Guest Column: Dr. Missy, Feelings Helper

Dr. Missy talks about today’s topic: Adolescents and Embarrassment

Adolescents and Embarrassment

Parents, please invite your kids to read this article about how to cope with embarrassment and then discuss it together.

 

Let’s talk about embarrassment. The emotion of embarrassment is uncomfortable. You can feel your face blush with redness. Ears ring and your pulse rate increases. You feel brainless. Beads of sweat may form on your forehead and under your armpits. Your head hangs and your eyes stare at the ground. Others are not laughing with you, they’re laughing at you.

 

Individuals react in different ways. Some people laugh at themselves and the situation. Others may react with anger and insult the person who embarrassed them or throw glaring looks of vengeance. You may desire to run away from the situation and cry because you feel hurt or clam up and pout. You may use profanity and stomp off in frustration. Others may escalate the situation until someone throws the first punch.

 

The person who embarrassed you may have been a family member, a friend, a peer, a classmate, teacher, or a stranger. Their motives could have come from malice, humor, or other intentions. Wow! They tuned into an area of sensitivity and poured salt into your trigger wounds. Some teasing, however, is good-natured and is common among friends and peers.

 

Being embarrassed in front of a group of people can be an overwhelming experience. Some moments we find laughable or funny at a later date and some moments are so painful, we store them away in our memories forever. However, we can learn coping skills for embarrassing situations.

 

It is a reality that embarrassing incidents will happen. Make a plan to manage your emotions before you experience embarrassing situations. We’ve all felt embarrassment and we can live through it.

 

Talk with adults and ask how they manage embarrassing moments. Interview your school counselor and ask her or him about coping skills and self-management tools to express and process emotions that are connected to situations of embarrassment. Ask peers about their most embarrassing moments.

 

Make a list of all the emotions you experience when you feel embarrassed. Often times our emotions are a combination of various feelings; hurt, rejection, anger, fear, and sadness. Feelings are temporary and feeling embarrassed does pass. Describe an incident when you expressed and processed the emotion of embarrassment. List your options when you are in an embarrassing situation.

 

Our feelings are housed inside our brain in an area called the Limbic System. Emotions give us energy and passion to live our lives. Human beings need emotions, but part of maturing is learning to manage the feeling of embarrassment.

 

Being embarrassed is temporary. Everyone gets embarrassed at times. Use your brain instead of your fists when you feel disrespected. Anger is a powerful emotion and motivates us to protect ourselves and others from danger and harm. However, we need to learn to manage anger. Describe an embarrassing experience where you were able to manage your anger.

 

You can learn to manage embarrassment without hurting yourself or others. Talk with a trusted adult about it. Talk to your parents about counseling services if needed.

 

Douglas Engelbart wrote “The rate at which a person can mature is directly proportional to the embarrassment he can tolerate.” Learning to manage embarrassment is a life lesson.

This article is not addressing the embarrassment and humiliation from consistent incidents that involve bullying behaviors. Children and teens need to seek adult intervention immediately when bullied by others.

 

Dr. Missy, Ph.D., is a feelings helper, child therapist, consultant, educator, and self-syndicated columnist. She provides therapeutic services at Affirmations, Columbus, Ohio. Contact her at melissamartincounselor@live.com.

 

Wood County Health District to Hold Flu Shot Clinic October 9th

Flu season is here!

Bowling Green, OH – Flu season is here and the single best way to prevent the flu is to get a flu vaccine each season.  The Wood County Health District is holding a walk-in flu shot clinic on October 9 from 12-4 pm.  Wood County Health District is located at 1840 E Gypsy Lane Rd in Bowling Green.  Since it is a walk-in clinic, no appointment is necessary.  Quadrivalent vaccines, which protect against 4 strains of the flu, are only $25 for the flu shot and $30 for the flu mist for self-pay patients. Many insurances are accepted and can be billed if the flu shot is covered. High-dose trivalent vaccines are available for those 65 years and older, which can be billed through Medicare.  If you cannot make it to the walk-in clinic, you can call 419-354-9049 to set up an appointment to get your flu shot on another date.

 

Flu season typically begins in October or November and peaks in January or February.  It takes about two weeks after getting the flu shot for the body to build up the antibodies for protection, so now is the perfect time to get your flu shot!

 

Flu shots are recommended each year for everyone 6 months of age and older.  Some people may be more susceptible to the flu and should make sure to get a flu shot, including people with certain medical conditions such as: asthma, lung disease, and diabetes, pregnant women, those who are 65 years or older, or those who live with or care for others who are at high risk of contracting influenza.
Certain people should consult their healthcare provider before obtaining the vaccine, including: those who are allergic to eggs, have had a severe reaction to a previous influenza vaccination, are younger than 6 months, have a history of Guillain-Barre Syndrome or are currently ill with fever.

THE FLU-1

 

If you have any questions about the flu clinic, you can call the Wood County Health District at 419-354-9049.

 

The Wood County Health District provides numerous services to the community, including medical services for uninsured and underinsured men, women and children. The mission of Wood County Health District is to take the initiative to facilitate opportunities for Wood County residents to lead healthy lives. The Health District is located at 1840 E. Gypsy Lane Rd. in Bowling Green. Normal office hours are 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, with late hours and satellite clinics are available. The Wood County Board of Health meetings are generally held on the second Thursday at 6:00 pm at the Wood County Health District and are open to the public.

Wood County Hospital to Sponsor Program on Distracted Driving

Tuesday, Oct. 6 at Wood County Hospital from 6 to 8:30 p.m.

Bowling Green, Oct. 2, 2015 — Parents and their teen drivers are invited to attend an interactive program on Distracted Driving on Tuesday, Oct. 6 at Wood County Hospital from 6 to 8:30 p.m.

Program attendees will be able to experience the effects of Distracted Driving through the use of a simulator. A panel of presenters including Paul Dobson, Wood County Prosecutor; Sandy Weichman, Coordinator of Safe Communities, and Lt. Brad Biller from the Bowling Green Police Department will provide sobering statistics and heartfelt stories of the costs of Distracted Driving.

They will also offer simple steps that drivers can use to help themselves and others around them be safer drivers.

To register for the program, call 419-354-8887.

Guest Columnist: Dr. Missy, Feelings Helper

This week’s Topic: Pushover parent or pushy parent? Parents often have different parenting styles and therefore they need to communicate and cooperate on discipline……..

Pushover parent or pushy parent?

 

When it comes to how you interact and discipline your kids, are you more like a doormat or Mack truck? Do you rollover your children or do they rollover you?

 

Researchers have identified four basic parenting styles based on disciplinary strategies, warmth and nurturance, communication styles, and expectations of maturity and control. What is your parenting style?

 

Authoritarian Parenting is the first type. Children are expected to follow strict rules without an explanation of why and parents may reply, “Because I’m the parent and I said so!” These parents tend to be perceived as overly controlling and punishing. Authoritarian parenting style generally leads to children who are obedient but passive, but they appear lower in happiness, social competence and self-esteem. A strong-willed child will rebel and push back.

 

Authoritative (similar word but different meaning) is second. Parents establish rules and guidelines but the parents are willing to listen to children and explain causes and consequences for behavior. Kids learn clear standards and how to solve problems. This style tends to result in children who are happy, capable and successful. Children learn they can express their opinions even if the parents have different views. These parents tend to be more nurturing and forgiving and are willing to negotiate and compromise on some issues.

 

Permissive Parenting tends to be seen as indulgent and they rarely discipline their kids. This type of parenting is nurturing but parents want to seen as more of a friend. This parenting style often results in children who rank lower in happiness and self-regulation. These children may have problems with authority figures at school and in the community.

 

Uninvolved Parenting, the fourth type, meets the child’s basic needs but they are generally detached from their kid’s life experiences. These children tend to lack self-regulation, have low self-esteem and are less competent than their peers. In some cases, these parents may neglect the needs of their kids. These children feel unloved and rejected.
Why does the Authoritative Parenting style have advantages over other the types? Children believe in fairness and will listen and comply when they perceive fairness. Children learn to communicate, connect actions to consequences, and learn from mistakes. They learn to manage their emotions and self-regulate.

 

Parents often have different parenting styles and therefore they need to communicate and cooperate on discipline. If the mother is overly strict and the father is overly permissive, the mom may be viewed at the “bad guy” while the dad is viewed as the “good guy.” If both parents are overly demanding, a child may become a perfectionist and develop unrealistic expectations or just give up on academics and school activities.

 

Of course, there are other factors involved in parenting like a child’s temperament and personality, culture, social influences, and physical and mental health issues. Blended families have an effect on disciplinary styles. Individual parents and partners bring their own unique ways of doing things into their families.

 

Answer the following questions: Do you get into power struggles with your children? If so, then someone wins and someone loses. Are you the queen of bossiness? Are you the king of yelling? How do you react when your kids misbehave? What are your goals of parenting? Do you calmly communicate? Are you consistent with discipline? Do you discipline by spanking or screaming? Do you often lose your cool?

 

Parents possess both strengths and weaknesses. Learning how to be a more effective parent is beneficial to the entire family. Yes, change is scary but it is necessary.

 

Parents and partners may benefit by attending family counseling services. Blaming and shaming each other is not the solution. Seek out an experienced and supportive therapist.

 

Dr. Missy, Ph.D., is a feelings helper, child therapist, consultant, educator, and self-syndicated columnist. She provides therapeutic services at Affirmations, Columbus, Ohio. Contact her at melissamartincounselor@live.com.

 

 

Wood County Hospital Announces New Walking Program

Dr. Espinoza encourages anyone in the community to join the walk. No special gear is required, just a pair of comfortable shoes…….

Announces New “JUSTWALK™” A Walk With a Doc Program

“Take a step toward better health,” says Nicholas Espinoza, DO

 

Bowling Green, Sept. 22, 2015 –– Wood County Hospital will host its’ first “JustWalk™” Walk With a Doc walking program on Saturday, October 10, 2015 at 9:00 a.m. Walkers will enjoy a refreshing and rejuvenating walk with Family Practice physician Nicholas Espinoza, DO, who will answer questions during the walk. The Walk will take place around the Wood County Hospital campus.

Monthly Walks with a Doctor on the Wood County Hospital Campus
Monthly Walks with a Doctor on the Wood County Hospital Campus

Walk With a Doc is a national non-profit organization whose mission is to encourage healthy physical activity in people of all ages, and reverse the consequences of a sedentary lifestyle in order to improve the health and well-being of the country. “This program has had tremendous participation and tremendous success in many other cities around the country,” said Dr. Espinoza “I’m very pleased to be a part of this exciting and simple program that shows such improved health results for so many people.”

 

Dr. Espinoza encourages anyone in the community to join the walk. No special gear is required, just a pair of comfortable shoes. Walk alone, with friends, a partner or family members, or with a group.This is a free program and pre-registration is preferred but not required. To register, call 419-354-8887 or visit www.woodcountyhospital.org The program will continue monthly through October 2016.

2015 Wood County Community Health Status Assessment Release Set

Wood County Health Partners are pleased to present the 2015 Wood County Community Health Status Assessment

2015 Wood County Community Health Status Assessment Release Set for September 15

 Bowling Green, OH – The members of the Wood County Health Partners are pleased to present the 2015 Wood County Community Health Status Assessment on Tuesday September 15, 2015 in the meeting rooms of the Wood County Hospital. Registration and a continental breakfast will be served from 8:30 am to 9 am, with a review of the new data occurring from 9 am to 10:30 am.

“This meeting will provide us a chance to reflect on a broad range of Wood County health trends that have occurred since the last assessment was conducted in 2012. It will also prompt discussions on where the county has moved in positive directions in health and where we still have room for improvement,” said Ben Batey, Wood County Health Commissioner.

From the beginning, community leaders were actively engaged in the planning process and helped define the content, scope, and sequence of the study. Data was collected through health surveys mailed to a random sample of Wood County adult residents. A random sample of students were selected and surveyed in Wood County schools. The goal was to identify key strengths, weaknesses, and health concerns for residents of Wood County.

The draft report was posted for review and public comment. Feedback from the public was used to clarify and validate the key findings of the assessment. The final report is now ready for the release.

This comprehensive Community Health Assessment is the result of a strong commitment by dedicated community partners working together to improve the health and quality of life of Wood County residents. The health assessment gives us a snapshot of our community as well as a comparison to the state of Ohio and our nation. The 2015 Wood County Community Health Status Assessment was made possible through funding from Wood County Hospital and by Wood County Health District through a grant from the Ohio Department of Health Bureau of Maternal and Child Health.

Chowline: Encourage your child to eat a healthy breakfast

If you haven’t already, you should also check out your children’s school’s breakfast program. These days, more than 90 percent of schools that participate in the National School Lunch Program also offer breakfast……

It’s always a struggle to get my children to eat a good breakfast before school. How can I make them get up early enough to be sure they start the day right?

ChowlineCereal with fruit
photo: liquidlibrary

Breakfast is important for kids heading to the classroom: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics advises that regularly eating a nutrient-rich breakfast helps children in several ways, including improving school performance and helping with maintaining a healthy weight. A good breakfast — something that provides a variety of nutrient-rich foods — provides nourishment for both muscle power and brain power.

Eating a healthy breakfast doesn’t have to take a lot of time. Here are some ideas to help make sure the kids don’t skip out without fueling up first, courtesy of nutrition experts with various organizations, including the dietetics academy, the Food and Drug Administration, and eXtension.org, which is the online outreach presence of the nation’s land-grant university system:

  • Prepare the night before. Put breakfast cereal and bowls on the table or peanut butter and whole-grain bread on the counter to make breakfast easy to prepare.
  • Have easy-to-handle fruit available on the counter or in the refrigerator to eat on the way out the door. Bananas, apples, peaches, pears and plums are all easy to grab and go. Younger kids are even more likely to eat bite-size pieces of fruit. Try putting some slices of fruit in a small plastic bag to go.
  • Be sure to have plenty of healthful options on hand. Buy breakfast cereals or cereal bars made with whole grains and with 8 grams or less of sugar per serving. Choose nonfat or low-fat milk, yogurt and cheese, and whole-grain bread, English muffins and tortillas.
  • Leave your blender on the counter to make easy breakfast shakes. Combine frozen berries, milk or yogurt, and even some protein powder — or come up with your own recipe — and blend them together for a quick and filling morning treat.
  • Make breakfast wraps using whole-wheat tortillas filled with low-fat cheese and apple slices or peanut butter and banana slices.
  • Think outside the breakfast box. Nontraditional foods work just as well as scrambled eggs to fuel the body. Offer your kids string cheese, a handful of nuts or trail mix, tuna salad, leftover chicken breast, a peanut butter sandwich, or whole-wheat crackers with low-fat cheese.
  • Be a role model. If your kids see that you’re in too much of a rush and skip breakfast more often than not, then they will, too.

If you haven’t already, you should also check out your children’s school’s breakfast program. These days, more than 90 percent of schools that participate in the National School Lunch Program also offer breakfast, and in the last few years, new breakfast standards regarding whole grain-rich foods, calories, trans fats, sodium and other dietary considerations have gone into effect. If an at-home breakfast truly isn’t in the cards at your house, it’s likely a healthy breakfast at school is an option.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Chowline: School lunch may be healthier than packed

No matter how nutritious a lunch is, it won’t do any good if a child won’t eat it…….

Generally, which is healthier for kids, a packed lunch or a school lunch?

Obviously, this could go either way, depending on the content of the actual meal. But according to at least one study, school meals might have a significant edge.

The research, published in 2014 in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, compared 1,314 lunches of preschool and kindergarten students in three schools in Virginia. About 43 percent of the lunches were packed lunches, and 57 percent were school lunches. Like most schools, the schools in this study participated in the National School Lunch Program, and the research was conducted after that program upgraded its nutrition standards in 2012-13.

The researchers found that packed lunches had more vitamin C and iron and less sodium than the school lunches, but the packed lunches were also higher in calories, fat, saturated fat and sugar and were lower in protein, fiber, vitamin A and calcium. Packed lunches were less likely to contain fruits, vegetables, unsweetened juice and milk and were more likely to include chips, crackers or other savory snacks, and sugar-sweetened beverages.

Although many kids balked when schools started serving healthier meals, a 2014 study in the journal Childhood Obesity found that 70 percent of elementary school leaders reported that students had warmed up to them.
chowline School lunch iStock

According to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the trick to making sure your children’s lunch is a healthy one is to make sure it provides a good balance: some lean protein, a whole grain, a fruit, a vegetable and a dairy product. Take a look at the school menu and talk with your children about what they like and don’t like in the school lunches, or if they’d prefer to bring a lunch from home. If the school lunch doesn’t appeal to your kids, talk with them once a week about what they’d like to carry with them. It’s important to get kids’ buy-in: No matter how nutritious a lunch is, it won’t do any good if a child won’t eat it.

The nutrition academy offers these ideas:

  • Pack easy-to-eat foods: strawberries or an easy-to-peel tangerine instead of an orange, for example, or carrots, cherry tomatoes or bell pepper strips instead of a salad.
  • For sandwiches or wraps, choose whole grain options and lean meat or cheese.
  • Make it fun. Cut sandwiches into stars or other unusual shapes. Celebrate special days by packing an all-orange lunch for Halloween, for example, or an all-red lunch for Valentine’s Day.
  • Ask if your children trade food with friends at lunchtime. That will help you determine what foods they prefer.

For a beverage, consider packing a small bottle of water with lunch. Earlier this year, the Harvard School of Public Health reported that about half of children and teens aren’t getting enough hydration, and nearly one-quarter don’t drink any plain water at all. Children tend to think cold water tastes better than water at room temperature. Adding a frozen water bottle to your child’s lunch pack will help keep the lunch cold and will thaw by lunchtime, providing a nice cool drink.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Wood County Health District Providing Guidance to Food Facilities in the Event of a “Do Not Drink” Advisory

A list of water haulers in the surrounding counties is being provided as licensed locations are not allowed to fill up their own water jugs and bring them into the restaurant…..

Bowling Green, OH – The Wood County Health District began providing advice for food facilities in case a Do Not Drink advisory is issued due to microcystin.

 

“Even though there are no current advisories we wanted restaurants and other food facilities to know ahead of time what they can and cannot do if a Do Not Drink advisory is issued,” said Brad Espen, Director of Environmental Health.

 

The fact sheet is being made available by email and on the Health District’s webpage at: http://woodcountyhealth.org/envhealth/food_safety.html.

 

In addition to this guidance, a list of water haulers in the surrounding counties is being provided as licensed locations are not allowed to fill up their own water jugs and bring them into the restaurant to use.

 

“If they want to buy bottled water from the store, that’s ok, but it might be better for them to hire a water hauler to bring in a larger quantity of water,” stated Lana Glore, Assistant Director of Environmental Health.

 

If there are any questions on the guidance, you may contact the WCHD Environmental office at 419-354-3702, or email healthdept@co.wood.oh.us

 

The Wood County Health District provides numerous services to the community, including comprehensive medical services for men, women and children.  Our Health and Wellness Center welcomes all patients and accepts most third party insurances, including uninsured or underinsured clients regardless of ability to pay.   The mission of Wood County Health District is to take the initiative to facilitate opportunities for Wood County residents to lead healthy lives. The Health District is located at 1840 E. Gypsy Lane Rd. in Bowling Green. Normal office hours are 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, with late hours and satellite clinics are available. The Wood County Board of Health meetings are generally held on the second Thursday at 7pm at the Wood County Health District and are open to the public.

 

 

Chowline: Decisions at the fair–Indulge, or be healthy?

Not all the food at fairs is “horribly unhealthy.” …….

We’re planning to go to the state fair. I haven’t gone in a long time and I keep thinking about all of the horribly unhealthy foods that I know I’m going to want to eat that day. I want to enjoy myself, but I’m afraid I’m going to gain back the 12 pounds I’ve lost this year all in one day. Any guidance?

It’s certainly not likely you’ll gain 12 pounds in a day of overindulgence, but that doesn’t mean it’s a great idea to have an elephant ear for breakfast, stromboli for lunch, bacon-on-a-stick for dinner and deep-fried ice cream for dessert. Your gastrointestinal system would probably have a hard time forgiving you for that, especially if you’ve been eating healthfully for months and your system isn’t used to such excess.

Instead of planning for an entire day of gluttony, why not do this? Focus on one or two treats that if you didn’t have, you’d end up truly disappointed. Then make smart choices the rest of the day. If you’ve been looking forward to a funnel cake for years, go ahead and enjoy. An occasional splurge is nothing to feel guilty about. Just be sensible.

Not all the food at fairs is “horribly unhealthy.” Seek out charbroiled chicken breast, sandwich wraps or a Greek salad. In fact, the Ohio State Fair, at least, offers a phone app with not only a map and a schedule, but a searchable food finder to help you locate the type of food you want.

The fair also is encouraging food vendors to join the “Taste of the Fair” program, offering small versions of signature menu items at a reduced price. Think of this as built-in portion control. And if one of your favorites isn’t participating in the program, you can control your own portions by splitting a dish with a friend or two.

It can be difficult to make smart choices at the fair because nutrition information isn’t readily available. But if you plan ahead, www.calorieking.com does offer some nutrition facts: Search for “fair food” and see if your favorites are listed. Would you really choose to indulge in a tray of deep-fried Oreos if you knew it had 890 calories? Or an order of chili fries if you knew it had nearly 700 calories?

Here are a couple of other things to remember:

  • Most, if not all the time, choose water as a beverage. Not only is it the best way to keep yourself hydrated on a hot day outdoors, but you’ll save yourself hundreds of calories by foregoing beverages high in sugar. If you must have flavor, unsweetened iced tea is your next best choice.
  • Don’t fool yourself: Deep-fried vegetables are more fat than they are vegetables. Lemon shakeups are more sugar than they are fruit. Roasted corn is a better choice for a vegetable, especially if you go easy on the butter and salt. A piece of fresh fruit is also a great choice: Ask at an ice cream stand that offers banana splits if they’d sell you just the banana, or find the local foods and farming exhibits, which sometimes offer complimentary apples or other produce. If you need a sweet icy treat, frozen bananas are healthier than ice cream.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Welcome! Ashley Brough to Briar Hill Health Campus

Welcome! Ashley Brough to Briar Hill Health Campus here in North Baltimore, Ohio!

Ashley Brough will be the new Executive Director at Briar Hill Health Campus, replacing Valerie Wallen, who accepted a position with Trilogy Health Services (owners of BHHC) in the Cincinnati area, near her family. Ashley is a Wood County gal, hailing from Pemberville, Ohio. Following graduation from Eastwood High School, Ashley attended Owens Community College and Eastern Michigan University.

Her work history includes ten years in Long Term Care, with nine of them in Nutrition Services, as Registered Dietitian. Ashley joined Trilogy in September 2012.

Ashley enjoys cooking, spending time with family and friends, playing volleyball and watching sports. She adds:

  • I spend every Sunday with my family having Sunday dinner and have done this since I was little.
  • I have a blue haired Persian cat named Pearl.
  • I love all cooking shows and love to try new recipes.
  • Eating is one of my favorite things, I love trying new restaurants.
  • I grew up on a small 70 acre farm where we raised corn, wheat, and soybeans.
  • If I was not in long term care I would love to be on Saturday Night Live or a professional organizer. Making people laugh at my personal expense is one of my favorite things to do as well as organizing!
  • I played volleyball for two years in college and still play on occasion.
  • I am a neat freak, my house is almost always spotless.

Welcome to NB Ashley!

Briar Hill Ashlee Brough