Family Fundamentals: No parent is perfect, but guidelines can help

” An active, attentive parent who is consistent in words and actions can be much more effective. “

Now that our daughter is almost 4, she often doesn’t pay attention no matter what my wife and I say. We can’t tell if this is just a phase or if she will soon get completely out of control. What’s the best way to handle things?

As you know, parenting isn’t easy. But there are guidelines you can use — guidelines that more than 30 years of research says can help.

The research, from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, resulted in a set of recommendations called “RPM3.” More of a mindset than a how-to, they can take some time to put into practice. And that’s OK, because parenting itself takes practice.

RPM3 stands for Responding, Preventing, Monitoring, Mentoring and Modeling. It focuses on principles you can apply in different situations:

  • Responding to your child in an appropriate manner. Many parents quickly react to their child instead of thinking things through. The goal is to make sure your response is neither overblown nor too casual, and that you explain the reasoning for your response to your child. If your daughter is acting out at the playground, for example, don’t threaten to never take her there again if she doesn’t behave. Rather, calmly call her name, ask her to look at you so you know you have her attention. Remind her of the rules and give her an option of calming down or going home to rest — a natural consequence of her behavior. Being consistent in your expectations and your follow-through, while at the same time being flexible depending on the situation, are key elements to keep in mind.
  • Preventing risky behavior or problems before they arise. To spot potential problems, you need to be actively involved in your child’s life. Knowing how your daughter usually thinks, feels and acts will help you notice when her behavior changes. Often, just spending enough one-on-one time with your daughter can prevent unwanted behavior.
  • Monitoring, Mentoring and Modeling are the other key elements of the RPM3 guidelines. Monitoring means you are aware of your child’s whereabouts and who she is with. Talk with her, even at a young age, about the things you do when you’re apart. Ask her about what she does when you’re apart, as well. Acting as a mentor for your daughter means you support and encourage her in behaviors that you want to see her develop, much like a coach does to develop a player’s strengths. Modeling means you make sure your own behavior provides a consistent, positive example for your daughter.

To learn more about these guidelines, read Adventures in Parenting, available free on the institute’s website at nichd.nih.gov (search for “RPM3”). You can also gain insights about families from Ohio State University Extension’s Live Smart Ohio blog at livesmartohio.osu.edu.

FamilyFundamental child

Remember, no parent is perfect, and no child will respond flawlessly to any parenting style. But an active, attentive parent who is consistent in words and actions can be much more effective.

Dear Subscriber: This column was reviewed by James Bates, assistant professor and field specialist of family wellness for Ohio State University Extension.

Family Fundamentals is a monthly column on family issues. It is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Family Fundamentals, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1044, or filipic.3@osu.edu

 

http://cfaes.osu.edu/sites/cfaes_main/files/site-library/site-documents/News/FF_famiily.pdf

Multiple Agencies Celebrate Earth month

April is Earth Month and Wood County and Bowling Green agencies are collaborating to provide multiple events geared toward conservation, education and family fun.

Multiple Agencies Celebrate Earth month

April is Earth Month and Wood County and Bowling Green agencies are collaborating to provide multiple events geared toward conservation, education and family fun.

The Seventh Annual Community Earth Day Celebration will be the culminating event held on Sunday, April 24th, 2016 from 2-4 pm at the Montessori School of BG, 515 Sand Ridge Road. This free family event has nature science education stations including: a giant Earth Ball, archery, a power-generating bicycle, bookmobile, art projects and crafts, nature walks, various giveaways including live saplings and much more.

There is a Passport for the Community Earth Day Celebration that can be picked up at the welcome table on the day of the event. Have the passport stamped at each booth and once complete, turn in the passport to be registered for great giveaways.

For a list of the activities during April, please visit www.communityearthday.com.

Community Earth Day Celebration booths include the following participants and family-friendly interactive activities:

The City of Bowling Green Utilities Division will be providing attendees with the opportunity to generate electricity using the Energy Bike. This stationary bicycle is connected to an electric motor that produces energy to power light bulbs, a radio, a fan and a heater. Through the resistance created by the motor, riders get direct feedback on the energy required to operate each appliance.

BG Parks and Recreation will have both an interactive booth and naturalist-led nature walks that are fun for the whole family. Nature walk times are 2:30 and 3:30 pm.

Ohio Department of Natural Resources activity:

The Maumee State Scenic and Recreational River is an important resource for aquatic organisms and people.  At the ODNR, Scenic Rivers table, families will have an opportunity to see the types of critters that live in the river and how they function as water quality indicators.

The Wood County Park District will have multiple activities including: an archery range, pet rock making, a water filtration activity, free program guides and a hands-on craft giveaway.

The Wood County District Public Library will have stories, a craft and the earth-friendly bookmobile that runs on compressed natural gas. On the bookmobile, books and media can be checked out using a WCDPL library card. There will also be a special storybook walk of The Earth Book by Todd Parr.

The Wood Soil & Water Conservation District will have a fun ring toss games and prizes.

More April Community Earth month events:

April 2nd Greenhouse Kids; 10:00- 11:15 am at Reuthinger Preserve. Kids learn about gardening fun and plant a seed in a recycled pot to take home. Register at www.wcparks.org.

April 9th Recycle your old electronics for FREE!; 10:00 am – 1:00 pm at BGSU Ice Arena. Recycle old electronics (no TVs, CRT monitors, or large appliances are accepted). Contact greenbg@bgsu.edu with questions. www.bgsu.edu

April 12th, 16th, 19th and 26th Garlic Mustard Removal; various times and parks. Learn about invasive plant species while you help pull and dispose of this invasive plant before it goes to seed. No experience is needed and we need all hands on deck. Register atwww.wcparks.org.

April 14th “Trashed” Documentary Screening; 7:00 – 9:00 pm at BGSU Psychology Building room 108. Watch this free screening of a powerful documentary that sheds light on our consumption of resources. http://www.bgsu.edu/campus-sustainability/earth-month.html#sthash.RXfhXeb2.dpuf

April 15th Woodcock Watch; 8:15 – 9:00 pm at Baldwin Woods Preserve. Hike with a naturalist to discover this little shorebird and their amazing flying maneuvers. Register at www.wcparks.org.

April 16th Earth Day Family Seed Planting; 9:00 am at Wintergarden Nature Preserve. Families will distribute seeds in the Bordner Meadow. The program is free to the first 8 families. Register at www.bgohio.org.

April 18th “Good COP, Bad COP: The Paris Climate Accord” Guest Lecture; 7:00 – 8:00 pm at BGSU Bowen-Thompson Student Union Theater room 206. Dr. Henry Pollack, a professor emeritus of Geophysics at the University of Michigan, will be presenting a blend of climate science and policy in a lecture sharing his research on how to move forward with public policy even though there is scientific uncertainty. – See more at: http://www.bgsu.edu/campus-sustainability/earth-month.html

April 20th BGSU Eco Fair; 11:00 am – 2:00 pm outside of the Bowen-Thompson Student Union.  Head outside & celebrate the Earth at BGSU’s annual Eco-Fair! Environmental organizations, groups, and initiatives from all across the region will be in the Union Oval from 11am -2pm. Come find out about all sorts of ways to get involved while meeting other individuals who have a passion for change-making! http://www.bgsu.edu/campus-sustainability/earth-month.html

April 20th Wildflower Wednesday; 6:30 – 7:30 pm at Cedar Creek Preserve. Journey on a naturalist-led walk looking for trout lily, trillium and more. Register at www.wcparks.org.

April 21st Bike for a Better BG; 5:15 pm at the BGSU Bowen Thompson Student Union (outside). In a collaborative effort between BGSU students & community members, this critical mass bike ride will encourage people to ride their bikes, raise awareness for the need of bike lanes in the city, and to have fun riding our bikes with our neighbors! More information here: http://www.bgsu.edu/campus-sustainability/earth-month.html

April 21st Living Green: Your Dream Home; 6:30 – 8:00 pm at W.W. Knight Nature Preserve. Save money and energy by learning about the Dream Green Home. Register at www.wcparks.org.

April 22nd Cache-In-Trash-Out (CITO) International Weekend Cleanup; 1:00 – 3:00 pm at William Henry Harrison Park. Help clean up the park while embarking on a modern day treasure hunt – Geocaching. All volunteers are welcome, limited GPS devices for program-specific caches. Dress to get dirty and be prepared for brief self-guided trail exploration. Bring drinking water. A change of clothes and shoes are recommended. Register at www.wcparks.org.

April 22nd After-School Vermicomposting; 3:30 – 4:30 pm at Way Public Library. Composting is cool!

April 22nd BG Earth Fest Concert 2016; 8:00 – 11:59 pm at Grounds for Thought. Join BGSU students & members of the community at Grounds for Thought Coffee Shop for musical performances by multiple artists. This collaborative concert will focus on raising awareness for environmental issues, promoting sustainability, and encouraging students to get involved. http://www.bgsu.edu/campus-sustainability/earth-month.html

April 23rd Preschool Story Time; 10:00 – 10:45 am at Way Public Library, 101 E Indiana Ave, Perrysburg, OH 43551.

April 24th Community Earth Day Celebration 2:00 – 4:00 pm at Montessori BG, 515 Sand Ridge Road. FREE community event with interactive educational stations and so much more! No registration needed; all are welcome.

April 27th Nature Tech: iNaturalist 7:00 – 8:30 pm at W.W. Knight Nature Preserve, 29530 White Road, Perrysburg. Help the Park District photograph and identify the plants and animals of Wood County. The list of species is approaching 200! Join the search for new creatures to add to the list. Register at www.wcparks.org.

April 29th Arbor Day Celebration 2:00 – 3:00 pm at Bicentennial Park, 200 Mark Lane Perrysburg, OH. Families welcome to participate in the annual event of planting an Arbor Day tree and learning about the past history of trees in our area. No registration needed; all are welcome.

April 30th Wood County Master Gradener Plant Exchange 9:00 – 11:00 am at Wood County Fairgrounds, Home and Garden Building 13800 W Poe Rd, Bowling Green, OH 43402. Sponsored by: Master Gardener Volunteers and the Ohio State University Extension Office. Schedule of Events: 9 – 10 am – Plant Drop Off, 9 – 10 am – Get your gardening questions answered, 10 – 11 am – Plant Exchange area opens with Information booths, demonstrations, and much more. Two free plants (subject to availability) to everyone who attends. Receive one additional plant for each plant you bring to exchange. We are now using numbered wristbands. No long lines! For more information, contact OSU Extension Office (419) 354-9050

May 1st Northwestern Water and Sewer District Open House 1:00 – 4:00 pm at 12560 Middleton Pike (St. Rt. 582) Bowling Green, OH 43402. Join in the free family fun with: free grilled lunch & drinks, free slushes from Mr. Melon, free giveaways & door prizes, inflatables, kids pedal tractor pull, fishing derby with prizes, building tours, employee operations challenge, interactive booths, free water shed water dispensing, meet the board & employees who serve you and a short program at 2:00 pm. Register by calling (419) 354-9090 x196, or emailing district@nwwsd.org.

May 7th Recycle Roundup 9:00 am – 12:00 pm at Perrysburg Township Office Complex 26609 Lime City Rd., Perrysburg, OH 43551. This service opportunity is open to residents of: City of Perrysburg, Perrysburg Township, Middleton Township and the City of Rossford. HHW collection, document destruction and small electronics recycling Check www.ci.perrysubrg.oh.us for detailed information.

May 9th Pollinators Workshop 7:00 – 8:00 pm at Way Public Library, 101 E Indiana Ave, Perrysburg, OH 43551. Lecture on the role of bees and other pollinators and how to plant for pollinators. Adult program, no registration required.

Give Blood April 15th

Give Blood April 15th – – – Powell Elementary along with Friends of the North Baltimore Public Library will be hosting a blood drive in the Powell gymnasium

Give Blood April 15th
Powell Elementary along with Friends of the North Baltimore Public Library will be hosting a blood drive in the Powell gymnasium April 15th from 4-9 pm.
When you arrive to give your donation, your name will be enterred into a drawing for a chance to win some locally donated gifts.
Come and join us to help save llives!
You can preregister by calling 1-800-733-2767 or go to redcrossblood.org

Live Rett Free 2016 – 5K Run, 1 Mile Fun Run & 1 Mile Walk or Stroll

A run and walk to benefit the International Rett Syndrome Foundation is scheduled for May 3 at Riverside Park.

Rett syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. The run/walk will support research and funding to find a cure.

A run and walk to benefit the International Rett Syndrome Foundation is scheduled for May 3 at Riverside Park.

Rett syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. The run/walk will support research and funding to find a cure.

What is Rett syndrome?

Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmenal disorder that affects girls almost exclusively. It is characterized by normal early growth and development followed by a slowing of development, loss of purposeful use of the hands, distinctive hand movements, slowed brain and head growth, problems with walking, seizures, and intellectual disability.

The disorder was identified by Dr. Andreas Rett, an Austrian physician who first described it in a journal article in 1966. It was not until after a second article about the disorder, published in 1983 by Swedish researcher Dr. Bengt Hagberg, that the disorder was generally recognized.

Live Rett Free 2016

5K Run, 1 Mile Fun Run & 1 Mile Walk or Stroll

To Benefit Rettsyndrome.org

Sunday May 1, 2016

Riverside Park – Riverside Pavilion

231 McManness Avenue – Findlay, OH

For more information, please email Live Rett Free. You may also call Amanda at (419) 306-4234 or Karen at (419) 957-3875.

Download the Offline Registration Form to register, sponsor or make a donation by check.

Online registration/donation—RETT Walk – Run Online – Website

Schedule of events:

5K Run 
1:00pm – 1:45pmPacket pick up
2:00pmRace begins
  
1 Mile Fun Run/Walk 
1:00pm – 2:00pmPacket pick up
2:45pmFun Run/Walk begins

*Pre-register by April 15th to receive a free Race/Event T-shirt. Shirts will be available for $10 on race day while supplies last.

*Awards will be presented to the top individuals in each age group, as well as the overall male and female runners.

Guest Columnist: Dr. Missy, Feelings Helper–Cyberbullying

The most important safety tool is parent involvement. Talk to your kids consistently about Internet safety and cyberbullying. Talk. Talk. Talk. Listen. Listen. Listen…….

Cyberbullying

What is Cyberbullying?

 

It is intentional, hostile, and malicious words with the intent to humiliate and do harm. It is pictures, or videos that occur in cyberspace without consent. “Cyberbullying occurs when an individual uses the Internet or another form of technology to harm other people, in a deliberate, repeated, and hostile manner,” according to www.endcyberbullying.org.

 

With mounting technologies of the Internet, cell phones, Instant Messaging, emails, chat rooms, blogging, and websites, the issue of cyberbullying is ever-increasing.

 

Is Cyberbullying the same as Bullying?

 

Cyberbullying happens online by the vehicle of technology while bullying occurs face-to-face. Online the bully’s identity can be hidden with an unlimited audience of individuals and groups of people.

 

Where are the Parents?

 

Should parents be criminally liable for kids’ cyberbullying? Mark O’Mara, legal analyst at www.cnn.com asks this question.

 

“Parental liability laws hold parents accountable, and financially liable, for the behavior of their children when it is deemed that the parents were negligent in their obligation to provide proper parental care and supervision,” according to www.cyberbullying.us. Does this law need to apply for cyberbullying? Do parents need to be held accountable for what their children do on social media sites?

 

What can Parents Do?

 

The most important safety tool is parent involvement. Talk to your kids consistently about Internet safety and cyberbullying. Talk. Talk. Talk. Listen. Listen. Listen.

 

Stopbullying.gov lists tips to help parents protect kids:

Establish specific rules for cell phones and computers and provide clear consequences.

Consistently monitor social media sites, text messages, and emails.

Install monitoring software on your kids’ computers and electronic devices.

Block the cyberbully on social media and eliminate her/his e-mail address.

Keep all evidence of cyberbullying, including text messages and harassing e-mails.

Report cyberbullying with threatening messages to police and school.

Parents can report to the social media sites as threatening bully messages violate company policies.

 

Other suggestions for safety:

Know our child’s passwords and screen names.

“Friend” your child on Facebook, Myspace, Twitter, and install filters on your child’s computer.

Consider a cell phone without a camera option for your adolescent.

Take away cell phones and computers (or computer cords) at night to eliminate nighttime cyberbullying.

Set time limits on cell phone usage. Do not allow cell phones at the dinner table, at family gatherings, or during family activities.

Unplug your kids from technology: computer, tablet, iPod, video games, cell phone, and visit nature, play board games, or just talk.

 

Do you know about Instagram, Tumblr, Snap Chat, and Yik Yak? Keep up on the current social media sites. Ask questions.

 

Parents need to find a balance between protecting their kids and policing their kids in regard to social media and technology. Adolescence is a developmental stage where teens are learning to make decisions and solve problems.

 

Resources on Cyberbullying

End to Cyber Bullying (ETCB) is a non-profit organization intended to end cyberbullying. Visit www.endcyberbullying.org.

 

OnGuardOnline.gov is the federal government’s website (partnered with the Stop Think Connect campaign, Department of Homeland Security, and the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education) to help kids and parents to be safe, secure and responsible online.

 

You can find free cyberbullying banners for kid’s web page, email, or social networking site at the National Crime Prevention Council website at www.ncpc.org.

 

CharacterPlus launched a student-led campaign to stop cyberbullying called ‘Character Goes Viral: Students Stop Cyberbullying.’ The campaign started at the CharacterPlus Student Summit when 80 students from regional high schools met to collaborate on how to stop cyberbullying.

 

If cyberbullying means you, or someone you know, feels suicidal, please call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) in the U.S.

 

Dr. Missy, Ph.D., is a feelings helper, child therapist, play therapist, and child trauma therapist. She provides therapeutic services at Affirmations, Columbus, Ohio.

 

 

 

Take the “Good Neighbor Quiz”

The Village of North Baltimore, led by Mayor Janet Goldner and Village Administrator Allyson Murray, wish to lead the charge to preserve and protect the character of our neighborhoods, “we just all need to do our part”.

The Village of North Baltimore, led by Mayor Janet Goldner and Village Administrator Allyson Murray, wish to lead the charge to preserve and protect the character of our neighborhoods, “we just all need to do our part”.

Take the Good Neighbor Quiz to find out if your home is safe and well maintained (and “legal”).

Answer True or False.

  • There is no litter or trash around my home, including in my yard, near the curb or alley.
  • I mow my lawn regularly (and maintain the property along the street and alley).
  • My neighbors can safely walk on my sidewalk because there are no holes in the concrete and the bushes are trimmed.
  • I store my trash in a secure area until trash collection day.
  • I do not place trash bags on the curb before trash collection day.
  • I always put my trash container away at the end of trash collection day.
  • My car is parked in my driveway, garage, or on the street (no wheels are on the lawn or the boulevard)
  • The gutters and downspouts on my house are securely attached.
  • The shingles on my house and garage cover my entire roof.
  • I always repair any broken window as soon as I can.
  • The doors to my home are securely attached.
  • While it may not be perfect, the paint on my house looks pretty good.
  • An emergency squad can find my home to help me or my family because my address is clearly marked.

According to Village Administrator Murray, if you answered false to any of the above questions, you may have a potential code violation. Call the village office with any questions or concerns at 419-257-2394.

In addition, Mayor Goldner says that the flyer below will be coming out with the water bills this month.

NB Recycle Day 2016 flyer

The village HOPES to be adding to this list of recyclables, including tires and possibly household paint and other household hazardous wastes.

April is shaping up to be “Clean-up NB” month, beginning with Brush Pick Up the first two weeks of the month.

NB Local Schools are having activities around Earth Day (Friday April 22).

The village Arbor Day celebration will be on the 29th, along with the NB Recycles Day!

Many more details to follow!

NB Village Good Neighbor Quiz flyer

Teaching Kids to Do Chores

Tip–You can increase the chances of household chores being done well and promptly by teaching kids how to do the task adequately, establishing clear standards for the job, and using reward and reminder systems.

Tip–You can increase the chances of household chores being done well and promptly by teaching kids how to do the task adequately, establishing clear standards for the job, and using reward and reminder systems.

Tools–In her book, Pick Up Your Socks, parent educator Elizabeth Crary offers parents several tools for helping children learn the various components of household chores and for addressing poor or non-performance.

  • Teach the task. For most children, this means actually showing them each step of the task. For instance, telling a child, “Set the table” is vague. Showing her where you keep the plates, utensils, glasses, and napkins is necessary, along with being very specific about where each item is to go. You also need to make sure that all items are stored in an accessible place to your child.
  • Establish standards and a time frame for the job.A clear time frame would sound like, “Take the trash out before you watch any television” or “Set the table by 5:30 p.m.”

    The standard for the job needs to be something both the child is capable of and the parent can tolerate. You need to be specific. For example, “Clean your room” could mean: make your bed; hang up clean clothes; put dirty clothes in hamper; put away toys on shelves; throw away trash. For older children, make a chart for them to refer to. Note: Beware of re-doing a job after a child has done it poorly. It usually teaches the child it’s okay to be sloppy because someone will clean up after him.

  • Reminders and Rewards. Most people, adultsand children, need help and support when beginning a new habit or learning new skills. Reminders can be visual (a chart to be checked off every day), or verbal (a parent can give a reminder in the beginning). Put a deadline on how long you will remind the child, so that the responsibility for remembering does not become yours).

    Rewards can be anything a child wants: treats, trinkets, privileges, praise, time, or attention.

Many parents assume that when a child no longer needs help doing the task, she can do it alone and responsibly. Unfortunately, learning a new habit takes much longer than learning a new skill. Encourage the habit by rewarding the child when she remembers to do it alone.

You’ll find more practical tips you can use right now inPick Up Your Socks . . . and Other Skills Growing Children Need! by Elizabeth Crary.

Smile Programs! Mobile Dentists to NB

The mobile dentists are coming to North Baltimore Middle School/High School 04-04-2016 and Powell Elementary 04-12-2016.

Smile Programs! 
The mobile dentists are coming to North Baltimore Middle School/High School 04-04-2016 and Powell Elementary 04-12-2016.
Enrollment forms were sent home.  To take advantage of this convenient opportunity and have your child see the dentist at school, please fill out and sign the enrollment form and return it to the school with your child.
If you have not received a form, please contact the school.  Together, we can keep your children healthy, in school, and learning.
Any questions, please contact Tonya Emahiser at 419-257-2124- ext. 2504
The Smile Express makes regular visits to schools, rural community sites, hospitals and various other locations in the following 18 Northwest Ohio counties: Lucas, Wood, Williams, Fulton, Ottawa, Erie, Sandusky, Henry, Defiance, Paulding, Putnam, Hancock, Seneca, Huron, Wyandot, Hardin, Allen, and Van Wert.

Guest Columnist: Dr. Missy, Feelings Helper–Bullying in the classroom

Let’s review bullying. “Bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time,” according to www.stopbullying.gov.

Bullying in the classroom

How does bullying happen in a classroom with a teacher present?

MaryAnn Byrne, a certified Olweus Bullying Prevention consultant reports, “My experience as a trainer of trainers has shown me that the most common place for bullying to occur is in the classroom with the teacher present.” The cafeteria, Physical Education class, playground, and school bus are yet. Her information is from bullying surveys completed by students at schools. Visit www.bullyingeducation.org.

Let’s review bullying. “Bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time,” according to www.stopbullying.gov.

But, how does bullying happen with a teacher in the room? Kids tell me that bullies knock books and pencils off desks and pretend it was an accident. Or flip the back of heads when the teacher’s head is turned away. Or whisper derogatory names. Or silently mouth threatening words. Or laugh and roll eyes when a student is discussing a topic in class. Body language is a large chunk of how humans communicate without words. Students who bully will talk before the bell rings and after the bell rings as they walk out the door. Among the chattering students a teacher cannot hear the malicious side conversations.

Warning Signs of Bullying

Your student may be bullied if he or she:

Leaves school with torn, damaged or missing clothing, books or other belongings

Has unexplained cuts, bruises, and scratches

Have few, if any, friends with whom to spend time

Seems afraid to be in school, leave school, ride the school bus, or take part in organized activities with peers

Has lost interest in school work or suddenly begins to perform poorly

Appears sad, moody, teary or depressed

Complains frequently of headaches, stomach aches, or other physical ailments

Avoids the cafeteria and/or doesn’t eat

Source: Southern Poverty Law Center

Signs a Child is Bullying Others 

Kids may be bullying others if they:

Get into physical or verbal fights

Have friends who bully others

Are increasingly aggressive

Get sent to the principal’s office or to detention frequently

Have unexplained extra money or new belongings

Blame others for their problems

Don’t accept responsibility for their actions

Are competitive and worry about their reputation or popularity

Types of Bullying 

Three types of bullying are listed at www.stopbullying.gov.

Verbal bullying is saying or writing mean things and includes: teasing, name-calling, inappropriate sexual comments, taunting, threatening to cause harm.

Social bullying, sometimes referred to as relational bullying, involves hurting someone’s reputation or relationships and includes: leaving someone out on purpose, telling other children not to be friends with someone, spreading rumors about someone, embarrassing someone in public.

Physical bullying involves hurting a person’s body or possessions and includes: hitting, kicking, pinching, spitting, tripping, pushing, taking or breaking someone’s things, making mean or rude hand gestures.

What can Teachers Do?

Preventing Classroom Bullying: What Teachers Can Do is a booklet that provides guidelines to help school staff to understand and manage the problem of bullying in school settings. Visit www.jimwrightonline.com/pdfdocs/bully/bullyBooklet.pdf.

Teachers need to: (1) assess the extent of the bullying problem in classrooms, (2) ensure the class understands what bullying is and why it is wrong, (3) confront any student engaged in bullying in a firm but fair manner, and (4) provide appropriate and consistent consequences for bullying.

Schools can ask children to complete an anonymous questionnaire that asks if they are bullied, whether they have witnessed bullying, and where and when bullying took place.

Wright, a school psychologist encourages teachers to change classroom layouts or rearrange seating to eliminate ‘blind spots’ where bullies can victimize students outside of view. Circulate frequently throughout the classroom and monitor student conversations and behavior.

Visit www.naesp.org/bullying-prevention-resources, the National Association of Elementary School principals, for multiple articles about bullying in schools.

Dr. Missy, Ph.D., is a feelings helper, child therapist, play therapist, and child trauma therapist. She provides therapeutic services at Affirmations, Columbus, Ohio.

 

 

TODAY – Briar Hill Health Campus and St. Luke’s Blood Drive

St. Luke’s Lutheran Church and Briar Hill Health Campus will hold a BLOOD DRIVE at St. Luke’s in North Baltimore, Ohio. – – – Please CALL Sara to see if any times to donate are still available – 419-257-2421.

St. Luke’s Lutheran Church and Briar Hill Health Campus will hold a BLOOD DRIVE at St. Luke’s in North Baltimore, Ohio.

Please CALL Sara to see if any times to donate are still available – 419-257-2421.

North Baltimore, OH (March 25, 2016) – Briar Hill Health Campus, a provider of senior health and hospitality services, is sponsoring a Blood Drive alongside St. Luke’s Lutheran Church of North Baltimore. Community members are encouraged to make donations that will assist The American Red Cross in their efforts to save lives.

The Blood Drive will take place on Wednesday, April 6th from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at Fellowship Hall in St. Luke’s. According to the American Heart Association, every two seconds someone in the U.S. needs blood. More than 41,000 donations are needed each day, and a single donation can save up to three lives. Briar Hill encourages community members to donate to this worthy cause.

Briar Hill Health Campus takes prides in positively impacting North Baltimore and its surrounding communities through their support of associations such as The American Red Cross. Those who wish to schedule an appointment to donate can call 1-800- RED CROSS or visit www.redcrossblood.org and enter the sponsor code STLUKESLUTH.

Blood Drive Briar HIll and St. Lukes flyer
Briar Hill’s senior living services are delivered by staff specially trained to honor and enhance the lives of our residents through compassion and commitment to exceeding customer expectations. To learn more about our campus, please call 419-257-2421 or visit our web site at www.briarhillhc.com.