Archery Park Opens

The Wood County Park District introduces its newest park property. Free Archery Range Available to Public

Free Archery Range Available to Public

The Wood County Park District introduces its newest park property. The Arrowwood Archery Park grand opening will be Sunday, October 14, 2018 from 1:00 – 3:00 pm. Try your hand at archery and receive a short safety and skills lesson available first-come, first-served. Guests are welcome to bring their own equipment.

The new archery range, located at 11126 Linwood Road in Bowling Green, will be open every day of the year from 8:00 am until 30 minutes past sunset. It is a covered, open-air shelter that is free to use. Park visitors bring their own equipment for personal range use. Park programs will provide equipment and instruction.

The first public program offered at the Arrowwood Archery Park will be the free Jack-O’-Lantern Open Archery on Saturday, October 27th from 10 am until 12:30 pm. Pumpkins and carving tools are provided to create your jack-o-lantern target. Expert instruction and archery equipment are also provided at this Halloween-themed outdoor recreation program.

For more information about the 20 parks and nature preserves in the Wood County Park District system and about the public programs offered, please visit www.wcparks.org , or call 419-353-1897.

Briar Hill 2nd Annual Trunk or Treat

The Briar Hill Health Campus would like to invite the North Baltimore community to bring your children and grandchildren to come enjoy a fun and unique trick or treating experience!

IT’S BACK! COME BE A PART OF OUR TRUNK OR TREAT EVENT!
We would like to invite the North Baltimore community to bring your children and grandchildren to come enjoy a fun and unique trick or treating experience!
2nd Annual
Trunk or Treat
FREE COMMUNITY EVENT

Costumes Encouraged • Candy • Hot Dog, Chips and Drink Meals for $2.50
Trick or Treating • Trunk Decorating Contest for a Cash Prize

All proceeds from food purchases will benefit the North Baltimore Fire Department as part of the Briar Hill Hope for the Holidays fundraising efforts.

For questions about the Trunk Decorating Contest, please contact Alicia at alicia.wolf@briarhillhc.com or 419-257-2421.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29TH • 5:30 – 6:30 p.m.
Briar Hill Health Campus Parking Lot

600 Sterling Drive • North Baltimore, OH 45872
419-257-2421 • briarhillhc.com •
A Trilogy Health Services Community

NB Butcher Shop Specials at Custom Cuts 10/9

Senior Citizens Tuesdays 10% OFF Any Purchase – From the Farm to the Freezer – Custom Cuts will cut whatever you want!

Come on out!!!

Senior Citizens Tuesdays
10% OFF Any Purchase


From the Farm to the Freezer –
Custom Cuts wi
ll
cut whatever you want!

Get 2 FREE Chicken Leg Quarters with any $25 purchase!

It’s time to FILL YOUR FREEZER
LOCALLY 
Raised & Grain Fed
BEEF and PORK

Beef sides or Quarters
$2.75 lb
(processing included)

Hogs – Whole or Half
$1.50 lb
(processing included)
((smoking is extra))

– CALL FOR DETAILS –
– 419-257-3529 –

Ground FRESH Daily!
85% Lean Ground Beef
$4.79#
———-
USDA Choice Boneless
English Chuck Roast – $5.49

USDA Choice Beef Cube Steaks – $4.99#
———————–
Assorted Bone-In Chops – $2.29#

Pork Steak – $2.79#

Pork Cutlets – $3.99

All Natural
Boneless Chicken Breasts
$2.89#

All Natural Keystone Canned
Beef & Pork
$7.99 28 oz. can

All Natural Keystone Canned
Chicken
$6.89 28 oz. can

————
NEW Breakfast Bundle
5# Hickory Smoked Bacon – sliced & wrapped to your order
5# Whole Hog Bulk Sausage – Mild – Salt & Pepper – Plain
5# Breakfast Ham Steaks – sliced & wrapped to your order
1 – dozen FRESH BROWN EGGS
All for ONLY – $59!!!
(Bundles MADE FRESH when ordered – call today to have yours ready when you get there…)

DEER PROCESSING
TAG & Deposit
Required!

We accept
Credit – Debit – EBT

3 Tips for a Healthy Baby

Numerous studies offer evidence that a child’s learning abilities are developed during early childhood, meaning before even heading off to school.

(Family Features) When you’re a new parent, once you’ve successfully navigated the first car ride home from the hospital and the euphoria of this new little life begins to fade, you’re left with one resounding question: now what?

Over the years, you’ll have many responsibilities as a parent, but your most important focus in those early days, weeks and months is your child’s health and development, including his or her brain, gut and senses.

Brain

Numerous studies offer evidence that a child’s learning abilities are developed during early childhood, meaning before even heading off to school. That’s why it’s important to begin nurturing your baby’s cognitive development from the start.

That doesn’t mean you need to reach for the flash cards right away, though. Instead, focus on simply talking, singing and playing together. These activities can help develop vocabulary and other important cognitive functions. As your baby develops, pay attention to what captures his or her attention and encourage exploration of toys, textures and other items of interest.

Gut

When it comes to a baby’s gut health, the first six months are critical. It’s during this time period when babies have yet to be introduced to solid food that the immune system and metabolism are developing and being programmed for the future. Research published in “Cell” shows good gut bacteria during infancy, specifically Bifidobacterium, plays a critical role in establishing strong immune systems and metabolism.

“It’s important for infants to have an abundance of beneficial bacteria, such as Bifidobacterium,in their gut early in life,” said Dr. Tracy Shafizadeh, PhD, gut health expert for Evivo. “Unfortunately, as an unintended consequence of modern medical practices such as antibiotics and C-sections, it is estimated that nine out of 10 babies have exceptionally low levels of Bifidobacterium. This allows an overgrowth of bad gut bacteria, which is linked to short- and long-term health conditions such as colic, eczema, allergies, asthma, diabetes and obesity.”

There is, however, a way for parents to identify if their baby has high or low levels of Bifidobacterium by asking three simple questions. If the answer is “yes” to any of these questions, there’s a good chance your baby’s Bifidobacterium levels are low.

  • Were you or your baby given antibiotics during pregnancy, childbirth or in the first six months after childbirth?
  • Were you or your baby born via C-section?
  • Does your baby have diaper rash or have 5-plus loose, watery poops per day?

If you’re concerned about your baby’s gut health, talk with your pediatrician about an option like Evivo, the first and only baby probiotic clinically proven to restore the levels of B. infantis, a specific strain of Bifidobacterium, in a baby’s gut and reduce bad gut bacteria linked to colic, eczema, allergies, diabetes and obesity by 80 percent.

Senses

Sensory cues are what allow your baby to take in information about surroundings. Exposing your baby to various sensory experiences funnels a wealth of information to help develop skills and better understand the visual, audible, olfactory and textural stimulants that he or she encounters.

As your child grows older, these early experiences can help him or her recognize different colors, sounds, smells and tastes, some of which may later distinguish likes and dislikes, such as an enjoyment of one type of food and distaste for another.

Find more information and ideas for ways to improve your baby’s health at evivo.com.

SOURCE:
Evivo

BVHS: Athletic Concussions….Part II

Probably the most drastic change in management of concussions in the last few years is the use of rest…..

Athletic Concussions (Part 2), by Michael Stump, MD, Blanchard Valley Orthopedics & Sports Medicine

In “Athletic Concussions (Part 1),” I discussed how recent research has guided the immediate assessment and management of concussions in sports. With this article, I will continue this topic by discussing how research has affected the subsequent evaluation and treatment of concussions.

One evolving change to the evaluation of concussion is realizing that not all concussions are the same.  At least six different subtypes of concussion syndromes have been identified, and many patients will display more than one of these subtypes simultaneously. This is important to understand because these different subtypes may require different treatments. For instance, some patients will have a disruption of communication between the eyes and the brain. These individuals will have increased symptoms when their eyes are moving, such as when reading, driving or watching television. Individuals with this type of disruption benefit greatly from eye exercises. Other patients may have issues with fatigue during cognitive or concentration activities, and these individuals might benefit from time away from school and homework. Still others may experience mood disturbances due to the concussion, and their symptoms actually worsen if they are removed from school and their friends. Recognizing these different subtypes can be helpful in choosing the correct treatment and advancing athlete recovery.

Probably the most drastic change in management of concussions in the last few years is the use of rest.  In the past, both physical and mental rest were recommended until symptoms resolved. However, the latest research suggests we have been resting patients with concussions too much and slowing their recovery. The practice of “cocooning” in which the athlete with a concussion is placed in a dark, quiet room and told to sleep is no longer recommended. Now, athletes are encouraged to start returning to their normal activities as soon as they can tolerate it.

The key is to allow activities that do not reproduce symptoms. If an activity causes an increase in symptoms, then the athlete should stop that activity for the day. The next day, he or she can try the same activity again, attempting to partake in the activity a little longer than the previous day. In this way, the patient can gradually increase his or her activity over time, therefore returning to his or her usual routine more quickly. For instance, the athlete may try to walk a little each day and lengthen the walk 10 to 15 minutes every day if symptoms do not significantly increase. This is true of both physical and mental activities. In the past, providers recommended patients with concussions refrain from using “screens” such as computers, smart phones and video games. Now, as long as they do not increase symptoms, it is okay to use electronics. Additionally, if using electronics does cause symptoms, patients are permitted to attempt to gradually increase their use over time.

The one exception to returning to activities is anything that would have a risk of another head injury.  Athletes should not return to any contact or collision activity until all of their concussion symptoms and findings have resolved, and only with the consent of his or her physician.

While these new recommendations allow athletes to return to daily activities more quickly, it is still important for all athletes who may have a concussion to be evaluated by a physician. Providers can help determine which activities are safe for athletes to resume and give guidance on how to gradually increase others. They can also determine if more specific treatment is needed, such as eye exercises, physical or cognitive therapy, or medications, as well as what modifications to school and work may be necessary.

BVHS: Athletic Concussions…Part I

There have been many studies attempting to develop a test that can more accurately determine if an athlete has a concussion……

Athletic Concussions (Part 1) by Michael Stump, MD, Blanchard Valley Orthopedics & Sports Medicine

Concussions in sports have been in the news and on social media frequently over the last few years.  Over that same time period, there has also been an increase in research on concussions, and this new knowledge has changed many aspects of concussion treatment. The depth of this topic calls for a two-part column, and this week’s column will discuss what research has taught us about the initial evaluation and management of concussions.

A concussion is defined as a disturbance in brain function that occurs following some trauma to the head. Animal research has helped us understand what happens during a concussion at the cellular level. Basically, the brain is not working properly because communication between brain cells is disrupted.  This disruption results in the common signs and symptoms of a concussion, such as headache, confusion and difficulties with memory, concentration, dizziness and/or balance. Contrary to popular belief, most athletes with concussions do not experience a loss of consciousness.

The most frequent questions about concussions that occur during sports include, “What should I do if I suspect my child has a concussion?” and “Should I bring my son/daughter with a concussion to the emergency room?” The first important step in managing a concussion is to remove the individual from the practice or game immediately. Recent studies have shown that if an athlete is allowed to continue participating instead of being removed from play, even if they do not sustain another blow to the head, the risk for a prolonged recovery over one month is doubled. In answer to the emergency room question, while all patients with a suspected concussion should see a physician, in most cases it is not necessary to be seen immediately. Red flags that indicate the need for the athlete to be seen in the emergency room include a loss of consciousness lasting for over one minute, severe vomiting, unequal pupils, seizure, rapidly progressive headache or any other symptoms that worsen over time. If none of these are present, observe the individual for any worsening symptoms and see a physician within two to three days.

In the past, it was standard practice to wake patients with concussions every one to two hours to make sure their symptoms were not worsening. However, recent research has shown that frequent waking actually slows recovery, since proper sleep is important to recovery from concussions. Instead, providers recommend monitoring the injured athlete for at least three hours to make sure he or she is not showing any of the warning signs mentioned above, then allowing him or her to sleep.

There have been many studies attempting to develop a test that can more accurately determine if an athlete has a concussion. A number of blood tests and imaging studies, such as computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans have been reviewed, but none have been found to be useful. You may have heard about the “concussion blood test” that was in the media recently, but this test is only positive if a patient has bleeding in the brain; by definition, a concussion does not have any brain bleeding. Therefore, this test cannot distinguish between patients with a concussion and those without. While some modifications to MRIs have been shown to be positive in patients with concussions, these tests currently are not ready to be used in evaluation of patients.  Despite all this research, at this time, most athletes with concussions do not need any testing, and providers continue to make concussion diagnoses based on the patient’s history and examination.

Be sure to check back tomorrow for a discussion on how the latest research has changed the management of concussions.

“Living Through Loss” Series at Blanchard Valley Hospital

“Myths & Misconceptions of Grief” will focus on dispelling the many inaccurate beliefs about grief such as “grief improves the second year” and “grief progresses in predictable stages.”

“Living Through Loss” Series at Blanchard Valley Hospital

 The 30th annual “Living Through Loss” educational series by Bridge Home Health and Hospice, a division of Blanchard Valley Health System, is currently underway. Presentations are held from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the Marathon Auditorium at Blanchard Valley Hospital, located at 1900 South Main Street in Findlay. The topic for October is “Myths & Misconceptions of Grief” presented by Jill Gilgenbach, bereavement coordinator at Bridge Home Health and Hospice. The presentation will take place on Monday, October 15.

“Myths & Misconceptions of Grief” will focus on dispelling the many inaccurate beliefs about grief such as “grief improves the second year” and “grief progresses in predictable stages.” An opportunity for discussion will follow the presentation. Although the thought of speaking up in a group can be intimidating, many attendees find the discussion helpful as they discover their questions and concerns are similar to others. Gilgenbach will be available to speak with attendees in private following the presentation.

“Living Through Loss” is a nine-month series that focuses on the issues surrounding the death of a loved one. Presentations provide information related to the grief process and offer opportunities for discussion. Although the thought of speaking up in a group can be intimidating, many attendees find the discussion helpful as they discover their questions and concerns are similar to others. Each monthly presentation is open to the public and registration is not required.

Topics and dates following the October presentation are as follows:

  • November 19: Facing the Holidays After a Loss
  • December 17: Guilt, Anger and Challenges
  • January 21: Understanding Depression in Grief
  • February 18: Taking Care of You
  • March 18: Cooking for One: Your Food, Your Mood
  • April 15: Grief and Tough Topics
  • May 20: Reinvesting in Life: Discussing Growth, Reconciliation and Renewal

This series is sponsored by Bridge Home Health and Hospice. For questions or to have a full program brochure sent to you, please contact Gilgenbach at 419.423.5351 or email bridge@bvhealthsystem.org

Williams Becomes a Certified Professional of Healthcare Quality

Roxanne Williams, director of corporate quality and patient safety at Blanchard Valley Health System (BVHS), has recently become a certified professional in healthcare quality (CPHQ).

BVHS Director of Corporate Quality and Patient Safety Becomes a Certified Professional of Healthcare Quality

Roxanne Williams

 Roxanne Williams, director of corporate quality and patient safety at Blanchard Valley Health System (BVHS), has recently become a certified professional in healthcare quality (CPHQ). A CPHQ is an individual who has passed an accreditation examination developed by the National Association of Healthcare Quality.

Becoming a CPHQ means Williams demonstrates competent knowledge and understanding of program development and management, along with quality improvement concepts and other quality-related skills. Only approximately 11,000 professionals have received this certification.

“BVHS consistently strives to offer the highest quality of care and service,” said Williams. “Becoming a CPHQ provides me with a deeper understanding of quality principles and tools that can be used within the organization. I am honored to bring these skills to the health system.”

For more information on the certification for professionals of healthcare quality, visit nahq.org/certification/CPHQ-application.

BVHS Donates Materials for ‘Stop the Bleed’ Kits

These materials include gauze, gloves, markers, tourniquets for both adults and children, and more.

Blanchard Valley Health System Donates Materials for ‘Stop the Bleed’ Kits

 The emergency & trauma services department of Blanchard Valley Health System (BVHS) has purchased materials for kits that assist individuals in stopping an otherwise uncontrollable bleed during an emergency. These materials include gauze, gloves, markers, tourniquets for both adults and children, and more.

The department aims to educate the community on how to utilize the kits to stop a bleed while also providing them with the resources to do so. The goal is to distribute the kits to schools across Hancock County, major businesses in Findlay and law enforcement facilities to place in officer vehicles.

“These kits can save lives,” said Katie Richard, registered nurse and trauma program manager at BVHS. “When used correctly, the supplies we plan to distribute to the community can significantly decrease mortality in the event of an emergency. Our goal is to help prepare the community for such an incident, with the hope that it will never occur.”

Blanchard Valley Hospital is a Level 3 trauma center certified through the American College of Surgeons. The hospital actively attempts to educate the community on a variety of preventative methods to avoid injury. “All injuries can be prevented,” Richard explained. “Distributing bleeding-control kits helps increase the chances a victim will survive.”

The bleeding-control kits will be formed and distributed as part of the American College of Surgeons’ “Stop the Bleed” campaign that aims to prepare the nation for emergencies.

For more information about these kits and BVHS’ trauma education programs, contact Richard at 419.423.5493 or krichard@bvhealthsystem.org.

Blanchard Valley Health System provides a total continuum of care to more than 100,000 households in an eight-county area.

10/1/2018

Chowline: Temp of 165 F Needed for Chicken

To Prevent Foodborne Illness…..

Does chicken have to be cooked to one uniform temperature, or can it be eaten like steak — rare, medium rare, medium or well done?

Great question, considering that American consumers eat more chicken than any other meat, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

However, unlike steak, all chicken dishes should be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees F to ensure that they are cooked thoroughly enough to kill any pathogens that could cause a foodborne illness, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It’s best to use a food thermometer placed in the thickest part of the chicken to make sure it is cooked to a safe internal temperature of 165 degrees F.

Raw chicken can be contaminated with the bacterial pathogens Campylobacter, Salmonella and Clostridium perfringens, the CDC says. So if you eat undercooked chicken or other foods or beverages contaminated by raw chicken or its juices, you could get a foodborne illness.

In fact, about 1 million people get sick from eating poultry that’s contaminated with harmful pathogens every year, according to CDC estimates.

To lessen your risk of developing a foodborne illness when cooking or eating chicken, the CDC recommends:

  • When shopping, place any packages of raw chicken into a disposable bag before putting it in your shopping cart or refrigerator to prevent raw juices from getting onto other foods.
  • Wash your hands with warm soapy water for 20 seconds before and after handling raw chicken.
  • Use a separate cutting board for raw chicken.
  • Never place cooked food or fresh produce on a plate, cutting board or other surface that held raw chicken.
  • Wash cutting boards, utensils, dishes and countertops with hot soapy water after preparing chicken and before you prepare the next item.
  • If you think the chicken you are served at a restaurant or anywhere else is not fully cooked, send it back for more cooking.
  • Refrigerate or freeze leftover chicken within 2 hours or within 1 hour if the temperature outside is higher than 90 degrees F.

It’s also important to remember that you shouldn’t wash raw chicken before cooking it. Rinsing or washing chicken doesn’t kill any pathogens that may be on the chicken. But when you wash or rinse raw chicken, you are likely splashing chicken juices that can spread pathogens in the kitchen and contaminate other foods, utensils and countertops, the CDC says.

This is a problem because pathogens such as Campylobacter and Salmonella can survive on surfaces like countertops for up to 32 hours, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@osu.edu.