August is National Breastfeeding Awareness Month

The Wood County WIC program is happy to join in celebrating this special month by inviting all our breastfeeding moms to stop by the WIC clinic any business day in August and receive a gift package and treats as our way of saying “Thank You.” ……..

Bowling Green, OH – This month, breastfeeding advocates will combine efforts in the promotion, protection and support of breastfeeding in the United States. August 1 – 7 has been designated as World Breastfeeding Week. The 2016 theme is about how breastfeeding is a major factor in getting us to think about how to value our well-being from the start of life, how to respect each other and care for the world we share.

 

WIC Promotes, Protects and Supports Breastfeeding

 

One of the major goals for the WIC program is to improve the nutritional status of infants. As a result, WIC health professionals encourage WIC mothers to breastfeed their infants. Below are a few reasons why we believe that breastmilk is the optimal food for your baby.

 

Breastmilk is good food for your baby. Breastmilk has a significantly positive impact on immune function, digestion, and brain development to mention just a few benefits. The World Health Organization calls mother’s early milk or colostrum “baby’s first immunization” because of the many immune factors it contains. These factors or antibodies provide protection from infection and illness. They are particularly important during baby’s first weeks outside of its mother’s protective womb when vulnerability to infection and diseases is high.

 

Breastfeeding Protects: mom, baby and Earth

 

This year’s Breastfeeding Awareness Month theme in Ohio is Breastfeeding Protects:  mom, baby and Earth. We know breastfeeding protects baby’s health, but what about Mom? According to research, mothers who breastfeed are less likely to experience breast/ovarian cancers, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease to list a few. Also, nursing moms are less likely to experience postpartum depression due to powerful and “feel good” hormones released during lactation.

 

Additionally, breastfeeding is the most natural and ecological way to feed a baby. Feeding a baby at the breast requires just two things – mom and baby’s bodies. It’s totally plastic free and no products are needed! This automatically reduces waste from production to feeding, not to mention the huge monetary savings that are realized. When you consider the pollution and waste materials generated by formula manufacturing and packaging, feeding breastmilk either directly from breast, or bottle produces far less waste and uses minimal natural resources.

 

In view of the lifesaving, monetary and ecological benefits of breastfeeding, we encourage everyone in our community to support breastfeeding because our families, communities and society benefit from having healthier moms, babies and children. Here is what you can do to support breastfeeding: tell a breastfeeding mom you encounter how appreciative you are for what she is doing, pass a note or say something like, “Thank you for breastfeeding.”  You will make her day!

 

Give Breastfeeding A Chance

 

The Wood County WIC program is happy to join in celebrating this special month by inviting all our breastfeeding moms to stop by the WIC clinic any business day in August and receive a gift package and treats as our way of saying “Thank You.” If you are a pregnant mom, stop by for a quick chat and a treat. WIC health professionals encourage you to give breastfeeding a chance. Any amount of breastfeeding is a success! We are convinced you will not regret your decision to give your baby the best start on life.

 

For more information about breastfeeding, call the Wood County WIC office at 419-354-9661. Walk-Ins are welcome.

Free Health Screenings for Heart Disease and Stroke Risk

Wood County Health District seeking volunteers and participants for heart disease and stroke screening event

Wood County Health District seeking volunteers and participants for heart disease and stroke screening event

BOWLING GREEN (August 4, 2016) – Wood County residents ages 27 to 64 are eligible for free health screenings for heart disease and stroke risk. The screenings include cholesterol, glucose, blood pressure and BMI. Appointments are required. Currently two screenings are scheduled for next week. Future events will be scheduled in Weston and Stony Ridge.

The current event schedule is:

Bowling Green – Tuesday, August 9 from 8 am to noon at the First United Methodist Church (1526 E. Wooster Street.)

Bradner – Thursday, August 11 from 8 am to noon at the Bradner American Legion (209 W. Crocker Street.)

North Baltimore – Thursday, Sept 1 from 8 am to noon at the North Baltimore Library (230 N. Main St.)

To schedule an appointment, call 419.352.8402 ext. 3258. Fasting for 8-10 hours before an appointment is recommended for more accurate results.

Registered Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) volunteers are also wanted to help with these events. If you are or want to become an MRC volunteer, contact William Bryant-Bey at 419.528.8402 ext. 3267 or wbryant-bey@co.wood.oh.us to learn more.

The events are funded by a grant from the National Association of City and County Health Officers to support Medical Reserve Corps activities. Three events have already had to be rescheduled due to no or low numbers of appointments.

Why screen for heart disease and stroke risk factors? Heart disease and stroke accounted for 26% of all Wood County adult deaths in 2013. Some heart disease and stroke risk factors can be changed, treated or controlled. These include blood pressure, diabetes, blood cholesterol, smoking and obesity.

The 2015 Wood County Health Assessment found that more than 1 in 4 people (26%) of Wood County adults had been diagnosed with high blood pressure, 30% had high blood cholesterol, 22% were obese, and 11% were smokers, four known risk factors for heart disease and stroke.

The Medical Reserve Corps is a national network of volunteers, organized locally to improve the health and safety of their communities. In Wood County, all types of volunteers are accepted including medical and non-medical individuals. During times of crisis, volunteers will be needed to help give medication or care for large number of injured or ill. Becoming an MRC volunteer requires completing online training and registration through an Ohio volunteer database. Wood County Health District encourages people to sign up now to make it easier for them to help later.

The mission of Wood County Health District is to take the initiative to facilitate opportunities for Wood County residents to lead healthy lives. Our Health and Wellness Center welcomes all patients and accepts most third party insurances, including uninsured or underinsured clients regardless of ability to pay. The Health District is located at 1840 E. Gypsy Lane Rd. in Bowling Green. Normal office hours are 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, with late hours available. The Wood County Board of Health meetings are generally held on the second Thursday of the month at 6 pm at Wood County Health District and are open to the public. More information can be found at www.woodcountyhealth.org.

Road Safety Education: To Keep You Safe

Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., AARP and the City of Bowling Green present Road Safety Education: To Keep You Safe

Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., AARP and the City of Bowling Green present Road Safety Education: To Keep You Safe

Bowling Green, OH (August 3, 2016) – Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc. (WCCOA), AARP and the City of Bowling Green will present Road Safety Education: To Keep You Safe from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Friday, August 12 at the City of Bowling Green Facilities Building (located at 815 E. Poe Rd. in Bowling Green).

Participants are invited to drive in their personal vehicles to experience the following:

  • Educational Seminars: consisting of the warning signs of unsafe driving, updates on how to solve driving concerns, traffic law updates and much more.
  • CarFit: an educational program sponsored by AAA, AARP and AOTA that offers older adults the opportunity to check how well their personal vehicles fit them. Valvoline Oil will be topping off fluid levels in your vehicle and will conduct an internal audit of your vehicle.
  • Booths: related to adaptive vehicle equipment, local resources, transportation, refreshments, raffle prizes and much more.

Lunch will be provided and is sponsored by the Wood County Beef Producers.

Reservations are required by contacting WCCOA at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or by emailing programs@wccoa.net.

The mission of the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., shall be to provide older adults with services and programs which empower them to remain independent and improve the quality of their lives.

 For information on programs and services, please contact the Wood County Committee on Aging, Inc., at (419) 353-5661, (800) 367-4935 or www.wccoa.net.

Chowline: Flaxseed may help to control blood pressure

My blood pressure has been inching up recently, and although I don’t yet have high blood pressure, I’m on the lookout for ways to reduce it. Recently I came across some information about flaxseed and how it can help. Can you tell me more about it?

There is some evidence that flaxseed may help reduce blood pressure, but it doesn’t appear to be a silver bullet.

First, good for you for taking steps to prevent high blood pressure. Normal blood pressure is 119/79 or lower. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is 140/90 or higher. It sounds like you are in the middle — somewhere between 120 and 139 for the top number and 80 to 89 for the bottom number — which is classified as “prehypertension.” This is the perfect time for you to take steps to prevent high blood pressure from taking hold.

Why? Hypertension is insidious. It usually has no symptoms, but it can cause stroke, heart failure, heart attack, kidney failure and other serious health issues.

Blood pressure fluctuates from day to day, so there’s no need to panic after one high reading. But if you experience several higher readings, which you might get at a doctor’s office, a community health screening or a blood donation site if you’re a blood donor, you should talk to your doctor. (Just a note about free blood pressure machines in grocery stores and drug stores: The cuffs may not be the right size for you or you might not use the instrument properly to get an accurate reading. It’s always best to get your blood pressure taken by a trained professional.)

To prevent high blood pressure, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention encourages a healthy lifestyle, which means eating foods low in sodium and high in potassium, including plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables; maintaining a healthy weight; being physically active; not smoking; and limiting alcohol (no more than one drink a day for women, and no more than two for men). These are the primary recommendations for reducing the risk of hypertension. And the bonus is that they have many other health benefits, too.

Adding seeds such as flaxseed to your diet is one way to improve its quality. And studies on flaxseed have yielded intriguing results. A systematic review of 11 studies found that consuming flaxseed may very well help lower blood pressure slightly, with ground or whole flaxseed having a greater effect than flaxseed oil. The analysis, published in the Journal of Nutrition in April 2015, suggested the effect of flaxseed consumption was greater after about three months of eating 30 to 50 grams, or about 2 to 3 tablespoons, of flaxseed a day.

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Flaxseed contains fiber, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and other nutrients. The high fiber content might prevent medications or supplements from being absorbed in the body, so don’t eat flaxseed at the same time as you take any of these. And, like other high-fiber supplements, flaxseed can cause constipation (if not taken with plenty of water) or other gastrointestinal issues. Tell your health care providers you’re trying flaxseed so they have a complete picture to help you manage your health.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Local Dementia Friendly America Network

Hancock County, OH – First in the State to be Recognized as a Dementia Friendly America Community

Hancock County is the first community in Ohio to join the Dementia Friendly America Network, and one of 29 communities who have been recognized nationwide. The Dementia Friendly America initiative is a multi-sector, national collaborative of over 35 leading organizations that are catalyzing a movement and set of best practices to foster “dementia friendly” communities across the United States to improve opportunities and outcomes for a growing number of people with dementia, their families and care partners.

Across the United States, an estimated 5.4 million Americans of all ages are living with Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. In Hancock County, an estimated 1,800 people have dementia and over 5,400 individuals are being impacted on a daily basis due to caregiving responsibilities. Nearly 60 percent of people with dementia live in their own communities and one in seven lives alone. Communities across the country are experiencing an urgent call to support people with dementia and their caregivers by becoming “dementia friendly.”

“Ohio’s population of older adults is growing more than 20 times faster than our overall population,” said Dr. Bonnie Kantor-Burman, Director of the Ohio Department of Aging. “The Hancock County Dementia Coalition shows how Ohio’s communities can and must embrace the challenges and opportunities of an aging population. When partners at all levels come together to make aging their business, we can ensure that families living with dementia are engaged and supported throughout their communities.”

In 2007, the Hancock County Dementia Coalition was founded by collaboration between the Alzheimer’s Association, Northwest Ohio Chapter and 50 North with the mission of creating a community that is aware and accepting of individuals with dementia. It quickly grew to include several county agencies, organizations, and businesses including the Area Agency on Aging 3, Blanchard Valley Health System, Hancock County ADAMHS (Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services) Board, Hancock County Educational Service Center, Hancock County Sheriff’s office, The Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation, United Way of Hancock County, University of Findlay, Whirlpool Corporation, and more. To provide support to further efforts of the Hancock County Dementia Coalition, The Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation and the Alzheimer’s Association, Northwest Ohio Chapter contributed as fiscal sponsors of this project.

“The Board and staff of the Foundation are gratified to see this designation come to Findlay,” said Katherine Kreuchauf, President of the Findlay-Hancock County Community Foundation. “The Foundation first supported the Coalition in 2012. The goal was for Findlay to become a place where families dealing with this devastating disease could find support and assistance. Four years later, we can see the results of the hard work and commitment of these volunteers and professionals. We appreciate what you have accomplished for our community.”

Hancock County has been using an evidence-based, dementia-friendly community toolkit to engage community members in a process that will help them determine their current strengths and gaps, identify community goals and ways to respond, and to act together to be dementia friendly. A dementia friendly community 1) raises awareness of and develops respect and inclusion for people with dementia, 2) has services and resources embedded in all areas of community to ensure meaningful access to community and promote quality of life, 3) supports and educates people with dementia, their care partners and families from diagnosis through disease progression and 4) promotes meaningful engagement in community life.

With the help of 30 Speaker’s Bureau volunteers, the Hancock County Dementia Coalition has presented 123 programs to over 2,895 individuals in the community as of today. For more information, please contact Elizabeth Kinzig, Dementia Coalition Coordinator, ekinzig@alz.org or 419-425-5409. More information about the Dementia Friendly America initiative is available at www.dfamerica.org.

Applications Being Accepted for Free Backpacks

Local organizations will also provide information about the services and opportunities available to local students……

Local students can go back to school with free school supplies and access to new resources thanks to the Bowling Green Salvation Army and United Way in Wood County. The nonprofits are sponsoring the Wood County Back to School Fair from 9 a.m. until 8 p.m. on Wednesday, August 10, at the Woodland Mall, 1234 North Main St. in Bowling Green. Families interested in receiving school supplies can apply from now until August 5 at the Salvation Army, 1045 N. Main St. in Bowling Green. Photo identification, birth certificates, and proof of income and address are required.

Local organizations will also provide information about the services and opportunities available to local students and their families including out of school programming, health care options, rent and utility assistance, early intervention services and more. The event is free and open to the public. Participating agencies include Girl Scouts of Northwest Ohio; WSOS Community Action Commission, The Cocoon, Boy Scouts of America, Children’s Resource Center, Wood County Health District and Wood County Hospital. Individuals interested in volunteering, seeking more information, or wishing to make a donation should contact United Way in Wood County at 419-352-2390 or the Bowling Green Salvation Army at 419-352-5918.

Going Fishing? Catch and Release or Make a Meal

2016 Ohio Sport Fish Consumption Advisory Reflects Changes in Water and Fish Tissue Quality…………….

Ohio has issued new guidelines for eating fish caught in lakes, rivers and streams, reflecting notable improvements in the waters of the state.

Among the improvements highlighted in the statewide study: freshwater drum caught from the Huron River may now be eaten once per week; advisories against eating common carp from the Big Darby Creek, North Branch Portage River, and Mahoning River have been lifted and are now one per month advisories; Acton, Chippewa, Kiser, Knox, Logan, Paint Creek, Sippo, and White lakes, as well as Findley #2, Griggs, Salt Fork, and Wills Creek reservoirs, along with the Black Fork Mohican River and Bad, Nimishillen and North Turkeyfoot creeks also were identified as improved for certain species. (See below for the complete table of changes to this year’s advisories.)

Fish can be part of a healthy diet and evaluations of fish tissue are showing some places where anglers can eat all of certain varieties of fish that they can legally catch. Unless otherwise notated in the new recommendations, a general advisory is in place that recommends limiting one meal each week of Ohio-caught fish.

Ohio EPA partners with the Ohio Department of Health and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources to develop consumption advisories for fish caught in Ohio. A total of 885 fish tissue samples collected from 51 lakes and 26 streams in 2014 and 2015 form the basis for the new advisories. Fish consumption evaluations help Ohio anglers make informed decisions about consuming their catch.

Additional information about fish consumption safety for women of child-bearing age, pregnant and nursing mothers, and children under 15 can be found at the Women, Infant and Children (WIC) Centers, local health departments, Ohio EPA and Ohio Department of Natural Resources regional offices.

 

The 2016 fish advisory information is available online and printed copies can be requested by calling (614) 644-2160.

 

 

Changes this year include (yellow is more restrictive, green is less restrictive):

Water bodySpeciesChange
Acton LakeChannel catfish

 

 

Bluegill, Common carp, Saugeye

Two meals per week (previously one meal per week) – mercury.

 

Unrestricted

 

Ashtabula River

(Hilldome Road to U.S. Route 20)

Smallmouth bassOne meal per month – PCBs.
Auglaize RiverRock bassOne meal per month – mercury.
Bad Creek

 

Channel catfishTwo meals per week (previously one meal per week) – mercury.
Big Darby Creek

(Entire length)

Common carp

 

 

Smallmouth bass

One meal per week (previously one meal per month – PCBs.

 

One meal per month – mercury.

Black Fork Mohican RiverFreshwater drumTwo meals per week (previously one meal per week) – mercury.
Black Fork Mohican RiverChannel catfish

 

Rock Bass

One meal per month – PCBs.

 

One meal per month – mercury.

Bokes CreekSmallmouth bassOne meal per month – mercury.
Chippewa LakeCommon carp, White crappie

 

Bluegill, Channel catfish

Two meals per week (previously one meal per week) – mercury.

 

Unrestricted

CJ Brown ReservoirCommon carpTwo meals per week.
FindleyReservoir #2Walleye, White bassUnrestricted
Greenville Creek

(Rockhill Avenue to the Pennsylvania border).

Largemouth bassOne meal per month – mercury.
Griggs ReservoirLargemouth bassOne meal per week (previously two meals per week)
Huron River

(Entire length)

Freshwater drumOne meal per week (previously one meal per month) – mercury.
Kiser LakeLargemouth bass

 

Bluegill

Two meals per week.

 

Unrestricted

Knox LakeCommon carp, White crappie

 

Channel Catfish

Two meals per week (previously one meal per week) – mercury.

 

Unrestricted

Lake LoganCommon carp, White crappie

 

Bluegill, Channel catfish, Saugeye

Two meals per week (previously one meal per week) – mercury.

 

Unrestricted

Lake WhiteCommon carpTwo meals per week.
Little Muskingum RiverSmallmouth bassOne meal per month – mercury.
Mahoning RiverCommon carpOne meal per month (previously six meals per year) – PCBs.
Mosquito CreekBluegillOne meal per week PCBs and lead, modification was triggered by lead.
Nimishillen CreekGreen sunfishUnrestricted
North Turkeyfoot CreekChannel catfish

 

 

Common carp

Two meals per week (previously one meal per week) – mercury.

 

Unrestricted

Paint Creek LakeBluegillUnrestricted
Rush Run LakeLargemouth bassOne meal per month – mercury.
Salt Fork ReservoirBluegillUnrestricted.
Sandusky River

(Rice Road, south of the Ballville Dam, to Lake Erie)

Common carp

Smallmouth buffalo

Continued one meal per month – PCBs, fishing location redefined.
Shade RiverFreshwater drumOne meal per month – mercury.
Sippo LakeBlack crappie, Bluegill, Common carp, Largemouth bassUnrestricted
South Turkeyfoot CreekYellow bullheadTwo meals per week (previously one meal per week) – mercury.
St. Marys RiverLargemouth bassOne meal per month – mercury.
Turkey Creek LakeLargemouth bassOne meal per month – mercury.
Wills CreekSaugeyeOne meal per month – mercury.
Wills Creek ReservoirChannel catfishTwo meals per week.

 

 

www.epa.ohio.gov

TONIGHT >>>> PICK IT UP, CLEAN IT UP HEART WALK

Join other North Baltimore community members for a “PICK IT UP, CLEAN IT UP HEART WALK”. Join the effort to clean the streets of North Baltimore before Good Ole Summertime Days.

Join other North Baltimore community members for a “PICK IT UP, CLEAN IT UP HEART WALK”.

Join the effort to clean the streets of North Baltimore before Good Ole Summertime Days.

The walk will challenge each walker to collect as much litter as possible within the hour.

Anyone interested is asked to meet on Thursday, July 28, at the Gazebo on Main Street at 6:30 pm.

Please bring gloves and extra groceries bags if you have them. Let’s give our hearts a good workout while while beautifying the streets of North Baltimore. Will meet at the Daily Queen after for refreshments and ice cream at 8:00pm.

Young and old are encouraged to participate.

**Rain date set for July 29, same place, same time.

Local Artist Offering Mini-Art Camps

Due to popular demand, local artist and educator, Erika Miklovic, of North Baltimore is offering a few more mini-art camp painting opportunities this summer! Classes will run 9:00-10:30 in downtown North Baltimore.

Due to popular demand, local artist and educator, Erika Miklovic, of North Baltimore is offering a few more mini-art camp painting opportunities this summer! Classes will run 9:00-10:30 in downtown North Baltimore.

Monday August 1st:Rainbow Tree
Tuesday August 2nd: Marigold Watercolor
Tuesday August 9th: Beach Scene
Wednesday August 10th: Flowers by the fence

Acrylic paintings are 11 x 14.

Cost: $60 for all 4 sessions or $20 for individual sessions. $5 sibling discount. Snack provided.

Contact me with your email and I will send you a paypal invoice to reserve your child’s spot. Half of the fee is a non-refundable deposit.

Erika Art Camp 2 Erika Art Camp 4 Erika Art Camp 3 Erika Art Camp 1

Butcher Shop Specials at NB Custom Cuts

North Baltimore Custom Cuts has announced their SPECIALS for July 27 – August 2. NEW Monthly Meat Raffle! CLICK HERE for more information!

North Baltimore Custom Cuts has announced their SPECIALS for July 27 – August 2. NEW Monthly Meat Raffle! CLICK HERE for more information!

NB Custom Cuts Store Front
Located on Insley Road, just east of North Baltimore, off Quarry Road. Exit at I – 75 southbound at the Eagleville Road Exit (168) – turn right – go a 1/4 mile north!

Regular HOURS:

Monday – Friday: 8 am to 5 pm each day

Saturday: 8 am – 1 pm

WEEKLY SPECIALS –

> > > Bratwurst < < <

Just $3.69/pound

– – – Regular or South of the Border Chili – – –
________________________

BACON

Sliced to your order!

$4.79/pound OR Rindless Jowl – $2.99
_______________________________

Steak Specials From OUR Freezer!

Save $1.00 per lb. OFF Regular Price of:

T-Bone – Porterhouse – N. Y. Strip – Ribeye – Chuckeye – Flank – Skirt

“WHILE THEY LAST!”
_______________________________________

MONTHLY MEAT RAFFLE
(NO product purchase necessary)

$5.00/ticket (5 tickets for $20.00)

Over $75.00 Value:

5 packs 1# Ground Beef
5 packs 1# Pork Sausage
5# of Chicken Breasts
5# Chicken Leg Quarters
5# Pork Steak

DRAWING August 8th – Winner will be announced

All ticket stubs re-entered for the Holiday Drawing!!!

________________________

Gift Certificates now available!

We now have FRESH Mac & Potato Salad

(prices good thru Monday, August 2)

Stop out and check out the Meat Case, new items being added all the time!

Custom Cuts Meat Case July 1

We also offer:

– Everglades Seasonings –

– St. Mary’s Meats –

– Ginger’s Goodies & Homemade Breads –

– Walnut Creek Noodles

Custom Cuts Product Rack July 1

OTHER AWESOME DEALS and SELECTIONS:

Custom Cuts From Our Freezer July 1

Custom Cuts Bundles July 1

Custom Cuts Slaughter Prices July 1

Roberts Donates for Health Campus Break Room

North Baltimore’s Briar Hill Health Campus had a recent remodeling project that was a gift from the family of two former residents at the care center.

by JP Miklovic

North Baltimore’s Briar Hill Health Campus had a recent remodeling project that was a gift from the family of two former residents at the care center.

The gift was a remodeling of the Break Room, which was gifted by Mr. & Mrs. William H. Roberts and Jane E. Leggiero, with many thanks to the Briar Hill staff who took such good care of Dr. Roberts and Ingrid Roberts. The donated money put some much needed TLC into the campus break room.

A plaque is mounted with the new television. Also the break room paint was touched up and new employee lockers were installed. Everything looks fantastic!

Below: Jen Fackler, Brenda Rice and Patti Gazarek enjoy a break in the improved break room.

Doc Robert’s son, Bill commented on how well the staff took care of Doc and “Ing”. (It wasn’t just because most people knew Ing and almost everybody knew Dad—the Briar Hill staff took wonderful care of all of their patients.)

One memory Bill shared was, “Some may remember Dad and Ing’s yellow lab, Ivory—she often came to visit at the health campus. This was good for her as well as good for Doc & Ing. The staff quickly adopted Ivory as a volunteer therapy dog and we would hang around the lobby while people made much of her.”

The Briar Hill Staff thanks the Roberts’ family for their generous support!

Briar Hill Doc Roberts Break Room July 2016 4 Briar Hill Doc Roberts Break Room July 2016 3 Briar Hill Doc Roberts Break Room July 2016 1

photos by JP Miklovic

Annual Wood County ‘Project Connect’ Fundraiser

A fundraiser for the 4th Annual Project Connect Wood County will be held. Project Connect, is a one-day, one-stop event that provides a broad range of free services to people at risk of homelessness or poverty.

A fundraiser for the 4th Annual Project Connect Wood County will be held from 5 p.m. until 8 p.m., on Wednesday, July 27, at Ziggy’s, 300 E. Wooster St., in Bowling Green.

Attendees are encouraged to bring jars of peanut butter or small bottles of laundry detergent. The fundraiser is open to the public.

Proceeds from the fundraiser will offset Project Connect’s expenses.

Project Connect, is a one-day, one-stop event that provides a broad range of free services to people at risk of homelessness or poverty.

The event will be from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. on Wednesday, October 19, at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, 315 South College Drive, in Bowling Green.

Individuals interested in volunteering to plan Project Connect, seeking more information, or wishing to make a donation should contact United Way in Wood County at 419-352-2390.

Project Connect is sponsored by the Continuum of Care of Wood County, a coalition representing business, social services agencies, churches and citizens who address housing needs in Wood County.

Contact: Jamie Brubaker, United Way in Wood County 419-352-2390.