Ohio State Researchers: Eating Tomatoes May Protect Against Skin Cancer

Non-melanoma skin cancers are the most common of all cancers………………..

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Could eating a tomato a day help keep skin cancer away — or at least lessen the risk of developing non-melanoma skin cancers?

Researchers at The Ohio State University think the answer is maybe, based on promising results of a new study of how nutritional interventions can modulate the risk for skin cancers in mice.

The study, published in the July 11 edition of Scientific Reports, found that mice fed tomatoes daily over 35 weeks and exposed to ultraviolet light experienced a 50 percent decrease in developing skin cancer tumors compared to mice that didn’t consume tomatoes.

The theory is that dietary carotenoids, the pigmenting compounds that give tomatoes their color, may protect skin against UV light damage, said Jessica Cooperstone, co-author of the study and a research scientist in the Department of Food Science and Technology in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at Ohio State.

Previous human clinical trials suggest that eating tomato paste over time can dampen sunburns, perhaps thanks to carotenoids from the plants that are deposited in the skin of humans after eating, and may be able to protect from UV light damage, Cooperstone said.

“Lycopene, the primary carotenoid in tomatoes, has been shown to be the most effective antioxidant of these pigments,” she said. “However, when comparing lycopene administered from a whole food (tomato) or a synthesized supplement, tomatoes appear more effective in preventing redness after UV exposure, suggesting other compounds in tomatoes, apart from lycopene, may also be bioactive.”

This is significant, considering that unprotected exposure to the sun is a major risk factor in the development of skin cancer, Cooperstone said.

In fact, non-melanoma skin cancers are the most common of all cancers, with more new cases — 5.4 million in 2012 — each year than breast, prostate, lung and colon cancers combined, according to the American Cancer Society.

Despite a low mortality rate, these cancers are costly, about $8.1 billion a year, are disfiguring, and their rates are increasing, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

“As a result, alternative methods for systemic protection, possibly via nutritional interventions to modulate risk for skin-related diseases, could provide a significant benefit,” Cooperstone said. “Foods are not drugs, but they can possibly over the lifetime of consumption alter the development of certain diseases.

“This preclinical research gets at that prevention aspect and rationalizes studying this issue further.”

The three-year study was funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health through the National Cancer Institute. The study was a collaborative project involving three other Ohio State researchers including Tatiana Oberyszyn, a professor and vice chair in the Department of Pathology in the College of Medicine; David Francis, professor and tomato geneticist in the Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, who developed the tomato varieties used in the study; and Steven Schwartz, a professor in Food Science and Technology

New ‘Memory Café’ in Toledo

Memory Café’s are for those with mild memory loss from any kind of dementia and their family members or friends.

The Alzheimer’s Association, Northwest Ohio Chapter will host a new Memory Café in collaboration with the Toledo Lucas County Public Library at Reynolds Corners Library on Wednesday, July 19th.  This will be the second location for a ‘Memory Café’ in Toledo hosted by the Alzheimer’s Association.

Memory Café’s are for those with mild memory loss from any kind of dementia and their family members or friends.  This program at Reynolds Corners Library will include a choice between an art project each month or just socializing.

Brenda Hendricks, Early Stage Coordinator at the Association, said “this allows for education, socialization and art opportunities.  At a time when social connections often lessen, this allows for new connections with others and fun.”  This first Café theme will be “Images in Time,” highlighting old photographs over coffee and snacks.

Memory Café will be held the third Wednesday of each month at the Reynolds Corner Branch Library at 4833 Dorr St., 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Call The Alzheimer’s Association at 1-800-272-3900 for more information or to sign up for the Café.

Chowline: Reusable Water Bottles Need to Be Washed Between Uses

Whatever you decide to do with your water bottle, it is important to remember that staying hydrated is a key part of staying healthy……….

I heard recently that reusable water bottles can sometimes be a hotbed of germs. Is that true?

Yes, at least according to a recent analysis from Treadmill Reviews that found that unwashed reusable water bottles could harbor significantly high levels of bacteria that are harmful to humans.

In fact, the report goes as far as to say that “drinking from the average refillable bottle can be many times worse than licking your dog’s toy.” According to the study, the average athlete’s water bottle has 313,499 colony-forming units, or CFUs, of bacteria per square centimeter while the average pet toy has 2,937 CFUs.

Yuck.

The study, which was performed by EmLab P&K, a New Jersey-based environmental testing firm, analyzed 12 types of water bottles and found differing amounts of CFUs based on the design of the bottle.

For example, slide-top bottles harbored 933,340 CFUs, compared to squeeze-top bottles at 161,971 CFUs and screw-top bottles at 159,060 CFUs. The bottle type that harbored the fewest bacteria was the kind with a straw top, which measured 25.4 CFUs.

But, that doesn’t mean you should toss your reusable water bottles and opt exclusively for store-bottled water instead. The report offers the following options for consumers to still get their required daily water intake while lessening their chances to encounter harmful bacteria and limiting their consumption of single-use containers:

  • After every use, wash your bottle in hot water with a teaspoon of unscented dish soap added. Soak it for a few minutes, rinse it well using warm water, and allow it to dry completely before the next use.
  • Occasionally use a weak bleach solution of 1 tablespoon of bleach per quart of water to sanitize the bottle.
  • Avoid letting your water bottle sit half full for long periods in between use.
  • Opt for using a straw-top water bottle. In the study, these types of bottles were found to have a lower prevalence of bacteria.
  • Opt for a stainless steel bottle.
  • Try to find a water bottle that doesn’t contain crevices and harder-to-clean spots. This will lessen the potential for harboring harmful bacteria, the study says.

Whatever you decide to do with your water bottle, it is important to remember that staying hydrated is a key part of staying healthy. Consuming an adequate amount of fluids helps to maintain body functions, including those of your heart, brain and muscles. Fluids also serve to carry nutrients to your cells, keep your temperature normal, digest food, flush bacteria from your bladder and prevent constipation.

Healthy people should get 30 to 50 ounces of water per day, which translates to about 4 to 6 cups or 1 to 1.5 liters, according to recommendations from doctors at Harvard Medical School. In addition to water, milk is also a good option to help in hydration.

So clean those water bottles and keep up your daily fluid intake. Your body will thank you later.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@osu.edu.

Fatal Crashes in Wood Country Reviewed – 2nd Qtr.

Two crashes were reviewed from the second quarter of 2017 and one was deferred to the third quarter for review.

Wood County Safe Communities held their quarterly Fatal Data Review on Tuesday, June 10, 2017. Two crashes were reviewed from the second quarter of 2017 and one was deferred to the third quarter for review.

The crashes reviewed were:
 Route 25 at Pearl St. in the City of Bowling Green
 Route 480 and Route 795
 Route 20 at Oakmead in Perrysburg Township (Deferred to Third Quarter)

The countermeasures established as a result of these crashes are as follows:
 Always wear your seatbelt
 Do not drive at an excessive speed
 Always be attentive when driving
 Always obey all traffic control devices
 Do not drive impaired
 Know your driving limitations

For more information, please contact Lt. Angel Burgos, Ohio State Highway Patrol, at 419-352-2481.

Flooding can contaminate wells

Private well owners encouraged to check their drinking water………………

BOWLING GREEN – Wood County Health District is urging residents in and around flooded areas to take precautions to help prevent disease and stay safe.

Heavy rains can create conditions that affect private wells and drinking water. If you live in an area that was recently or is currently flooded, your private well may be in danger of contamination from pollutants carried in flood waters.

Flood waters and runoff may contain fecal material from overflowing sewage systems, agricultural and industrial byproducts and other contaminants that can affect water supplies and cause water-borne illness. Wells located in pits, basements and low-lying areas are especially susceptible to contamination. To avoid illness, it is important for residents and businesses that were impacted by flooding to make sure their water is safe to drink.

Any well that has been submerged by flood waters should be pumped out once the floodwater recedes, then thoroughly disinfected and tested to determine that the water is safe.

People with private water wells who think their well may have been impacted by flooding should contact the Wood County Health District for information on disinfecting and testing water from a well. For information on well chlorination, go to http://www.woodcountyhealth.org/envhealth/private_water.html

The mission of Wood County Health District is to prevent disease, promote healthy lifestyles and protect the health of everyone in Wood County. Our Community Health and Wellness Center provides comprehensive medical services for men, women and children. We welcome all patients, including uninsured or underinsured clients, regardless of their ability to pay, and we accept most third-party insurance. For more information, visit www.woodcountyhealth.org

Wood County Health District releases report on physical activity and nutrition habits

This study compares local survey results to state and national data to paint a picture of the health of people in Wood County…..

BOWLING GREEN —Wood County Health District has released a study of the nutrition and recreational habits of county residents and workers. The health district will establish an action plan this fall based on the results of its 2017 Nutrition and Physical Activity Health Assessment.

This study, available at http://woodcountyhealth.org under Reports and Publications, compares local survey results to state and national data to paint a picture of the health of people in Wood County. While not a random sample that can be generally applied throughout the county, the data provides information that will be used to develop wellness, activity and nutrition initiatives.

Responses from the public, when compared to those from community leaders, show a need to better promote existing recreational facilities such as parks and biking and walking trails. This will help decide where additional opportunities may be needed.

Other highlights include:

  • More than two-thirds of Wood County adults were either overweight (35 percent) or obese (35 percent) by body mass index. Being overweight or obese can lead to a wide variety of diseases.
  • 56 percent of participants reported consuming two daily servings or less of fruits and vegetables. The American Cancer Society recommends that adults eat at least five daily servings of fruits and vegetables to reduce the risk of cancer and maintain good health.
  • Parents reported that only 1 percent of their children drank the recommended 10 or more servings of water per day. About 11 percent of school-age children in Wood County drink soda, punch, juice, sports drinks, energy drinks or other fruit-flavored drinks at least once per day in the past week, according to parents who participated.
  • 10 percent of people who responded reported having to choose between buying food and paying bills within the past year.

The mission of Wood County Health District is to prevent disease, promote healthy lifestyles and protect the health of everyone in Wood County. Our Community Health and Wellness Center provides comprehensive medical services for men, women and children. We welcome all patients, including uninsured or underinsured clients, regardless of their ability to pay, and we accept most third-party insurance. For more information, visit www.woodcountyhealth.org

Chowline: Eating Healthy at the Amusement Park

It’s fair,festival, and amusement park season………………………………….

My friends and I are planning to spend the day at an amusement park. Do you have any tips on how to avoid the sugar and calorie overload and eat as healthy as possible while there?

Amusement parks can still be a fun, wonderful way to enjoy a summer day without overindulging in the sugary, deep-fried, calorie-laden foods that the parks are traditionally known for.

Despite the temptation to feast on mounds of cotton candy, deep-fried candy bars, funnel cakes, snow cones, chili cheese fries and, of course, those infamous giant turkey legs, you can have nutritious foods and drinks at the park that taste good and are better for your health.

One of the best ways to eat healthy at the park is to pack some nutritious meals to bring with you. While many amusement parks won’t let you bring in outside food, you can pack a cooler with ice in your car and fill it with nutritious, portable foods that you can eat throughout the day. Some ideas for the cooler include fruit, nuts, yogurt, sandwiches, and veggies such as carrots and celery sticks, among others.

If you’d prefer to eat at the park, below are some suggestions for healthy food choices from Eatinghealthy.org and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics:

  • Instead of hot dogs, hamburgers and French fries, opt for something like a grilled chicken breast with a side salad or fruits and vegetables.
  • Avoid super-sized sodas, lemonades and other sugary drinks. Choose fat-free or low-fat milk or chocolate milk instead or a nice cold glass of water.
  • If you are looking for something sweet, try a candy apple. While they do pack about 300 calories each, the fiber in the apple will help keep you full.
  • Meat and vegetable kabobs allow you to indulge in the food-on-a-stick tradition of amusement park foods without the extra sugar and calories.
  • Corn on the cob is also a good option, preferably without the mounds of butter.

Another thing to remember about spending the day at an amusement park – you need to stay hydrated. It’s important that you drink plenty of fluids to avoid becoming dehydrated.

One tip is to bring a water bottle with you and drink it frequently throughout the day. If you don’t want to carry it around with you, another option is to request a cup of ice water from any food vendor at the park and drink it in between rides.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@osu.edu.

photo: Thinkstock

Quick Storms Blows Down Limbs

A quick hitter  of a storm moved on in Friday morning, flickering the power enough to turn off or force reset electronics and knock down a few limbs and power lines around North Baltimore.

A quick hitter  of a storm moved on in Friday morning, flickering the power enough to turn off or force reset electronics and knock down a few limbs and power lines around North Baltimore.

It was right around 7 am and the TV weather guys/gals were talking about all the communities that were going to be hit, but never seemed to mention good ol’ NB, and guess what, we got hit.

Traffic was diverted a short time on East Broadway, with the direction of NB PD, as Department of Public Works employees cleared a large limb or tree that fell across the road, just east of Poe Rd.

In this reporter’s yard we had a big limb come down from the top of an big, ol’ Black Walnut tree.

The village streets were all “open” around 8 am, with DPW crews continuing the clean-up and AEP crews repairing any down lines.

Contact the Village Office to report blocked streets or limbs on wires.  419-257-2394

Chowline: Safe, Healthier Options For Picnics

Remember, although most perishable foods are safe to be left out for two hours, in hot weather, especially in temperatures above 90 degrees, food should not sit out for more than an hour…………..

I’m planning to pack a picnic for our 4th of July celebration in the park. To save time, can I partially cook the ribs at home and finish cooking them later on the grill during the picnic?

While it’s understandable that you’d want to save time by partially cooking your meats before heading to the park, doing so could result in a case of foodborne illness. This is because partial cooking does not destroy bacteria that can cause illness. The added heat during partial cooking can allow these bacteria to grow to unsafe levels. A safer option is to fully cook the meats to a safe internal temperature on the grill at the picnic.

You should also use a meat thermometer to judge the doneness of the meat — don’t rely on the color of the food as an indicator of whether it is done. Beef and pork should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160 degrees, while chicken should be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees.

With July being designated as National Picnic Month, now is a good time to familiarize yourself with some other food safety tips to ensure you, your family and friends can enjoy months of summer picnics and barbecues without the potential for foodborne illnesses such as Salmonella or Listeria.

For example, did you know that it is better to store your cooler in the air-conditioned car as you drive to the park or beach for your picnic rather than placing it in a hot trunk? Or if you plan to buy takeout foods such as fried chicken for your picnic, you need to eat the food within two hours of purchase to avoid developing foodborne illness?

Or if you plan to make potato, egg or pasta salad, you should cool the potatoes, eggs or pasta and other ingredients to refrigerator temperature (below 40 degrees) before assembling? This prevents the salad from going into the temperature “danger zone” —between 40 and 140 degrees — where bacteria multiply rapidly during prep or storage.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service offer these other tips for safe, healthy picnics and barbecues:

  • Always use an insulated cooler with a cold source, such as ice, frozen gel packs or frozen foods.
  • Pack cold food first, right from the refrigerator. Keep food cold until ready to cook.
  • Cold salads, such as potato, chicken or pasta, should be kept cold until serving.
  • Plan to keep hot foods hot with a thermos or insulated dish.
  • Pack uncooked meat, poultry and seafood separately from all ready-to-eat foods, such as beverages, fruits and side dishes. A separate cooler for uncooked meats is an even better idea!
  • Avoid produce that’s bruised or damaged.
  • When choosing fresh-cut produce, such as half a melon or bagged mixed greens, pick only items that are refrigerated or surrounded by ice.
  • Store perishable produce, including berries, lettuce, herbs and mushrooms, as well as all cut or peeled produce, at 40 degrees or below.
  • Use a fresh, clean plate for serving cooked food. Don’t let raw meat juices touch other food.
  • Place leftovers promptly in the cooler and store it in the shade to stay cool. Discard any perishable food left out for more than two hours.

Remember, although most perishable foods are safe to be left out for two hours, in hot weather, especially in temperatures above 90 degrees, food should not sit out for more than an hour. And while this may seem intuitive, it’s important that you wash your hands, your work area and all utensils before, during and after preparing food.

July Troop 315 Newsletter

“This was the best camp year ever”  Our scout proclaimed. 

July Troop 315 Newsletter 

“This was the best camp year ever”  Our scout proclaimed.  With Kyle, Aiden, Billy and Noah having their final youth summer camp year,  It was very emotional for them.  These boys, plus Noah H.  crossed over when I started my first year as scoutmaster.  I journeyed the Boy scout trail together,  I trained and learned all I know about scouting, and all these boys worked very hard at ranks and are either at Life or Eagle rank in our troop. 

The troop means so much to them as well as all my younger scouts.  My hopes are that all these fine young me do great things in their adult life,  We plant the seed  and show them how to become leaders through the game of scouting.  That’s been the formula since the early days of the scouting movement.   Active parents and leaders enjoy the journey 100% and as for the 17 y/o scouts who are aging out.  Well;  They want to come back as adults and help the troop.  WOW.  There is no amount of money that can bring this feeling of satisfaction and I’ll say that over and over again. 

The troop, for the first time in decades, won the camp wide  games,  Over 550 scouts participates and our troop got first place,  3 boys participated in the Frontiersman program,   1 scout was called out in the Order of the Arrow, and our troop received the Baden Powell Award.  As an old storyteller would say,  ” You should have been there!”. 

There won’t be a meeting on July 2nd in observance of Independence day… Scouts and families,  Go have a cookout and spend time with family 

July 9th 

All scouts , please bring your Handbook to the meeting.  Our leaders will be going over all the you learned at camp to see what ranks  your are moving up to.  This in in preparation for our Awards picnic being held on  July 23rd. 

July 16 

Elections.  All scouts and leaders,  We will be listening to our scouts battle for all leadership and duty positions at this meeting.  SPL, ASPL, PL, APL, Troop Guide, Quartermaster, Chaplin’s Aid,

July 23

Awards Picnic – We will meet at the scouthouse for a Potluck Supper and Awards.  All scouts will receive their merit badges, ranks, and office patches at the event.  Parents, please bring a hot or cold dish to the picnic.  We will hold it at the scouthouse at the normal meeting time  6:00pm  Scouts, Class A shirt for the event

July 29 

Good Old Summertime Fundraiser.    This is a big event for us and needs all scouts and parents to commit.   An email will follow for sign up times but this event requires 2 scouts for food booth and 2 for custodian work in 2 hour shifts  during the event all day.  We will set up the station on Friday night in front of the firehouse.  We also need parents during these times to help with sales, money, grill  and overall management of the event.  The shift counts as a share when it comes to money earned.  Each 2 hr shift counts as one.  All scouts will work 1 hour in the booth and one emptying trash and spot sweeping the streets.  If we are caught up on custodial,  then we can use them in the booth as well.    

Troop 337 will be serving breakfast from the booth til 10:00am and we will take over from there til close of GOST at 9:30pm.  It’s a biggy but does earn a lot of money for each scout.  I will need parent support for logistics as well so if interested in helping with food purchase,  setup,  food safety and permits, let me know. 

No meeting on July 30 .  We’ll be wiped out from the GOST Festival 

August 6 

Shake down for White water rafting trip.  This is a prep meeting to let scouts know what to expect, pack, schedule, Merit badge work for the camp

 August 7 – 9 

Rafting in Ohiopyle PA.    Here it is , our High adventure .  I have 4 paid scouts for the trip and our deadline is July 12 to pay and register scouts for the trip.  $110.00 includes.  travel, camping, rafting, food for the event.  If you like high adventure, heart pumping, rapids,  scenic stops in mountain terrain,  Natural sights including, Natural water slide, Water falls,  and awesome views,  This is your trip.  Please let me know asap if your planning on going.  I you transport scouts and want to go as an adult,  Your ticket is free.  I’ll know numbers as we gather participants. 

Shawn Benjamin
nbtroop315@aol.com

Photos from Summer Camp 2017

Click on the images to enlarge.

Heritage Farm Demo: Livestock Care

Stop by anytime between 1-4 pm the first Saturday of each month to see farm staff and volunteers in action working on the farm.

Stop by anytime between 1-4 pm the first Saturday of each month to see farm staff and volunteers in action working on the farm. Each month’s activity is dependent upon the season’s progress, so themes are subject to substitution.
For July, we’ll be grooming the livestock, and cleaning and repairing their living areas.
Saturday, July 1st; 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Carter Historic Farm
18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green
No Registration needed.