Chowline: Time to chill–Be sure fridge is cold enough

I noticed that a friend of mine has a thermometer in her refrigerator. She says she uses it to make sure the refrigerator is cold enough. Why would this be necessary? Aren’t refrigerators built to keep food cold enough?

Well, yes, the whole idea of refrigerators is to keep food cold. But your refrigerator might not be cold enough.

It could be due to something as simple as opening the door more often than usual. Or it’s possible that the fridge is packed too tightly, not allowing cold air to circulate around the food properly. Your friend is on top of things by keeping a refrigerator thermometer and checking it regularly to make sure her food is being stored safely.

Refrigerators should be kept at a temperature above freezing (obviously) but below 40 degrees F.  Above this temperature, some types of bacteria start to multiply rapidly, and they’re more likely to reach numbers that can cause foodborne illness.

chowline refrig cold enough
photo: Ingraham Publishing

Surprisingly, as many as 43 percent of home refrigerators have been found to be above 40 degrees, according to the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. The only way to really know your fridge’s temperature is to use a thermometer. It’s important to check the temperature regularly and make adjustments to the refrigerator’s settings to keep foods at 40 degrees or below.

Some refrigerators have a built-in thermometer, but just in case it goes out of whack without you realizing it, it’s a good idea to have a good old-fashioned appliance thermometer so you can double-check occasionally.

For most of us, our refrigerator isn’t pristine. In fact, according to a 2013 study by NSF International, an independent public health auditing and certification organization, the refrigerator’s vegetable and meat compartments are the two germiest places in the home kitchen. The study found Salmonella, Listeria, yeast and mold in vegetable compartments, and yeast, mold, Salmonella and E. coli bacteria in meat compartments. It’s important to know that you should separate raw meat, poultry, seafood and eggs from other foods in your refrigerator. Use a bin to store raw meats.

Authorities differ on how often to clean refrigerator bins. Some say every month. Others say every four months. Think of it as a good spring cleaning followed by summer, fall and winter cleanings. Doing so isn’t difficult. Just empty and remove the bins from the refrigerator. Wash them with hot soapy water. Rinse out the bins thoroughly and dry with a clean towel or fresh paper towels. Wipe down refrigerator shelves. Wipe off jars and containers as you return them to the shelves. And don’t miss the bottom of the refrigerator, underneath the produce bins.

For detailed guidance about keeping foodborne illness at bay by keeping your refrigerator and the rest of your kitchen clean, see “A Clean Kitchen Required for Food Safety” by University of Minnesota Extension, online at www.extension.umn.edu/food/food-safety/sanitation.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or [email protected].

Community Fish Fry – LUNCH – drive-thru – TODAY

ALL PROCEEDS WILL BE GOING TO OUR VERY OWN SENIOR CENTER IN NORTH BALTIMORE

Community Fish Fry Drive-Thru – TODAY – September 10th at Briar Hill Health Campus, located at 600 Sterling Drive North Baltimore OH 45872 or call to reserve delivery of 4 meals or more  to your business in town only !!!

ALL PROCEEDS WILL BE GOING TO OUR VERY OWN SENIOR CENTER IN NORTH BALTIMORE which is a non-profit organization and serves our community seniors with  Meals on Wheels, activities, monthly birthday parties for area seniors, and a wholesome environment where friends can gather and enjoy the company of another !!

What better way to help and to get involved with our community than to help Briar Hill help the Senior Center to continue to give back to our seniors here in North Baltimore. Dig deep into your pockets and hearts and head out to Briar Hill TODAY and purchasing a fish dinner!

Briar Hill Community Fish Fry Sept. 2015 flyer

Chowline: School lunch may be healthier than packed

No matter how nutritious a lunch is, it won’t do any good if a child won’t eat it…….

Generally, which is healthier for kids, a packed lunch or a school lunch?

Obviously, this could go either way, depending on the content of the actual meal. But according to at least one study, school meals might have a significant edge.

The research, published in 2014 in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, compared 1,314 lunches of preschool and kindergarten students in three schools in Virginia. About 43 percent of the lunches were packed lunches, and 57 percent were school lunches. Like most schools, the schools in this study participated in the National School Lunch Program, and the research was conducted after that program upgraded its nutrition standards in 2012-13.

The researchers found that packed lunches had more vitamin C and iron and less sodium than the school lunches, but the packed lunches were also higher in calories, fat, saturated fat and sugar and were lower in protein, fiber, vitamin A and calcium. Packed lunches were less likely to contain fruits, vegetables, unsweetened juice and milk and were more likely to include chips, crackers or other savory snacks, and sugar-sweetened beverages.

Although many kids balked when schools started serving healthier meals, a 2014 study in the journal Childhood Obesity found that 70 percent of elementary school leaders reported that students had warmed up to them.
chowline School lunch iStock

According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the trick to making sure your children’s lunch is a healthy one is to make sure it provides a good balance: some lean protein, a whole grain, a fruit, a vegetable and a dairy product. Take a look at the school menu and talk with your children about what they like and don’t like in the school lunches, or if they’d prefer to bring a lunch from home. If the school lunch doesn’t appeal to your kids, talk with them once a week about what they’d like to carry with them. It’s important to get kids’ buy-in: No matter how nutritious a lunch is, it won’t do any good if a child won’t eat it.

The nutrition academy offers these ideas:

  • Pack easy-to-eat foods: strawberries or an easy-to-peel tangerine instead of an orange, for example, or carrots, cherry tomatoes or bell pepper strips instead of a salad.
  • For sandwiches or wraps, choose whole grain options and lean meat or cheese.
  • Make it fun. Cut sandwiches into stars or other unusual shapes. Celebrate special days by packing an all-orange lunch for Halloween, for example, or an all-red lunch for Valentine’s Day.
  • Ask if your children trade food with friends at lunchtime. That will help you determine what foods they prefer.

For a beverage, consider packing a small bottle of water with lunch. Earlier this year, the Harvard School of Public Health reported that about half of children and teens aren’t getting enough hydration, and nearly one-quarter don’t drink any plain water at all. Children tend to think cold water tastes better than water at room temperature. Adding a frozen water bottle to your child’s lunch pack will help keep the lunch cold and will thaw by lunchtime, providing a nice cool drink.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or [email protected]

Chowline: Plan Ahead to Save Money at the Grocery Store

The cost of food does inch up over time, but not as much as you might think…….

My grocery bill seems to be getting more and more expensive. I noticed it especially when we stocked up the weekend before school started. What are some ways we can cut expenses but still have enough to eat?

The cost of food does inch up over time, but not as much as you might think. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s official figures, average costs for food for a family of four in June 2010 ranged from $134.50 to $265.90 a week, depending on whether you were being “thrifty” or “liberal” in your spending, compared with $149.50 to $296.80 in June 2015. Note that these estimates count food costs only, not cleaning products or other items that you probably also pick up at the grocery store. They also assume that you’re buying foods for a nutritious diet and that you’re eating all meals and snacks at home.

Plan Ahead to save at the store  photo : Valueline
Plan Ahead to save at the store
photo : Valueline

That said, here are some ideas from the USDA and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to save dollars at the grocery store:

  • It’s often said, but it works: Don’t shop on an empty stomach. Going to the grocery store when you’re hungry can lead to impulse purchases that add up at the cash register.
  • Plan ahead. Look at your grocery store’s weekly circular for sale items that you can build meals around. The circular is often available online if you don’t see one in a local newspaper or with other advertisements delivered to your door.
  • Better yet, look through the dark corners of your freezer and pantry for items you may have forgotten about and determine how you can use them for meals in the coming week. Making use of the food you already have is a no-brainer, especially during weeks when you anticipate having extra expenses on non-food items — like toiletries or school notebooks.
  • Use your week’s menu to build your grocery list — and stick to your list. If you’re tempted to buy something that’s not on the list, think long and hard about it. Do so only if you know you need the item that week or if it’s an especially good bargain.
  • Check prices of sale items to see if you can get the same discount whether or not you purchase the suggested number of items. For example, if a sale item is marked “3 for $6,” you may be able to buy just one of the items for the sale price of $2. This policy varies between stores and among items, but it’s often listed on small print on the price tag on the grocery store shelf.
  • Speaking of price tags, be sure to look at the unit price (price per ounce or other unit of measure) to compare how much you could save over time by buying a larger quantity. Sometimes the unit-price savings are significant, but not always.
  • Take a close look at snack foods or other extras that you “always” put in your cart, examining not only their cost but the nutrition they provide, and determine if there’s a better option. If you typically buy snack crackers, look for those that primarily provide whole grains — or consider whether a bag of apples could take their place.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or [email protected].

Briar Hill Community Fish Fry in September

Time for our Hope for the Holidays, Briar Hill Health Campus in North Baltimore, Ohio is holding a fish fry and we need you and all your friends and family to come on out to enjoy at hot meal and good conversation!! Briar Hill is donating all proceeds to the North Baltimore senior center and we need your help to make this event and all the other events there after for our Hope for the Holidays to be the best, we can do it !!!

Time for our Hope for the Holidays, Briar Hill Health Campus in North Baltimore, Ohio is holding a fish fry September 10th and we need you and all your friends and family to come on out to enjoy at  hot meal and good conversation!! Briar Hill is donating all proceeds to the North Baltimore senior center and we need your help to make this event and all the other events there after for our Hope for the Holidays to be the best,  we can do it !!!

What better way to help out our community senior center and to fill our bellies then to come out to Briar Hill !!!

Hope to see you all there!

Thank you from the North Baltimore senior center and the staff at Briar Hill !!! Briar Hill Community Fish Fry Sept. 2015 flyer

COMMUNITY FISH FRY!
Thursday, September 10th
11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
$8.00 Per Meal • Drive-Thru
Deliver to in Town Businesses
Breaded & Deep Fried Perch
French Fries • Coleslaw • Apple Crisp
If you will be ordering more than 4 meals please reserve your meal by calling 419-257-2421 by September 4th.
All proceeds will benefit the
Hope for the Holidays Fundraiser!

Chowline: Making the “see food” diet work for you

There’s a bit of overlap in the three aspects of food choice, but they’re all worth knowing more about…….

I started keeping a bowl of fruit on the kitchen counter to encourage my family to eat more produce. It works. What are some other ideas to help us eat more healthfully?

Putting healthful food within arm’s reach is a tried-and-true technique for helping make good food choices. There’s plenty of research to back that up ­— and it works both ways.

A recent study at The Ohio State University found that compared with normal-weight people, obese people tended to keep more food visible not only in the kitchen, but throughout the house. They also generally ate more sweets and other less healthful foods than their counterparts. It’s as if that old (not funny) joke were true: “I’m on the ‘see food’ diet. If I see food, I eat it.” Clearly, the food environment around us matters.

Cornell University’s Brian Wansink has been called the eating behavior guru. In a recent article in the journal Psychology and Marketing, he analyzed 112 studies and concluded that most people make food-related decisions based on three elements: They select foods that are convenient, attractive and “normal.” So, when a bowl of fruit is the first thing you see when you enter the kitchen, and it’s attractively displayed in a nice bowl, you will more likely choose to eat fruit rather than the stale corn chips on a shelf in a back corner of the pantry.

There’s a bit of overlap in the three aspects of food choice, but they’re all worth knowing more about:

  • Convenient. The concept of convenience includes both physical and mental effort. Put healthful foods at the front of the refrigerator, ready to grab and go. Buy 100-calorie packages of snacks instead of trying to guess what a reasonable portion is. Find restaurants that, as their standard options, serve fruit or vegetables on the side instead of fries or onion rings and include bottled water, unsweetened ice tea or even milk with meals instead of soft drinks.
  • Attractive. Making food attractive has to do with all manner of presentation, from how it is served to how much it costs to what it is called. Wansink’s research shows that more children will eat broccoli when it’s called “Dinosaur Trees.” The same is true when vegetarian burritos are served as “Big Bad Bean Burritos.” And, serving foods on china increases the value people place on it, compared with normal dishes or paper plates.
  • Normal. People lean toward food choices that they perceive as the norm. One example of “normalizing” healthy eating is to always put salad bowls on the dinner table, even on days when salad isn’t being served. That makes it seem like salad is a standard part of every dinner, rather than as an infrequent side dish.

Wansink calls this the CAN approach — short for “convenient, attractive, normal” — and he says the opposite is also true: Making less-healthy food less convenient, less attractive and less normal can decrease its consumption. Put less-healthful snacks in a cupboard in the laundry room, he suggests, or try the cupboard above the refrigerator. Learn more at his website at foodpsychology.cornell.edu.

Briar Hill HC donates over 2 tons of food

North Baltimore’s Briar Hill Heath Campus donated 5,051 pounds of food to The Bridge Fellowship food pantry in NB.

North Baltimore’s Briar Hill Heath Campus donated 5,051 pounds of food to The Bridge Fellowship food pantry in NB.

The donations were made possible from various events sponsored  by Briar Hill, including the campus’ annual food drive at Powell Elementary, which is where the vast majority of the donations were collected!

The donations were also received at the car wash and from the Briar Hill staff offering a helping hand to make our Hope for Hunger Fundraiser possible!

From Left –  Pastor Mike Soltis and Rita Zeigler from Bridge Fellowship church and food pantry, help Sara Williams, Briar Hill Community Service Rep, load up the donations.

Chowline: Decisions at the fair–Indulge, or be healthy?

Not all the food at fairs is “horribly unhealthy.” …….

We’re planning to go to the state fair. I haven’t gone in a long time and I keep thinking about all of the horribly unhealthy foods that I know I’m going to want to eat that day. I want to enjoy myself, but I’m afraid I’m going to gain back the 12 pounds I’ve lost this year all in one day. Any guidance?

It’s certainly not likely you’ll gain 12 pounds in a day of overindulgence, but that doesn’t mean it’s a great idea to have an elephant ear for breakfast, stromboli for lunch, bacon-on-a-stick for dinner and deep-fried ice cream for dessert. Your gastrointestinal system would probably have a hard time forgiving you for that, especially if you’ve been eating healthfully for months and your system isn’t used to such excess.

Instead of planning for an entire day of gluttony, why not do this? Focus on one or two treats that if you didn’t have, you’d end up truly disappointed. Then make smart choices the rest of the day. If you’ve been looking forward to a funnel cake for years, go ahead and enjoy. An occasional splurge is nothing to feel guilty about. Just be sensible.

Not all the food at fairs is “horribly unhealthy.” Seek out charbroiled chicken breast, sandwich wraps or a Greek salad. In fact, the Ohio State Fair, at least, offers a phone app with not only a map and a schedule, but a searchable food finder to help you locate the type of food you want.

The fair also is encouraging food vendors to join the “Taste of the Fair” program, offering small versions of signature menu items at a reduced price. Think of this as built-in portion control. And if one of your favorites isn’t participating in the program, you can control your own portions by splitting a dish with a friend or two.

It can be difficult to make smart choices at the fair because nutrition information isn’t readily available. But if you plan ahead, www.calorieking.com does offer some nutrition facts: Search for “fair food” and see if your favorites are listed. Would you really choose to indulge in a tray of deep-fried Oreos if you knew it had 890 calories? Or an order of chili fries if you knew it had nearly 700 calories?

Here are a couple of other things to remember:

  • Most, if not all the time, choose water as a beverage. Not only is it the best way to keep yourself hydrated on a hot day outdoors, but you’ll save yourself hundreds of calories by foregoing beverages high in sugar. If you must have flavor, unsweetened iced tea is your next best choice.
  • Don’t fool yourself: Deep-fried vegetables are more fat than they are vegetables. Lemon shakeups are more sugar than they are fruit. Roasted corn is a better choice for a vegetable, especially if you go easy on the butter and salt. A piece of fresh fruit is also a great choice: Ask at an ice cream stand that offers banana splits if they’d sell you just the banana, or find the local foods and farming exhibits, which sometimes offer complimentary apples or other produce. If you need a sweet icy treat, frozen bananas are healthier than ice cream.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or [email protected].

Chowline: As mercury rises, beat the heat with water

Water serves as a medium where chemical reactions take place — and the body is a veritable 24-hours-a-day laboratory bustling with such reactions…….

Do we really need to drink more water when the weather is hot?

If you’re outdoors when it’s hot and sticky, and you become hot and sticky yourself, then, yes, that’s a good signal that you should drink more water.

chowline water iStock
photo: iStock

You might not think much about it, but water is the most abundant substance in your body. Each and every organ in your body needs water to do its job. Water serves as a medium where chemical reactions take place — and the body is a veritable 24-hours-a-day laboratory bustling with such reactions. Water also helps control body heat through perspiration and helps lubricate your knees, elbows and other joints. And it does other jobs, as well — too many to list here.

As your body uses all that water, and loses it from perspiration, urination and other functions, the water needs to be replaced.

While you might need to consume a few ounces of protein, carbohydrate and even some healthful fats in your daily diet, you need a lot more water: It’s recommended that men get 3.7 liters of water a day, and women, 2.7 liters. And in certain situations, such as very hot weather, your body needs more than normal.

But before you start lugging around 2-liter bottles filled with H2O, it’s important to know that you do get quite a bit of water from other beverages and even from foods. With foods, fruits and vegetables generally contain the most water — watermelon is about 91 percent water by weight; raw broccoli, 89 percent. But even other foods such as beans, chicken, pasta and bread contain ample amounts of water that your body can put to use.

That said, don’t discount the need for a glass — or actually about eight — of good old-fashioned water each day. That’s about the amount of fluids you should drink to accompany the water you’re getting from food. According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ Complete Food and Nutrition Guide, the body’s need for water varies from day to day, with more needed when you experience:

  • Higher levels of physical activity. During exercise, the academy advises “drink early and often.”
  • Exposure to extreme temperatures, either hot or cold. You need water to maintain a normal body temperature.
  • Exposure to dry air, such as heated or recirculated air.
  • High altitudes. At about 8,200 feet, your heart rate as well as urine output could increase, both of which require you to drink more water.
  • Pregnancy, which increases the recommendation for fluid intake for women to 3.8 liters a day.
  • Illness that includes fever, diarrhea or vomiting. Plenty of fluids are needed to prevent dehydration.
  • Eating a high-fiber diet. The body needs more water to process the fiber through the intestines.

Nutritionists generally recommend water as the top choice as a beverage. Not only is it calorie-free, it’s cheap from the tap and provides everything your body needs to replenish fluids. So, tip back your glass and enjoy, knowing you’re doing your body good.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or [email protected].

TAKE ACTION: CONGRESS TO VOTE ON YOUR RIGHT TO KNOW

Congress is fast-tracking a bill that protects Big Ag from having to tell you if you are buying and consuming genetically engineered (GE) food. It also would prevent farming communities from creating “GE-free zones” to protect organic and sustainable farms from contamination.

Congress is fast-tracking a bill that protects Big Ag from having to tell you if you are buying and consuming genetically engineered (GE) food. It also would prevent farming communities from creating “GE-free zones” to protect organic and sustainable farms from contamination.This legislation, misleadingly called the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act (H.R. 1599), is also known as the Deny Americans the Right to Know (DARK) Act. The House Agriculture Committee approved the DARK Act this week and the full House is expected to vote by July 23rd.

Call your Representative today and tell him/her you want the right to know if GE foods are on the shelf – and you support states’ rights to require labeling. 
  1. Call (877) 796-1949 and you’ll be connected to a staffer in your U.S. representative’s office.
  2. Simply tell the staffer your name, where you’re from, and say: “I’m a constituent and I care about my right to know what’s in the food I eat. I want my representative to vote NO on H.R. 1599 and to support H.R. 913, which would require mandatory GE labeling.”
  3. Forward this message on to your friends. The phone number will route callers to the correct office, even if they don’t live in the same Congressional district as you do.
A poll conducted by OEFFA in February revealed 87 percent of Ohio voters support GE labeling. This is a critical opportunity to hold your legislator accountable by asking him/her to stand with the vast majority of their constituents on this issue.Need a little help making the call? OEFFA has a great video on our Advocacy Toolkit webpage that shows how to make an effective call to your legislator. Don’t delay—call today!

After you make the call, let us know by calling us at (614) 421-2022 Ext. 208 oremailing us. Thank you for taking action!

Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association

41 Croswell Rd., Columbus OH 43214

(614) 421-2022   www.oeffa.org

“Crazy for Quinoa”

by Kendal Shaffer, BGSU Dietetic Intern. Kendal is doing a brief internship at the OSU Extension Office in Wood County and submitted this nutrition article for your reading enjoyment…..

 

Pronounced Keen-wah, this nutritious pseudo-grain is a versatile, nutty tasting seed that can be used in a variety of dishes. While its mainstream popularity is relatively new, this ancient grain has been around for centuries in South America. A few decades ago, NASA looked into making this simple seed astronaut food due to its rich nutritional content. Then, the year 2013 was declared the ‘International Year of Quinoa’ by the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization in the hopes it would increase awareness to this nutritional powerhouse in more geographic regions. It has also been enthusiastically supported by the health-minded consumers of many countries, the topic of countless websites and blogs, and the focus of innumerable popular cooking show episodes.

QuinoaCookedUncooked

And all for good reason too, when compared gram for gram with brown rice, quinoa has the same calories but contains more protein and more healthy fats such as linoleic acid, DHA and choline. It also has higher amounts of minerals including iron, folate, magnesium and zinc to name a few. Quinoa has moderate amounts of calcium and low sodium levels as well. With the nutritional punch this tiny seed packs, it can be an excellent choice for vegans, vegetarians and meat lovers alike!

Although there are multiple ways to cook quinoa, one of the simplest ways is boiling it via stove top. When deciding how much quinoa to make, keep in mind, the cooking process will more than double the original measured volume. It is important to first rinse the seeds in a fine mesh strainer to remove the outer layer known as saponin, which can leave the cooked product tasting bitter. Of note – packaged quinoa is usually pre-rinsed which makes this step unnecessary; be sure to read the container to double check.

Put the quinoa into a pot with twice as much water or broth as dry quinoa seeds. Cook the mixture on medium-high until it has been boiling for a few minutes, at this point, remove the pot from the heat and cover. Let the mixture sit for approximately 10-15 minutes or until seeds become tender. You can visually tell quinoa is ready to eat when the outer ring has detached itself from some of the seeds; this will look like little spirals in your pot.

Use the cooked quinoa as a substitute for rice in your favorite dishes. You can also make your own quinoa creation by adding almost any combination of protein sources or produce items. Feel as though you lack creativity? Utilize technology and scroll through the infinite number of delicious quinoa recipes online and on Pinterest for inspiration. You will quickly find the fun doesn’t stop at quinoa salads, there are quinoa cookies, quinoa meatballs, quinoa protein bars and just about everything else under the sun. With that being said, it’s time to get in the kitchen and try some new recipes, happy eating!

Simple Quinoa Salad

From www.tablespoon.com

1 ½ cups Quinoa
3 cups water
1 large handful chopped fresh cilantro
2 Tbsp olive oil
1 avocado
drizzle of honey or agave nectar
1 /1 cups chopped grape tomatoes
1 lemon or lime

  1. First, rinse quinoa thoroughly in a small strainer. Bring 3 cups of water to a boil. Put quinoa in water and reduce heat to simmer. Cover and cook until all water is absorbed (10-15 minutes).
  2. While the quinoa is cooking, halve your tomatoes and cut up your avocado and cilantro.
  3. Once the quinoa is cooked, drizzle w/ olive oil and agave or honey and sprinkle with salt, pepper.
  4. Stir up the quinoa to release some heat and bring to room temp.
  5. Stir in avocado, tomato and cilantro, squeeze your citrus over this, toss and enjoy!

KendallShaffer

My name is Kendal and I am a recent graduate of Bowling Green State University.  I earned my Master’s degree in Food and Nutrition in May 2015. I hope to be a clinical dietitian in the future, specializing in pediatric nutrition. I am married with two children, aged 4 and 1 who keep me entertained and very busy. I also love to run or do anything active in my free time. I recently finished my first sprint triathlon at the end of July and am already excited to sign up for #2!

 

 

Ohio State University Extension to offer Free Cooking Classes in Wood County

Eating Healthy can be affordable and taste great……

Wood County Extension is offering free cooking classes geared toward helping low-income families learn tips to buy healthy food on a budget, and prepare healthy recipes.

cookinmattersGroup
Cooking Matters Class

Called “Cooking Matters”, the class will be taught by OSU Extension Program Assistants Sue Miklovic and Heidi Phillips at the Wood County Extension office. The program involves six, two hour classes held on consecutive Tuesdays, starting July 28th and ending September 1st. Participants must pre-register and attend all sessions to “graduate” from the program. Class size is limited to 12-15 people.

During most of the six classes, participants will break into groups to learn nutrition information, prepare the recipes of the day, and then taste-test it. Each person will be given a copy of the recipe prepared, along with the ingredients to make the recipe at home. Participants may possibly receive some new cooking utensils and tools.

Additionally, the group will take a grocery store tour during one of the classes.

All classes will be held in the demo kitchen at the Wood County Extension Office at 639 S. Dunbridge Rd., Bowling Green, from 9am to 11 am. The program is offered through Ohio SNAP- Ed, which is a nutrition education program serving low-income adults and youth throughout Ohio. The goal of the program is to improve the likelihood that persons receiving SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly known as food stamps) benefits will make healthy food choices within a limited budget.

To register, call 419-354-9050 and ask for Cooking Matters