NB School CLOSED – Feb. 6

Due to road conditions related to the weather…

Due to road conditions related to the weather…

North Baltimore Local School have CLOSED for the day, Thursday, Feb. 6, 2020 joining most other area schools.

Area counties including Wood are at Level I Snow Emergency. 

Commencing last evening, sleet and freezing rain mixed with snow and frozen mist giving most things outside a pain in the butt coating of icy stuff!

PLAN ON STARTING YOUR VEHICLES  EARLY IF LEFT OUTDOORS OVERNITE!

DO NOT DRIVE WITH BLOCKED VISION!

Temps will warm slightly through the day… Winter is still happening in The SouthWood!

WRAP: Wellness Recovery Action Plan Class Coming Up

Classes will be held Thursday February 20 and Friday February 21 10:00a.m.-4:00p.m. both days.

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio – National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Wood County is a leading self-help organization offering free events, educational classes, support groups, and other programs that address mental health for the Wood County community.

This month, NAMI Wood County is offering an educational course called “WRAP” or “Wellness Recovery Action Plan.” This two-day, course, FREE of charge, was developed by a group of people who experience mental health and other health and lifestyle challenges. Your WRAP program is designed by you in a practical, day-to-day terms, and holds the key to getting and staying well. It can be used as a compliment to any other treatment options you have chosen. Classes will be held Thursday February 20 and Friday February 21 10:00a.m.-4:00p.m. both days.

Register via email at [email protected] or call our office at 419-352-0626. Check out our website for more information on WRAP and any other programming at www.namiwoodcounty.org.

ODOT Will Fund Local Pedestrian Safety Improvements

The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) is making it easier for local governments to fund much-needed safety improvements.

Expansion of Funding for Local Government Transportation Safety Projects, Pedestrian Safety Improvement Program

State funding 100 percent of project costs, providing more money for pedestrian safety

COLUMBUS – Thanks to the recent increase in the state motor vehicle fuel tax, the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) is making it easier for local governments to fund much-needed safety improvements. Roadway safety has been a key focus for Governor Mike DeWine and ODOT.

Until now, ODOT required a 10 percent local contribution for safety projects. Under new guidance intended to remove barriers when applying for funds, ODOT announced the state will now cover 100 percent of the project costs. The increased costs to ODOT will be funded through the additional revenue provided by last year’s fuel tax increase.

“In previous years, if communities were not able to match the funding, a project may have unnecessarily been stalled,” said Governor Mike DeWine. “With ODOT now funding 100% of safety projects, communities can make needed updates in a timely manner, ensuring the safety of both pedestrians and drivers.”

Safety improvements, such as adding turn lanes, reconstructing rural curves and upgrading signs, signals and pavement markings, are eligible for the funding. Funding requests typically range from $200,000 to $5 million, though the department will consider funding requests up to $10 million.

“This level of commitment to safety is a new high water mark for ODOT. In my many years in and around the Department, this is the first time we’ve offered all local governments 100% funding of safety projects,” said ODOT Director Jack Marchbanks.

An analysis of crashes in Ohio from 2009 – 2018 found that 63 percent of all deadly and serious injury crashes occurred on roadways maintained by local governments.

ODOT accepts applications twice a year. The deadlines are April 30 and September 30. The department also accepts abbreviated applications any time of year for projects $500,000 or less. Information about the program can be found on ODOT’s website.

“Every Ohioan is precious. That’s why our mantra at ODOT is toward zero deaths. We won’t be satisfied until the number of deaths in Ohio is zero – and every city, county, village and township has the resources to help us achieve it,” Marchbanks said.

ODOT is also dedicating an additional $10 million to the Pedestrian Safety Improvement Program. These investments will improve safety for Ohioans traveling on foot or by bike in the state’s largest cities. Safety improvements could include:

  • Curb ramps, raised crosswalks, curb extensions, pedestrian refugee islands
  • Pedestrian countdown signals or Pedestrian Hybrid Beacons
  • Street lights
  • Pavement markings like high-visibility crosswalk striping and advance yield markings
  • Signage for crosswalks or Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacons

To apply, municipalities should reach out to the safety coordinator in their ODOT district.

From 2014 – 2018, ten counties accounted for 65 percent of all pedestrian deaths: Franklin, Cuyahoga, Montgomery, Hamilton, Lucas, Stark, Butler, Summit, Lorain, and Mahoning. Seven in 10 deadly crashes involving pedestrians occur on roads maintained by local governments.

After last year’s motor vehicle fuel tax increase, the state was able to infuse an additional $50 million into Ohio’s highway safety program. As a result, Ohio now invests $158 million annually and runs the third-largest program in the nation. Funding can be used to make improvements on any public roadway in the state.

NB Custom Cuts Specials This Week

Get something to throw on the grill, other than ground hog – STEAK SALE!

February 3 – 7, 2020

SHOP LOCAL!!!

Senior Citizens Tuesdays
10% Off Any Purchase

Locally Raised – Grain Fed Freezer Beef + Pork
Beef Sides or Quarters – $2.75#
Hogs Whole or Halves – $1.45#
(includes processing)

FREEZER SALE – $1.00 OFF per pound on ALL STEAKS
WHILE THEY LAST!!!
CHOOSE FROM:

Ribeye

New York Strip

Porterhouse

T-Bone

Top Sirloin

USDA Choice Boneless Beef Chuck English Roast – $5.49#
USDA Choice Bone-In Beef Chuck Roast – $5.49#
OUR Hand Trimmed Ground Beef – $4.79#
Beef Cube Steak – $4.99#

Assorted Bone-In Pork Chops – 2.89#
Pork Steak – $2.79#
Pork Cube Steaks – $3.99#

Keystone 28 oz can
Beef & Pork – $7.99
Chicken – $6.89

Jumbo Chicken Wings $2.49#

Boneless Chix Breasts – $2.89#

Chicken Leg Quarters – 99¢ 

Our Hickory Smoked Bacon – $5.99#

Extra Meaty Smoked Ham Hocks – $1.99#
Fresh Side Pork – $4.99#

We accept EBT – Debit – Credit
Thanks to ALL the Deer Hunters!
See you next year!!

Online Water Bill Payment Available in NB

Online services now available!

The Village of North Baltimore is excited to offer residents an easy and convenient method to view and pay their water & sewer bills online.

1.) Go to:  www.northbaltimore.org,

2.) Click on the blue “Pay Water Bills Online” button,

www.northbaltimore.org

• Let your bills pay themselves – enroll in AutoPay
• Make a payment online, by phone or by text with
credit/debit card or e-check
• Enroll in paperless billing – reduce paper waste for
a better environment
• Pay by phone even when the offi ce is closed –
use our automated system
• A nominal convenience fee is applied to all
transactions

New Doctor Joins Fostoria Primary Care

Dr. Mark Weiner Joins Fostoria Primary Care

Dr. Mark Weiner, a family practice physician, has joined Fostoria Primary Care, a division of Blanchard Valley Health System, and will begin seeing patients located at 617 North County Line Street, Fostoria.

Dr. Mark Weiner, MD, Family practice physician

 

Dr. Weiner provides primary care to patients 13 years of age or older. Services include preventive medicine, chronic conditions, well checks and more.

“I am excited to welcome Dr. Weiner to the Blanchard Valley Health System family of professionals,” said Kelly Shroll, president of Blanchard Valley Medical Practices. “He shares our strong passion for providing the best patient care.”

Dr. Mark Weiner received his bachelor’s degree from Kalamazoo College (Kalamazoo, MI) and then completed his osteopathic medical degree at Michigan State University (East Lansing, MI).

For more information, please call 419.436.9091.

BVHS Weekend Column: Aches and Pains in the Winter

If you do experience some extra aches and pains this season, here are a few tips to help you find needed relief…..

Dealing with Aches and Pains in the Winter, by Thomas Kindl, MD, Blanchard Valley Pain Management

Thomas Kindl, MD, Blanchard Valley Pain Management

 

It’s that time of year when we dig out snow shovels out of storage and exchange our shorts for snowsuits. The frigid temperatures and snow-filled driveways can make this season one of the toughest on our backs and achy joints.

When shoveling those snowy driveways and sidewalks this winter, don’t forget to wear well-supported shoes with good traction to reduce the risk of a fall. Also, when lifting heavy snow, don’t forget to bend your knees and keep your back straight. If you must turn, pivot with your feet and do not twist your back.

If you do experience some extra aches and pains this season, here are a few tips to help you find needed relief:

  1. Apply cold. Icing the area for 15-20 minutes every 3-4 hours can reduce pain and swelling.
  2. Consider moist heat. For chronic pain and stiffness, applying heat to the area can increase blood flow and relax the muscles. Apply heat to the area for 20 minutes and then let the site rest for 20 minutes. Alternating heat and cold can also be soothing and beneficial to areas of inflammation.
  3. Applying braces and elastic bandages can help add support and minimize swelling.
  4. For pain in an extremity, positioning the injured area above the level of the heart when sitting or lying down can reduce inflammation.
  5. Stretch and strength. Gentle mobility can stimulate healing and, when tolerated, exercising can increase flexibility and muscle strength.
  6. Taking Tylenol and/or anti-inflammatory medication (after consulting with a physician) can also help reduce pain.

 

 

Ohio Hemp growers: Tread slowly

A plant with more than 0.3% THC is considered marijuana and is illegal to grow in Ohio and some other states; therefore, it must be destroyed.

Ohio Hemp growers: Tread slowly

Published on January 30, 2020

COLUMBUS, Ohio—Got a hankering to grow hemp?

Consider the gamble: The crop could generate hundreds, even thousands, of dollars per acre. Or, quite possibly, nothing at all.

The market price for CBD oil, which is derived from hemp flowers, has declined recently because of an oversupply on the market. Farmers in some states are awaiting payment for hemp they grew but could not sell. Some other growers are finding it can be very easy for hemp to exceed the legal limit of 0.3% THC; when this happens, the plants must be destroyed.  

“Don’t jump in,” said Peggy Hall, an agricultural and resource law field specialist for Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

“There are a lot of lawsuits already, and we can learn from those if we proceed with caution.”

Now that it’s legal to grow hemp in Ohio, a lot of people are interested in growing the crop, particularly to turn it into CBD oil, lured by high profit potential.  

But the risks of growing hemp should be carefully weighed against the possible profits, said Hall, who was among the speakers at the “Growing Hemp in Ohio” conference sponsored by CFAES in Wooster on Jan 24.

Anyone who does decide to grow hemp should work with an attorney regarding the terms of the contracts with both the seed company as well as the company that will buy the harvested crop, Hall said.

Having a contract between the farmer and the seed or seedling provider is critical to protect the farmer should something go amiss with the plants, Hall said. If the purchased seeds produce male plants instead of female plants, they can’t be used for CBD oil. Female hemp plants produce the flowers that are needed for CBD; male plants just produce more seed.

And if a plant comes from a seed without the proper genetics, it might be more apt to produce more than the legal limit of 0.3% THC. A plant with more than 0.3% THC is considered marijuana and is illegal to grow in Ohio and some other states; therefore, it must be destroyed.

“There are many different considerations to be made because of the unique nature of this crop,” Hall said. “This is not like a typical grain contract.”

Contracts need to be clear on who’s responsible if the harvested plant tests over the THC limit, Hall said. A contract with a buyer likely will specify the field where hemp will be grown. Hemp grown for CBD oil cannot be within one mile of any medical marijuana plants because of the risk of cross-pollination that could spike the THC levels in the CBD plants, Hall said.

“If the plants test over the THC limit, who’s responsible for the loss of that crop?” Hall said.

A farmer’s contract with a buyer should specify that, she said.

Before any contracts are signed, a prospective hemp grower should thoroughly investigate the financial standing and background of any company the farmer plans to contract with, Hall said.

“We’ve already seen some fly-by-night type companies spring up and leave a grower empty-handed,” she said. “Whenever there is a lot of money to be made on something, we see that.”

How much money can be made from hemp grown for CBD oil is unclear in the current market given the oversupply, said Brad Bergefurd, a CFAES horticulture specialist.

When CBD oil prices were at their peak, $45,000 to $65,000 per acre was possible, but in 2019, prices have dropped 60% to 80%, Bergefurd said. At the same time, the cost of planting and harvesting hemp for CBD oil is high, ranging from $10,000 to $15,000 per acre, he said.

“That’s part of why I feel uneasy about this crop,” he said.

Beginning in 2014, universities and private companies could grow hemp if the state where they were located applied for a license. Ohio was not among the states that did so. As a result, it was not legal to grow here until late last year just after the federal government made it legal for any state to grow it.  

“That might have been a good thing Ohio didn’t get in on hemp earlier,” Bergefurd said.

Some hemp farmers in other states are still trying to sell the crop they harvested, he said.

“In Ohio, we didn’t cash in on the early gold rush of hemp, but now we can sit back and learn from some of the problems states that did are facing.” 

For more information about growing hemp, see go.osu.edu/hemptips. CFAES will host a hemp production and marketing opportunities workshop on Ohio State’s Columbus campus on Feb. 17 from 7–8:30 p.m. at the Kunz-Brundige Franklin County Extension Building, 2548 Carmack Road, Columbus, Ohio, at CFAES’ Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resources Laboratory. For more information, contact Peggy Hall at [email protected] or 937-645-3123; or Lee Beers, OSU Extension educator, at [email protected] or 330-638-6783.

Saved By the Belt

Bowling Green man and woman join “Saved by the Belt” Club

 

 

(BOWLING GREEN)  – Bowling Green residents Timothy R. Dennis and Cinthia M. Anderson joined Ohio’s “Saved by the Belt” Club earlier this week after their safety belt saved them from sustaining life-threatening injuries. The incident occurred at Dowling Road and State Route 199 in Wood County on November 4.

Ohio State Highway Patrol Lieutenant Angel R. Burgos, Bowling Green Post commander, presented them with “Saved by the Belt” certificates signed by Ohio Department of Public Safety Director Thomas J. Stickrath and Colonel Richard S. Fambro, Patrol superintendent.

“Timothy and Cinthia are a living testimony to the effectiveness of safety belts,” Lieutenant Burgos said. “Everyone needs to buckle up every trip, every time.”

Provisional data from 2019 shows 457 people in Ohio were killed in traffic crashes where a safety belt was available, but not in use.

The “Saved by the Belt” Club is a joint effort by the Ohio Department of Public Safety and more than 400 Ohio law enforcement agencies. This club is designed to recognize people who have benefited from their decision to wear safety belts.

They also received a “Saved by the Belt” license plate bracket.

Safe Communities of Wood County Coordinator Sandy Wiechman (pictured left) helped Lieutenant Angel R. Burgos present Cinthia M. Anderson and Timothy R. Dennis with their Saved by the Belt awards.

Care Compass Project:  Navigating the Caregiving Continuum Seminar

CARE Compass is a place to gather together and obtain resources to make the journey of caregiving less stressful.

Care Compass Project:  Navigating the Caregiving Continuum Seminar

Bowling Green, Ohio (January 10, 2020) – The Care Compass project serves as a quarterly network gathering for caregivers. CARE Compass is a place to gather together and obtain resources to make the journey of caregiving less stressful. This upcoming session will be held on February 5 at First Christian Church, 875 Haskins Road, Bowling Green, from 11am-1pm. 

AGENDA:

11:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Lisa Myers, LISW, WCCOA will discuss the signs and symptoms of depression and anxiety in care recipients and caregivers.  

11:45 a.m – 12:15 p.m. Lunch sponsored by Brookdale of Bowling Green

12:15 p.m. – 1 p.m. Karla Gleason, Physical Therapist with NOMS/CPW Healthcare will present on transforming pain management without the use of opioids. 

The Care Compass Project is free and open to all caregivers but requires pre-registration by calling 1-800-367-4935 or 419-353-5661 or by emailing [email protected] Those wanting to learn about caregiving are welcome and those who are currently caregiving are encouraged to bring their care recipients. Separate caregiving services are provided during the training session to those community members in need of care.  

Other Care Compass dates for 2020 are scheduled for June 3, September 2, and November 4. 

The CARE Compass Project is sponsored and brought to the community by: Brookdale of Bowling Green, Wood County Committee on Aging, BGSU Optimal Aging Institute, Golden Care Partners, Ohio Living Home Health and Wood County Hospital.

For ongoing community support, caregivers are encouraged to join the Facebook Community: facebook.com/WoodCountyCareGiverCircle

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.  

WCCOA Welcoming Entries for 14th Annual Poetry Contest

Any Wood County resident 50 years of age or older may participate.

 The Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA) will be accepting entries for this year’s poetry contest. Any Wood County resident 50 years of age or older may participate. The opening date for submissions is Tuesday, January 21 and will be closing on Friday, March 27 at 4 p.m.

Poems should share stories based on the theme of Persistence. We are looking for poetry that in some way celebrates the heart and soul of Wood County citizens as they continue to celebrate their lives.

Entries must be submitted in English, double spaced, in a 12-point Times New Roman Font. Entries must be entirely your own work and never previously published, online or offline. All styles of poems are acceptable but they must be originals. Any plagiarized short stories and poems will be disqualified.

Two entries will be accepted per person. Intent to submit will not be accepted. Poems are to have a title and the poet’s name, address and phone number, and should not be longer than one (1) page.

Poems are due to the Program Department at the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., 305 North Main Street, Bowling Green, Ohio 43402 by Friday, March 27, 2020 by 4 p.m. You may also e-mail your entry to [email protected]

Winners will be selected by a Bowling Green State University Writing Professor. All poems entered will be available for reading in a loosely bound edition.

Winning poems will be announced on April 24 and published on our blog and announced on our Facebook page www.facebook.com/wccoa. The grand prize award will be a $50 gift card.  Prizes are sponsored by Bowling Green Manor & Bowling Green Care Center.

All poems will be posted on our blog site, [email protected]

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net

Northwest Ohio Crops Day 2020

Find answers to your agronomy questions, obtain private pesticide applicator and fertilizer recertification, and CCA education hours as you prepare for the next growing season.

Northwest Ohio Crops Day 2020,

Join OSU Extension at the Bavarian Haus, just outside of Deshler, Ohio on Friday, February 7, 2020, starting at 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 for the third annual Northwest Ohio Crops Day.  

Find answers to your agronomy questions, obtain private pesticide applicator and fertilizer recertification, and CCA education hours as you prepare for the next growing season.

Feb. 7, 2020, 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Bavarian Haus, 3814 State Route 18, Deshler, Ohio.

Cost is $35 by Jan. 31 and $45 after that date; the fee includes lunch.

Education credits offered include 1 hour Ohio Department of Agriculture recertification; 3 hours of pesticide recertification for categories 1, 2, and 6 Core; 2.5 hours of commercial pesticide CEU Core, 2c and 10c; and 4.5 hours of CCA credits.

For more information, contact Garth Ruff, 419-592-0806 or [email protected].