Chowline: Focus on what causes most foodborne illness

Wash hands and surfaces thoroughly and often when preparing and serving food.

What foods are most problematic when it comes to foodborne illness?

While an estimated 48 million Americans become sick and 3,000 die each year due to foodborne illness, many of those cases can’t be traced to a specific source. So, to answer questions like yours, authorities recently examined outbreaks caused by a known pathogen, which account for roughly 9 million illnesses and 1,000  fatalities annually.

The report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Food Safety and Inspection Service identified foods associated with four major foodborne pathogens: Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157, Listeria monocytogenes and Camplyobacter. They focused on these four bugs in part because of the frequency and severity of the illnesses they cause.

The report looked at foodborne illness outbreaks between 1998 and 2012, giving greater weight to those that occurred most recently, since 2008. Among the findings:

  • Beef and vegetable row crops, such as leafy vegetables, were responsible for more than 80 percent of E. coli O157 illnesses.
  • Illnesses associated with Salmonella were linked to a wide number of types of foods, with seeded vegetables (such as tomatoes), sprouts, fruits, eggs, poultry, beef and pork responsible for 77 percent of illnesses.
  • Dairy foods, most often raw milk or cheese produced from raw milk (such as unpasteurized queso fresco) were responsible for 66 percent of illnesses related to Campylobacter, and chicken was responsible for 8 percent of illnesses.
  • Half of illnesses from Listeria were caused by fruits and another 31 percent were caused by dairy foods. The researchers cautioned, however, that the high proportion of illnesses linked to fruits are due to a single large outbreak from cantaloupes in 2011.

For any type of foodborne disease, people who are most at risk for serious illness include young children, older adults, pregnant women and anyone with a condition that affects the immune system, such as diabetes, cancer, AIDS or an organ transplant. To reduce the risk, take common-sense precautions, including:

  • Know safe minimum cooking temperatures. Ground beef should be cooked to 160 degrees F, poultry (whole or ground) to 165 degrees, and pork to 145 degrees plus a three-minute rest period. Use a meat thermometer to be sure.
  • Avoid foods that are known to put you at high risk, such as raw milk or foods that have been recalled due to a food safety issue.
  • Wash hands and surfaces thoroughly and often when preparing and serving food.
  • Keep raw meat and fish, which could harbor bacteria that would be eliminated during cooking, away from fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Chill perishable foods properly. Don’t let them sit at room temperature for more than two hours.

For more guidance, see the CDC website at cdc.gov/foodsafety/prevention.html.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

2015 Sport Fish Consumption Advisory Reflects Some Significant Improvements

Some Ohio waterways are showing signs of improvement based on sampling conducted for the 2015 sport fish consumption advisory. All “Do Not Eat” advisories for the Mahoning River have been removed and replaced with less stringent advisories described below. There are also improved advisories listed for Lake Erie, the Tiffin River and Findley Lake.

Some Ohio waterways are showing signs of improvement based on sampling conducted for the 2015 sport fish consumption advisory. All “Do Not Eat” advisories for the Mahoning River have been removed and replaced with less stringent advisories described below. There are also improved advisories listed for Lake Erie, the Tiffin River and Findley Lake.

A total of 503 fish tissue samples collected from 16 lakes and 19 streams in 2013 form the basis for the new advisory. Fish consumption evaluations help Ohio anglers make informed decisions about consuming their catch. Fish low in contaminants can be an important part of a healthy diet.

A statewide advisory of one fish meal per week remains in place due to mercury. Fish contaminated with high levels of mercury have been shown to cause neurological damage and impaired development in young children.

Certain fish caught in the following areas can be eaten more often:

Findley Lake – All waters

  • Largemouth bass — one meal per week (previously one meal per month due to mercury).

Lake Erie – All waters

  • Rock bass — one meal per week (previously one meal per month due to PCBs).

 Mahoning River – Rockhill Avenue to the Pennsylvania border

  • Smallmouth bass – one meal per month for all sizes, due to PCBs and mercury (was “do not eat” for fish over 15 inches and one meal every two months if under 15 inches). 
  • Channel catfish – one meal every two months for all sizes due to PCBs (was “do not eat” for fish over 21 inches). 
  • Largemouth bass — one meal per week. 

Tiffin River – All waters

  • Northern pike greater than 25 inches — one meal per month due to mercury (previously applied to all sizes). Fish under 25 inches revert to the statewide advisory of one fish meal per week.

Advisories in the following water bodies have been added:

Fish Creek – All waters

  • Rock bass — one meal per month due to mercury.

Huron River – All waters

  • Smallmouth buffalo and common carp — one meal per month due to PCBs.

Lake Erie – All waters

  • Smallmouth bass — one meal per month now due to mercury as well as PCBs. 

Mahoning River – Rockhill Avenue to the Pennsylvania border

  • Northern pike, rock bass, and bluegill — one meal per month due to PCBs.
  • Yellow perch — one meal per week due to PCBs.
  • Walleye — one meal per month now due to mercury as well as PCBs.

Mosquito Creek – All waters

  • Northern pike — one meal per month due to mercury.
  • Common carp — one meal per month due to PCBs.
  • Bluegill — one meal per week due to PCBs.

Muskingum River – From Zanesville Dam to the mouth of the Ohio River

  • Spotted bass — one meal per month due to mercury.
  • Striped bass hybrid — one meal per month due to PCBs and mercury.

St. Joseph River – All waters

  • Rock bass and northern pike — one meal per month due to mercury.

Tiffin River – All waters

  • All flathead catfish and channel catfish 20 inches or more — one meal per month due to mercury.

Ohio EPA partners with the Ohio Department of Health and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources to develop consumption advisories for fish caught in Ohio. Fish consumption advisories are updated annually.

Additional information about fish consumption safety for women of child-bearing age, pregnant and nursing mothers, and children under 15 can be found at the Women, Infant and Children (WIC) Centers, local health departments, Ohio EPA and Ohio Department of Natural Resources regional offices.

The 2015 fish advisory information is available online and printed copies can be requested by calling (614) 644-2160.

Get NB Lion’s Club Baked Steak Dinner Tickets TODAY!

The North Baltimore Lions Club will be holding a Baked Steak Dinner on Saturday, March 21st from 4:30 – 6:30 (or until sold out.)

The North Baltimore Lions Club will be holding a Baked Steak Dinner on Saturday, March 21st from 4:30 - 6:30 (or until sold out.) 

Adults $8.00 Children $4.00 (half portion) The menu will be: Baked Steak, mashed potato w/gravy, corn, applesauce, roll and dessert. 
Contact any Lions Club member or call Doug at (419) 257-2574. 

This project is the sole fund raiser for the Lions Club and is used to fund many efforts to prevent blindness and to aid those with poor sight. Many local programs are supported, including eye screenings at the local elementary school, tuition for students attending Buckeye Boys State, Buckeye Girls State and Camp Campbell Gard for fifth grade students, Safety Village and many others. 

Please support your local Lions Club and its efforts.

March Luncheon of NB Alumni and Friends of SW FL

The March Luncheon of North Baltimore Alumni and Friends of Southwest Florida

The March Luncheon of North Baltimore Alumni and Friends of Southwest Florida will be held Thursday, March 19 at 1 p.m.at the Gulf View Grill, 2095 North Beach Rd, Englewood FL 34223. This location has amazing food and an amazing view.

Please join us if you are in the area. We always enjoy lots of great memories, grins and giggles about our time NB.

If you plan to attend please email me Anita Sharninghouse – asharn13@aol.com.

WCCoA to Celebrate the 13th Annual March for Meals

Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA) announced today its participation in the 2015 March for Meals campaign – a nationwide community-by-community celebration of the local Meals on Wheels programs that keep seniors independent in their own homes.

Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. joins Local Meals on Wheels Organizations Across the Country to Celebrate the 13th Annual March for Meals

Support during March will help to address senior hunger and isolation in Wood County

(Bowling Green, OH), March 2, 2015 – Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA) announced today its participation in the 2015 March for Meals campaign – a nationwide community-by-community celebration of the local Meals on Wheels programs that keep seniors independent in their own homes.

Elected officials and community champions from across the area will deliver meals to older adults in Wood County to help bring an awareness to senior hunger.

County, city, and township officials, along with local real estate agencies, media personnel, and other community champions have already started to sign up to deliver meals.

March for Meals is a national campaign held annually during the month of March, initiated and sponsored by Meals on Wheels America to raise awareness of the struggles faced by our aging neighbors and to encourage action on the part of local communities. Hundreds of Senior Nutrition Programs across the United States, like WCCOA promote March for Meals through public events, partnerships, volunteer recruitment and fundraising initiatives.

“Our Meals on Wheels programs are on the front lines every day making sure that no senior is forgotten,” said Meals on Wheels America President and CEO Ellie Hollander. “March for Meals is a time when communities can come together to stand with their local Meals on Wheels programs and ensure all seniors live a nourished lives with independence and dignity.”

For more information on March for Meals, visit www.marchformeals.com.

About the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc.

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

About Meals on Wheels America (Formerly Meals On Wheels Association of America)

Meals on Wheels America is the oldest and largest national organization supporting the more than 5,000 community-based senior nutrition programs across the country that are dedicated to addressing senior isolation and hunger. This network exists in virtually every community in America and, along with more than two million volunteers, delivers the nutritious meals, friendly visits and safety checks that enable America’s seniors to live nourished lives with independence and dignity. By providing funding, leadership, education and advocacy support, Meals on Wheels America empowers its local member programs to strengthen their communities, one senior at a time. For more information, or to find a Meals on Wheels provider near you, visit www.mealsonwheelsamerica.org.

NBACM News – Lenten Lunch Wednesday

The public is invited to lunch and Lenten devotions.

The public is invited to lunch and Lenten devotions from noon to 1:00 p.m. at Church of the Good Shepherd (119 W. Broadway) in North Baltimore on Wednesday, March 4.

This meal will be provided and served by the North Baltimore Praise Chapel.

The meal is part of the ministry of NBACM (North Baltimore Area Cooperative Ministry).

Weekly Schedule for Lent 2015
Weekly Schedule for Lent 2015

Legion Specials March 2015

The North Baltimore American Legion Post 539 Bar and Grill is OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. Here are the Daily Specials and information about TACO NIGHT – BINGO – Fish Fry Friday and NASCAR Sunday.

Legion Specials March 2015

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC @ 7:00 am for Breakfast

2 – Breaded Chicken and Cheese Balls

3 –  Fish Sandwich and Fries – BINGO Night

4 – Cube Steak Patti Melt and Fries

5 – Baked Chicken – TACO Night

6 – Tuna and Noodles – Friday Fish Fry (5:30 pm)

7 – Sausage Gravy and Biscuits

8 – NASCAR Sunday 1 – 8 pm (no grill – bring dish to share)

9 – Big T and Fries

10 – Baked Steak and Chips – BINGO Night

11 – Shrimp and Fries

12 – Hamburger Casserole – TACO Night

13 – Mac and Cheese with Tuna – Fish Fry Friday (5:30 pm)

14 – Sausage Gravy and Biscuits

15 – NASCAR Sunday 1 – 8 pm (no grill – bring dish to share)

16 – Strips and Fries

17 – Corned Beef and Cabbage – BINGO Night

18 – 3 pc. Chicken and Fries

19 – Hamburger Casserole – TACO Night

20 – Salmon Patties and Hash Browns – Fish Friday (5:30 pm) HOME DELIVERY – Call 419-257-2158

21 – Sausage Gravy and Biscuits

22 – NASCAR Sunday 1 – 8 pm (no grill – bring dish to share)

23 – Hot Cheese Ball and Breaded Veal

24 – Wings and Fries – BINGO Night

25 – Grilled Ham and Cheese and Soup

26 – Baked Steak Dinner – TACO Night

27 – Cod Fish Sandwich and Fries – Fish Fry Friday (5:30 pm) HOME DELIVERY – Call 419-257-2158

28 – Sausage Gravy and Bisquits

29 – NASCAR Sunday 1 – 8 pm (no grill – bring dish to share)

30 – Smoked Sausage

31 – Baked Steak and Chips – BINGO Night

April 3 –  Fish Fry Friday (5:30 pm) HOME DELIVERY – Call 419-257-2158

Subject to change without notice

Chowline: Great nutrition ideas ripe for the picking

When you’re doing your food shopping, make it a point to buy one fruit, vegetable or whole grain you’ve never tried before. You never know what might become a new favorite…..

I need some fresh ideas to give my diet a boost. I eat fairly well now, but I feel like I’m in a rut and want some easy ways to make some changes while keeping health and nutrition front and center. Your thoughts?

You picked a good time to focus on a healthy diet with National Nutrition Month just around the corner in March.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association) has sponsored the annual event since 1973, when it started as National Nutrition Week. The group has a website devoted to the month, nationalnutritionmonth.org, which is chock-full of handouts and tip sheets with just the kind of information you’re looking for. Look under “Promotional Resources” on the website for access.

The great ideas from this group of registered dietitians include tips such as:

  • Want some crunch? Don’t reach for chips — try crunchy vegetables instead. Use low-fat dressing as a dip.
  • Dress up seafood or poultry with a fruit puree. Just blend apples, berries, peaches or pears for a thick, sweet sauce.
  • Thirsty? Choose water first, and drink plenty of it, especially if you’re active or if you’re an older adult.
  • Reducing sodium doesn’t have to be bland. Create your own salt-free seasoning blend. The group’s “Eating Right with Less Salt” tip sheet offers recipes for a mixed herb blend, an Italian blend and a Mexican blend.
  • Are your portion sizes reasonable? If you haven’t measured foods in awhile, it could be a good exercise to get out the kitchen scale and measuring spoons and cups to evaluate how close your normal portions compare with recommended serving sizes. (It also wouldn’t hurt to review recommended serving sizes for different foods at choosemyplate.gov.)
  • Not getting enough vegetables? Try heating a cup of vegetable soup as a snack or as part of lunch or dinner.
  • Add some variety to healthy snacks by combining options from different food groups: top a banana with frozen yogurt and a few nuts, or spread a tablespoon of peanut butter on apple slices.
  • When you’re doing your food shopping, make it a point to buy one fruit, vegetable or whole grain you’ve never tried before. You never know what might become a new favorite.
  • If you’re not doing so already, and if you’re able to, eat fish or shellfish twice a week. Types that are higher in healthy omega-3 fatty acids and lower in mercury include salmon, trout, oysters and sardines.

The National Nutrition Month website also offers plenty of other resources, including healthy eating quizzes and games for kids and adults, and information on services offered by registered dietitians. Check it out. You’re bound to come away with plenty of new ideas to chew on.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.