Wood County Prevention Coalition Community Meeting

Scott C. Martin is a social and cultural historian who specializes in the 19th-century United States and the history of drugs and alcohol. Since receiving his doctorate from the University of Pittsburgh in 1990 he has taught at the University of California, Riverside, and, since 1993, BGSU.

The Wood County Prevention Coalition Community Meeting is set for April 28, 2017 at 8:30 AM- 10:00 AM. Our featured speaker is Scott C. Martin, PhD, Bowling Green State University History Professor and Department Chair. Martin will present on our nation’s past history with opioids and addiction, which in many ways parallels our current issues.

Scott C. Martin is a social and cultural historian who specializes in the 19th-century United States and the history of drugs and alcohol. Since receiving his doctorate from the University of Pittsburgh in 1990 he has taught at the University of California, Riverside, and, since 1993, BGSU.

He has written or edited books on 19th-century American leisure, the market revolution in America, and the antebellum US temperance movement. He has a chapter on the 20th-century U.S. and alcohol drugs policy in the Oxford Handbook of American Political history, and is working on a study about alcohol and drugs in the American Civil War. Dr. Martin has experience as being a past president of the Alcohol and Drugs History Society and the Ohio Academy of History.

Through this presentation, we can get a better understanding of how we got here in today’s history of drugs and alcohol, and where we go from here concerning the opiate epidemic. Other topics that will be included in the meeting is a presentation on the #Push4Prevention stipend, We are The Majority report, coalition news and reports, announcements, and round table discussion.

Mobile Dentists to Visit NB Schools

April 19………….

North Baltimore students will have a chance to get their teeth checked out  this month.  Mobile Dentists will visit the Powell Elementary School on April 19th.

Parents who are interested can fill out the enrollment form sent home last  week and return it to the school.

For more information, contact Tonya Emahiser . Powell Health Aide at 419-257-2124

Village of Bairdstown – Sewer Installation

Through April, daytime, intermittent lane restrictions are possible on SR 18…

Northwestern Water and Sewer District Road Work

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio, – The Northwestern Water and Sewer District (the District) delivers water and sewer services to over 19,000 customers in Wood, Sandusky and Hancock counties.  Although many of our construction and maintenance projects are performed underground, our utility work can impact roads throughout our area.  The District will announce updates and when additional projects are under contract.  Updates and additions are highlighted in bold and underlined.  The below is a current list of active and upcoming construction projects that impact traffic:

Village of Bairdstown – Sewer Installation

Through April, daytime, intermittent lane restrictions are possible on SR 18, between Bushey Road and Leathers Road for sewer installation.  Traffic will be maintained by flaggers.  Daytime intermittent lane restrictions and short-term closures are also possible on local streets in Bairdstown for sewer installation.  Project complete: June.

For a full list of projects on and off road, please visit our website:
http://www.nwwsd.org/engineering/project-information/current-projects/

Pinwheels for Wood County Child Abuse Awareness

The Village of North Baltimore is partnering with Wood County Department of Job & Family Services, Children’s Services Department on Child Abuse Awareness.

The Village of North Baltimore is partnering with Wood County Department of Job & Family Services, Children’s Services Department on Child Abuse Awareness.

April is Child Abuse Awareness Month. Wood County Children’s Service has set up pinwheels to represent each case of child abuse or neglect investigated in the county. In North Baltimore, there were 73 complaints of child abuse and neglect, investigated by NB PD last year.

A representatives from Wood County JFS installed the 73 pinwheels in front of the Village Reservoir on SR 18. They also spoke to NB Village Council at the meeting April 4, to give more information about Child Abuse Prevention.

CLICK to ENLARGE. To report child abuse phone – 419-354-9669

A Parents Guide to First Aid

In homes where there are small children, safety is an important issue. Parents want to protect their children from all potential dangers and will most often take steps to make their home as safe an environment as possible.

In homes where there are small children, safety is an important issue. Parents want to protect their children from all potential dangers and will most often take steps to make their home as safe an environment as possible.

first aidIn homes where there are small children, safety is an important issue. Parents want to protect their children from all potential dangers and will most often take steps to make their home as safe an environment as possible.Unfortunately, despite one’s best efforts, accidents may still happen. The National Safety Council cites injuries as the leading cause of childhood death. Of the accidents that cause these injuries, half occur in the home. When they do, parents or guardians will need to be prepared to take the necessary action. Understanding basic first aid and how to apply it according to the injury and age of the child is critical and can save the life of their child.

How to Keep Your Home Safe

Prevention is the first step that people should take in order to protect their family. There are various threats to take into consideration when making safety plans and changes to the home. To prevent poisoning, chemicals and other toxic items should be stored appropriately. Most often, this means storing them in a locked cabinet or in a location that is high enough that it is inaccessible to children. In efforts to prevent fires and burns, matches and lighters should also be kept in locations that children do not have access to. Fire and carbon monoxide detectors on every level of the home are important to warn families of fire and carbon monoxide, the latter of which has no taste or smell. In addition, parents should create fire escape plans and conduct practice drills to ensure that everyone understands what needs to be done if there is a fire. Create an emergency phone number and contact list, put on the walls, tables so that children know who to contact in the event of an emergency.

How to Teach Your Child about First Aid and Emergencies

Emergencies happen, but it isn’t always the child who needs emergency care. If a parent is injured, it may be the child who must administer care and contact the authorities or emergency medical services. For this reason, children should be taught basic first aid so that they know how to react in an emergency situation. These skills can also help them if they are in a situation where an adult is not readily available but immediate action is required in order to help a friend or other family member. Children should be taught what to do to stop bleeding, how to help if someone is choking or if someone has fallen and injured themselves. Parents should discuss what to do in an emergency situation and can even find useful online resources to help them teach their children.

Even before a parent teaches a child first aid, it is important that the child is taught how to call for help. All children should know how to call 911 in the event of an emergency. They should also know their full names, their parents’ full names, and their address and phone number so that they are able to provide this information over the phone. Children must be taught when it is appropriate to call 911 and the importance of only calling it for emergencies.

First Aid for a New Parent

It’s natural for new parents to be overly concerned when it comes to the wellbeing of their offspring. Despite the desire to prevent injuries and illness, some first-time parents don’t know exactly where to begin. Babies, toddlers, and younger children are commonly injured by falls, burns and scalding. A prepared parent will know how to prevent a baby from rolling off of a surface and will have moved sharp objects out of the way when toddlers are learning to walk. A bad fall can result in trauma to the child’s head and even brain injury. Infants can burn easily, even from bath water that is too hot. To prevent burns, care should be taken to ensure that temperatures are tolerable for delicate babies.

Babies also have a high risk of choking, suffocating, and drowning. Babies are at risk of falling from beds, tables, or sofas. Both babies and toddlers are known for putting items in their mouths. If an item is not approved as a toy for infants, the child may choke on it and risk suffocation. Loose buttons, marbles, and other small objects should be placed in safe locations to avoid choking or accidental suffocation. Care should also be taken to buy the appropriate type of toys. Careful parents will also want to take infant and child CPR classes. Due to their smaller frames, techniques for infant and child CPR will differ from techniques for adults. First aid classes will also provide parents with the knowledge of what to do for other types of injuries such as burns from overly hot water. Food is another area of concern for parents. Food should be properly stored and heated to prevent illness or accidental injury from heat.

We offer an online CPR course for $30 which you can complete and get certification for your workplace or your loved ones. To sign up, please click here.

Enhance Your Easter with Ham

by JP Miklovic

From breakfast to the dinner table, my Easter meal isn’t complete without a delicious ham for our guests to enjoy and share.

by JP Miklovic

From breakfast to the dinner table, my Easter meal isn’t complete without a delicious ham for our guests to enjoy and share. Whether I’m serving up a casual brunch, an early dinner or a formal holiday feast, an easy-to-prepare spiral ham is the perfect centerpiece for any meal occasion.

Perfectly cooked and hand trimmed, Smithfield spiral sliced hams make holiday entertaining quick and effortless, so you can spend less time in the kitchen and more time with family and friends.

For an added twist that will truly impress your guests, try any of Smithfield’s exceptional flavor offerings, like the Baked Apple Spice Spiral Sliced Ham, part of the premium Smokehouse Reserve line. You’ll also delight family and friends with flavors like Salted Caramel, Pecan Praline, Brown Sugar and Crunchy Glaze.

Serve up any leftovers as-is or easily incorporate them into an array of tasty dishes for brunch, lunch or dinner the next day. Try this Leftover Ham and Bacon Hash for a quick at-home brunch dish or use in an easy appetizer like Ham and Brie Crostini.

With flavor this easy, this could be your most delicious Easter yet. For more Easter recipe inspiration, visit Smithfield.com.

Leftover Ham and Bacon Hash 

1          tablespoon Dijon mustard

2          tablespoons olive oil

3/4       teaspoon kosher salt

1          teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2          pounds yellow potatoes, diced

8          ounces button mushrooms, quartered

1 1/2    cups Smithfield Anytime Favorites Cubed Ham or Smithfield Hickory Smoked Spiral Sliced Ham, cooked

4          slices Smithfield Hometown Original Bacon, cooked and cut into 1-inch pieces

2/3       cup jarred roasted red pepper, drained and roughly chopped

3/4       cup fresh mozzarella cheese, cubed

2-3       eggs, fried or poached to preference (optional)

1/3       cup fresh basil leaves, thinly sliced

Heat oven to 425 F. In large bowl, whisk together mustard, oil, salt and pepper until combined. Add potatoes and mushrooms, and toss to coat.

Spread potato mixture evenly onto two lightly oiled or nonstick, rimmed baking pans and roast in oven 35-40 minutes, or until potatoes and mushrooms have started to brown, stirring halfway through cooking. Add any leftover bacon or ham to mixture and stir.

Add in roasted peppers to oven-safe serving casserole (if desired) and top with cheese. Bake additional 10-15 minutes, or until cheese has softened and begun to melt. Top hash with eggs, if desired, and sliced basil.

Ham and Brie Crostini with Fig Jam 

1          French baguette (10-12 ounces), sliced on bias, 1/4-inch thick (about 24 pieces)

1/2       cup extra-virgin olive oil

3/4       pound Smithfield Hickory Smoked Spiral Sliced Ham, cut into 24 pieces

9          ounces Brie cheese, sliced and cut into 24 pieces

1/4       cup fig jam

Heat oven to 400 F.

Lightly brush both sides of baguette slices with oil and place slightly spaced on rimmed baking pans. Bake 10-12 minutes, or until lightly browned and crisp.

Top each slice with ham and Brie; bake additional 5-8 minutes, or until Brie has just started to melt.

Top each crostini with fig jam and serve warm.

(Family Features)

Chowline: To Eat or Not to Eat – An Egg-cellent Question about Easter Eggs

You use for your Easter egg hunt – if you follow safe handling and storage practices…….

My mom is hosting Easter dinner this year and plans to have an Easter egg hunt for the grandkids. Growing up, we always ate the eggs used in the egg hunt, and my mom insists this is fine. But I’ve heard that you shouldn’t eat those eggs. You should have a separate batch — one to eat and one to hide and use for decorations. Which one of us is right?

Well, that depends. You both are right – in certain circumstances.

Eggs are an important source of protein and are delicious to eat. However, they must be handled safely to prevent the chance of contracting a foodborne illness. One such outbreak occurred nationwide in 2010 when nearly 2,000 consumers reported becoming ill and some 550 million eggs were recalled due to salmonella contamination, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

While the chances of foodborne illness are small, you still need to practice safe food handling when dealing with raw eggs in preparation for dyeing Easter eggs. That includes washing your hands thoroughly before handling the eggs at every step – cooking well, cooling, dyeing and hiding – says the American Egg Board.

If you are making Easter eggs that will be eaten, it is important that you make sure the eggs are thoroughly cooked. This can be done by placing fresh eggs with intact shells — never use eggs with cracked shells — in a saucepan and cover them with at least 1 inch of water. Cook the eggs until the yolk and white are firm. Then run cold water over the eggs and store them in the refrigerator until you are ready to decorate them.

However, if you are among those who prefer to decorate hollowed egg shells (by blowing the raw egg through a hole in the shell), be sure to use pasteurized shell eggs to lessen the potential of salmonella exposure. You can also wash the egg in hot water and rinse it in a solution of 1 teaspoon of chlorine bleach per one-half cup of water to sanitize it, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service.

Other safe handling tips from the USDA include:

  • Use warm water and food coloring or food-grade dyes to color eggs if they will be eaten.
  • Refrigerate the eggs in their cartons after coloring, and refrigerate them again after they’ve been hidden and found.
  • Don’t eat or hide cracked eggs because bacteria can get inside them.
  • When hiding eggs, consider the places you choose to hide them carefully. You should avoid places where pets, animals, insects or lawn chemicals could come in contact with the eggs and possibly contaminate them. Eggs should also be hidden in places that are protected from dirt, moisture and other sources of bacteria.
  • Boiled eggs can be safely kept out of the refrigerator for a maximum of two hours before they become hazardous to eat. But remember – that two-hour window includes the time it takes to both hide and find the eggs.
  • Boiled eggs can be stored in the refrigerator for one week. After that, they are unsafe to eat.

So in answer to your question, you can eat the eggs that you use for your Easter egg hunt – if you follow safe handling and storage practices. But, to be on the safe side, you may want to consider dyeing two batches of eggs – one for eating and the other for hunting.

If you plan to use Easter eggs for decorations and they will be out of the refrigerator for more than two hours, it’s best not to eat those eggs at all.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@osu.edu.

WSWCD Fish Sale & Pond Clinic

The Wood Soil and Water Conservation District is offering a spring fingerling fish sale and pond clinic.

The Wood Soil and Water Conservation District is offering a spring fingerling fish sale and pond clinic.

The public is invited to attend the spring pond clinic at W. W. Knight Nature Preserve 29530 White Rd. Perrysburg, OH 43551.

Bill Cody, the “Pond Doctor,” and Craig Everett, OSU Extension will share general information on pond care and maintenance.  Bring your questions. They’ll have answers.

The pond clinic is free and open to the community. Please RSVP at wcswcd@woodswcd.com or call 419-354-5517. To ensure the correct amount of materials.

The deadline for ordering fish is Thursday, April 27th. Fish species offered include: Bluegill, Redear Sunfish, Channel Catfish, Largemouth Bass, Yellow Perch, Fathead Minnows, and White Amur.  Order forms are available on the website at www.woodswcd.com, by calling the district office or by stopping by the office at 1616 E Wooster Street (Greenwood Centre – The Courtyard) Bowling Green, OH.

TUESDAY – Senior Citizen Discount at NB Custom Cuts

Senior Discount Tuesday (SAVE 10%)!!! North Baltimore Custom Cuts – – – CLICK HERE for more information!

Senior Citizen Tuesdays

10% OFF ANY PURCHASE!

NB Custom Cuts Store Front
Located on Insley Road, just east of North Baltimore, off Quarry Road. Exit at I – 75 southbound at the Eagleville Road Exit (168) – turn right – go a 1/4 mile north!

Regular HOURS:

Monday – Friday: 8 am to 5 pm each day

Saturday: 8 am – 1 pm

The WEEKLY SPECIALS are Coming Soon!

Simplify Fish Fridays with Sheet Pan Dinners

by JP Miklovic – – – While lemon is a great complement to seafood, think about pairing with other citrus flavors like orange and lime…….

by JP Miklovic

If you’re observing Lent, Friday fish dinners could be in your future, but that’s no reason to feel limited by what you can cook. Seafood pairs well with all sorts of flavors – from chili seasoning to lime extract – and bakes quickly on a sheet pan with minimal cleanup.

Follow these simple tips from Dr. Wendy Bazilian, McCormick Health Advisor and Registered Dietitian, to get your family asking for good-for-you proteins like salmon and shrimp all year long:

  • While lemon is a great complement to seafood, think about pairing with other citrus flavors like orange and lime. Try marinating shrimp in a mixture of lite coconut milk, lime extract, ginger and red pepper.
  • Add colorful vegetables like zoodles or asparagus to your sheet pan to boost both seafood and vegetable servings. You don’t need a spiralizer to make zoodles because many grocery stores offer pre-made zoodles in the produce section.
  • Keep shrimp in your freezer to pull out for stir fries, pastas or this Coconut Lime Shrimp with Zoodles recipe.

Explore more recipes to enjoy during Lent, spring and beyond at McCormick.com, or look for McCormick Spice on Facebook and Pinterest.

Coconut Lime Shrimp with Zoodles

Prep time: 15 minutes

Cook time: 15 minutes

Servings: 4

1/4       cup Thai Kitchen Coconut Milk (regular or lite)

1          teaspoon McCormick Ground Ginger

1/2       teaspoon McCormick Garlic Powder

1/4       teaspoon McCormick Crushed Red Pepper

1/4       teaspoon McCormick Pure Lime Extract

1          pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined

1          small zucchini, cut into thin noodles with spiralizer

1          medium yellow squash, cut into thin noodles with spiralizer

1          medium carrot, cut into thin noodles with spiralizer

2          tablespoons oil

1/2       teaspoon salt

1/4       teaspoon McCormick Ground Black Pepper

Heat oven to 375 F.

In large, re-sealable plastic bag, mix together coconut milk, ginger, garlic powder, crushed red pepper and lime extract. Add shrimp; turn to coat well.

Refrigerate 15-30 minutes. Remove shrimp from marinade. Discard any remaining marinade. In center of large, shallow, foil-lined baking pan, arrange shrimp in single layer.

In large bowl, toss vegetable noodles and oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper; toss to coat well. Spread noodles around shrimp in pan.

Bake 10-15 minutes, or until shrimp turn pink and are cooked through and noodles are tender. Serve shrimp over vegetable noodles.

Test kitchen tip: For faster prep, use 4 cups store-bought spiralized vegetable noodles instead of spiralizing them yourself.

 

Orange Chili Sheet Pan Salmon

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 20 minutes

Servings: 8

Nonstick cooking spray

2          tablespoons olive oil

2          teaspoons McCormick Pure Orange Extract

2          pounds salmon fillets, skin removed

1          pound asparagus, ends trimmed

1          medium red bell pepper, cut into strips

1          package McCormick Original Chili Seasoning Mix

2          tablespoons packed brown sugar

Heat oven to 375 F. Spray foil-lined, 13-by-9-inch baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray.

In small bowl, mix together oil and orange extract. Place salmon and vegetables on separate sides of baking sheet. Brush vegetables with 1 teaspoon extract mixture. Brush both sides of salmon with remaining mixture.

In small bowl, mix together seasoning mix and brown sugar. Sprinkle 2 tablespoons seasoning mixture over vegetables. Sprinkle both sides of salmon evenly with remaining seasoning mixture.

Bake 20 minutes, or until fish flakes easily with a fork and vegetables are tender.