New Carey Medical and Diagnostic Center Community Open House

Community open house on Wednesday, July 31 from 4 pm to 6 pm in Carey……

 The recently-constructed Carey Medical & Diagnostic Center will be hosting a community open house on Wednesday, July 31 from 4 pm to 6 pm. The new address of the facility is 930 Sheriden Drive (Carey). The general public is cordially invited to tour the facility, meet the providers and care team and learn about future health offerings of the center.

Carey Medical Center

 

This very special program will feature a welcome by BVHS President and CEO, Scott Malaney and additional remarks by Kelly Shroll, president of Blanchard Valley Medical Practices. The first 300 attendees to complete a tour of the new facility will receive a commemorative gift. A Carey Chamber of Commerce ribbon cutting will immediately follow.

For more information, please email events@bvhealthsystem.org or call 419.423.5551.

Opinion: Alzheimer’s disease: more needs to be done

“Your parents, grandparents and even you are at risk considering the fact that 10,000 Americans turn 65 each and every day…”

Alzheimer’s disease: more needs to be done, says AMAC
Finding solutions need to be a priority for all Americans
 
WASHINGTON, DC, July 5 — June was Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month but, says senior advocate Dan Weber, “it’s not enough to be aware that it is a devastating, deadly infirmity. It is imperative that we raise our voices in support of decisive action to offer real support for its nearly six million victims and their caregivers.”
 
In a statement backing legislative efforts focused on Alzheimer’s, the president of the two-million-member Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC] urges Congress to put political differences aside and get cracking on new legislation that could make a difference.
 
“It was heartening to see the House, the Senate and President Trump on the same page when the BOLD [Building Our Largest Dementia Infrastructure] legislation was enacted on New Year’s Day. The BOLD Infrastructure for Alzheimer’s Act provides $100 million dollars to fund new and potentially more effective ways to treat the disease and provide aid for besieged caregivers. But it is clearly not enough when we are at war with a disease that is spreading at such a dangerously fast pace.”
 
Two additional Alzheimer’s bills have been introduced in Congress.  The Younger-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Act expands the availability of resources to younger seniors suffering from Alzheimer’s and other dementias, resources that are currently available only to patients over 60 years of age. The Improving HOPE for Alzheimer’s Act would expand comprehensive Alzheimer’s disease care planning services for patients.
 
“Both merit attention by lawmakers in a timely fashion.”
 
Weber says that more needs to be done to stop what is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. and which targets the nation’s fastest growing population — senior citizens. He cites Alzheimer’s Association statistics showing that the overwhelming majority of victims are seniors. Nearly one-million older Americans between 65 and 74, 2.5 million between 75 and 84 years of age and 2.1 million over 85 have the disease. “Your parents, grandparents and even you are at risk considering the fact that 10,000 Americans turn 65 each and every day, a growth rate that will continue for ten or more years, according to theCensus Bureau.
 
And, adds Weber, if that is not enough for lawmakers to get together and provide support and solutions, consideration needs to be given to the financial impact the disease is having on the economy. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, it’s is the most expensive illness plaguing America today. It is costing more than cancer and heart disease. 
 
The Association estimates that Medicare and Medicaid will spend $195 billion on Alzheimer’s in 2019 and that by 2050 the disease will cost these two agencies $770 billion.  To learn more and join the fight to end Alzheimer’s, visit alz.org/advocacy.

Building a Balanced Diet with a Better Sandwich

The ingredients inside a sandwich, not the bread itself, are the most significant drivers of calories, fat and sodium, according to some recent research…..

(Family Features) Fad diets come and go, and as many Americans find, so do the pounds they lose. Most experts agree that eliminating, or drastically reducing, any of the major foods groups from your diet can be detrimental to your health and prevent you from achieving long-term healthy eating goals.

Each of the food groups plays a distinct role in fueling your body and providing it with the vitamins and nutrients it needs. Attempt a well-rounded approach to eating, such as one that includes more nutritious choices for popular dishes like sandwiches. In general, pay attention to the variety, amount and nutrition of the foods you consume.

Consider these ideas for creating a balanced diet and a nutritious sandwich to help ensure you get enough of each food group:

Start from the Outside
There are two groups of grains: whole grains and refined grains. Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel, while refined grains have been milled for a finer texture and are required to be enriched per government mandate to help the population make up for nutrient shortfalls. Grains should account for about one quarter of each meal, but at least half of them should be whole grains – a fact that may surprise some people.

“Many health professionals mistakenly encourage consumers to skip the bread when trying to improve diets,” said Yanni Papanikolaou from Nutrition Strategies Inc., who completed a study to assess the energy and nutrients contributed from sandwiches in diets of children and adolescents. “Americans need to think twice before cutting bread from their diets. In fact, bread packs more of a nutrient punch than a caloric one.”

The ingredients inside a sandwich, not the bread itself, are the most significant drivers of calories, fat and sodium, according to Papanikolaou’s research. A separate study published in the journal “Nutrients” shows grain foods contribute less than 15 percent of all calories in the total diet, while delivering greater than 20 percent of three shortfall nutrients – dietary fiber, folate and iron – and greater than 10 percent of calcium, magnesium and vitamin A.

Consumers can significantly and positively impact their caloric, fat and sodium intake by making more deliberate decisions about sandwich ingredients, including choosing either whole-grain or enriched-grain bread. Find more information about the role of grains in a healthy diet at GrainFoodsFoundation.org.

Rethink the Ingredients
Making more nutritious choices with sandwiches and positively impacting your consumption of calories, fat and sodium is oftentimes a matter of changing the way you stack ingredients between the bread. Consider this sample sandwich: two slices of whole-grain or enriched bread, 2-3 slices of lunchmeat, two slices of cheese, a few spinach or lettuce leaves and a slice of tomato.

Contrary to popular belief, research shows that sandwich eaters who choose either whole- or enriched-grain bread can consume less calories, fat and sodium compared to the typical sandwich consumed in the American diet. This demonstrates the need to focus on the ingredients between the bread for a better (more healthful) sandwich.

Try a different take on a lunchtime favorite by adding spicy horseradish to this Roast Beef and Arugula Sandwich, or make packing a lunch even simpler with this Ultra-Thin Pastrami Sandwich Lunchbox.

Protein
According to the USDA, most Americans get about the right amount of protein in their diets, but could do better at choosing leaner options and adding more variety to their menus.

Incorporating more variety doesn’t have to mean sacrificing convenience. For example, while prepared meats like deli meats, hot dogs and jerky are sometimes a target of critics, numerous studies and the Dietary Guidelines for Americans affirm they can be part of a healthy, balanced diet. Prepared beef products provide a convenient source of protein, vitamins and minerals. Because most prepared meats are pre-cooked, they offer consumers easy, on-the-go access to the nutrient density in meat.

The prepared meats category is diverse and offers choices to meet nutrition needs, tastes, budgets and personal preferences. Thousands of products are available in the meat case, including low- and reduced-sodium products, low- and reduced-fat products, American Heart Association-certified, organic, Kosher grass-fed options and more. Learn more at meatpoultrynutrition.org.

Roast Beef and Arugula Sandwich

Recipe courtesy of the Grain Foods Foundation
Prep time: 5 minutes
Servings: 2

  • 1 tablespoon low-fat mayonnaise
  • 2 teaspoons horseradish
  • 4 slices whole-wheat bread
  • 4 slices tomato
  • 4 ounces lean roast beef, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup arugula or wild greens
  1. Spread mayonnaise and horseradish evenly over two bread slices.
  2. Layer tomato, roast beef and arugula on top of mayonnaise and horseradish. Top with remaining bread slices.

Ultra-Thin Pastrami Sandwich Lunchbox

Recipe courtesy of the North American Meat Institute
Servings: 1

  • 2 slices thin whole-wheat sandwich bread
  • 2 tablespoons low-fat garden vegetable cream cheese
  • 1 ounce ultra-thin pastrami
  • 1 ounce unsalted pretzels
  • 1 apple
  • 1 squeezable low-fat yogurt
  • 1 water bottle (8 fluid ounces)
  1. Using knife, spread bread slices with cream cheese. Layer pastrami on bottom slice and top with second slice.
  2. Fill lunchbox with sandwich, pretzels, apple, yogurt and water bottle.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images (main image)

 

SOURCE:
North American Meat Institute
Grain Foods Foundation

Blanchard Valley Health System Welcomes New CIO

Wellman has 30 years of experience working in health care information technology…..

Blanchard Valley Health System Welcomes New Chief Information Officer James Wellman

Blanchard Valley Health System is proud to welcome James Wellman, CHCIO as the organization’s new Chief Information Officer (CIO). Wellman will be primarily responsible for overseeing the strategy and development of the information technology department and will join the other members of the BVHS Executive Steering Council.

Chief Information Officer James Wellman

 

Wellman began his education at the University of Louisville (Louisville, KY) where he completed his bachelor’s degree in workforce leadership. He went on to achieve his master’s degree in healthcare administration at Oklahoma State University (Stillwater, OK) and eventually became a certified healthcare chief information officer (CHICIO) from the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives.

For the past nine years, Wellman has been the chief information and compliance officer for a county hospital in Oklahoma. He has 30 years of experience working in health care information technology (IT), beginning his career at the University of Kentucky HealthCare and dedicating 21 years to the organization’s IT department.

Wellman has a passion for working in the community hospital environment and understands the great responsibility health care IT has on an organization and community. “I truly enjoy working with a team to help them grow professionally and personally,” he said. “I maintain an open-door policy and believe that all those who work in health care IT must understand and embrace the health care mission.”

“We are pleased to welcome James and his wife, Amy, to the BVHS family,” said Scott Malaney, CEO and president of BVHS. “James brings a unique skillset geared toward advancing IT departments in the health care setting. We are excited to see the positive impact he will have on our organization.”

For more information about BVHS, visit bvhealthsystem.org.

Ninth Annual ROAD SAFETY EDUCATION DAY Planned

Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., AARP and the City of Bowling Green present Road Safety Education: To Keep You Safe

The WCCOA is offering a Road Safety Education Day. Here are the details:

Bowling Green, OH (August 9, 2019) – Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA), AARP and the City of Bowling Green will present the ninth annual Road Safety Education: To Keep You Safe from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Friday, August 9 at the City of Bowling Green Facilities Building (located at
815 E. Poe Rd. in Bowling Green).

Participants are invited to drive in their personal vehicles to experience the following:
* Educational Seminars: Exploring Technology in Todays Vehicles, presented by Mike Brown, “New Laws, Road Rules, Traffic Safety and Crash Prevention…” The new drivers license requirements and when is it time to hit the brakes when driving? Brad Biller Retired BG Police Officer & Safe Communities of Wood County, Sandy Wiechman.

* CarFit: an educational program sponsored by AAA, AARP and AOTA that offers older adults the opportunity to check how well their personal vehicles fit them. AAA will be topping off fluid levels in your vehicle and will conduct an internal audit of your vehicle.
* Booths: Valvoline, AARP, Kingston of Perrysburg, AAA, Mobility Works, WSOS Transportation Coordination, State Farm Insurance & more will have booths providing information and services to guests. Adaptive vehicle equipment, local resources, transportation, refreshments, raffle prizes and much more!

Lunch will be provided and is sponsored by the Wood County Beef Producers.

According to the Insurance Information Institute, not only are Americans over the age of 65 a higher percentage of drivers on the road than ever before, they also suffer one of the highest rates of fatalities – second only to that of young adults. In 2015, older adults accounted for 14.9% of all traffic fatalities.

As Wood County adults age and changes occur in their vision and other capabilities, opportunities such as this one will help to keep those senses sharp and everyone safe.

Reservations are required by contacting WCCOA
at (419) 353-5661,
(800) 367-4935 or by emailing : programs@wccoa.net.

For more information from the Insurance Information Institute, please visit
http://www.iii.org/issue-update/older-drivers.

Safe Communities highlights National Theft Prevention Month

Ohio currently ranks seven out of ten in the most stolen vehicles.

 
Wood County Safe Communities announced earlier this week that there have been 8 fatal crashes in Wood County for the calendar year of 2019, compared to the 7 for the same period in 2018.
 
This month Safe Communities highlights National Theft Prevention Month. Motor vehicles are the essential method of transportation for the vast majority of us, and frequently, a crucial piece of our lives. Imagine what may occur if one day your vehicle vanished.  Vehicle burglary is an extravagant wrongdoing, with the expense of stolen vehicles pegged at more than $5.9 billion – that is billion with a “B”.
 
Summers prove to be the worst season for vehicle theft. Nearly three quarters of a million vehicles were stolen in the United States this past year. In fact, according to the NICB, an average of 209 vehicles are stolen in the U.S every single day, simply because the keys or key-less entry key fob was left in the vehicle, while parked in the owner’s driveway or at the convenience store. Some vehicles are even left unlocked, running and unattended.
 
Ohio currently ranks seven out of ten in the most stolen vehicles. Let’s take action! Here are some ways you can help prevent motor vehicle theft.
 
  • Close and lock all windows and doors when you park
  • Park in well-lit areas.
  • Do not leave the area while your vehicle is running.
  • Do not leave your keys in your vehicle
  • Always stow away your valuables

BVHS Weekend Column: Health Care and Human Trafficking

Identifying and assisting trafficked victims can be difficult because both victims and traffickers can be from any demographic…..

Health Care and Human Trafficking , by Mindy Lause, RN, Blanchard Valley Hospital Emergency Department

                     

Human trafficking is also known as modern day slavery. It often manifests as prostitution or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labor, servitude and the removal of organs. Since medical care becomes necessary for trafficked victims due to poor living conditions, abuse and inadequate nutrition, health care professionals are in a unique position to identify this vulnerable patient population.

The Annals of Health Law reported that 87.8 percent of trafficking victims experienced contact with someone in the public health system. Victims of child abuse or neglect, people with disabilities, LGBTQ community members, runaways, foreign nationals, and people with substance abuse issues have been named as vulnerable populations throughout the literature, presenting with a wide-range of health issues such as burns, fractures, sexually transmitted infections, pelvic inflammatory disease, untreated chronic conditions, dental abscesses, repeated exposure to harmful chemicals and/or malnourishment. Given the crisis endured, the victim may also present with psychological distress.

Clinicians are not the only ones in the position to identify a victim. Recent research indicates victims tend to confide in support staff of emergency departments or urgent care centers because they seem “less intimidating.”

When victims present, usually it is with another person who may be or claim to be his or her boyfriend/girlfriend, uncle/aunt, husband/wife, sibling, or parent. Reluctant to leave, the person will often control the conversation by correcting the patient and answering in response to questions asked by the medical provider. The victim may exhibit fear, anger and/or anxiety, or be completely submissive.

Suspicious red flags include absence of official documents or identification, being a poor historian, having late presentation of disease/symptoms, being unable to give an address, and/or appearing to lie about their age. Minors may also be living with people other than their parents or failing to attend school.

Identifying and assisting trafficked victims can be difficult because both victims and traffickers can be from any demographic. Medical providers also risk endangering the victim if the trafficker believes they are under suspicion. This can lead health care providers to feel powerless; however, documenting the victim’s injuries and treatment in the medical record can help build a case against the trafficker.

If your suspicion is aroused, use plain language and active listening, and be sure you are asking sensitive questions away from the potential trafficker (one-on-one, in a private area). You can also reach out to trauma-informed medical professionals such as a forensic nurse or sexual assault nurse examiner (SANE).

Perhaps surprisingly, the goal in any suspected case is not for disclosure but to treat the victim’s medical condition, educate the victim of options, and empower the victim with choice. This is done while also keeping in mind that individuals rarely identify themselves as victims of human trafficking, and, due to the psychological dynamics at play, may even defend their traffickers.

If a victim has disclosed he or she has been trafficked, follow the protocol within your institution. In situations of immediate, life-threatening danger, report to law enforcement.

Chowline: Barbecue safely this Fourth of July weekend

Take note of how old your grill brush is and what condition it’s in…..

I’m ready to use my grill for the first time this summer for a July Fourth  Weekend cookout. Is it OK to use a steel wire grill brush to clean the grease and grime that’s built up since the last time I used it?  

Your question is similar to another that was asked in a “Chow Line” column from July 2018, so it’s best answered by reissuing that column here.

When using a wire grill brush, it’s important to take note of how old your grill brush is and what condition it’s in. If your grill brush is worn down, warped, or has some missing bristles, you might want to consider throwing it out.

This is because you’ll want to be careful that you don’t inadvertently leave behind any wire bristles from the grill-cleaning brush that could end up in the meat or vegetables that you are grilling.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there have been several reported cases of internal injuries following unintentional ingestions of wire grill-cleaning brush bristles by both children and adults. The severities of the injuries have ranged from puncture of the soft tissues of the neck, causing severe pain upon swallowing, to perforation of the gastrointestinal tract, requiring emergency surgery, the CDC said.

In fact, an estimated 1,698 consumers visited emergency rooms between 2002 and 2014 after having ingested wire bristles in grilled foods, according to a 2016 study in the journal Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery.

The study authors said that while wire-bristle grill brush injuries aren’t common, they do tend to increase during the grilling season, which makes sense, of course. The months with the highest number of reported injuries are June, July, and August, they said.

More detailed information on wire grill brush injuries can be found at saferproducts.gov, which allows consumers to list information on what their injuries were and how they occurred. 

Consumer Reports offered these tips to help consumers avoid accidental ingestion of wire bristles when barbecuing:

  • Use a moist cloth or paper towel to clean the grill surface before cooking.
  • If you use a wire-bristle brush, thoroughly inspect the grill’s surface before cooking for the presence of bristles that might have dislodged from the grill brush and could embed in cooked food.
  • Depending on the type of grill you have, you might be able to clean it using a pumice stone or a coil-shaped, bristle-free bush.
  • You might try using crumpled-up aluminum foil to brush loose food particles off a warm, but not hot, grill rack or grate.

Another important grilling safety tip to remember is to always use a food thermometer to ensure that your meat is cooked to the correct internal temperature to destroy any harmful bacteria such as E. coli or salmonella that might be present, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

For meats such as steak and pork, that temperature is 145 degrees Fahrenheit. For ground meats—including beef, pork, veal, and lamb—the correct temperature is 160 degrees, the USDA says. And poultry such as chicken and turkey should be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and its outreach and research arms, OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@osu.edu.

NB Garden Club GOST Flower Show Entry Info

NB Garden Club Annual Flower Show for GOST

THE NORTH BALTIMORE GARDEN CLUB IS SPONSORING A FLOWER SHOW SATURDAY, JULY 27, 12PM-5PM AT THE NORTH BALTIMORE PUBLIC LIBRARY WOLFE COMMUNITY ROOM.

ENTRIES MAY BE DROPPED OFF:

  • FRIDAY, JULY 26, 5 PM-7 PM
  • SATURDAY, JULY 27, 9 AM-10 AM – Judging is closed and will be from 10 AM-Noon.
  • All items need to be picked up between 5p-6p Saturday, July 27, unless arrangements are made at time of drop off

FOR PRINTED RULES AND A LIST OF CATEGORIES, PLEASE GO TO DAWN’S FLOWER SHOP, MILLER INSURANCE, OR THE NORTH BALTIMORE PUBLIC LIBRARY.  THE FLOWER SHOW IS PART OF THE GOOD OLD SUMMERTIME CELEBRATION THAT SAME DAY!

NEW THIS YEAR – we will have a “fun” category to display any extra entries, or things maybe not ready to be judged.

All gardeners welcome!

SHOW CATEGORIES

ALL FLOWER SPECIMENS NEED TO BE IN CLEAR VASES OR JARS. THE GARDEN CLUB HAS VASES AVAILABLE FOR USE IN THE SHOW. PLEASE REMOVE ALL SPENT FLOWERS PRIOR TO JUDGING, AND PLEASE HAVE THE REQUIRED NUMBER OF BLOOMS IN CATEGORIES THAT ARE SPECIFIC. PLEASE BE ABLE TO TELL US WHAT SUB CATEGORY YOUR ROSE SPECIMEN WILL BE ENTERED IN AT TIME OF DROP OFF. WE HAVE ENTRY BLANKS AVAILABLE AT THE NORTH BALTIMORE PUBLIC LIBRARY IF YOU WISH TO FILL OUT AHEAD OF TIME. THE NORTH BALTIMORE GARDEN CLUB AND THE JUDGE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO ADD OR SUBTRACT CATEGORIES BASED ON ITEMS BROUGHT IN.

PLANT CATEGORIES:

ANNUAL HANGING BASKET INDOOR PLANT HANGING BASKET

HOUSE PLANTS FAIRY GARDEN

ORCHIDS AND BONSAI LARGE FLOOR PLANTS

AFRICAN VIOLETS/FLOWERING HOUSE PLANTS

BEGONIA GERANIUM

ANNUALS CATEGORIES: CLEAR VASE ONLY, WE CAN PROVIDE

MARIGOLDS, LARGE, ONE BLOOM MARIGOLDS, DWARF, 2 BLOOMS

PETUNIAS, SINGLE, 2 FLOWERS ONE COLOR

PETUNIAS, DOUBLE, 2 FLOWERS ONE COLOR

ZINNIAS, DWARF, 2 BLOOMS ONE COLOR ZINNIAS, LARGE, 1 BLOOM

SNAPDRAGON, ONE STEM SALVIA, 1 STEM

SUNFLOWER, SMALL, 2 BLOOMS SUNFLOWER, LARGE, 1 BLOOM

GLADIOLUS, ANY VARIETY NOT TO EXCEED 20 INCHES

ALL OTHER ANNUALS NOT LISTED…TWO BLOOMS SMALL, ONE BLOOM LARGE

ROSES:

HYBRID TEA ROSE, ONE BLOOM GRANDIFLORA, 1 SPRAY

FLORIBUNDA, ONE SPRAY MINIATURE, 1 SPRAY

SHRUB OR KNOCK OUT, ONE SPRAY OTHER ROSE (NOT LISTED)

PERENNIALS:

CLEMATIS, ANY VARIETY, ONE BLOOM COREOPSIS, ANY VARIETY, THREE BLOOMS

DAISY, ANY VARIETY, 2 BLOOMS DELPHINIUM, ONE STOCK

GLOBE THISTLE, ONE STEM DAY LILY, ONE SCAPE*

PHLOX, ONE STEM YARROW, ONE STEM 

RUDBECKIA, ANY COLOR, 2 BLOOMS

ECHINACEA (CONEFLOWER) ANY COLOR, ONE STOCK

HOSTA, ANY VARIETY, ONE LEAF

ORIENTAL OR ASIATIC LILY ONE STEM

ANY OTHER PERENNIALS NOT LISTED, SMALL=2 BLOOMS, LARGE= 1 BLOOM

BUTTERFLY BUSH ONE STEM

*SCAPE: STEM WITH FLOWERS AND BUDS, LENGTH NOT TO EXCEED 24 INCHES.

ARRANGEMENTS: 

PATRIOTIC THEME ANY SIZE

MINIATURE ARRANGEMENT, LESS THAN SIX INCHES

LARGE ARRANGEMENT, ANYTHING OVER SIX INCHES

ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE IN ANY TYPE OF CONTAINER WHICH HOLDS WATER. ARRANGEMENTS MUST CONTAIN AT LEAST 50% LIVING ITEMS

PICK UP OF ITEMS WILL BE FROM 5PM-6PM SATURDAY NIGHT. PLEASE MAKE ARRANGE FOR SOMEONE TO PICK UP BY 6PM

THANKS FOR PARTICIPATING IN THE 2019 FLOWER SHOW

Drive safely on 4th of July

Under no circumstance is it ever acceptable to get behind the wheel of a vehicle after you’ve been drinking…..

Each year, Independence Day explodes with festive fireworks, tasty backyard barbecues, and American pride. Unfortunately, the merrymaking can create dangerous road conditions, as some drivers hit the streets after drinking alcoholic beverages. This Independence Day, Safe Communities wants to remind driver the Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving. 
 
It’s essential that our community members understand the safety and financial risks they take when they drink and drive. In fact, according to NHTSA, 37,361 people were killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2017, and 28% (10,497) of those fatalities occurred in a crash during which the drive had a BAC over the legal limit of .08. Night time is especially dangerous; the rate of alcohol impairment among driver involved in fatal crashes during the holiday period was more than three times higher at night than it was during the day.
 
Under no circumstance is it ever acceptable to get behind the wheel of a vehicle after you’ve been drinking. Doing so endangers you and everyone on the road with you. Before you head out for your celebrations, make sure you plan a sober way home.
 
Law enforcement in Wood County is taking part in the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign during the Fourth of July holiday weekend to put an end to drunk driving. Due to law enforcement’s dedication to protecting the lives of resident in their communities, you’ll see increased enforcement on the roads zero tolerance for those who drive impaired

Toasting the New WaterShed in BG

Cost is 25 cents per gallon or a dollar for five gallons.

H20 Toasting to the New WaterShed in Bowling Green

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio, – The Northwestern Water and Sewer District (The District) is proud to announce the opening of its eleventh WaterShed location in Northwest Ohio.   The District, the Wood County Commissioners, and clean-water partners Industrial Fluid Management celebrated the opening of the second Bowling Green WaterShed with a “toast” to clean water.

The new WaterShed is located at 989 South Main Street in Bowling Green, between the Pagliai’s Pizza and the Work Leads to Independence buildings.  

To mark the occasion, The District is declaring today “WaterShed Wednesday” at the new South Main Street location.  Please bring your own bottles and containers to fill up for free! 

A WaterShed is a stand-alone building owned by The District that houses a reverse-osmosis, 9-step water treatment system and provides perfect tasting purified drinking water at a low price.  Cost is 25 cents per gallon or a dollar for five gallons.

A decade ago, The District began building WaterSheds as an alternative source of drinking water for residents in rural Wood County on private well systems with poor water quality. 

According to District President Jerry Greiner, “We’ve discovered that even though there are high-quality public water systems, there is a demand for water with additional filtration at a low cost, especially for those who drink well water.  We chose this location based upon the success of most our popular WaterShed location on Poe Road.”  

This year, total WaterShed sales reached the $1.4 million mark.  The income is used to maintain the properties and then invested back into The District’s operational budget.  

CLICK HERE for WaterShed locations!

Custom Cuts Open July 4th!

Open until 1:00 for YOUR GRILLING PROTEIN!!!

North Baltimore Custom Cuts will be OPEN Thursday, July 4th from 8 am – 1 pm
– FRESH for YOUR GRILL!

Senior Citizens Tuesdays
10% OFF ANY Purchase

 

From the farms to the freezers – We’ll cut whatever you want FRESH!!!

85% LEAN Ground Beef Patties
3 – 1 // 4 – 1 //  6 – 1
$5.35#

 

Beef Short Ribs – $7.49#
Beef Brisket – $4.09#

 

ALL STEAKS CUT TO ORDER!!

NY Strip – $8.79#        Top Sirloin – $6.59#        Ribeyes – $12.99#        T-Bone – $10.99#

Pork Spare Ribs – $2.99#
Western Style Ribs  – $3.39#
Pork Steak – $2.79#
Bone-In Pork Chops – $2.89#

 

Boneless Chicken Breasts – $2.89#
Chicken Leg Quarters 99¢

Amish Natural Casing Hot Dog – $5.99#

Hickory Smoked Bacon (OUR OWN) – $5.99#


1 # packs of Whole Hog Sausage
Plain – Mild – Southern – Salt & Pepper
$3.29#

Our Bun Length Brats
$1.50 each
Regular – Cheddar – Pepper Jack – Bahama Mama


Deli Cheeses
Colby – Swiss – Pepper Jack – CoJack
$5.49#


We accept Credit – Debit – EBT