Local Artist Offering Mini-Art Camps

Due to popular demand, local artist and educator, Erika Miklovic, of North Baltimore is offering a few more mini-art camp painting opportunities this summer! Classes will run 9:00-10:30 in downtown North Baltimore.

Due to popular demand, local artist and educator, Erika Miklovic, of North Baltimore is offering a few more mini-art camp painting opportunities this summer! Classes will run 9:00-10:30 in downtown North Baltimore.

Monday August 1st:Rainbow Tree
Tuesday August 2nd: Marigold Watercolor
Tuesday August 9th: Beach Scene
Wednesday August 10th: Flowers by the fence

Acrylic paintings are 11 x 14.

Cost: $60 for all 4 sessions or $20 for individual sessions. $5 sibling discount. Snack provided.

Contact me with your email and I will send you a paypal invoice to reserve your child’s spot. Half of the fee is a non-refundable deposit.

Erika Art Camp 2 Erika Art Camp 4 Erika Art Camp 3 Erika Art Camp 1

Butcher Shop Specials at NB Custom Cuts

North Baltimore Custom Cuts has announced their SPECIALS for July 27 – August 2. NEW Monthly Meat Raffle! CLICK HERE for more information!

North Baltimore Custom Cuts has announced their SPECIALS for July 27 – August 2. NEW Monthly Meat Raffle! CLICK HERE for more information!

NB Custom Cuts Store Front
Located on Insley Road, just east of North Baltimore, off Quarry Road. Exit at I – 75 southbound at the Eagleville Road Exit (168) – turn right – go a 1/4 mile north!

Regular HOURS:

Monday – Friday: 8 am to 5 pm each day

Saturday: 8 am – 1 pm

WEEKLY SPECIALS –

> > > Bratwurst < < <

Just $3.69/pound

– – – Regular or South of the Border Chili – – –
________________________

BACON

Sliced to your order!

$4.79/pound OR Rindless Jowl – $2.99
_______________________________

Steak Specials From OUR Freezer!

Save $1.00 per lb. OFF Regular Price of:

T-Bone – Porterhouse – N. Y. Strip – Ribeye – Chuckeye – Flank – Skirt

“WHILE THEY LAST!”
_______________________________________

MONTHLY MEAT RAFFLE
(NO product purchase necessary)

$5.00/ticket (5 tickets for $20.00)

Over $75.00 Value:

5 packs 1# Ground Beef
5 packs 1# Pork Sausage
5# of Chicken Breasts
5# Chicken Leg Quarters
5# Pork Steak

DRAWING August 8th – Winner will be announced

All ticket stubs re-entered for the Holiday Drawing!!!

________________________

Gift Certificates now available!

We now have FRESH Mac & Potato Salad

(prices good thru Monday, August 2)

Stop out and check out the Meat Case, new items being added all the time!

Custom Cuts Meat Case July 1

We also offer:

– Everglades Seasonings –

– St. Mary’s Meats –

– Ginger’s Goodies & Homemade Breads –

– Walnut Creek Noodles

Custom Cuts Product Rack July 1

OTHER AWESOME DEALS and SELECTIONS:

Custom Cuts From Our Freezer July 1

Custom Cuts Bundles July 1

Custom Cuts Slaughter Prices July 1

Roberts Donates for Health Campus Break Room

North Baltimore’s Briar Hill Health Campus had a recent remodeling project that was a gift from the family of two former residents at the care center.

by JP Miklovic

North Baltimore’s Briar Hill Health Campus had a recent remodeling project that was a gift from the family of two former residents at the care center.

The gift was a remodeling of the Break Room, which was gifted by Mr. & Mrs. William H. Roberts and Jane E. Leggiero, with many thanks to the Briar Hill staff who took such good care of Dr. Roberts and Ingrid Roberts. The donated money put some much needed TLC into the campus break room.

A plaque is mounted with the new television. Also the break room paint was touched up and new employee lockers were installed. Everything looks fantastic!

Below: Jen Fackler, Brenda Rice and Patti Gazarek enjoy a break in the improved break room.

Doc Robert’s son, Bill commented on how well the staff took care of Doc and “Ing”. (It wasn’t just because most people knew Ing and almost everybody knew Dad—the Briar Hill staff took wonderful care of all of their patients.)

One memory Bill shared was, “Some may remember Dad and Ing’s yellow lab, Ivory—she often came to visit at the health campus. This was good for her as well as good for Doc & Ing. The staff quickly adopted Ivory as a volunteer therapy dog and we would hang around the lobby while people made much of her.”

The Briar Hill Staff thanks the Roberts’ family for their generous support!

Briar Hill Doc Roberts Break Room July 2016 4 Briar Hill Doc Roberts Break Room July 2016 3 Briar Hill Doc Roberts Break Room July 2016 1

photos by JP Miklovic

Annual Wood County ‘Project Connect’ Fundraiser

A fundraiser for the 4th Annual Project Connect Wood County will be held. Project Connect, is a one-day, one-stop event that provides a broad range of free services to people at risk of homelessness or poverty.

A fundraiser for the 4th Annual Project Connect Wood County will be held from 5 p.m. until 8 p.m., on Wednesday, July 27, at Ziggy’s, 300 E. Wooster St., in Bowling Green.

Attendees are encouraged to bring jars of peanut butter or small bottles of laundry detergent. The fundraiser is open to the public.

Proceeds from the fundraiser will offset Project Connect’s expenses.

Project Connect, is a one-day, one-stop event that provides a broad range of free services to people at risk of homelessness or poverty.

The event will be from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. on Wednesday, October 19, at St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, 315 South College Drive, in Bowling Green.

Individuals interested in volunteering to plan Project Connect, seeking more information, or wishing to make a donation should contact United Way in Wood County at 419-352-2390.

Project Connect is sponsored by the Continuum of Care of Wood County, a coalition representing business, social services agencies, churches and citizens who address housing needs in Wood County.

Contact: Jamie Brubaker, United Way in Wood County 419-352-2390.

Parenting Press: Teach Your Child Fire Safety

Show kids how to use a coat or blanket to smother flames on another person’s clothes……..

Tip–Have regular fire drills in your home with your family. A child trained in fire safety is a safer child.

Link to book description

It is very good sense to teach children of all ages fire safety. According to the National Fire Protection Association, children 5 and younger are more than twice as likely to die in fires as older children and adults. Fire safety education can save lives.

Tools–The following suggestions and information are drawn from Kids to the Rescue! First Aid Techniques for Kids and from the National Fire Protection Association.

  • Matches and lighters are for adults only. Tell children these are tools, and they are only for grown-ups. Children should never touch them. If they find them, or see another child touching them, they should tell a grown-up right away.
  • You can’t hide from fire. Many children die in fires because they try to hide from smoke or flames rather than escape. Tell children they cannot hide, but they can get out. Role play with them your own fire escape plan. Teach them the phrase, “Get out and stay out.” Tell them never to reenter a burning building.
  • Know what a smoke alarm sounds like. Children need to recognize the sound of a smoke alarm and react immediately. Conduct a fire drill, using a smoke alarm to signal the escape.
  • Have an escape plan. Hold fire drills frequently. Everyone should know at least two ways out of every room and be familiar with all exits, including windows. Decide on a meeting place outside where everyone should gather.
  • Stop, drop, and rollStop, drop, and roll. Teach children the classic remedy for burning clothes:

    Stop–where you are–don’t run.
    Drop–to the ground.
    Roll–cover your face with your hands and roll over and over, or back and forth to smother the flames.

    Show kids how to use a coat or blanket to smother flames on another person’s clothes. Role play the procedure.

  • Crawl low under smoke. Teach children to find another exit if they come up against smoke or flames while trying to escape a fire. Teach them to crawl low under smoke, with their head one to two feet above the floor. To simulate smoke during a fire drill, you can stretch a bed sheet two feet above the floor–have the children crawl under the “smoke” to the exit.

You’ll find more practical tips you can use right now in Kids to the Rescue! First Aid Techniques for Kids by Maribeth and Darwin Boelts.

 

Chowline: How to use the ‘5-20’ rule for healthy choices

Daily Value percentages aren’t listed for everything on the label…….

I’ve never been a fan of Nutrition Facts labels, but a friend recently mentioned that she reads them all the time, using something called the “520 rule.” What is the 520 rule?

Ah, she was talking about what is known as the ”5-20 rule,” and it applies to the Daily Value percentages that are listed on the label.

Basically, it’s just a quick guideline to use when you look at those percentages to determine how a food might fit into your daily dietary goals.

Any nutrient listed as 5 percent or less of the Daily Value is considered low. Any listed as 20 percent or more of the Daily Value is considered high.

For nutrients you want to limit, such as saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium, try to choose foods with low Daily Value percentages. Foods with 5 percent or less would be great choices, while it would be smart to limit foods with 20 percent or more.

For nutrients you want to get enough of, such as fiber, vitamins A and C, calcium, and iron, look for foods with 20 percent or more of the Daily Value. A food with 5 percent or less of the Daily Value for those nutrients simply isn’t a good source of them.

By now, you are probably wondering, “What the heck is a Daily Value?” Simply put, the Daily Value is a generic nutrient-intake standard based on a 2,000 calorie-a-day diet. For key nutrients, the Nutrition Facts label provides percentages of the Daily Value that a serving of the food contributes toward the daily total.

In reality, daily nutrient recommendations depend on your age and gender. However, it’s not practical to have different food labels for each individual group, so Daily Values are used instead. Still, it could be important for you to know where your needs vary.

For example, the Daily Value for calcium is 1,000 milligrams, so a food with 300 milligrams of calcium in it would have a Daily Value percentage of 30 percent. But teenagers need 1,300 milligrams of calcium a day, and women 51 and older and men 70 and older need 1,200 milligrams a day. So, even if you consume 100 percent of the Daily Value of calcium, you still might not be getting enough.

Sodium is similar. The Daily Value for sodium is 2,400 milligrams, but that might be too much for some people, especially those with hypertension.

Daily Value percentages aren’t listed for everything on the label. For example, you won’t see a percentage for trans fats, because, basically, there is no level of trans fat that’s recommended for consumption. You should keep it as close to zero as possible.

Also, a Daily Value percentage for protein is listed only when a food makes some type of claim for protein, such as a high-protein breakfast bar. In those cases, the percentage is based on a total Daily Value level of 50 grams of protein a day.

Once you start examining the Daily Values, you can find yourself getting lost in a bit of a rabbit hole. But you don’t need to know all the nitty-gritty to make them useful. Just use the percentages — and the 5-20 rule — to make comparisons between foods to help you make the best choices.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

OEFFA Urges Constituent Action

Last week, Ohio Senators Rob Portman and Sherrod Brown joined the majority of the Senate to pass a GE labeling “compromise” bill. Unfortunately, that compromise gave away the store! It was extremely disappointing to all of us who have worked toward an honest and transparent labeling system for GE food.

Last week, Ohio Senators Rob Portman and Sherrod Brown joined the majority of the Senate to pass a GE labeling “compromise” bill. Unfortunately, that compromise gave away the store! It was extremely disappointing to all of us who have worked toward an honest and transparent labeling system for GE food.
The Roberts-Stabenow GE “non-labeling” bill, is so riddled with loopholes and problematic definitions that it is likely to be challenged in court. Even the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration are also at odds over the bill.
Worse yet, it disadvantages rural, low-income, and elderly people who may lack the smart phones and data plans required to scan each item and visit a website for information before each purchase.
Despite all of the problems and concerns, powerful biotech lobbies have been very successful at fast tracking this bill. It will be voted on in the House this week and then sent to the President’s desk.
President Obama can either sign or veto the bill or neglect to sign it while Congress is in session (a pocket veto).

Call the President today: (202) 456-1111

Tell him to veto this bill and keep his campaign promise to allow the public their right to know what they eat. 

Chowline: An ear of corn A-OK as part of a balanced diet

Try something different and roast corn on the cob on the grill

We really enjoyed having corn on the cob on July Fourth. One of my children asked why we don’t have it more often. I explained that corn is a starchy vegetable and we shouldn’t eat too much of it. But it got me thinking, how much is reasonable?

Yes, corn is a starchy vegetable. But it’s perfectly fine to enjoy it as part of a balanced diet.

According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, anyone 9 years or older should aim to eat 2 to 3 cups of vegetables a day. That equals 14 to 21 cups a week, and the guidelines recommend that 4 to 6 cups a week, or a bit more than one-quarter of all vegetables, be starchy. Besides corn, starchy vegetables include:

  • Potatoes
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Green peas
  • Lima beans
  • Cassava
  • Plantains
  • Jicama
  • Parsnips
  • Water chestnuts

Most Americans get plenty of starchy vegetables because we eat so many white potatoes, which account for 80 percent of all starchy vegetable consumption, as well as 25 percent of all the vegetables we eat. That’s a lot of potatoes. While they’re a good source of potassium, and of fiber especially if you eat the skin, consider diversifying your diet and replacing some of those potatoes with other starchy vegetables. Including, of course, sweet corn.

Corn is a good source of folate, beta carotene and thiamin along with other vitamins and minerals, and has more fiber than potatoes. It also provides zeaxanthin, an antioxidant that may protect against age-related eye disease, such as macular degeneration.

One cup of corn has about 145 calories. (One medium-sized ear of corn has about two-thirds of a cup of corn.) But watch the butter and salt, which of course add significantly to the calories and sodium. Using spray butter (the kind in the pump-spray bottle) judiciously instead of spreading on butter or margarine can trim calories and still provide that familiar flavor.

Or, try something different and roast corn on the cob on the grill. Just husk as usual, and then brush the corn with olive oil and place directly on a hot grill. Turn the cobs periodically and cook until the kernels are slightly charred. Instead of using salt, try pepper, garlic, or other herbs and spices for flavor.

As you’re enjoying the traditional summer favorite, take a look at the other vegetables you commonly eat and make sure you’re getting plenty of variety, including dark green, red and orange vegetables as well as beans, such as pinto or kidney beans. The Dietary Guidelines recommend eating a wide variety of produce to get a broad array of nutrients. For more about vegetables, see choosemyplate.gov/vegetables.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Zika Virus Presentation to be Hosted by BG Parks and Recreation

Bowling Green Parks and Recreation is hosting a presentation by Wood County Health District Epidemiologist, Connor Rittwage and Health Educator, Jennifer Campos on Zika Virus.

Bowling Green Parks and Recreation is hosting a presentation by Wood County Health District Epidemiologist, Connor Rittwage and Health Educator, Jennifer Campos on Zika Virus.

The presentation will be held on Tuesday, July 12 at 7 pm at the Simpson Building Meeting Room at 1291 Conneaut Ave. in Bowling Green.

The presentation will include an overview of Zika Virus:

  • how it spreads
  • where it is found
  • symptoms and outcomes of Zika
  • how it is transmitted
  • how it is diagnosed
  • how it is treated
  • how it can be prevented
  • The role of Wood County Health District in Zika surveillance and education.

Red Cross issues emergency call for blood and platelet donations to address significant shortage

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families…..

TOLEDO, Ohio (July 5, 2016) — The American Red Cross has issued an emergency call for blood and platelets, urging all eligible donors to give now to replenish an extremely low summer blood supply.

 

Blood donations have fallen short of hospital needs for the past few months, resulting in about 39,000 fewer donations than what’s needed, as well as a significant draw down of the overall Red Cross blood supply. In addition, the Independence Day holiday may have caused many regular donors to postpone donations due to vacation plans. A recent Red Cross poll revealed that more than 75 percent of donors surveyed indicated vacation plans this summer, many of them occurring the weeks before and after July 4.

 

“Right now, blood products are being distributed to hospitals faster than donations are coming in, which is why we are making this emergency request for donations,” said Christy Peters, External Communications Manager of the Western Lake Erie Blood Services Region. “Donations are urgently needed now to meet the needs of hospital patients in the coming days and weeks. If you’ve thought about giving blood and helping to save lives, now is the time to do it. It’s the blood donations on the shelves that help save lives when an emergency occurs.”

 

How to Help

To schedule an appointment to donate, use the free Blood Donor App, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). The Red Cross is extending hours at many donation sites to allow for more donors to make an appointment to give. Donation appointments and completion of a RapidPass online health history questionnaire are encouraged to avoid longer wait times. Donors with all blood types are needed.

 

Those unable to give can still help by encouraging others to give through a SleevesUp virtual blood drive at redcrossblood.org/sleevesup, giving of their time through volunteerism or making a financial donation to support Red Cross humanitarian work across the country and around the world.

 

Who Blood Donations Help

Every two seconds in the United States blood and platelets are needed to respond to patient emergencies, including accident and burn victims, heart surgery and organ transplant procedures, and patients receiving treatment for leukemia, cancer or sickle cell disease. The Red Cross must collect approximately 14,000 blood and platelet donations every day for patients at about 2,600 hospitals and transfusion centers nationwide.

 

Because of generous donors, the Red Cross is able to provide blood products to patients like 11-year-old Mae Rainey, who needs regular blood transfusions as part of her treatment for a blood disorder.

 

“I am very grateful for the opportunities that the Red Cross has given us to get her to her healthiest state,” said Caleb Rainey, Mae’s older brother.

 

Watch Mae’s story to learn how blood donations can make a lifesaving difference.

 

Upcoming blood donation opportunities

Ohio

Fulton

 

Swanton

7/11/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Swanton Alliance Church Epic Center, 124 N. Main Street

 

Delta

7/12/2016: 1 p.m. – 6 p.m., Shiloh Christian Union Church, 2100 County Road 5

 

Archbold

7/19/2016: 11 a.m. – 5:30 p.m., Ruihley Park Pavilion, 320 W Holland Street

 

Wauseon

7/21/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., First Christian Church, 129 E. Elm

_______________

Hancock

 

Arlington

7/9/2016: 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m., Good Hope Lutheran Church, 300 S. Main St.

 

Findlay

7/15/2016: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., USW Local 207L Union Hall, 1130 Summit St.

7/19/2016: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., St. Marks United Methodist Church, 800 S. Main St.

7/20/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Parkview Christian Church, 15035 SR 12 East

7/21/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, 2330 S. Main St.

7/22/2016: 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., The Courier, 701 W. Sandusky St.

7/25/2016: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., Hancock County American Red Cross, 125 Fair St.

_______________

Henry

 

Liberty Center

7/6/2016: 1 p.m. – 6 p.m., Liberty Center High School, 103 W. Young Street

 

Holgate

7/11/2016: 1 p.m. – 6 p.m., St. Peter Lutheran Church, 710 E. Joe E. Brown

 

Deshler

7/18/2016: 1 p.m. – 7 p.m., Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, 230 Allendale Avenue

 

Napoleon

7/25/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Napoleon American Legion, 500 Glenwood

 

Ridgeville Corners

7/25/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Ridgeville Corners American Legion, CR 19

_______________

Lucas

 

Toledo

7/5/2016: 10:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

7/5/2016: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m., Toledo Mud Hens, 406 Washington Street

7/6/2016: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., 911 Training Center, 2127 Jefferson Avenue

7/6/2016: 10:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

7/7/2016: 10:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

7/8/2016: 7 a.m. – 4 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

7/9/2016: 7 a.m. – 2 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

7/11/2016: 8 a.m. – 4 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

 

Maumee

7/12/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Maumee American Legion, 204 Illinois Ave.

 

Toledo

7/12/2016: 10:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

7/13/2016: 10:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

7/14/2016: 10:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

 

Holland

7/15/2016: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., 102.3 Proclaim FM, 7112 Angola Road

 

Sylvania

7/15/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., McCord Road Christian Church, 4765 McCord Road

 

Toledo

7/15/2016: 7 a.m. – 4 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

 

Sylvania

7/16/2016: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Sylvania Senior Center, 7140 Sylvania Ave.

 

Toledo

7/16/2016: 7 a.m. – 2 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

7/18/2016: 8 a.m. – 4 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

7/18/2016: 11:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Toledo Hospital, 2142 N. Cove Blvd

7/19/2016: 10:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

7/20/2016: 10:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

 

Maumee

7/21/2016: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., Professional Skills Institute, 1505 Holland Rd.

 

Oregon

7/21/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Hope Community Church, 5650 Starr Ave.

 

Toledo

7/21/2016: 10:30 a.m. – 6:30 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

7/22/2016: 7 a.m. – 4 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

7/23/2016: 7 a.m. – 2 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

7/25/2016: 8 a.m. – 4 p.m., Toledo Blood Donation Center, 3510 Executive Parkway

Ottawa

 

Marblehead

7/6/2016: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m., Marblehead VFW, 421 W. Main Street

 

Port Clinton

7/7/2016: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., All State, 3979 Knoll Crest Drive

7/8/2016: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., All State, 3979 Knoll Crest Drive

 

Elmore

7/11/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Grace Lutheran Church, 19225 W. Witty

 

Port Clinton

7/11/2016: 1 p.m. – 6 p.m., Edgewood Manor, 1330 South Fulton Street

 

Put in Bay

7/12/2016: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Put-In-Bay Town Hall, 601 Catawba Avenue

 

Elmore

7/13/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., The Block, 320 Toledo Street

 

Oak Harbor

7/18/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Community Market Oak Harbor VFW, 251 W. Main Street

7/19/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Ottawa County Fairgrounds Building B, 7870 W. State Route 163

 

Port Clinton

7/22/2016: 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., Magruder Hospital, 615 Fulton Street

_______________

Putnam

 

Miller City

7/5/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Miller City Sportsmans Club, 400 S. Main Street

 

Pandora

7/7/2016: 12:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., Pandora United Methodist Church, 108 Washington

 

Kalida

7/19/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Kalida High School, 301 N. Third Street

 

Columbus Grove

7/22/2016: 1 p.m. – 7 p.m., Columbus Grove American Legion, 412 Plum

_______________

Sandusky

 

Fremont

7/12/2016: 12 p.m. – 5 p.m., Fremont Recreation Center, 600 St. Joseph St.

 

Clyde

7/13/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 609 Vine St.

 

Fremont

7/14/2016: 10:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Fremont Eagles, 2570 W State St

7/18/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Fremont VFW, 204 Birchard Ave.

7/22/2016: 8 a.m. – 1 p.m., Grace Community Church, 900 Smith Road

_______________

Seneca

 

New Riegel

7/5/2016: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., New Riegel American Legion, 17 S. Perry St.

 

Tiffin

7/8/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Family of Faith Lutheran Church, 870 W. Market Street, (Inside theTiffin Mall)

7/14/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 36 Melmore Street

 

Fostoria

7/18/2016: 12:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Fostoria Fire Hall, 233 W. South St.

 

Green Springs

7/18/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Green Springs United Methodist Church, 117 N Broadway

7/20/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Elmwood Healthcare at the Springs, 401 N. Broadway St.

_______________

Wood

 

Bowling Green

7/8/2016: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Bowling Green State University, Bowen-Thompson Student Union

7/9/2016: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Bowling Green Covenant Church, 1165 Haskins Rd.

7/9/2016: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m., Bowling Green Eagles Club, 1163 North Main Street

7/13/2016: 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., Christ’s Church In Bowling Green, 14455 Campbell Hill Road

 

Rossford

7/16/2016: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., Local 8 Union Hall, 807 Lime City Road

 

Bowling Green

7/20/2016: 8 a.m. – 2 p.m., Ohio Dept of Job and Family Services, 1928 E. Gypsy Lane Road

 

Portage

7/22/2016: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., Christ United Methodist Church, 301 West Main Street

 

Perrysburg

7/23/2016: 8:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m., Hilton Garden Inn, 6165 Levis Commons Blvd.

7/25/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Lutheran Church of the Master, 28744 Simmons Rd

_______________

Wyandot

 

Sycamore

7/7/2016: 12:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m., Mohawk Community Center, 295 St. Hwy. 231

 

Carey

7/11/2016: 12:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Carey Shrine Cafeteria, 315 Clay St.

 

Michigan

Monroe

 

Dundee

7/5/2016: 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., Dundee Community Center, 242 Toledo Street

 

Monroe

7/7/2016: 12:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., St. Michael Catholic Church, 502 W. Front Street

 

Petersburg

7/7/2016: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Summerfield High School, 17555 Ida West Rd.

 

Monroe

7/8/2016: 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., Redeemer Fellowship Church, 5305 Evergreen Drive

7/9/2016: 8 a.m. – 1 p.m., St. Marys Church, 127 N. Monroe Street

 

Milan

7/20/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Marble Memorial United Methodist, 8 Park Street

 

Temperance

7/20/2016: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m., Lambertville VFW, 4120 Piehl Road

 

Monroe

7/22/2016: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Monroe High School, 901 Herr Road

 

About the American Red Cross

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

NB Custom Cuts Weekly Specials – July 5 – 11

NB’s newest business, North Baltimore Custom Cuts has announced their SPECIALS for July 5 – 11, including FREE Chicken Quarters with qualifying purchase. CLICK HERE for more information!

NB’s newest business, North Baltimore Custom Cuts has announced their SPECIALS for July 5 – 11, including FREE Chicken Quarters with qualifying purchase. CLICK HERE for more information!

NB Custom Cuts Store Front
Former Belleville Meats and previously Husing & Son on Insley Road.

Regular HOURS:

Monday – Friday: 8 am to 5 pm each day

Saturday: 8 am – 1 pm

WEEKLY SPECIALS –

> FREE Leg Quarters <

Get 4 Chix Leg Quarters FREE with any $35 purchase!!!
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– – -Try our NEW – – –

“South of the Border” Chili Brats! Just $3.99/lb.
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4# Packs of “3 to 1” Bacon Burgers – ONLY $22.50
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We now have FRESH Mac & Potato Salad – $3.99/lb.

(prices good thru Monday July 11)

Stop out and check out the Meat Case, new items being added all the time!

Custom Cuts Meat Case July 1

We also offer:

– Everglades Seasonings –

– St. Mary’s Meats –

– Ginger’s Goodies & Homemade Breads –

– Walnut Creek Noodles

Custom Cuts Product Rack July 1

OTHER AWESOME DEALS and SELECTIONS:

Custom Cuts From Our Freezer July 1

Custom Cuts Bundles July 1

Custom Cuts Slaughter Prices July 1

OSU Offers “Dining with Diabetes: Beyond the Kitchen”

Self-paced online course to help participants learn, share and chat with health professionals about managing diabetes……

COLUMBUS, OH, July 1 – Educators and researchers at Ohio State University Extension, Family and Consumer Sciences, have developed a self-paced online course to help participants learn, share and chat with health professionals about managing diabetes.

  • The course, Dining with Diabetes: Beyond the Kitchen, focuses on carbohydrates, fats, sodium, vitamins, minerals and fiber. The easy to follow three-module course includes lessons, videos and activities to complete.

Participants can expect to learn:

  • How important blood sugar and carbohydrates are for managing diabetes.
  • How fats and sodium affect a healthy diet.
  • The role vitamins, minerals and fiber play in a healthy diet.
  • How to make healthy food choices when eating out and grocery shopping.

After completion of the course, participants receive a printable certificate. They are also automatically entered in a quarterly drawing for a $100 Amazon.com gift card.

Sign up is easy and free. Visit go.osu.edu/DWD_BTK and click “buy now.” The course will be added to cart for checkout at no cost. After completing the transaction, participant will be required to create an account with campus.extension.org to take advantage of all the materials.

Course instructors for Dining with Diabetes: Beyond the Kitchen are Cheryl Barber-Spires, Barb Hennard, Shawna Hite, Dan Remley and Susan Zies.

For questions or assistance, contact Dan Remley at remley.4@osu.edu or Susan Zies at zies.1@osu.edu.

DWD BeyondTheKitchen