Raising the Steaks: Finishing the Finest Beef on Grass

If you want to learn how to manage your grass-fed herd to improve the marbling and flavor of your beef, don’t miss this on-farm workshop opportunity!

If you want to learn how to manage your grass-fed herd to improve the marbling and flavor of your beef, don’t miss this on-farm workshop opportunity!

Dr. Jim Linne of White Clover Farmand USDA NRCS State Grazing Specialist Troyce Barnett will help you achieve consistent quality in your pasture-finished beef during this on-farm workshop and pasture walk.

Learn about:

  • Cattle selection and frame scores;
  • Forage species selection, establishment, and management for different soils, terrains, and microclimates;
  • Watering systems and water quality;
  • Livestock rotations;
  • Stockpiling fescue, and
  • Using warm season annuals to extend grazing days.

Cost: $20 for OEFFA members, $30 for non-members

Registration: Pre-registration is required and space is limited. The deadline to register is June 20. To register, go to www.oeffa.org/q/raisingthesteaks.

Raising the Steaks: Finishing the Finest Beef on Grass
Friday, June 24—1-5 p.m.
White Clover Farm
9600 E. Prospect Rd., Hillsboro, OH 45133
  

Questions? Contact Milo Petruziello at (614) 421-2022 Ext. 206 or milo@oeffa.org.

This event is part of the 2016 Ohio Sustainable Farm Tour and Workshop Series. For more information, click here.

Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association

41 Croswell Rd., Columbus OH 43214

(614) 421-2022   www.oeffa.org

Weather Has Severe Potential This Weekend

People at, or hosting, outdoor activities on Friday night and Saturday should pre-plan to monitor weather conditions closely and have a plan as a precaution to seek indoor shelter should thunderstorms move into our area. There still remains a little uncertainty of the timing of thunderstorms and the exact impact areas.

from: 

BRADLEY J. GILBERT, O.C.E.M.

EMA DIRECTOR

WOOD COUNTY, OHIO

People at, or hosting, outdoor activities on Friday night and Saturday should pre-plan to monitor weather conditions closely and have a plan as a precaution to seek indoor shelter should thunderstorms move into our area.  There still remains a little uncertainty of the timing of thunderstorms and the exact impact areas.

A warm front will move through the area on Friday bringing scattered showers and thunderstorms (some could be strong or severe).  The main area for a severe weather threat on Friday will be from the Ohio/Michigan border northwest across Michigan and into Wisconsin.  Although not officially in the “Marginal” risk category for severe weather, we are close enough to that area that thunderstorms and conditions should be monitored closely in case any stronger storms make it into Ohio.  The primary threats would be damaging straight-line winds, hail, frequent lightning, and heavy downpours of rain.

The bigger concern for a severe weather threat will be on Saturday as warm/moist air destabilizes the atmosphere across the Great Lakes as well as upper atmosphere dynamics that would support severe weather formation.  The Storm Prediction Center has Wood County in the “Marginal” (lowest) risk category for severe weather on Saturday; however, the risk category increases to “Slight” just to our east.  From Ottawa and Sandusky Counties eastward across Northeast Ohio will be the primary target for severe weather on Saturday.

Once again, we will be very close to that increased risk area (and it could be expanded in forecasts on Friday to include Wood County), so weather conditions should be monitored closely on Saturday and even into the overnight hours of Saturday.

The primary threats will be damaging straight-line winds, hail, frequent lightning, and heavy downpours of rain.  Conditions will also be conducive for a derecho to form and move northwest to the southeast across the Great Lakes.  As a reminder, a derecho is a large fast moving complex of severe thunderstorms with straight-line winds that can go as high as 80-90 mph (equal to EF0 tornado winds) which could cause considerable damage including widespread power outages.

Again, the threat of these conditions occurring are more likely to our east (at this time), but it is close enough to monitor weather conditions closely on Saturday and Saturday night.

The NWS Cleveland office will be providing us an update on Friday.  Once that information is received and the updated information from the Storm Prediction Center arrives, we will provide another email and Facebook update to you on Friday.

BRADLEY J. GILBERT, O.C.E.M.

EMA DIRECTOR

WOOD COUNTY, OHIO

Chowline: 8 great ways to eat more veggies every day

Vegetables provide vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants in a nice little package with relatively few calories……..

I know I should be eating more vegetables, but I need inspiration. What are some easy ways to fit more vegetables into my diet?

You’ve already conquered the first hurdle: Making the decision to actually eat more vegetables. Now you need to get into the habit. Knowing how good they are for you should be just the motivation you need.

Vegetables provide vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants in a nice little package with relatively few calories or other pitfalls. Eating enough of them as part of an overall healthful diet can help prevent heart disease and some types of cancer.

Make sure you get a wide range of vegetables, such as dark green leafy greens and broccoli; red and orange vegetables, such as tomatoes, carrots and winter squash; legumes, including beans, edamame and chickpeas; starchy vegetables, including white potatoes, corn, plantains and green peas; and other kinds such as green beans, onions, cauliflower, cucumbers, celery, zucchini, mushrooms and peppers. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends working in all of these types of vegetables over the course of a week.

chowline fresh vegetables

Unfortunately, most people don’t eat the recommended 2 to 3 cups of vegetables every day. In fact, only 9 percent of us eat that amount, according to a 2015 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. So, here are some ideas for boosting your veggie intake:

  • Start your day right by lightly sauteing sliced cherry tomatoes and a large handful of spinach and adding them to scrambled eggs. Next time, try finely chopped broccoli and red peppers.
  • Boost the bulk and the nutrients in canned soup by adding canned or frozen vegetables.
  • Making pasta? Saute some chopped onion, peppers, mushrooms, chopped spinach and summer squash. Stir them into the sauce along with some diced tomatoes.
  • Like to dip? Use baby carrots to dip into hummus. It’s great as a snack or as part of lunch.
  • Create a wrap with a whole-grain tortilla filled with romaine lettuce, red cabbage, shredded carrots, pepper strips, cucumber and julienned zucchini. Spread the tortilla with smashed avocado and add a little salsa.
  • Rinse off some asparagus, pat dry, coat with some olive oil and sprinkle with pepper. Broil the spears or place directly on the grill.
  • Make it a habit to eat a salad at lunch or dinner each day. It could be as simple as leafy greens dribbled with some oil and balsamic. Or, add as many fresh vegetables as you like. You can make it a meal by loading on some chickpeas, edamame or other source of protein.
  • Make a quick side dish by draining and rinsing a can of red or black beans and heating them with a little salsa. Another option: Drain a can of whole green beans and add some Italian-seasoned chopped tomatoes.

For more ideas, see the Fruits and Veggies: More Matters website at fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org. Choose “Meal Planning,” and prepare to be inspired.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

GOST Jack Patterson 5K Run Registration Info

The North Baltimore Good Ole Summertime (GOST) 5K Run/Walk and the “Fun Run” of One Mile registration information is now available.

The North Baltimore Good Ole Summertime (GOST) 5K Run/Walk and the “Fun Run” of One Mile registration information is now available.
Please note: To be guaranteed a tee-shirt, you must be registered two weeks prior to the race (July 15).
Kids 1M Fun Run Immediately following the finish of the 5K race
Place: Downtown North Baltimore
Course: Begins and ends at the intersection of Broadway and Main
(adjacent to the North Baltimore Fire Station)
 Refreshments and Awards will follow the race
 Full race results can be found at www.nbacc.org and www.findlaystriders.com
 Top Three place winners named. All runners are eligible for door prizes.
Contact person – Kathi Bucher – 419-257-2124 – nbacc284@gmail.com
Dr. Chris Lofquist, Findlay, will provide complimentary stretching and soft tissue/active release for runners at the 5K
GOST 5K 2016 Flyer 900
CLICK on the image to ENLARGE and PRINT
CLICK on the image to ENLARGE and PRINT

Benefit to Fund ADA Improvements at WC Historical Museum

STARS ARE ALIGNED TO SUPPORT THE WOOD COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM
Julie’s Dance Studio Benefit Performance to Benefit Accessibility

STARS ARE ALIGNED TO SUPPORT THE WOOD COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM
Julie’s Dance Studio Benefit Performance to Benefit Accessibility

The Wood County Historical Society is honored to partner with Julie’s Dance Studio as the recipient of their annual Star-Style Benefit Show in support of the Wood County Historical Society Accessibility Project. Julie’s dancers will perform on Saturday, June 4, 2016, 7:00-8:00 PM, at the BG Schools Performing Arts Center, 530 W. Poe Road in Bowling Green. Admission is donation-only and 100% of the proceeds will be donated to the Wood County Historical Society Accessibility Project “Join Us at the Top of the Stairs,” to provide an elevator and other Accessibility amenities, assuring that all members of our community have access to Wood County’s treasured Historical Museum.

Star-Style 2016 is an annual show by the performers of Julie’s Dance Studio. Ticketed performances begin at 10 am, 1 pm, and 4 pm, with the special 7 pm Benefit Show for the Wood County Historical Society rounding out the evening.

The Wood County Historical Society Accessibility Project will fund the installation of an elevator, handicap-accessible restrooms, bus-friendly access, ramping, and an improved meeting space for public rentals. These improvements will make the Historical Museum more accessible for all patrons. The Museum is currently open for self-guided tours Monday – Friday, 10am – 4pm and weekends from 1 – 4pm. Photos and construction updates are online at facebook/woodcountyhistory

Special Guest Columnist: “From Munching to Meal Prep” by Ashley Parsons

Meal prep can save you hours of cooking time during the week if you set aside time during the weekend…….

From Munching to Meal Prep

How often do you get home, are starving, and don’t feel like cooking and cleaning up a meal for dinner? What about the dreaded, “What’s for dinner?” question from your significant other or kids. Many of us find ourselves in this situation more often than not. Do you ever look back on what you ate for lunch or dinner and realized it was all junk foods or snacks? Good news! There is an easy way to combat this problem, if you are willing to plan ahead. Meal prepping is something that has recently been gaining popularity, but it is not just for athletes and body builders. Meal prepping is simply preparing, cooking, (and pre-portioning) meals ahead of time. Meal preparation can eliminate the stress of having to worry about what to put on the table, but also has many other benefits as well.

Ashley_ Food Prepping2 pix

Meal prep has three big advantages, aside from not having to worry about what everyone will eat. These advantages are it saves time, it saves money, and it helps you stay on track with eating nutritious, wholesome meals. Meal prep can save you hours of cooking time during the week if you set aside time during the weekend. When you prep multiple recipes/meals at once, you will be able to multitask and maybe even overlap cooking ingredients that go in multiple dishes. Meal prep will take the place of going out to eat and having to wait at drive thrus, or wait in sit down restaurants for your food. Meal prep will save you money. When we eat out, it usually costs us more than if we were to cook at home. When we pick what foods/recipes we are going to meal prep, we can try to plan to overlap ingredients to make sure that none of them go to waste. In addition to using all the ingredients we buy for our recipes, we can also base our meal prep around what is on sale, or what we have coupons for. Using your local grocery store ad is a great place to start when thinking about recipes for the week. Planning your meals ahead of time will keep you on track with your nutrition as well. When you are thinking about what to buy to prepare for the week, try to include fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats/protein, low-fat or non-fat dairy and healthy fats (avocados, walnuts, olive oil are some examples). When you plan to buy, and prep all of these foods, you are setting yourself up to consume a more nutritious diet. When nutritious foods are prepped and available, you will be more likely to consume them as opposed to less nutritious options.

Here are some easy ideas for beginners: (use amounts suitable for your family size)

Marinate chicken in your favorite marinade (Italian dressing is always a good idea) the night before you would like to cook it. Grill chicken until cooked thoroughly (160 degrees). Serve it throughout the week chopped in salads, with barbeque sauce, in a pasta dish, or any other way you think of!

Buy assorted fruits and vegetables that are on sale at your local grocery store. Wash and cut them for easy snacking. Dips such as low-fat ranch, hummus, and nonfat/lowfat yogurt may be good pairings.

ashley yogurt with blueberries

Keep nonfat or lowfat yogurt and cottage cheese, cheese sticks, and lowfat/nonfat milk easy available for a good source of protein and calcium.

A great way to eat more vegetables is to roast them. Roasting your vegetables brings out a whole new flavor profile. Try buying a head of cauliflower and broccoli, tossing it in some olive oil and pepper, and roasting at 400 degrees until crisp tender (about 30-40 minutes).

An easy way to incorporate more whole grains into your diet is to make a salad or have some oatmeal for breakfast. These are two of my favorites, and their flavor holds up really well throughout the week: Sweet Potato and Raisin Quinoa Salad and Peanut Butter Baked Oatmeal.

Sweet Potato and Raisin Quinoa Salad:

Ashley-Sweetpotato quinoa

 

2 cups peeled, diced and roasted sweet potatoes

1/3 cup raisins

1/3 cup seeds or nuts, toasted (can be pumpkin, sunflower, sliced almonds)

2 cups cooked quinoa, cooled

¼ cup sliced green onion

¼ cup balsamic vinegar

2 tbsp olive oil

1 tsp dijon mustard

Combine roasted sweet potatoes, raisins, seeds/nuts, cooked quinoa, and green onion in a bowl. Combine dressing: balsamic vinegar, olive oil, and Dijon mustard in a separate bowl. Pour into quinoa mixture. Refrigerate and serve as a side dish or on top of some leafy greens! Yum!

**As time goes on, the raisins and quinoa absorbs the dressing. Additional balsamic, olive oil, Dijon mustard can be added for more moisture.

Peanut Butter Baked Oatmeal:  

AshleyP article oatmeal

3 cups quick cooking oats

½ cup brown sugar

1 cup skim milk

2 tbsp melted butter

2 eggs

2 teaspoons baking powder

½ tsp salt

2 teaspoons vanilla

½ cup peanut butter

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a bowl, mix together all of the ingredients until combined. Grease a 9×13 pan and pour oatmeal mixture into the pan. Bake for 20-25 minutes (longer is you like it more crunchy). It is great served hot with warm milk and diced banana. Enjoy all week long!

 

About the Author:

AshleyParsons

Hi, my name is Ashley Parsons. I am from the Cleveland, Ohio area, but have had the pleasure of calling Bowling Green, Ohio my home for the past 5 years. I received my bachelors in dietetics from Bowling Green State University in 2015. I was then accepted into their combined dietetic internship and master’s program, which I will complete in May 2017. My goal is to move back to Cleveland area to be close to my parents, and work as a Clinical dietitian at The Cleveland Clinic. Some of my favorite things in life include my family, my dog, cooking, exercising, my church, being with friends, baseball, sunshine, and peanut butter.

Chowline: Smoothies can boost fruit, calcium intake

When prepared healthfully, smoothies can provide a big boost in nutrition…….

My teenage daughter has a sudden affinity for smoothies. She is making them all the time. Is this something I should encourage?

Smoothies can be a great way for anyone to consume more produce, and even additional calcium if milk, yogurt or calcium-fortified juice is part of the mix.

And most teens need more fruits, vegetables and calcium in their diets. A 2006 study in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that less than 1 percent of boys and less than 4 percent of girls aged 14 to 18 years ate the recommended amount of produce. (For girls 14-18, the recommended amount is 1.5 cups of fruit and 2.5 cups of vegetables per day. Boys that age need an extra half-cup of each.)

Both boys and girls from 14 to 18 years need 1,300 milligrams of calcium a day — about the amount in 4.5 cups of milk. A national nutrition survey in 2005-2006 found that 42 percent of teen boys and only 10 percent of teen girls consumed enough calcium every day.

So, in a word, yes! If your daughter’s smoothies help her consume enough produce and calcium day to day, by all means encourage her on her smoothie craze. But it’s important to make sure they’re healthy beverages, not sugar-laden frozen slushies or milkshakes in disguise.

chowline fruit smoothie

When prepared healthfully, smoothies can provide a big boost in nutrition. According to a study published in Health Education and Behavior in 2015, when smoothies were introduced as an option at school breakfasts at a middle school and high school in Utah, students eating a full cup of fruit during breakfast increased from 4.3 percent to a whopping 45.1 percent.

Another study, published in the Journal of Child Nutrition and Management in 2015, showed that 68 percent of high school students who chose yogurt as a breakfast option didn’t choose milk, suggesting that yogurt products — including many smoothies — may offer an appealing calcium-rich alternative for non-milk drinkers.

The smoothies made for the Utah school study included milk or juice, vanilla yogurt, and fruit — usually bananas, strawberries, pineapple and mandarin oranges, but sometimes cherries and pears — and even spinach for green smoothies. No extra sugar, frozen yogurt or ice cream was added — a good guideline for keeping the nutritional profile of a smoothie high. Adding ice will provide a nice chill and help lower the calorie count. Using frozen fruit — even frozen bananas — helps keep a smoothie thick with or without ice cubes.

For healthy recipe ideas, try the “Fruits and Veggies: More Matters” website at fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org. Click on “Recipes” and choose “Beverages and Smoothies.” You will find 16 pages of recipes for everything from an Orange Banana Frosty to a Watermelon Strawberry Shake (no ice cream included).

In addition, consider introducing your daughter to choosemyplate.gov/teens. This website encourages teens to adopt healthy food and activity habits to last a lifetime.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Final Day for Community Wellness Day Registration

Please join us for Community Wellness Day on Thursday, June 16, 2016. Receive 20 different blood tests for one low price. Registration will take place from May 16 – 20!

Registration will take place from May 16 – 20, 2016 by calling 419-354-8679

Join Wood County Hospital in taking a positive step toward improving your health by taking part in our Community Wellness Day, held in the hospital meeting rooms. Gain valuable information in regards to your health status and use this information to take action to reach your wellness goals.

This event will offer over 20 different blood tests for a low price. In addition, participants will receive various free screenings and educational information which will provide you an overview of your current general health. Get a jump start on your path to a healthy lifestyle!

Please join us for Community Wellness Day on Thursday, June 16, 2016. Receive 20 different blood tests for one low price.

WCH Health and Wellness graphic

Chowline: Why food safety is vital during pregnancy

When a woman becomes pregnant, she undergoes all sorts of physical changes……

Why are pregnant women at greater risk of foodborne illness?

When a woman becomes pregnant, she undergoes all sorts of physical changes that are necessary for her body to accept and nurture the growing baby in her womb.

One of those changes involves part of the mother’s immune system called “cell-mediated immunity.” When it’s working normally, cell-mediated immunity helps fight the kinds of pathogens that move from cell to cell. This doesn’t affect the part of the immune system that involves antibodies, which remains fully functioning during pregnancy.

Cell-mediated immunity is the type of immunity involved when a person has an organ transplant and the body rejects the new organ, thinking it’s a foreign invader. When a woman becomes pregnant, the body suppresses this function to allow the body to accept the fetus.

That’s all well and good, but it does put the mother and fetus at higher risk for some types of foodborne illness.

According to foodsafety.gov, the federal government’s hub for food safety information, the top five pathogens related to food poisoning during pregnancy are bacteria Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter, E. coli and Salmonella, and a parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Depending on the pathogen and the severity of the illness, these can cause miscarriage, premature birth, stillbirth or birth defects in the fetus, as well as serious health problems for the mother.

chowline food duringpregnancy
photo: iStock

Food Safety for Pregnant Women, online at foodsafety.gov/risk/pregnant, provides details about each of these pathogens as well as other guidelines, including:

  • Avoid unpasteurized milk and products made from it. Soft cheeses, such as brie, feta, Camembert, Roquefort, queso blanco and queso fresco are frequently made with unpasteurized milk. Some hard cheeses are also made with raw or unpasteurized milk. Always read the label.
  • Avoid unpasteurized juice or cider. Even fresh-squeezed juice has been associated with E. coli.
  • Avoid raw seafood and be selective with smoked seafood. Both pose a risk from Listeria. Smoked seafood is OK only if it is canned or otherwise processed to be shelf-stable (the kind that doesn’t need refrigeration), or is an ingredient in a casserole or other dish cooked to at least 165 degrees F.
  • Avoid premade ham, chicken, tuna or other meat or seafood salads, such as those you can buy in a deli. Make them at home instead.
  • Don’t eat hot dogs or lunchmeats unless you’ve heated them to steaming hot — 165 degrees F.
  • Be sure any eggs you eat are cooked until the yolk is firm. Any casseroles or foods containing raw eggs should be cooked to 160 degrees F. Avoid foods containing raw or undercooked eggs, including unpasteurized eggnog, cookie or cake batter, Caesar salad dressing, tiramisu, eggs Benedict, homemade ice cream and freshly made hollandaise sauce.

For more details, see foodsafety.gov/risk/pregnant.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Wood County Clean Plate Awards to be Presented Thursday

The 2016 Clean Plate Award will be presented to forty (40) licensed food service operations out of more than 800 food service operations in Wood County.

The Annual Wood County Clean Plate Awards

 

Bowling Green, OH – Wood County Health District is pleased to announce the presentation of this year’s Clean Plate Awards on Thursday, May 12, 2015 at 5:30 p.m. The presentation will take place at the Wood County Health District located at 1840 East Gypsy Lane Road, Bowling Green, Ohio.

 

The 2016 Clean Plate Award will be presented to forty (40) licensed food service operations out of more than 800 food service operations in Wood County. These restaurants and other food service operations have been dedicated to upholding excellent sanitation and food safety knowledge within their facility. The recipients will receive a certificate of excellence and recognition of excellent performance in food safety from the Wood County Health District.  The winners of the Clean Plate Award will also receive a Clean Plate Award decal to display at their facility. This is the sixth year that the Wood County Board of Health will hand out the awards. “The Food Service Operations in Wood County that are presented with the Clean Plate Award have gone above and beyond in the practice of safe food handling,” said Lana Glore, Director of Environmental Services at the Wood County Health District.

 

This year’s recipients include: American Table Family Restaurant, Bass Pro Shop, Bowling Green High School, Bowling Green Manor, Bowling Green Middle School, Carolyn’s Personalized Catering, Conneaut Elementary, Crim Elementary, Eagle Point Elementary, Eastwood High School, Eastwood Middle School, Edible Arrangements, Fernando’s, First Solar/Eurest Dining, Glenwood Elementary, Holiday Inn Express and Suites, Kenwood Elementary, Luckey Elementary, Marco’s Pizza #8, Nazareth Hall, Northwood High School, Northwood Elementary, Olney Elementary, Pemberville Elementary, Poppin George’s Kettle Corn of BG, Rita’s Dairy Bar, Rossford High School, Subway #5859, Super Suppers – Perrysburg-Maumee, Swig,  Wood County Committee on Aging in Rossford, Northeast Center, Perrysburg, North Baltimore, Pemberville, Wayne & Bowling Green, Wood County Justice Center, Wood Lane School, and WSOS Perrysburg/Rossford Early Childhood Center.

 

Questions regarding the Clean Plate Awards may be directed to Kelly Bechstein, Registered Sanitarian at 419-354-2702, ext. 3283 or kbechstein@co.wood.oh.us.

STARTS TODAY – Village Posts Hydrant Flushing Schedule

Residents may experience rusty water during this period. Please use caution when using water for laundry purposes …….

NOTICE TO NORTH BALTIMORE RESIDENTS:

The North Baltimore Water Department will be flushing fire hydrants during the month of May.  The flushing will be divided into four sections of the Village with the railroad and Main St. as the dividing mark.

May 9-10….…………………………………………………………………………….Southeast

May 11-12…….……………………………………………………………………….Northeast

May 13…………………………………………………………………………………..Make-Up East Side

May 16-17…….……………………………………………………………………….Southwest

May 18 -19…………………………………………………………………………….Northwest

May 20………………………………………………………………………………….Make-Up West Side

Residents may experience rusty water during this period.  Please use caution when using water for laundry purposes.  Should you do laundry during this testing period and rust appears on clothing, rust removing chemicals may be obtained through the Village office.  The water will be safe to drink.  If you should have any questions, please call the Water Department at (419) 257-2141 or the Village office at (419) 257-2394

Village of N. Baltimore

Water and Wastewater Dept.

Chow Line: Takeaways from the Biggest Loser Study

Focus on health, not the scale………

I recently heard some discouraging news about the prospects of losing weight and keeping it off. What is the best course for people like me, who had a lifelong battle with weight?

You’re likely talking about the study that followed 14 “Biggest Loser” contestants six years after they competed on the TV show. The study, in the journal Obesity, has received wide media coverage.

One of the participants actually weighs less than she did at the end of the competition, but the other 13 regained some or all of the weight they had lost. While more than half retained at least a 10 percent weight loss six years later, five now weigh as much or more as they did before the Biggest Loser. Their level of physical activity had not changed significantly since the end of the competition.

What surprised the researchers most were the measurements of the participants’ “resting metabolic rate,” or the calories a person burns while at rest. It’s generally known that when people diet and they trim down, their metabolism slows and they don’t burn as many calories. But researchers found that as these participants regained pounds, their metabolic rates did not increase as expected. In order to maintain their weight, most Biggest Loser graduates must eat 200 to 800 fewer calories per day than other people who weigh exactly the same as they do.

chowline weight loss exercise

In addition to that hurdle, researchers found that the participants continue to have significantly lower levels of the hormone leptin. Less leptin triggers hunger and cravings, and is normal when you diet. The participants had normal levels of leptin when they started the Biggest Loser competition and almost none when they finished. Six years later, the participants’ leptin levels had not returned to normal. They were hungry, all the time.

So, what does this mean for you? Since everyone is different, it’s difficult to say. But here are some things to consider:

  • Focus on health, not the scale. Eat 2 to 2.5 cups of vegetables and 1 to 1.5 cups of fruit every day, and round out your diet by focusing on whole grains, lean protein and healthy oils. And get plenty of physical activity: Make it your goal to walk, play sports or work out for at least 30 minutes five days a week. Even if the pounds don’t drop, regular physical activity lessens the risk of chronic disease.
  • Take guidance from the National Weight Control Registry, www.nwcr.ws, a database of more than 10,000 people who have lost 30 pounds or more and have kept it off for at least a year. Most report they have had success by maintaining a low-calorie, low-fat diet, and 90 percent say they exercise an average of an hour a day. But understand the hunger pangs you will likely feel are real, and you will have to work harder to maintain your weight than your lean friends.
  • Shed any shame or guilt you feel about your weight. As science learns more about individual differences in metabolism as well as leptin and other hormones that affect hunger and appetite, it’s easier to understand the biological underpinnings of why so many of us struggle with weight issues. Self-blame doesn’t help.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.