BVH Pain Management Solutions

Blanchard Valley Hospital (BVH) in Findlay, Ohio is proud to offer balanced and effective pain management solutions for patients suffering from chronic pain, pain that affects quality of life and the ability to participate in normal daily activities.

Blanchard Valley Hospital (BVH) in Findlay, Ohio is proud to offer balanced and effective pain management solutions for patients suffering from chronic pain, pain that affects quality of life and the ability to participate in normal daily activities.

The board-certified pain management physicians and clinical staff at BVH take an individualized approach to assess your pain. Advanced education and technology have made pain relief possible and help return patients to happy and productive lives. The experienced providers at BVH can help diagnose and treat any of the following:

  • Back pain & sciatica
  • Work related injuries
  • Neck pain & pinched nerves
  • Persistent pain after back or neck surgery
  • Headaches after whiplash injury
  • Arthritis pain in neck or lower back
  • Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD)
  • Nerve damage or muscle spasm pain
  • Chronic pelvic pain, including interstitial cystitis
  • Shingles pain
  • Fibromyalgia & more

Most insurances are accepted for pain management services, including Worker’s Compensation. Call 419.423.5555 to schedule an appointment, or visit bvhealthsystem.org for more information. Let us help you find solutions for your pain.

Chowline: BBQ Safely– Be Careful with Steel Grill Brushes

There have been several reported cases of internal injuries following unintentional ingestions of wire grill-cleaning brush bristles by both children and adults.

I clean my grill each time after I cook on it, using a steel wire grill brush to keep the grease and grime from building up on the grill racks. I’ve used the same brush for a couple of years now because I love how it cleans, but I’m wondering if I should get a new one this year.  

That depends on just how old your grill brush is and what condition it’s in. If your grill brush is worn down, warped or has some missing bristles, you may want to consider throwing it out.

photo:thinkstock

This is because you’ll want to be careful that you don’t inadvertently leave behind any wire bristles from the grill-cleaning brush that could end up in the meat or vegetables that you are grilling.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there have been several reported cases of internal injuries following unintentional ingestions of wire grill-cleaning brush bristles by both children and adults. The severities of the injuries have ranged from puncture of the soft tissues of the neck, causing severe pain on swallowing, to perforation of the gastrointestinal tract requiring emergency surgery, CDC said.

In fact, an estimated 1,698 consumers have gone to emergency rooms between 2002 and 2014 after having ingested wire bristles in grilled foods, according to a 2016 study in the journal Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

The study authors said that while wire-bristle grill brush injuries aren’t common, they do tend to increase during the grilling season, which makes sense, of course. The months with the highest number of reported injuries are June, July and August, they said.

More detailed information on wire grill brush injuries can be found at saferproducts.gov, which allows consumers to list information on what their injuries were and how they occurred.

Consumer Reports last week offered these tips to help consumers avoid accidental ingestion of wire bristles when barbecuing:

  • Use a moist cloth or paper towel to clean the grill surface before cooking.
  • If you use a wire-bristle brush, thoroughly inspect the grill’s surface before cooking for the presence of bristles that might have dislodged from the grill brush and could embed in cooked food.
  • Depending on the type of grill you have, you may be able to clean it using a pumice stone or a coil-shaped bristle-free bush.
  • You may try using crumpled-up aluminum foil to brush loose food particles off a warm — but not hot! — grill rack or grate.

Another important grilling safety tip to remember is to always use a food thermometer to ensure that your meat is cooked to the correct internal temperature to destroy any harmful bacteria such as E. coli or salmonella that may be present, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

For meats such as steak and pork, that temperature is 145 degrees Fahrenheit. For ground meats, including beef, pork, veal, and lamb, the correct temperature is 160 degrees, USDA says. And poultry such as chicken and turkey should be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) and its outreach and research arms, OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@osu.edu.

PRODUCE SAFETY CONSULTATIONS NOW AVAILABLE FOR OHIO GROWERS

Free, one-on-one training offered by Ohio Department of Agriculture

REYNOLDSBURG, OH (July 13, 2018) –The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) is now offering produce growers FREE, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved consultations to help farmers comply with the upcoming Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety rule.

ODA’s Division of Food Safety, through a cooperative agreement with the FDA, is responsible for enforcing the Produce Safety rule in Ohio. Farm inspections will begin in the spring of 2019, but prior to inspections, ODA staff is offering these voluntary consultation visits to help growers identify what steps they may need to take to comply with the Produce Safety rule before regulatory inspections begin.

Farms can request a farm consultation visit to determine specific requirements to their farm. This service is offered as a one-day course that provides one-on-one training in which trained and certified ODA staff will visit farms and walk growers through what will be expected with new federal regulations on their farm. In addition to the consultation, farms will also receive resource materials that will help aid in compliance.

Growers unsure if their farm is subject to the Produce Safety rule, can review FDA’s FSMA regulation document or contact ODA for additional assistance. Produce farms that are exempt from the rule are welcome to schedule consultation visits, as some of the requirements are similar to those required by third party food safety auditors.

FSMA, which was signed into law on January 4, 2011, is the most comprehensive reform of the nation’s food safety laws since 1938. Its goal is to better protect public health by shifting U.S. food supply safety efforts from a response approach to one of prevention. FSMA is comprised of seven rules that span the entire food supply chain. Of these rules, the one most likely to impact produce growers is the Produce Safety rule.

For more information on FSMA, the Produce Safety rule or to schedule your on-farm consultation visit agri.ohio.gov or call (614) 600-4272.

July 13th at the NB Legion

A couple of activities at North Baltimore American Legion Post #539.

A couple of activities at North Baltimore American Legion Post #539.

 

The American Red Cross is holding a Blood Drive in the Community Room at the legion hall on American Legion Drive.

This evening the Ladies Auxiliary will be holding a B – B – Q.

Stop down to give blood or support the auxiliary!

Post #539 WEBSITE

This Week’s Specials at NB Custom Cuts

Tuesday is Senior Day at North Baltimore’s Butcher Shop, NB Custom Cuts – SAVE 10% off purchases on Tuesdays!

Tuesday is Senior Day at North Baltimore’s Butcher Shop, NB Custom Cuts – SAVE 10% off purchases on Tuesdays!

Grill Bundle

6 EACH of…
+ 8 oz. New York Strip
+ Bratwurst
+ Boneless Pork Chops
+ Leg Quarters
+ 1/3 pounder burger patties – 85% lean

All for ONLY $59.00

Steak Bundle

Baker’s Dozen (13)
8 oz. Flat Iron Steaks

$49.00
———–

Build Your Own
BRAT BUNDLE
Select ANY 20 of our CUSTOM Bun Length Brats
Regular – Cheddar – Chicken – Pepper Jack – Italian – Bahamama 
Mix & Match
any 20 brats for $30

———-

Ground FRESH Daily!
85% Lean Ground Beef
$4.79#
———-

USDA Choice Ribeyes – $12.99#

USDA Choice N. Y. Strip – $11.99#

USDA Choice Top Sirloin – $8.99#

Western Style Pork Ribs – $3.39#

Pork Spare Ribs – $2.99#

All Natural Boneless Chicken Breasts – $2.89#

All Natural Chicken Leg Quarters – $2.89#

Walnut Creek Casing Hot Dogs – $5.99#

Deli Cheeses
Colby – Swiss – Pepper Jack – Co-Jack – $5.49#

We accept:
Credit – Debit – EBT

Alzheimer’s Could Devastate US Healthcare

Alzheimer’s can devastate healthcare in the U.S., says AMAC
Are researchers making progress in finding ways to deal with the disease?

Alzheimer’s can devastate healthcare in the U.S., says AMAC
Are researchers making progress in finding ways to deal with the disease?
WASHINGTON, DC, July 6 – A cure for Alzheimer’s disease does not exist and treatments are hit and miss. However, researchers are working overtime to find new ways to deal with the menace of dementia, according to senior advocate Dan Weber.
Dementia, most notably Alzheimer’s, is a leading cause of death among the elderly. According to the Alzheimer’s Association it kills one out of three seniors. In fact, the Alzheimer’s Association says that between 2000 and 2015, deaths from heart disease decreased 11% while deaths from Alzheimer’s disease increased 123%.
Weber, who is president of the Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC], says that the statistics paint a bleak picture. But, he says, researchers are making progress in finding ways of dealing with the illness. He cites recent news that Temple University scientists successfully used a 22-year-old asthma drug to reverse some of the most damaging effects of dementia in mice.
Dr. Domenico Praticò, Director of the Alzheimer’s Center at Temple and the study’s lead investigator, told the Philadelphia Inquirer “for the first time, we are showing that we can do something after the disease is established.”
It will take some time to determine whether such a treatment could be effective in humans, says Weber. “But, it provides a modicum of hope as do other such research reports, including work being done by researchers at Colorado University’s Anschutz Medical Campus in Denver. Researchers there have been testing two drugs that hold promise—Aducanumab and Leukine.”
Aducanumab appears to be effective in eliminating plaque that builds up in the brain, which is a key factor in the development of Alzheimer’s. The Aducanumab study has been ongoing for years and remarkably is currently undergoing field trials in some 360 locations. Leukine, meanwhile, is clinical trials to see if it can be effective in “slowing or even stopping the progression of Alzheimer’s disease,” according to CU Anschutz.
Weber says that “it is imperative that scientists to find an efficient way to deal with Alzheimer’s because of the speed with which this particularly damaging form of dementia is claiming new victims. Left unchecked, the scourge of Alzheimer’s will have devastating consequences on healthcare in the U.S.”
He cites these additional statistics courtesy of the Alzheimer’s Association:
·     There are more than 5.7 million Americans who are currently afflicted with the disease and that number will grow to 14 million by the year 2050
·     Every 65 second a new case of the disease is diagnosed
·     The disease kills more people than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined and is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States
·     16.1 million Americans provide unpaid care for people with Alzheimer’s or other dementias
·     These caregivers provided an estimated 18.4 billion hours of care valued at over $232 billion
·     This year, Alzheimer’s and other dementias will cost the nation $277 billion and by 2050, these costs could rise as high as $1.1 trillion
“While we might worry about the prospect of a loved one falling victim to the disease, we need to accept the fact that any of us might need to assume the role of principal caregiver to a mother, father or other relative or friend in their later years. And so, it is important to remember that you are not alone. Friends and relations might not understand the nightmare of looking after an Alzheimer’s patient 24/7. But, it is comforting to know that there are people who understand your plight. And, they can provide comforting answer answers that can ease your frustrations as the illness progresses and imposes new, unthinkable burdens on you. They may not have all the answers, but they can let you know what to expect and provide ways of dealing with day-to-day situations,” concludes Weber.
Here’s a link to practical advice from individuals who have first hand knowledge of the consequences of the disease and stories about how they dealt with them: the Alzheimer’s Reading Room.

Chowline: USDA Warns– Wash Your Hands Properly to Prevent Foodborne Illness

The U.S. Department of Agriculture just sent out a warning last week urging people to wash their hands throughout the food preparation process, not just at the beginning of cooking….

My husband gets frustrated with me because I’m always reminding him to wash his hands multiple times when cooking. He says washing before he cooks is enough.  Which one of us is right?  

In this case, you are right.

In fact, the U.S. Department of Agriculture just sent out a warning last week urging people to wash their hands throughout the food preparation process, not just at the beginning of cooking.

And when you wash your hands, the USDA is urging people to take their time and wash their hands properly.

photo: Thinkstock

This warning comes as a new USDA study in collaboration with North Carolina State University and RTI International, a North Carolina-based nonprofit research institute, found that people are failing to properly wash their hands 97 percent of the time when they are cooking, and instead are rushing through the process.

The study was conducted in six test kitchen facilities. It found that most people failed to wash their hands for the recommended 20 seconds, and most did not dry their hands with a clean towel. Many, instead, wiped their hands on their clothes or other objects.

Rushed handwashing can lead to cross-contamination of food and other surfaces, resulting in foodborne illness.

For example, the study found that 48 percent of participants spread bacteria from raw meat on their hands onto spice containers; 11 percent spread bacteria to refrigerator handles; and 5 percent of the time, bacteria was spread to salads.

One way to avoid cross-contamination is to always follow handwashing recommendations as advised by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

  • Wet your hands with clean, running water.
  • Apply soap and lather to your hands by rubbing them together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers and under your nails.
  • Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds — the amount of time it takes to hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.
  • Rinse your hands well under clean, running water.
  • Dry your hands using a clean towel, or air dry them.

If soap and water are not available, you might alternatively use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that is at least 60 percent alcohol, CDC says. However, it is important to note that while these sanitizers can reduce the number of pathogens on your hands in many situations, they don’t remove all types of pathogens.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@osu.edu.

7 Ways to Create a High-Tech, Healthy Home

Most experts agree that natural light is good for your overall wellbeing.

(Family Features) Home technology devices have come a long way, and many homeowners are discovering that their features aren’t just for convenience and comfort. A growing number of technology-enabled home features promote a healthier living space for you and your family.

From boosting indoor air quality to cutting back on dust, dirt and germs, these ideas are the perfect way to add functional upgrades that improve your quality of life.

1. Minimize floor debris.
The floors in most homes are grounds for an unsettling array of dust, dirt and other unsavory elements, many of which are tracked in from outdoors. A robotic vacuum can help you keep these and other allergens like pet hair under control with next to no effort. Some models even know when they’re low on battery, return to their docking station to recharge then rely on memory to pick up just where they left off. Many are also self-emptying for a virtually hands-free cleanup job after the initial setup.

2. Create climate zones.
A zoned approach to cooling and heating systems allows homeowners to cool and heat their homes in multiple zones, reducing energy consumption in spaces used infrequently. Today’s systems take climate management one step further. In addition to regulating the temperature, a system like Mitsubishi Electric Zoned Comfort Solutions offers advanced, multi-stage filtration that constantly cleans the air to capture and remove contaminants which may trigger allergy and asthma symptoms, spread germs and impact air quality. In addition, features like platinum deodorizing filters on select systems use nanotechnology to absorb and neutralize odors.

3. Wash away germs.
It’s only natural that a device you use to wash dirty hands is often one of the most bacteria-laden elements in a home. However, if you don’t have to touch a faucet, concerns about germs may diminish. Hands-free faucets are hardly new; they’ve been the norm in public restrooms for years. Now these models are more accessible (and affordable) for homeowners, offering the same germ-minimizing and water conservation benefits as their commercial counterparts.

4. Monitor for danger.
Fire alarms and carbon monoxide detectors are obvious essentials for any home, but smart models take protection even further by letting you know about a problem even when you’re not at home. By connecting the monitors to a smart device, such as your phone, you can be alerted to potential concerns before they become major threats to your health or even life. An added bonus: many models will also send notices about issues like low battery life, so if you get the alert while you’re already out, you can save yourself an extra trip.

5. Reduce ductwork.
Humidity can cause heating, ventilation and air conditioning ducts to become damp and breed mold, mildew and bacteria, but eliminating or reducing ductwork means less dust or bacteria circulating throughout your home. You can further manage air quality with options such as a Mitsubishi Electric Zoned Comfort System. These cooling and heating systems are available in both ducted and ductless configurations and use filters that are easy to access, remove and clean. Typically homes only use one type of cooling and heating system, but some home designs, such as room additions or retrofits, may require a hybrid system with a mix of ducted and ductless products with short duct runs and robust filtration.

In fact, Mitsubishi Electric ducted air systems use less ductwork than traditional systems. Less ductwork results in less chance of air leakage, which reduces energy loss, and less contaminants building up in the ductwork. For homeowners looking to go the ductless route, the simplicity of an option like the MLZ One-Way Ceiling Cassette indoor unit is an aesthetically friendly solution that blends into the ceiling. This system easily slides between standard 16-inch joists.

6. Let there be light.
Most experts agree that natural light is good for your overall wellbeing. Among the benefits are its mood-boosting abilities, and some research indicates it’s better for your eyes than the harsh glare of artificial bulbs (assuming you don’t stare directly at the sun, of course). Make it easy to fill your home with ambient natural light using smart technology for your window coverings, including blinds or drapes. Whether powered by a remote control or your smartphone, you’ll have the ability to create a lighter, brighter room at your fingertips.

7. Don’t overlook the outdoors.
A lawn that is over-watered is a breeding ground for mold, insects and other threats to your health. A smart irrigation system can help regulate your sprinklers to monitor the weather and avoid unnecessary watering. In addition, some models allow you to program the exact type of grass or vegetation to help keep tabs on lawn and flower bed moisture levels and make automatic adjustments to strike a perfect balance between drying out and oversaturating.

Explore more health-conscious solutions for your home at MitsubishiComfort.com.

SOURCE:
Mitsubishi Electric Cooling & Heating

Fire Cracker Specials at NB Custom Cuts!

OPEN ON THE 4TH OF JULY – 8 AM – 1 PM – Senior Citizen’s Tuesday – 10% OFF any purchase!

OPEN
on the 4th of July
8 am – 1 pm

Senior Citizen’s Tuesday
10% OFF any purchase!

– BRATS – BRATS – BRATS – 
Bun-Length – choose from:

Regular – Chicken – Cheddar – Italian –
Pepper Jack – Bahama Mama
just $1.50 each

85% Lean Ground Beef Patties
2 – 1  /  3 – 1  /  4 – 1   / 6 – 1 
–  $5.35#

USDA Choice Ribeyes – $12.99#

USDA Choice N. Y. Strip – $11.99#

USDA Choice Top Sirloin – $8.99#

USDA Choice T – Bone – $10.99#

USDA Choice Porterhouse – $11.99#

Pork Steak – $2.79#

Western Style Pork Ribs – $3.39#

Asstd. Bone-In Pork Chops – $2.29#

Boneless Pork Chops – $3.99#

Pork Spare Ribs – $2.99#

Walnut Creek Natural Casing Hot Dogs – $5.99#

Deli Cheeses
– Colby – Pepper Jack – Swiss – Co-Jack –
$5.49

We accept:
Credit – Debit – EBT

Chowline: Certain Tick Bites Can Cause Food Allergies

Can you really develop an allergy to red meat from a tick bite?

That depends.

In certain cases, with a certain tick, in some people and in some states, including Ohio, yes.

According to a recent article about a study on lone star ticks and allergies that was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, some people who have been bitten by a lone star tick have gone on to develop an allergy to eating red meat, and in some cases, dairy.

The study, done by researchers with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, found that, in rare cases, some people have developed life-threatening allergic reactions to red meat after being bitten by a lone star tick.

A bite from a lone star ticks can cause meat allergies in some people. Photo: Thinkstock

The study attributes the allergic reaction to galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), which is a type of sugar that animals make in their bodies. As a result, it’s found in red meats, including beef, pork and lamb, the exception being primates.

According to published reports, humans don’t have alpha-gal, but have an immune response to it. Symptoms of the allergy can include itching, swelling, abdominal cramps, and in some people, anaphylaxis, which is a life-threatening allergic reaction.

While the association between lone star tick bites and the allergy are clear, more research is needed to understand why these alpha-gal allergies develop in some people and not in others, according to the JAMA report.

The timing of the study is significant, however, considering that the tick season –April though September — is expected to be tough this year, according to Glen Needham, a retired entomologist and tick expert formerly with Ohio State University Extension, the outreach arm of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES) at The Ohio State University.

Ohio has several tick pest species, including American dog ticks, blacklegged ticks, and lone star ticks, all of which can pose a threat to humans because of the diseases they can transmit.

While Jackson, Scioto and Vinton counties have especially high populations of Lone Star ticks, the species can be found in any Ohio county, he said.

To prevent tick bites when in areas where they may be active, Needham recommends that you should:

  • Wear light-colored clothes including long-sleeve shirts tucked into your pants and long pants tucked into your socks or boots.
  • Apply a tick repellent according to label instructions.
  • Do frequent tick checks of your body while outside and a thorough inspection at shower time.
  • Protect your pets with an anti-tick product recommended by a veterinarian.
  • Keep dogs on a leash and avoid weedy areas.

And if you find a tick attached, do not crush or puncture it. Instead, use your pointy tweezers, tick removal tool or protected thumb and finger to carefully remove the tick by pulling it straight up with steady even pressure, Needham said.

“Folk methods, such as using oil to smother the tick or using a flame to burn the tick, do not work, may be dangerous and delay removal,” he said. “You should wash your hands and the tick bite site with warm soapy water and keep the specimen in a container of rubbing alcohol or hand sanitizer to take it with you to a healthcare professional if you develop any health-related symptoms or rashes.”

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or turner.490@osu.edu.

From NB Police: Important Message – The LINK

Attention Citizens: Important Message: The LINK- Which provides Mental Crisis Services is closing. Beginning July 1, 2018,

Attention Citizens: Important Message: The LINK- Which provides Mental Crisis Services is closing. Beginning July 1, 2018,

Unison Health will be managing the Wood County Crisis line and providing prescreens for Wood County residents.

Even as this transition occurs, the Wood County ADAMHS Board and Unison Health are committed to ensuring continuity of care for clients and stakeholders throughout the community.

If you or someone you know exhibits signs of a mental health crisis, including: feeling excessively sad or anxious, hopelessness, feeling like harming others or self, and/or thoughts of suicide – the new crisis service line should be accessed immediately by calling:

419-502-HOPE (4673)
The crisis line is available 24/7. 

With over 250 dedicated staff members serving nearly 8,000 adults, adolescents and children throughout Northwest Ohio — Unison Health is a leading resource for people seeking access to behavioral health, substance abuse treatment and primary healthcare.

The partnership between the Wood County ADAMHS Board and Unison Health ensures crisis services for the residents of Wood County continue to be easily accessed now and into the future

Heat Illnesses Can be Fatal

Would You Know What to Do?…

Did you know your body is constantly in a struggle to disperse the heat it produces? Most of the time, you’re hardly aware of it – unless your body is exposed to more heat than it can handle.

In 2014, 244 people died in the U.S. from exposure to excessive heat, according to Injury Facts 2017, the annual statistical report on unintentional injuries produced by the National Safety Council. Heat-related illnesses can escalate rapidly, leading to delirium, organ damage and even death.

There are several heat-related illnesses, including heatstroke (the most severe), heat exhaustion and heat cramps. Those most at risk include:

  • Infants and young children
  • Elderly people
  • Pets
  • Individuals with heart or circulatory problems or other long-term illness
  • People who work outdoors
  • Athletes and people who like to exercise – especially beginners
  • Individuals taking medications that alter sweat production
  • Alcoholics and drug abusers

Heatstroke

Heatstroke can occur when the ability to sweat fails and body temperature rises quickly. The brain and vital organs are effectively “cooked” as body temperature rises to a dangerous level in a matter of minutes. Heatstroke is often fatal, and those who do survive may have permanent damage to their organs.

Someone experiencing heatstroke will have extremely hot skin, and an altered mental state, ranging from slight confusion to coma. Seizures also can result. Ridding the body of excess heat is crucial for survival.

  • Move the person into a half-sitting position in the shade
  • Call for emergency medical help immediately
  • If humidity is below 75%, spray the victim with water and fan them vigorously; if humidity is above 75%, apply ice to neck, armpits or groin
  • Do not give aspirin or acetaminophen
  • Do not give the victim anything to drink

Heat Exhaustion

When the body loses an excessive amount of salt and water, heat exhaustion can set in. People who work outdoors and athletes are particularly susceptible.

Symptoms are similar to those of the flu and can include severe thirst, fatigue, headache, nausea, vomiting and, sometimes, diarrhea. Other symptoms include profuse sweating, clammy or pale skin, dizziness, rapid pulse and normal or slightly elevated body temperature.

Uncontrolled heat exhaustion can evolve into heatstroke, so make sure to treat the victim quickly.

  • Move them to a shaded or air-conditioned area
  • Give them water or other cool, nonalcoholic beverages
  • Apply wet towels or having them take a cool shower

Heat cramps

Heat cramps are muscle spasms that usually affect the legs or abdominal muscles, often after physical activity. Excessive sweating reduces salt levels in the body, which can result in heat cramps.

Workers or athletes with pain or spasms in the abdomen, arms or legs should not return to work for a few hours. Instead:

  • Sit or lie down in the shade.
  • Drink cool water or a sports drink.
  • Stretch affected muscles.
  • Seek medical attention if you have heart problems or if the cramps don’t get better in an hour.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers more information on heat-related illness in this FAQ.

The best way to avoid a heat-related illness is to limit exposure outdoors during hot days. Air conditioning is the best way to cool off, according to the CDC. Also:

  • Drink more liquid than you think you need and avoid alcohol
  • Wear loose, lightweight clothing and a hat
  • Replace salt lost from sweating by drinking fruit juice or sports drinks
  • Avoid spending time outdoors during the hottest part of the day, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Wear sunscreen; sunburn affects the body’s ability to cool itself
  • Pace yourself when you run or otherwise exert yourself

    SOURCE: National Safety Council