desserts – 419-257-2421

Tab-U-Lator At It Again!

The Can Tab-U-Lator for Ronald McDonald House Northwest Ohio needs TABS!

The Can Tab-U-Lator for Ronald McDonald House Northwest Ohio needs TABS!

Nikki is an employee at North Baltimore McDonald’s where she and the Tab-U-Lator stand by another tab donation of 100 pounds, or about 151,000 tabs!

The tabs are donated to the Ronald  McDonald  House of N W O. The tabs are then recycled for money to use to help the families that utilize Ronald McDonald House NWO.

Pop tabs are made with a different type of aluminum and can be recycled easier than pop cans. Anyone can get pop tabs! Pop tabs are found on pop and energy drink cans, vegetable & soup cans, special diet food cans … JUST ABOUT ANYWHERE!!!

Contact the Tab-U-Lator for details, or to pick-up your tabs!

It’s National Pizza Day

Whether it is thin crust, Chicago-style, deep dish or anything in between, pizza is an American favorite…

Today is National Bagel Day, National Toothache Day, and NATIONAL PIZZA DAY.

Pizza….I Love You…..


National Pizza Day is observed annually on February 9th. Whether it is thin crust, Chicago-style, deep dish or anything in between, pizza is an American favorite.

Here are some interesting facts about pizza:
*Pepperoni is the most popular pizza at 36% of all pies ordered.
*Over 3 billion pizzas are sold in the USA each year. Add another 1 billion on frozen pizzas
*17% of all US Restaurants are pizzerias.
*Antica Pizzeria, the first Pizzeria, opened in Naples, Italy, in 1738. *Gennaro Lombardi, the first Pizzeria in the United States, opened in 1895 in New York City.
*Americans consume on average 23 pounds of pizza per person each year.

Source: National Calendar Day

Show Off Your Sweet Side This Valentine’s Day

Your friends and family will be impressed……..


(Family Features) Treat family, friends and co-workers to something they will all love this Valentine’s Day by making easy and impressive cookies. Start with your favorite roll-out cookie recipe or simply dress up store-bought ones by adding some simple details with icing.

From the cupids at Wilton, here are three ways to leave them smitten with sweets this Valentine’s Day:

  • Desserts with dimension. Triple your treats by stacking three decorated cookies in different sizes together and attach them with icing.
  • Complement with color. A simple piping technique looks stunning when piped in different colors on your cookies.
  • Get to gifting. Wrap your finished treats in a Valentine’s Day treat bag or box.

For more fun and delicious Valentine’s Day recipes, baking tips and inspiration, visit www.wilton.com.
Stackable Ombre Heart Cookies
Each stacked cookie serves 1.

  • Favorite roll-out cookie recipe
  • Royal icing (recipe on wilton.com)
  • Rose Icing Color
  • Heart Micro Mini Icing Decorations
  1. Prepare and roll out cookie dough following recipe directions. Use 3 smallest cutters from 4-piece heart nesting cookie cutter set to cut out shapes. Bake and cool cookies.
  2. Divide royal icing into three equal portions, and tint 3 shades of rose. Thin a portion of each shade following recipe directions. Use tip 3 and full-strength tinted icing to outline cookies. Use thinned tinted icing in cut decorating bag to fill in cookies; gently tap to smooth icing. Let dry overnight.
  3. Use icing to attach cookies, stacking largest to smallest; place icing decoration on top.

Scalloped Heart Cookies
Each cookie serves 1.

  • Favorite roll-out cookie recipe
  • Ready-To-Use White Creamy Decorator Icing
  • Icing Colors: Burgundy, Red-Red and Christmas Red
  1. Prepare and roll out dough following recipe directions. Use largest cutter from the 4-piece heart nesting cookie cutter set to cut out shape. Bake and cool cookies.
  2. Divide icing into four equal portions. Tint one of each portion light burgundy, dark burgundy and combination of red-red/Christmas red. Reserve last portion white.
  3. Starting from top edge of heart, use tip 102 and icing in dark burgundy, light burgundy, red and white to pipe V-shaped groups of two petals, one piped from left and one from right, to create row of petals in alternating colors. Repeat with second row between petals in first row. Continue to repeat pattern until cookies are covered.

SOURCE:
Wilton

New Study Shows Pesticides in Store Brand Foods

New Study of Leading Grocery Chains Shows Multiple Dangerous Pesticides Found in Store Brand Food

Study of Leading Grocery Chains Shows Multiple Dangerous Pesticides Found

 

Columbus, OH—Testingreleased today found store and name brand foods produced and sold by the top four U.S. food retailers, Kroger, Walmart, Costco, and Albertsons—purchased in central Ohio and 14 cities across the country by Friends of the Earth, the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA), and other organizations contain residues of toxic pesticides linked to a range of serious health and environmental problems.

 

The report, Toxic Secret: Pesticides uncovered in store brand cereal, applesauce, beans, and produce, found that oat cereals, apples, applesauce, spinach, and pinto beans at the retailers contained detectable amounts of glyphosate, organophosphates, and neonicotinoids. The average level of glyphosate found in cereal samples (360 parts per billion) was more than twice the level set by scientists at Environmental Working Group for lifetime cancer risk for children. The average level of glyphosate found in pinto beans (509 ppb) was more than 4.5 times the benchmark.*

 

“The findings of this report clearly illustrate why consumers are increasingly making the choice to purchase certified organic food,” said Amalie Lipstreu, Policy Director at OEFFA.

 

“Toxic pesticides are showing up in what should be some of the healthiest and most affordable foods supermarkets sell,” said Kendra Klein, PhD, senior staff scientist at Friends of the Earth. “Children, farmworkers, and rural communities are routinely exposed to multiple pesticides linked to cancer, learning disabilities, and hormone disruption. This is unacceptable. We’re calling on food retailers to get toxic pesticides out of their supply chains and off store shelves and help make organic food available to all Americans.”

 

Findings of the food testing commissioned by Friends of the Earth are significant because of the ubiquity of toxic pesticides found in many different types of non-organic foods children eat on a daily basis. Findings include: 

  • Glyphosate, a probable human carcinogen according to the World Health Organization’s cancer research agency, was found on 100 percent of oat cereal samples and 100 percent of pinto bean samples tested.
  • Organophosphates, which are so toxic to children’s developing brains that scientists have called for a complete ban, were found in 100 percent of applesauce samples, 61 percent of whole apples, and 25 percent of spinach samples, at levels ranging from 0 to 3.31 nmol/g. 
  • Neonicotinoids, which the European Union has banned due to robust science linking the chemicals to bee die-offs and which have been linked to endocrine disruption and autism spectrum disorder, were found in 80 percent of spinach and 73 percent of applesauce samples ranging from 0 to 0.14 nmol/g. 

Brands tested by an independent laboratory included Great Value (Walmart), Kroger (Kroger), and Signature Kitchens and Signature Select (Albertsons/Safeway). 

 

Kroger, Walmart, Albertsons, and Costco control over one third of all food and beverage sales in the U.S. Friends of the Earth and over 100 organizations are urging these companies and all food retailersto phase-out toxic pesticides in their supply chains.  

 

Friends of the Earth and allies are also calling on Congress to pass Rep. Nydia Velazquez’s (D-NY) bill H.R. 230 to ban the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos. The study report details additional actions state and federal governments could take to eliminate the use of neonicotinoids, glyphosate, and organophosphates, incentivize transition to organic production, and direct public dollars to purchase certified organic food and beverages. 

 

“Ohio retailers can choose to phase out toxic pesticides and our state government can support the increasing number of Ohio farmers voluntarily transitioning to organic production systems. This will help farmers become more profitable and reduce the load of pollutants in our residents and our waterways,” Lipstreu said.

 

Friends of the Earth is releasing the report today with OEFFA, Beyond Toxics, CATA-El Comite de Apoyo a Los Trabajadores Agricolas, Ecology Center, Environment Texas, Grassroots Environmental Education, Maryland Pesticide Education Network, Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides, People and Pollinators Action Network, Pesticide Action Network North America, Toxics Action Center, Toxic Free North Carolina, and Turner Environmental Law Center.

 

* Environmental Working Group determined that a one-in-a-million cancer risk would be posed by ingestion of 0.01 milligrams of glyphosate per day. To reach this maximum dose, one would have to eat a single 60-gram serving of oat cereal with a glyphosate level of 160 parts per billion (ppb) or a 90 gram serving of pinto beans with a glyphosate level of 110 ppb. The highest residue level from a cereal product sample (931 ppb, purchased from Walmart) would result in an estimated 58 µg/day glyphosate exposure, which is nearly six times greater than EWG’s health benchmark. The highest residue level from a pinto bean product sample (1,849 ppb, purchased from Albertsons) would result in an estimated 168 µg/day glyphosate, which is nearly 17 times greater.

Testing released today found store and name brand foods produced and sold by the top four U.S. food retailers—Kroger, Walmart, Costco, and Albertsons—contain residues of toxic pesticides linked to a range of serious health and environmental problems.   Products tested were purchased in central Ohio and in 14 cities across the country by Friends of the Earth, OEFFA, and other organizations.     

The report, Toxic Secret: Pesticides uncovered in store brand cereal, applesauce, beans, and produce, found that oat cereals, apples, applesauce, spinach, and pinto beans at the retailers contained detectable amounts of glyphosate, organophosphates, and neonicotinoids.    The report shows that toxic pesticides linked to cancer, learning disabilities, and hormone disruption are present in what should be some of the healthiest and most affordable foods supermarkets sell:

  • Glyphosate, a probable human carcinogen according to the World Health Organization’s cancer research agency, was found on 100 percent of oat cereal and pinto bean samples.
  • Organophosphates, which are so toxic to children’s developing brains that scientists have called for a complete ban, were found in 100 percent of applesauce samples, 61 percent of whole apples, and 25 percent of spinach samples. 
  • Neonicotinoids, which have been linked to bee die-offs, endocrine disruption, and autism spectrum disorder, were found in 80 percent of spinach and 73 percent of applesauce samples. 

OEFFA is calling on the DeWine Administration and the Ohio Department of Agriculture to invest more in Ohio’s organic and transitioning farmers, who are producing food that is healthier for consumers, the environment, and our rural communities. Please take a minute to email them now and tell them you want the state to support organic agriculture. Click here.

Tax Return Specials on Meats

Bundle your meat and get a deal!!!


– SENIOR CITIZEN TUESDAY –
10% OFF ALL PURCHASES!!!

From the farms
to the freezers –

We’ll cut
whatever you want!

“Tax Return Specials”

LOCALLY rAISED + GRAIN FED
FREEZER BEEF & pORK

Beef – $275# – Includes Beef – Cut – Wrap – Freeze
Pork – $1.45# – Includes Pork – Cut – Wrap – Freeze
CALL FOR DETAILS!!!
419-257-3529

Steak bundle #1
“Baker’s dozen”
13 (thirteen)
8 oz. Flat iron steaks
$49

Steak bundle #2
“baker’s dozen”
New York
Strip Steaks
$69

grill bundle
6 each:
8 oz NY strip
brats
1/3 pounder burger patties
chix leg quarters

valentines special

ribeye for 2 – $12.99
new york strip for 2 – $11.99
hand cut when you order!!!

Ground Fresh DAILY!
85% LEAN Ground Beef
– $4.79# –

One Pound Packs
Whole Hog Sausage
Plain/Saft & Pepper/Mild/Southern
$3.29#

N. B Custom Cuts thanks ALL the deer hunters for their business –
See you next year!

We accept:

Credit – Debit – EBT