Public Tour and Workshop – Ohio’s Organic and Sustainable Farms

Do you want to experience life as a shepherd? Learn how to effectively combat weeds in the garden without chemicals? See draft horses make sorghum cane into sweet syrup? Sample local meats, cheeses, and artisan jams and preserves? Or learn how to butcher your own chickens or install your own solar photovoltaic system?

Annual Public Tour and Workshop Series Features Ohio’s Organic and Sustainable Farms
2015 Guide Now Available
Do you want to experience life as a shepherd? Learn how to effectively combat weeds in the garden without chemicals? See draft horses make sorghum cane into sweet syrup? Sample local meats, cheeses, and artisan jams and preserves? Or learn how to butcher your own chickens or install your own solar photovoltaic system?

The Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association (OEFFA) is sponsoring 15 tours, nine workshops, a one-day Women Grow Ohio event, and a farm to table dinner as part of the2015 Ohio Sustainable Farm Tour and Workshop Series. The series, which features these and other topics, will allow Ohioans to see, taste, and experience life on the farm while gaining practical new skills.

Meet local farmers and experience sustainable farming up close and personal during these OEFFA’s farm tours:
Develop your farm and do-it-yourself skills, during these workshops where you can delve deeper into specific topics:
Celebrate Ohio farms and flavors, during this unique farm to table dinner:
OEFFA has offered annual farm tours for more than 35 years, providing unique opportunities for growers, educators, and conscientious eaters to learn about sustainable agriculture and local foods on the farm from growers and producers with years of practical experience.
The 2015 farm tour and workshop series is promoted in cooperation with the Ohio State University Sustainable Agriculture Team and the Clintonville Farmers’ Market, who are sponsoring additional tours. In total, the series features 29 farms tours, one university research center tour, 10 educational workshops, a one-day Women Grow Ohio event, and a benefit dinner.
For additional information and a complete list of all farm tours, including dates, times, farm descriptions, and driving directions, click here.

Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association

41 Croswell Rd., Columbus OH 43214

(614) 421-2022   www.oeffa.org

OEFFA

Panera Bread Day at Praise Chapel – TODAY – Wednesday

Praise Chapel has been blessed with a weekly delivery of Panera Bread and pastries. Needy families and individuals can come and receive bread, bagels, and pastries at the church.

Praise Chapel has been blessed with a weekly delivery of Panera Bread and pastries. Needy families and individuals can come and receive bread, bagels, and pastries at the church.

These items will be available every Wednesday, from noon until 3 PM in the back of the church.

We are located at 500 West Broadway in North Baltimore, Ohio, 45872.

Praise Chapel Panera Bread

NB Legion asks your opinion for Friday Night Dinners

The American Legion plans to expand its Friday Night Dinner choices and asks for your preferences in menu choices. Listed are several options that are being considered. Please leave a comment below or send an e-mail indicating your favorites.

North Baltimore American Legion Post #539 plans to expand its Friday Night Dinner choices and asks for your preferences in menu choices.  Listed are several options that are being considered.  Please leave a comment below or send an e-mail indicating your favorites.

☐ Fish Fry                          ☐ Baked Steak                 ☐ Spaghetti      ☐ Perch Dinner

☐ Beef & Noodles          ☐ Beef Manhattan        ☐ Fried Chicken

Other Suggestions: ______________________________________________________________

How often would you like to see these menu choices offered? ___________________________

Your input is sincerely appreciated!

American Legion Post 539

Important Crop Insurance Deadline Near for Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio Producers

Producers Need to Certify Conservation Compliance – – – The USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) reminds producers in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio that they need to have their Highly Erodible Conservation and Wetland Conservation Certification form (AD-1026) on file with their local USDA service center

SPRINGFIELD, IL., May 5, 2015 — The USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA) reminds producers in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio that they need to have their Highly Erodible Conservation and Wetland Conservation Certification form (AD-1026) on file with their local USDA service center by June 1, 2015. The 2014 Farm Bill required all producers have the form on file by the June 1 deadline to become or remain eligible for crop insurance premium support.

“Most producers have an AD-1026 certification form on file, however, some specialty crop, nursery, even some corn and soybean producers may not. Those with catastrophic coverage (CAT) may not realize that if they don’t comply with the Conservation Compliance provisions, they will be responsible for the full premium,” said Brian Frieden, director, Springfield Regional Office. “We have taken many steps recently to broaden participation in the crop insurance program as part of the farm safety net, including offering new policies such as the Whole-Farm Revenue Protection, Supplemental Coverage Option, and extending organic price elections to many new crops.”

Producers should visit their local USDA service center and talk with their crop insurance agent before the June 1, 2015, deadline to ask questions, get additional information or learn more about conservation compliance procedures. Producers who file by the deadline will be eligible for federal crop insurance premium support during the 2016 reinsurance year.

Additional information about federal crop insurance and the Highly Erodible Land and Wetland Conservation provisions is available on the RMA Farm Bill webpage.

Crop insurance is sold and delivered solely through private crop insurance agents. A list of crop insurance agents is available at all USDA Service Centers and online at the RMA Agent Locator. Producers can use the RMA Cost Estimator to get a premium amount estimate of their insurance needs online. Learn more about crop insurance and the modern farm safety net at www.rma.usda.gov.

Chowline: A deadly reminder on home canning safety

For low-acid foods, a pressure canner MUST be used (and used properly) to destroy any botulinum spores that may be lurking in the food……

I was surprised when I heard that the botulism that recently killed someone likely came from home-canned potatoes. I just started canning last year. What can I do to make sure I’m doing so as safely as possible?

A lot of people were surprised. Foodborne botulism is rare: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that there are only about 20 cases per year in the U.S. But when it does strike, the culprit is usually home-canned foods.

Botulism is caused by a nerve toxin produced by bacteria called Clostridium botulinum. These bacteria are found in the soil but grow best in conditions with very low oxygen. The bacteria form spores which keep the bacteria dormant until they find themselves in an environment that allows them to grow. If untreated, someone with botulism could experience paralysis of the respiratory muscles, arms, legs and other parts of the body. Botulism is fatal in 3 to 5 percent of cases, the CDC says.

According to the National Center for Home Food Preservation, C. botulinum spores can produce deadly toxin within three to four days in the right conditions, which include:

  • A moist, low-acid food.
  • Temperature between 40 and 120 degrees F.
  • Less than 2 percent oxygen.

All fresh vegetables, including green beans, asparagus, carrots, corn, potatoes and peppers, are low-acid foods, meaning they have a pH above 4.6. The lower the pH, the higher a food’s acidity. Tomatoes used to be considered a high-acid food, but in recent years some types have been found to have pH values higher than 4.6, making them a low-acid food. Because tomatoes are right on the border between high acid and low acid, anyone using the boiling-water method to can tomatoes or homemade salsa needs to add lemon juice or citric acid during the canning process to be safe.

For low-acid foods, a pressure canner must be used (and used properly) to destroy any botulinum spores that may be lurking in the food. Temperatures need to reach 240 to 250 degrees F  for a long enough time, which depends on the food being canned, the size of the jars and the way the food is packed in the jars.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Complete Guide to Home Canning is the bible for do-it-yourself canning. It is available to download for free, chapter by chapter, at the National Center for Home Food Preservation’s website, nchfp.uga.edu.

Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, also offers how-to videos and classes on home food preservation. For details, go to fcs.osu.edu/food-safety/home-food-preservation. OSU Extension also offers a fact sheet on botulism, available at go.osu.edu/botulism.

Don’t be cavalier about home canning. Home-canned foods can look, smell and taste normal and still be contaminated. Follow canning guidelines precisely to be sure your canned vegetables are safe.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Chow Line: A tried-and-true DIY ‘detox’ diet

Today, many detox diets focus on juicing or eliminating entire food groups and promise to help you burn fat, boost metabolism, improve digestion and (almost always) lose weight……

I’ve seen a lot of different versions of “detox” diets. Which type might work best to help me shed a few pounds this spring?

“Detox” and similar diets have been around for ages. As early as the 1930s, the grapefruit diet promised quick weight loss because of some sort of fat-burning enzymes, which simply don’t exist.

Today, many detox diets focus on juicing or eliminating entire food groups and promise to help you burn fat, boost metabolism, improve digestion and (almost always) lose weight. However, there seems to be no consensus about what a detox diet really consists of, or what it is that you need to detoxify out of your body that your liver, kidney and colon don’t already eliminate.

That said, spring is always a good time to recharge your diet. And if you want to drop a few pounds, why not do so in a way that’s sustainable over time and avoid a yo-yo pattern of weight loss and gain? Start with these guidelines:

  • Eat two fruits a day — the equivalent of 1 to 2 cups total. Be sure to eat a wide variety, not only to keep your diet interesting but so you reap the benefits of a range of different types of produce. Try strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, cherries, honeydew, pineapple, mango, oranges, grapes or any other fruit. Frozen and canned fruit also count. To lose weight, limit how much juice and dried fruit you eat, such as raisins or prunes, because they pack a lot of calories in a small amount and won’t fill you up. In fact, if you choose to eat dried fruit, count it double (a quarter-cup equals a half-cup of fruit for the day).
  • Eat 2.5 cups of vegetables or more each day. Again, choose a wide variety. Over the course of a week, be sure to include dark green vegetables, such as broccoli, spinach, kale, collard or other greens; red and orange vegetables including red peppers, carrots, tomatoes, pumpkin and winter squash; beans, such as black beans, pinto beans and kidney beans; and other vegetables, such as cabbage, cauliflower, green beans and zucchini. Limit starchy vegetables such as potatoes, green peas and corn. When eating raw leafy greens, double the amount: Eat 2 cups and count them as 1 cup.
  • Limit refined grains, such as bread, rice and pasta, to 2 to 3 ounces a day, and enjoy an additional 2 to 3 ounces of whole grains. An “ounce” in this case is equal to one slice of bread, half an English muffin, a half-cup of oatmeal, 1 cup of breakfast cereal, a half-cup of rice or pasta, or one 6-inch tortilla.
  • Enjoy 3 to 5.5 ounces of protein per day, including poultry, seafood, lean beef, nuts and eggs (1 egg is equal to one ounce of protein).
  • Eat 2.5 to 3 cups of lowfat or nonfat dairy a day, including milk, yogurt and cheese.
  • Choose healthy oils, such as olive oil, and limit to 1 to 2 tablespoons a day.

This plan might look familiar: It’s the plan recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Get more details at www.choosemyplate.gov.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Cinco De Mayo Fiesta at the Eagles

CINCO DE MAYO FIESTA at the North Baltimore Eagles
Tuesday, May 5, 2015
Dinner served from 4:00 ‘til Gone

MENU

3 tacos, beans and rice 8.00
3 tostadas, beans and rice 8.00
2 beef burritos, beans and rice 8.00

Munchies

Nacho Chips and Cheese 1.50
Nacho Chips and Cheese with Guacamole 2.50
Nacho Chips and salsa 1.50

Extras

Salsa .50
Guacamole .75
Sour Cream .25
Peco de gallo .75

* all dinners will be served with salsa and sour cream*

Free delivery to local factories

Call in your order @ 419-257-9004

Eagles Cinco De Mayo Fiesta flyer

NB Little League Opening Day Parade and Festivities (food)

The North Baltimore Little League will be holding their Opening Day Parade and games this Saturday. Everyone is invited to come and eat and watch the games.

The North Baltimore Little League will be holding their Opening Day Parade and games this Saturday. Everyone is invited to come and eat and watch the games.

Saturday, May 2nd.

Parade starts at 9:00 am (from the “Food Center Parking Lot” at the 4-way, at at South Main and State) and games to follow at the Little League Fields on East Water Street across from Poly One.

The concession stand will be open from 9:30 am to the end of ball games around 1:00pm.

We have local fireman manning the grill!!

NB Little League Opening day specials 2015

Chowline: Diet may play role in chronic inflammation

As people grow older, chronic inflammation often sets in……

Are there foods you can eat to reduce chronic inflammation?

Health issues related to chronic inflammation have been getting quite a bit of attention in recent years. Ironically, inflammation is an important part of the immune system — in young people, bouts of inflammation actually help fight off disease and help repair damage from injury or exposure to harmful substances.

But according to the National Institutes of Health (more precisely, the National institute on Aging), as people grow older, chronic inflammation often sets in, and it tends to be associated with a whole host of diseases and conditions, including heart disease, arthritis, frailty, type 2 diabetes, physical disability and dementia.

The challenge is that the science to help us understand this link is still evolving. Does chronic inflammation lead to these conditions? Or is it merely a marker in someone whose body is already trying to deal with them? Or, is it possible that chronic inflammation and these ailments have a more complex relationship?

That said, chronic inflammation is associated with these conditions, some of which can be debilitating. And it appears that an overall healthy diet, especially one that’s rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and omega-3 fatty acids, can help reduce mild chronic inflammation. While, again, the evidence isn’t quite clear, it is promising. Knowing that there could be this added benefit to eating right might help nudge you toward reaching for that apple instead of an apple fritter.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the professional association for registered dietitians, recommends against focusing on a specific food for some type of miracle cure against chronic inflammation. There have been some studies that suggest foods such as fatty fish (salmon, for example), berries, tart cherry juice and other specific foods have anti-inflammatory properties. But instead of focusing on a few food items, considering changes to the whole diet is a better approach.

The Academy, and other trusted sources such as the Harvard School of Public Health, offer anti-inflammatory guidance including:

  • Fill up half your plate with fruits and vegetables at meals, and eat a wide variety. For fruit, include strawberries, cherries, oranges and blueberries. Vegetables should include tomatoes and leafy greens such as kale, spinach, collards and chard.  Avocados, though high in calories, are also considered to have anti-inflammatory properties because of the heart-healthy fat they contain.
  • Eat nuts, in moderation, as part of your diet, including almonds and walnuts.
  • Incorporate high-fat fish, such as salmon, sardines and anchovies, into your regular meal plan, and choose heart-healthy oils such as olive oil.

Diet isn’t the only thing associated with inflammation. Stress, weight, sleep patterns and physical activity are also among the factors that could have an effect. Strive for balance, not only in your diet but in life, and you may reap more benefits than you realize.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

The Annual Wood County Clean Plate Awards

Area food service operations recognized for excellent performance in food safety – including:

NB Local Schools Powell Elementary and Wood County Committee on Aging in North Baltimore

Area food service operations recognized for excellent performance in food safety – including: 

 NB Local Schools Powell Elementary and Wood County Committee on Aging in North Baltimore

Bowling Green, OH – Wood County Health District is pleased to announce the presentation of this year’s Clean Plate Awards on Thursday, May 14, 2015 at 6:15 p.m. The presentation will take place at the Wood County Health District located at 1840 East Gypsy Lane Road, Bowling Green, Ohio.

The 2015 Clean Plate Award will be presented to forty-two (42) licensed food service operations out of more than 800 food service operations in Wood County.  These restaurants and other food service operations have been dedicated to upholding excellent sanitation and food safety knowledge within their facility. The recipients will receive a certificate of excellence and recognition of excellent performance in food safety from the Wood County Health District.  The winners of the Clean Plate Award will also receive a Clean Plate Award decal to display at their facility.

This is the fifth year that the Wood County Board of Health will hand out the awards and this is the highest total number of recipients to receive the award since the program began. “Food service operations that receive this award meet very stringent criteria,” said Brad Espen, Director of Environmental Services at the Wood County Health District.

This year’s recipients include: BG’s Frosty Fare, Bowling Green High School, Bowling Green Manor, Bowling Green Middle School, Carolyn’s Personalized Catering, Conneaut Elementary, Crim Elementary, Eastwood High School, Eastwood Middle School, Fernado’s, Frisch’s Big Boy #11, Hot Head Burritos, Islamic School of Greater Toledo, Kenwood Elementary, Luckey Elementary, Main Creek Farms, Marco’s Pizza #8, Northwood High School, Northwood Middle School, Olney Elementary, Owen’s Community College – Culinary Center, Pemberville Elementary, Pisanello’s Pizza, Poppin George’s Kettle Corn of BG #1,2 &3, Powell Elementary, Rita’s Dairy Bar, St. Rose School, Subway #5859, Super Suppers Perrysburg-Maumee, Twisty Treat, Uncle Buck’s Sandwich & Fudge Shop, Weenie Dawgs, Wood County Hospital Café and the Wood County Committee on Aging in Rossford, Northeast Center, Perrysburg, North Baltimore, Pemberville, Wayne & Bowling Green.

Questions regarding the Clean Plate Awards may be directed to Kelly Bechstein, Registered Sanitarian at 419-354-2702, ext. 3283 or kbechstein@co.wood.oh.us.

The Wood County Health District provides numerous services to the community, including comprehensive medical services for men, women and children.  Our Health and Wellness Center welcomes all patients and accepts most third party insurances, including uninsured or underinsured clients regardless of ability to pay.   The mission of Wood County Health District is to take the initiative to facilitate opportunities for Wood County residents to lead healthy lives. The Health District is located at 1840 E. Gypsy Lane Rd. in Bowling Green. Normal office hours are 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, with late hours and satellite clinics are available. The Wood County Board of Health meetings are generally held on the second Thursday at 7pm at the Wood County Health District and are open to the public.

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Chowline:Keep fresh produce healthy and safe

Rinse produce thoroughly under running water before eating, cutting or cooking it…..

I’m hearing more about antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Should I start cleaning fresh produce with a commercial fruit and vegetable wash?

Antibiotic-resistant microbes, including bacteria, viruses and other bugs, are indeed a serious public health issue in the areas of both food safety and healthcare. But if you carefully follow standard guidelines to reduce the risk of foodborne illness from fresh produce, food safety experts say any added benefit you might get from commercial washes available today would be minimal at best.

You may be hearing more about antibiotic resistance because of a series of outbreaks that recently made news. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a strain of Shigella bacteria that is resistant to ciprofloxacin, or Cipro, a commonly used antibiotic, sickened 243 people in 32 states and Puerto Rico between May 2014 and February 2015. Most cases were traced to people who had recently traveled internationally. Shigellosis is transmitted person to person through (excuse the term) the fecal-oral route, often because people don’t wash their hands thoroughly after using the bathroom or changing a diaper.

Shigella can be spread through food if it is on an infected person’s hands when preparing or serving food, or in some cases if the food was grown or washed in contaminated water. It can also be spread through contaminated recreational water.

Foodborne illnesses that are most commonly associated with fresh produce include sickness caused by Salmonella, E. coli and Listeria monocytogenes. Such bacteria, as well as viruses and other types of bad bugs that can make people ill, can sometimes be resistant to antibiotics. Food isn’t grown or raised in sterile conditions, and so it’s always wise to take precautions when handling food.
chowline fresh produce

Recommendations include:

Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and warm water before and after food preparation.

Rinse produce thoroughly under running water before eating, cutting or cooking it, whether it’s grown at home or purchased from a grocery store or farmers market, and whether it’s grown conventionally or organically.

Promptly refrigerate prepackaged lettuce and other produce labeled “ready to eat.” Although the washing during processing removes soil particles and does a good job minimizing the risk of foodborne pathogens, it doesn’t hurt to give it an extra rinse just before eating it.

Carefully handle produce with a rind, such as cantaloupe and watermelon. It should be scrubbed with a clean produce brush under running water before being cut into. If you laid it on a cutting board or other surface before washing it, clean and sanitize the surface before cutting into the fruit to reduce the risk of cross-contamination.

For more ideas and some instructional videos, see The Ohio State University’s Food Safety website, foodsafety.osu.edu. Recommendations for consumers are under “Dine In.”

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.