Award-Winning Journalist to Keynote Ohio’s Largest Food and Farm Conference

Award-winning agriculture journalist Alan Guebert will be a featured keynote speaker at the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association’s (OEFFA) 36th annual conference, Sustainable Agriculture: Renewing Ohio’s Heart and Soil,

Award-Winning Journalist to Keynote Ohio’s Largest Food and Farm Conference: Alan Guebert to Discuss Future of Farming
Award-winning agriculture journalist Alan Guebert will be a featured keynote speaker at the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association’s (OEFFA) 36th annual conference, Sustainable Agriculture: Renewing Ohio’s Heart and Soil, on Saturday, February 14 in Granville, Ohio (Licking County).

“For more than 20 years, Alan has had his finger on the pulse of American agriculture, offering keen insights into the politics, money, and technology behind our nation’s food and farm system,” said OEFFA Program Director Renee Hunt.

Guebert will speak as part of the state’s largest sustainable food and farm conference, an event which draws more than 1,200 attendees from across Ohio and the country.
In his Saturday, February 14 keynote address presented by Northstar Café, “Farming’s Future Faces: Shaping the Course of Our Food System,” Guebert will explore the ways in which science, technology, and big business have changed farming over the last 50 years—from the introduction of synthetic nitrogen and genetic engineering, to the rise of large grocery chains that have replaced small corner shops—and what the next 25 years may have in store.
In a December radio interview, Guebert told Ag Today in Central Ohio, “It’s all going to change because it always changes… Every 25 years or so, something really big comes along and changes everything in agriculture.”

His keynote will explore why the future of farming will require us to focus on public policy and private muscle to ensure the tools, resources, and knowledge we use today and tomorrow are intelligent, sustainable, and profitable.

On Saturday, February 14 at 10:35 a.m., Guebert will also lead a one hour workshop, “Should We Have an Organic Check-Off Program?” This moderated debate will explore both sides of a proposed organic check-off program.

Guebert, an award-winning freelance agricultural journalist and expert who was raised on a 720 acre dairy farm in southern Illinois, began the syndicated agriculture column “The Farm and Food File” in 1993. It now appears weekly in more than 70 newspapers throughout the U.S. and Canada.
Throughout his career, Guebert has won numerous awards and accolades for his magazine and newspaper work. In 1997, the American Agricultural Editors’ Association honored him with its highest awards, Writer of the Year and Master Writer.
Guebert has been described as “one of America’s finest writers on the workings and the politics of our food system” by Eric Schlosser and “a rare gift to farmers and non-farmers alike since he provides down-home wisdom that helps us all make sense of the important, but often misunderstood food and farm issues” byFred Kirschenmann.
He has worked as a writer and senior editor at Professional Farmers of America andSuccessful Farming magazine and contributing editor at Farm Journal magazine.

His new book, The Land of Milk and Uncle Honey: Memories from the Farm of My Youth, will be published by the University of Illinois Press in spring 2015.

In addition to Guebert, this year’s conference will feature respected scientist and biotechnology expert Dr. Doug Gurian Sherman as keynote speaker on Sunday, February 15; nearly 100 educational workshops; three in-depth pre-conference workshops on Friday, February 13; a trade show; activities for children and teens; locally-sourced and organic homemade meals, and Saturday evening entertainment.
The OEFFA conference will be held at Granville High School, 248 New Burg St. in Granville. For more information about the conference, or to register, go towww.oeffa.org/conference2015. Past conferences have sold out in advance, so early registration is encouraged to avoid disappointment.

NB Food Pantry to continue

The North Baltimore Food Pantry will continue at the “old” Salvation Army facility, served by The Bridge Fellowship Church, in partnership with the Salvation Army.

The North Baltimore Food Pantry will continue at the “old” Salvation Army facility, served by The Bridge Fellowship Church, in partnership with the Salvation Army.

The Bridge Fellowship (www.thebridgeub.com)

The Bridge Fellowship of North Baltimore is pleased to announce that the Food Pantry will continue at the current location of 123 East Broadway. It will serve the community on Friday from 9 am – 12 Noon.

The pantry opens again on January 9th.

This current installment of the Pantry will be in partnership with the Salvation Army during this initial stage of transition.

If anyone is in need of assistance, you may contact the Salvation Army of Bowling Green for scheduling at 419.352.5918.

Bridger staffing, under the leadership of Joanne/Bob will, conduct the actual dispersal of food items (419.260.0413). These new faces will do their best to assist you.

We look forward to serving this community. Pastor Mike Soltis

 

“Harley’s Famous Chili” Fundraiser

The North Baltimore High School 2015 Softball team is hosting a Fundraiser featuring the ever popular “Harley Caldwell’s Famous Chili”

The North Baltimore High School 2015 Softball team is hosting a Fundraiser featuring the ever popular “Harley Caldwell’s Famous Chili”
When: Saturday Jan 10, 2015 from 3:00 to 7:00 (During Girls and Boys Ridgemont Basketball Games).
Where: N.B.H.S.- Outside concession area. Cost will be $3.00 a bowl
** North Baltimore Eagles #2633 is sponsoring this fundraising event. **

Chowline: ’Tis the season to stay healthy

One of my friends is inspiring me to stay healthy over the holidays. She is making extra efforts to drink a lot of water and to walk more between now and New Year’s. What are some other healthy holiday ideas?

What a great way to celebrate the holidays — giving the gift of healthy living to yourself.

One of the keys to making it work is attitude. Don’t act like Scrooge when you decide not to have that second Christmas cookie. Instead, smile as you realize that you can enjoy the holidays without eating and drinking so much that you become bloated.

Your friend’s tactics are motivating in part because they’re simple. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Choose MyPlate offers other healthy holiday ideas that don’t require a massive effort, including:

  • When planning appetizers and snacks, choose crackers that are whole grain. Offer hummus, which is high in protein and a good source of fiber as well as vitamins and minerals. Serve whole-grain bread rolls instead of those made with white flour.
  • Water is always a great choice to quench your thirst, and you can dress it up for holiday parties. Get some carbonated water and serve with slices of lemon or lime, or flavor with a splash of fruit juice. Enjoy a cup or two before you fill the wine glass.
  • Consider fruit for dessert. Instead of pie, try baked apples with cinnamon and just a sprinkle of sugar, or serve fresh berries with a dollop of vanilla yogurt and a spoonful of granola on top.
  • For holiday cookies and other baked goods, try using apple sauce or pureed bananas in place of butter or margarine to reduce fat and calories. Just use a one-to-one replacement.
  • If you have a recipe that calls for heavy cream, try evaporated skim milk instead. It won’t be as rich, and it doesn’t whip or thicken like cream does, but it can be a great substitute in many recipes.
  • Prepare two (or more?) vegetables for holidays dinners, and be sure to fill half your plate with them.
  • When serving meats, trim away fat before cooking, or be sure to do so on your plate before eating. And go easy on the gravy and sauces: A little goes a long way.

You might not think all of these ideas will fit with your holiday plans. But choose a few. And remember, even if you include healthier ingredients in your cookies, it is best to load up on fruits and vegetables and limit desserts. Small steps can have a big impact and help set you in the right direction for the new year.

Chow Line is a service of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH, 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

KIDS – Breakfast with Santa on Saturday!

Join in for the fun and the food and a VISIT with Santa Claus at the Petro Iron Skillet in North Baltimore, Ohio! Come on out – Kids Eat Free*

Join in for the fun and the food and a VISIT with Santa Claus at the Petro Iron Skillet in North Baltimore, Ohio! Come on out – Kids Eat Free*

Petro Iron Skillet Christmas Flyer

Ice Cream Food Goodie Shoppe Last Minute Baking

It is coming down to crunch time for Christmas and the Holidays! If you need some last minute help with your baking needs, give the crew at the Ice Cream Food Goodie Shoppe in Downtown North Baltimore a call!

It is coming down to crunch time for Christmas and the Holidays! If you need some last minute help with your baking needs, give the crew at the Ice Cream Food Goodie Shoppe in Downtown North Baltimore a call!

Taking last minutes orders for the following holiday bake goods.

Sugar cut out cookies (soft) $5 dozens

pumpkin pie or apple pie $8 each

pumpkin rolls $8

pretzel peanut butter pretzels $3 for 18 of them

pecan pie $15

Buckeyes $5 dozens

Santa Cupcakes dozen $5

We can deliver…

Give us a call – 419-257-2406

Specialty Coffee:

Caramel Delight, Hazey Day, Lucky Irish, Peppermint Day, Salty Day, Sweet Bee, Toffee Day, Vanilla Day

These are with Stem Milk. 20 oz $3.00 or 12oz $2.50

The Kountry Cupboard  And Ice Cream Shoppe We will be closed Wednesday Dec 17 2014  and will reopen on Thursday..

The week of Christmas we are we be open Monday 11am to 8pm

LIKE these Facebook pages:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ice-Cream-Food-Goodies-Shoppe/275932462615061

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Kountry-Cupboard/1415902235364450

CLICK ON THE ITEMS FOR AN ENLARGEMENT – MORE DETAILS AND PRICES

Chow Line: When it comes to food, play it safe

Don’t let perishable food remain in the “danger zone” of 40 degrees to 140 degrees F for longer than two hours…..

Over the weekend, we did some holiday shopping and stopped at the grocery store. We were out for longer than I anticipated, and we left food in the car for about three hours before we got home. Is that food OK to eat? It was chilly, but I’m not sure how cold it was outside.  

It’s good that you’re asking. Too many people don’t take foodborne illness seriously. It’s hard to say why.

It could be because an illness doesn’t always occur when you don’t follow food safety guidelines. Let’s face it: If you became ill every single time after eating meat that’s not been cooked to the proper temperature, you would learn your lesson pretty quickly. If it rarely happens, you may never even associate your illness with those rare hamburgers you ate.

Another reason could be due to the fact that common symptoms of foodborne illness — nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea — mimic those of the flu or some other bug. There are more than 250 different types of foodborne illness out there. People may naively believe they have never experienced any of them, when, in fact, they have.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that each year, roughly 1 in 6 Americans, or 48 million people, get sick from foodborne illness. Of those, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die. Foodborne illness is a serious problem. Fortunately, it’s often preventable by taking a few precautions.

Those precautions include time and temperature control: Don’t let perishable food remain in the “danger zone” of 40 degrees to 140 degrees F for longer than two hours. That’s the temperature at which any foodborne pathogens that may be in the food can multiply rapidly and grow enough to cause illness.

In your case, the food you bought and kept in your car might have been kept cold enough for those three hours. But it might not have. You’d be hard-pressed to find a food-safety expert who would advise you to take a chance and eat that food — or worse, serve it to your holiday guests. Sadly, “when in doubt, throw it out” would apply here. The smart thing to do is to discard the questionable food and head back to the grocery store.

Foodsafety.gov, a federal website with valuable food safety information, offers more holiday food shopping guidance at www.foodsafety.gov/blog/2014/12/other-holiday-shopping-grocery-shopping.html. Check it out, and stay safe for the holidays.

Chow Line is a service of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH, 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Iron Skillet Fundraiser Night for NBHS Cheerleaders

Come join us helping to raise funds for the North Baltimore Varsity & JV Cheerleaders by having great food & a good time at our Iron Skillet Fundraiser Night!

Come join us helping to raise funds for the North Baltimore Varsity & JV Cheerleaders by having great food & a good time at our Iron Skillet Fundraiser Night!

When: Sunday, November 30, 2014

Where: Iron Skillet, Petro Stopping Centers – 12906 Deshler Rd, North Baltimore

What Time: 4:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

The cheerleaders will be on hand to help serve during the event.

Iron Skillet will be donating 10% of all sales to the High School Cheerleading fund.

Make sure to bring your family & friends!

Petro Iron Skillet Cheer_Fundraiser flyer

Chow Line: It’s not the turkey that makes you tired

Since turkey provides tryptophan, which makes serotonin, which makes melatonin — it makes some sense to blame the turkey when you feel sleepy after Thanksgiving dinner.

Every year at Thanksgiving, my cousin claims that turkey makes you sleepy. But I thought that myth had been debunked years ago. What’s the story?

Well, don’t be too hard on your cousin. The notion that eating turkey will make you sleepy has been around for a long time. And if you look at your family members after Thanksgiving dinner, it’s likely you will see evidence that it’s true. But it’s not.

Nap2

The myth started because turkey contains tryptophan. With the help of iron, riboflavin and vitamin B6, the body can convert tryptophan into niacin, also known as vitamin B3. But more to the point, the body can also use tryptophan to make serotonin, a brain chemical that helps make melatonin, a hormone that can control your sleep/wake cycles. Since turkey provides tryptophan, which makes serotonin, which makes melatonin — it makes some sense to blame the turkey when you feel sleepy after Thanksgiving dinner.

The thing is, turkey doesn’t contain a large amount of tryptophan. Pork and cheddar cheese contain even more, and no one complains that they put you to sleep. Other foods that contain tryptophan include eggs, fish, milk, nuts, peanuts, peanut butter, pumpkin seeds, soy and tofu.

Also, when you eat turkey or any other protein-rich food, tryptophan has to compete with other amino acids to get to the brain. For a person to become drowsy from tryptophan, it needs to be taken in higher doses and on an empty stomach.

Still, it’s likely that after dinner on Turkey Day, you may see some family members nodding off in front of the television. If it’s not the tryptophan, what’s going on?

Nap

Most scientists believe that the drowsiness is caused by the heavy portions of carbohydrates in the typical Thanksgiving meal: mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, stuffing, rolls, cranberry sauce — and pumpkin pie to top it off. Those food items alone provide more carbohydrates — and calories — than most people eat in an average day. That kind of over-indulgence diverts the body’s blood supply to the digestive system and away from the brain and other parts of the body, and that’s what makes you feel sleepy.

If you need further proof for your cousin to believe you, check out a two-minute animated video produced last year by the National Science Foundation and the American Chemical Society. It explains the myth and why scientists don’t believe it. It’s online at go.usa.gov/WsDH.

Chow Line is a service of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH, 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Chowline: Is your turkey thawing yet?

We are hosting Thanksgiving this year, and I’ve been worried about having enough space in the refrigerator to thaw the turkey. My husband suggested thawing it in our attached garage. Good idea or bad idea?

Bad idea. Take the time to clean out the refrigerator.

Even if you shiver when you step into the garage, you simply don’t have complete control over the temperature in that space. And temperature control is what it’s all about when it comes to thawing the turkey safely. You need to keep the bird below 40 degrees, and you can’t guarantee that outside of a refrigerator.

Thawing the turkey in the refrigerator is the simplest method. All you do is take the turkey, still completely wrapped, and put it in a big pan to catch any juices that might leak out during the thawing process.And, just in case, place the turkey on the bottom shelf so any stray juices don’t drip onto other foods.

turkey thawing

Keep the bird refrigerated long enough to thaw. U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines are:

  • One to three days for 4- to 12-pound turkeys.
  • Three to four days for 12- to 16-pound turkeys.
  • Four to five days for 16- to 20-pound turkeys.
  • Five to six days for 20- to 24-pound turkeys.

Luckily, a thawed turkey can remain in the refrigerator for an additional one to two days before you put it in the oven, so place it in the refrigerator earlier rather than later to be sure it’s completely thawed.

Another way to safely thaw a turkey is to place it in cold water. But this method is more complex than it sounds: You have to be sure the turkey is completely submerged, and you have to replace the cold water every 30 minutes to be sure the water stays below 70 degrees F. It can take up to 12 hours to thaw a turkey using the cold water method, depending on the size of the turkey. That’s a long time to fill and drain (and fill and drain) a container with cold water.

You might think that thawing a turkey properly isn’t as important as cooking it thoroughly: After all, thorough cooking kills bacteria, right?

That’s true, but there’s a major flaw in that argument: Some foodborne pathogens produce toxins that remain in the food even after bacteria are destroyed. You simply don’t want to take the chance.

For more information on keeping your Thanksgiving dinner a safe one, check out Turkey Tips from the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service at www.fsis.usda.gov.

Chow Line is a service of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH, 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Thanksgiving Pie Fundraiser for NBHS Music Boosters

Order a FRESH Homemade Pumpkin Pie • Apple Walnut Caramel Pie • Pecan Pie from the Briar Hill Health Campus Kitchen, save yourself some work and help the North Baltimore Music Boosters, Hope for the Holidays Fund.

Order a FRESH Homemade Pumpkin Pie • Apple Walnut Caramel Pie • Pecan Pie from the Briar Hill Health Campus Kitchen, save yourself some work and help the North Baltimore Music Boosters, Hope for the Holidays Fund.

To place your order, call 419-257-2421, fax completed sheet to 419-257-2515 or email valerie.wallen@briarhillhc.com no later than Monday, November 24th.

Pies will be available for pick-up between 8:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m., November 25th & 26th. Local orders can be delivered.

All proceeds will benefit the Hope for the Holidays fund that will be supporting the North Baltimore Band Boosters.

NBHS Band Briar Hill Pie Fundraiser flyer
419-257-2421
600 Sterling Drive
N. Baltimore, OH 45872
www.briarhillhc.com