Fish Fry Friday – Feb. 20 at The Legion

Get out of the house! Stop in at the Legion for Fish Fry Friday and NASCAR Sunday!

North Baltimore American Legion Post #539 will hold a Public Fish Fry on February 20th, 5:30-8:00. All you can eat – just $7.99.

Come and support your American Legion!

Starting Feb.22nd. the Sons of the American Legion will be open from 1:00 to 8:00 pm {Sundays] offering Shuffleboard League and NASCAR.

Bring a dish to share – The Bar will be open – NO kitchen.

Recipes Worth Trying: Maple Cream Bonbons

” They are delicious little candies, and JP definitely liked them “…….

Recipes Worth Trying by Sue Miklovic

I love to try new recipes often, especially for special holidays, birthdays, and events. I was looking for something I thought My Love would like for Valentine’s Day, and decided to give this recipe a try. I found it on Pinterest. It is called Maple Cream Bonbons, and it originally came from Taste of Home.

They are delicious little candies, and JP definitely liked them, much more than the cheesecake filled strawberries dipped in chocolate that I made him last year.

If maple is a favorite of yours, give them a try.

Ingredients:
1 cup butter, softened

3-1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar

3 tablespoons maple flavoring

2 cups chopped walnuts (I used pecans)

2 cups semisweet chocolate chips

1 cup butterscotch chips

ingredients
Ingredients

Directions:

In a large bowl, cream the butter, sugar and maple flavoring until smooth. Stir in walnuts. Shape into 1-in. balls; place on waxed paper-lined baking sheets. Freeze until firm.

Creamy filling with nuts
Creamy filling with nuts

In a microwave , melt chips; stir until smooth. (Instead of the microwave, I melted mine in a small crockpot. Note: I also do this when I make “Buckeyes”)

Melting chocolate in a small crockpot makes dipping easier
Melting chocolate in a small crockpot makes dipping easier
Maple balls, ready to be dipped
Maple balls, ready to be dipped

Yummy

Dip balls in chocolate; allow excess to drip off. Place on waxed paper-lined baking sheets.
RWTMapleBonbon5

Refrigerate until set. Store in the refrigerator. Yield: 5 dozen.

RWTMapleBonbon6

Hope you enjoy these as much as we did.

Chowline: Assure food safety when using slow cooker

Food safety is especially important to take into account if the food will be eaten by people most at risk from foodborne illness…..

I use my slow cooker a lot, but I recently read that you should thaw frozen items beforehand. I can understand that this would be necessary for meat, but is it a problem to use a bag of frozen vegetables without thawing it first?

That should be OK.

The idea behind thawing food before putting it into a slow cooker is to reduce the amount of time the food is in the “danger zone,” which is between 40 and 140 degrees F. That’s when any bacteria that might be on or in the food could multiply quickly and become a food safety concern. Food should move through the danger zone within two hours.

Meat is more dense than vegetables are, and if you put it in a slow cooker when it’s still frozen, it could stay in that danger zone for too long. Vegetables thaw more quickly, so it’s less of a concern to use frozen vegetables in a slow cooker.

Food safety is especially important to take into account if the food will be eaten by people most at risk from foodborne illness: older adults, children, pregnant women, or anyone undergoing cancer treatment or dealing with a chronic illness, such as diabetes. They are most at risk for developing serious complications from the intestinal problems that could result from food bugs.

Although slow cookers use low temperatures — generally between 170 degrees and 280 degrees F — to cook food, the lengthy cooking time and steam produced in the cooker combine to destroy bacteria. That said, it’s especially important to use some type of liquid (to generate steam) and to keep the lid on the slow cooker as much as possible during cooking. The temperature can dip 10 to 15 degrees F when the lid is removed.

To assure safety when using the slow cooker:

  • If you’re planning to cook a roast or other large cut of meat or poultry in the slow cooker, consult the manufacturer’s recommendations to be sure the meat is heated thoroughly quickly enough. Or, just cut the meat into smaller chunks first.
  • For the first hour, use the high setting. That will move the food through the danger zone more quickly. After that, you can switch to a lower setting if the food will be cooked all day.
  • You may want to test the heating capacity of your slow cooker. To do that, fill the crock in the slow cooker one-half to two-thirds full of water. Put on the lid and turn the heat to low, or 200 degrees F if you have a model with a temperature display. After eight hours, check the temperature of the water with a meat thermometer. Be sure to do so quickly, as the water will cool significantly as soon as the lid is removed. The water should be 185 degrees. If the temperature is below that, the slow cooker may be unsafe to use.

If you’re not home during the entire cooking process and the power goes out, throw away the food even if it looks done.

For more information about slow cooker food safety, see the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s fact sheet at www.fsis.usda.gov/shared/PDF/Slow_Cookers_and_Food_Safety.pdf.

Chow Line is a service of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Chowline: Simple steps to eating a heart-healthy diet

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends limiting saturated fat to 10 percent of total calories (for example, 180 calories from saturated fat, or 20 grams a day, on an 1,800-calorie-a-day diet).

I’ve seen a lot of Valentine’s Day promotions focusing on heart health. What are some easy ways I can make sure my diet is heart-healthy?

Your body will give you a heartfelt thank you for following a healthful, balanced diet with three heart-healthy components:

  • Limited saturated and trans fats. Eating too much of these types of fats increases your risk of high blood cholesterol, particularly the “bad” LDL kind. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends limiting saturated fat to 10 percent of total calories (for example, 180 calories from saturated fat, or 20 grams a day, on an 1,800-calorie-a-day diet). For trans fats, the guidelines recommend keeping them as low as you possibly can. Look at Nutrition Facts labels for saturated and trans fat content. And reduce consumption of butter and other fats that are solid at room temperature, as well as animal fat from meat, cheese and dairy products.
  • Reduced sodium. Too much sodium causes the body to retain excess fluid, resulting, for many people, in high blood pressure. High blood pressure increases the risk of stroke, heart disease and kidney disease. Limiting processed foods can help you significantly reduce sodium in the diet. Most Americans average about 3,400 milligrams of sodium a day. The recommended limit is 2,300 milligrams, or 1,500 milligrams if you already have high blood pressure.
  • Lots of fiber. People who eat more fiber tend to have a lower risk of heart disease. Increase fiber intake by eating more beans and other legumes, eating plenty of fruits and vegetables, and choosing whole grains instead of refined. The average American’s diet supplies only about 10-15 grams of fiber a day, while the recommendation is to eat 20-35 grams.

Need some help putting these recommendations into practice? Here are some quick tips:

  • Choose vegetables and fruit first. They’re naturally low in fat and sodium and tend to be high in fiber. Include a serving of whole fruit (not juice) at breakfast and lunch. Fill half your dinner plate with vegetables. Eat salad every day.
  • Choose lean meats and fat-free or low-fat dairy products. If you’re a cheese lover, try 2-percent-fat varieties. Watch out for processed meats, such as ham and lunchmeat — they tend to be sky-high in sodium.
  • Opt for high-fiber breakfast cereal. Look at Nutrition Facts labels and choose cereals with 5 grams of fiber or more per serving.
  • Lay off the pizza. Pizza alone is responsible for nearly 10 percent of the saturated fat and 6 percent of the sodium in the American diet. Make it an occasional treat rather than a staple.

If you’re thinking of adopting a whole new diet, the DASH Eating Plan, based on the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute recommendations, is worth a try. Learn more about it online at nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/dash.

Chow Line is a service of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Chowline: Find out details when foods are recalled

The best place to look for recalls of fresh produce and other products regulated by the Food and Drug Administration is www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls……

A friend told me that there has been an apple recall. She said only certain varieties were affected, but couldn’t remember which ones. Where can I learn more about this kind of thing? 

There actually have been two recent recalls related to apples, both of which were linked to a bacterium called Listeria monocytogenes. It is a deadly pathogen and you’re lucky to have a friend who will warn you about such recalls.

One recall began because of an ongoing outbreak of L. monocytogenes. The outbreak was traced to commercially produced caramel apples made from Gala and Granny Smith apples grown and processed by a company in California, Bidart Bros. Seven people have died in the outbreak, and 31 were hospitalized in 11 states around the country.
caramel apple

At first, just caramel apples were recalled, but when L. monocytogenes was found at the company’s apple-packing facility, the firm recalled all of its Gala and Granny Smith apples. You should know that these are two of the most widely grown apple varieties, and apples from other growers and processors are not linked to this outbreak.

However, if you have caramel apples at home purchased before Dec. 24, 2014, or Gala or Granny Smith apples purchased before Jan. 6, and you’re not sure if they are affected, check the advisory from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention at cdc.gov/listeria/outbreaks/caramel-apples-12-14/advice-consumers.html, or check with your grocery store. If you do have them, throw them away immediately. Place them in a closed plastic bag in a sealed trash to prevent other people or animals from eating them.

Although L. monocytogenes accounts for a relatively small fraction of foodborne illness, it’s particularly lethal: An estimated 18 percent of those who contract listeriosis die. Most at risk are older adults; pregnant women; patients undergoing cancer treatment, transplants or receiving medications that suppress the immune system; people with AIDS or other immuno-compromising conditions, such as liver or kidney disease or insulin-dependent diabetes; and small children.

There was another recall on Dec. 10, 2014, for fresh-cut Gala apples grown in Pennsylvania and prepared and distributed by Del Monte Fresh. No illnesses have been reported related to this recall, but a random test by the Ohio Department of Agriculture found L. monocytogenes on the fresh-cut fruit. Grocery stores often used these apples in snack packs and other packaged, ready-to-eat fruit bowls. It’s not likely anyone would still have these items on hand, but a complete list of products affected is online at www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm426419.htm.

The best place to look for recalls of fresh produce and other products regulated by the Food and Drug Administration is www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls. This website has an easy-to-use search function to help you find details quickly.

Also, you can see recently recalled foods at foodsafety.gov/recalls, which includes foods regulated by both the FDA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (primarily meat products).

Chow Line is a service of Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Legion Lunch Specials and Activities – Jan. 26 – 31

North Baltimore American Legion Post #539 Grill Specials for January 26 through 31.

North Baltimore American Legion Post #539 Grill Specials for January 26 through 31.

Stop in today for breakfast or lunch!

January 26 – Breaded Veal

27 – Coney Dog and Potato Salad

28 – Cube Steak Patti Melt (BINGO at 6:00)

29 – Mac & Cheese with Smoked Sausage

30 – Beef Stew and Biscuits

31 – Sausage Gravy and Biscuits

– OPEN to the public – DAILY at 7 am (except Sunday)

– Bingo every Tuesday Evening (doors open at 5:30)

– Fish Fry every couple of Friday’s

– Karaoke every once in a while

– ALWAYS Good Food, Good Drink and Good Friends!

Banquet Hall Rental available!

Call 419-257-2158 for information an “To Go” orders!

 

Legion Baked Steak Dinner Friday

North Baltimore American Legion Post 539 will be holding a Baked Steak Dinner on Friday, Jan.29 – ALL are invited – OPEN to the PUBLIC

North Baltimore American Legion Post 539 will be holding a Baked Steak Dinner on Friday, Jan.29 – ALL are invited – OPEN to the PUBLIC

The Baked Steak Dinner is from 5:30 – 7:30 pm and costs just $7.00 and includes all the fixins’.

CARRY OUT & PICK – UP orders – CALL 419-257-2158

 

NB Legion Specials – Jan. 19 – 24

North Baltimore American Legion Post #539 Grill Specials for January 19 through 24. Stop in today for breakfast or lunch!

NB Legion Specials – Jan. 19 – 24

North Baltimore American Legion Post #539 Grill Specials for January 19 through 24. Stop in today for breakfast or lunch!

OPEN to the public – DAILY at 7 am (except Sunday)

January 19 – Smoke Sausage

20 – Sloppy Joe and Onion Rings

21 – Shrimp and Fries

22 – Baked BBQ Chicken

23 –  Beef and Noodles –

AND – – – Friday  FISH FRY (all you can eat) – 5:30 until gone – $7.99

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Dining With Diabetes Classes Gear Up For Winter Cooking

Dining with Diabetes is an exciting program for people with diabetes and/or their caretakers or for those who want to learn to eat healthier. The free Dining with Diabetes class is a series of three classes. Registration is first-come, first-served. A few openings are still available.

Ohio State University Extension Wood County is teaming up with Meijer Stores to offer a series of Dining with Diabetes classes starting this month.  According to Susan Zies, Extension Educator Family and Consumer Sciences, “never before have we had such a demand for these classes across the state, as Ohio and our country face many challenges with the growing diabetic epidemic.”

 

Dining with Diabetes is an exciting program for people with diabetes and/or their caretakers or for those who want to learn to eat healthier.  The free Dining with Diabetes class is a series of three classes.  Participants will receive a recipe booklet, information on cooking with low/no sugar, diabetic food preparations, lecture from a registered dietician, and cooking demonstrations at each session.  Classes will be held at the Ohio State University Extension Wood County office from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 Noon, January 29, February 5 and 12, 2015. Participants must attend all three classes.

 

This is what previous participants had to say, “I loved the class, great ideas and great food and it is nice to meet new people.” “Great information. Good interaction.” “Informative and needed. I enjoyed the class.”

 

People with diabetes, as well as their family members or caretakers, are encouraged to attend.  For more information or to learn how to register, please call the Ohio State University Extension Office at 419-354-9050Seating is limited, registrations will be on a first come basis.

 

Here is a recipe from the Dining with Diabetes class that you may enjoy.

I encourage you to try making this at home. It’s a favorite from past participants!

 

Dining with Diabetes Hearty Bean Soup
Dining with Diabetes Hearty Vegetable Bean Soup

Hearty Vegetable Bean Soup

Makes approximately ten, one cup servings

 

Ingredients:

2 tsp. olive oil

1 cup each- diced onions, red pepper and carrots

2 cloves garlic, minced (or ¼ tsp. garlic powder or 1 tsp. bottled pre-minced garlic)

1 tsp. each dried thyme, oregano and parsley

3 cups reduced-sodium broth (can be beef, chicken or vegetable)

1 cup tomato sauce

2 (19 oz.) cans pinto beans, drained and rinsed

1 tsp. brown sugar

¼ tsp. black pepper

 

Equipment

Measuring cups and spoons

Large saucepan or stockpot

Strainer

Mixing spoon

Ladle

 

 

Directions

Step 1.  Heat olive oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Add onions, red pepper, carrots, garlic, thyme, oregano and parsley. Cook and stir for 5 minutes, until vegetables begin to soften. Add all remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil.

Step 2. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer, covered for 15-20 minutes until vegetables are tender.

Legion Menu Jan. 12 – 17

Stop by for a game of “good old fashioned shuffleboard!”

The North Baltimore American Legion Grill Specials for January 12 – 17

– OPEN to the public – DAILY at 7 am (except Sunday)

Stop by for a game of “good old fashioned shuffleboard!”

The North Baltimore American Legion Grill Specials for January 12 – 17

– OPEN to the public – DAILY at 7 am (except Sunday)

– Bingo every Tuesday Evening (doors open at 5:30)

– Fish Fry every couple of Friday’s

– Karaoke every once in a while

– ALWAYS Good Food, Good Drink and Good Friends!

Banquet Hall Rental available!

Call 419-257-2158 for information an “To Go” orders!

This week’s Specials:

12 – Big “T” and Onion Rings

13 – Fried Bologna Sandwich

14 – Grilled Ham and Cheese

15 – Open Faced Turkey and Mashed Potatoes

16 – Baked Steak Dinner

17 – Sausage Gravy and Biscuits