Special Guest Columnist: “From Munching to Meal Prep” by Ashley Parsons

Meal prep can save you hours of cooking time during the week if you set aside time during the weekend…….

From Munching to Meal Prep

How often do you get home, are starving, and don’t feel like cooking and cleaning up a meal for dinner? What about the dreaded, “What’s for dinner?” question from your significant other or kids. Many of us find ourselves in this situation more often than not. Do you ever look back on what you ate for lunch or dinner and realized it was all junk foods or snacks? Good news! There is an easy way to combat this problem, if you are willing to plan ahead. Meal prepping is something that has recently been gaining popularity, but it is not just for athletes and body builders. Meal prepping is simply preparing, cooking, (and pre-portioning) meals ahead of time. Meal preparation can eliminate the stress of having to worry about what to put on the table, but also has many other benefits as well.

Ashley_ Food Prepping2 pix

Meal prep has three big advantages, aside from not having to worry about what everyone will eat. These advantages are it saves time, it saves money, and it helps you stay on track with eating nutritious, wholesome meals. Meal prep can save you hours of cooking time during the week if you set aside time during the weekend. When you prep multiple recipes/meals at once, you will be able to multitask and maybe even overlap cooking ingredients that go in multiple dishes. Meal prep will take the place of going out to eat and having to wait at drive thrus, or wait in sit down restaurants for your food. Meal prep will save you money. When we eat out, it usually costs us more than if we were to cook at home. When we pick what foods/recipes we are going to meal prep, we can try to plan to overlap ingredients to make sure that none of them go to waste. In addition to using all the ingredients we buy for our recipes, we can also base our meal prep around what is on sale, or what we have coupons for. Using your local grocery store ad is a great place to start when thinking about recipes for the week. Planning your meals ahead of time will keep you on track with your nutrition as well. When you are thinking about what to buy to prepare for the week, try to include fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats/protein, low-fat or non-fat dairy and healthy fats (avocados, walnuts, olive oil are some examples). When you plan to buy, and prep all of these foods, you are setting yourself up to consume a more nutritious diet. When nutritious foods are prepped and available, you will be more likely to consume them as opposed to less nutritious options.

Here are some easy ideas for beginners: (use amounts suitable for your family size)

Marinate chicken in your favorite marinade (Italian dressing is always a good idea) the night before you would like to cook it. Grill chicken until cooked thoroughly (160 degrees). Serve it throughout the week chopped in salads, with barbeque sauce, in a pasta dish, or any other way you think of!

Buy assorted fruits and vegetables that are on sale at your local grocery store. Wash and cut them for easy snacking. Dips such as low-fat ranch, hummus, and nonfat/lowfat yogurt may be good pairings.

ashley yogurt with blueberries

Keep nonfat or lowfat yogurt and cottage cheese, cheese sticks, and lowfat/nonfat milk easy available for a good source of protein and calcium.

A great way to eat more vegetables is to roast them. Roasting your vegetables brings out a whole new flavor profile. Try buying a head of cauliflower and broccoli, tossing it in some olive oil and pepper, and roasting at 400 degrees until crisp tender (about 30-40 minutes).

An easy way to incorporate more whole grains into your diet is to make a salad or have some oatmeal for breakfast. These are two of my favorites, and their flavor holds up really well throughout the week: Sweet Potato and Raisin Quinoa Salad and Peanut Butter Baked Oatmeal.

Sweet Potato and Raisin Quinoa Salad:

Ashley-Sweetpotato quinoa

 

2 cups peeled, diced and roasted sweet potatoes

1/3 cup raisins

1/3 cup seeds or nuts, toasted (can be pumpkin, sunflower, sliced almonds)

2 cups cooked quinoa, cooled

¼ cup sliced green onion

¼ cup balsamic vinegar

2 tbsp olive oil

1 tsp dijon mustard

Combine roasted sweet potatoes, raisins, seeds/nuts, cooked quinoa, and green onion in a bowl. Combine dressing: balsamic vinegar, olive oil, and Dijon mustard in a separate bowl. Pour into quinoa mixture. Refrigerate and serve as a side dish or on top of some leafy greens! Yum!

**As time goes on, the raisins and quinoa absorbs the dressing. Additional balsamic, olive oil, Dijon mustard can be added for more moisture.

Peanut Butter Baked Oatmeal:  

AshleyP article oatmeal

3 cups quick cooking oats

½ cup brown sugar

1 cup skim milk

2 tbsp melted butter

2 eggs

2 teaspoons baking powder

½ tsp salt

2 teaspoons vanilla

½ cup peanut butter

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a bowl, mix together all of the ingredients until combined. Grease a 9×13 pan and pour oatmeal mixture into the pan. Bake for 20-25 minutes (longer is you like it more crunchy). It is great served hot with warm milk and diced banana. Enjoy all week long!

 

About the Author:

AshleyParsons

Hi, my name is Ashley Parsons. I am from the Cleveland, Ohio area, but have had the pleasure of calling Bowling Green, Ohio my home for the past 5 years. I received my bachelors in dietetics from Bowling Green State University in 2015. I was then accepted into their combined dietetic internship and master’s program, which I will complete in May 2017. My goal is to move back to Cleveland area to be close to my parents, and work as a Clinical dietitian at The Cleveland Clinic. Some of my favorite things in life include my family, my dog, cooking, exercising, my church, being with friends, baseball, sunshine, and peanut butter.

Chowline: Smoothies can boost fruit, calcium intake

When prepared healthfully, smoothies can provide a big boost in nutrition…….

My teenage daughter has a sudden affinity for smoothies. She is making them all the time. Is this something I should encourage?

Smoothies can be a great way for anyone to consume more produce, and even additional calcium if milk, yogurt or calcium-fortified juice is part of the mix.

And most teens need more fruits, vegetables and calcium in their diets. A 2006 study in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association found that less than 1 percent of boys and less than 4 percent of girls aged 14 to 18 years ate the recommended amount of produce. (For girls 14-18, the recommended amount is 1.5 cups of fruit and 2.5 cups of vegetables per day. Boys that age need an extra half-cup of each.)

Both boys and girls from 14 to 18 years need 1,300 milligrams of calcium a day — about the amount in 4.5 cups of milk. A national nutrition survey in 2005-2006 found that 42 percent of teen boys and only 10 percent of teen girls consumed enough calcium every day.

So, in a word, yes! If your daughter’s smoothies help her consume enough produce and calcium day to day, by all means encourage her on her smoothie craze. But it’s important to make sure they’re healthy beverages, not sugar-laden frozen slushies or milkshakes in disguise.

chowline fruit smoothie

When prepared healthfully, smoothies can provide a big boost in nutrition. According to a study published in Health Education and Behavior in 2015, when smoothies were introduced as an option at school breakfasts at a middle school and high school in Utah, students eating a full cup of fruit during breakfast increased from 4.3 percent to a whopping 45.1 percent.

Another study, published in the Journal of Child Nutrition and Management in 2015, showed that 68 percent of high school students who chose yogurt as a breakfast option didn’t choose milk, suggesting that yogurt products — including many smoothies — may offer an appealing calcium-rich alternative for non-milk drinkers.

The smoothies made for the Utah school study included milk or juice, vanilla yogurt, and fruit — usually bananas, strawberries, pineapple and mandarin oranges, but sometimes cherries and pears — and even spinach for green smoothies. No extra sugar, frozen yogurt or ice cream was added — a good guideline for keeping the nutritional profile of a smoothie high. Adding ice will provide a nice chill and help lower the calorie count. Using frozen fruit — even frozen bananas — helps keep a smoothie thick with or without ice cubes.

For healthy recipe ideas, try the “Fruits and Veggies: More Matters” website at fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org. Click on “Recipes” and choose “Beverages and Smoothies.” You will find 16 pages of recipes for everything from an Orange Banana Frosty to a Watermelon Strawberry Shake (no ice cream included).

In addition, consider introducing your daughter to choosemyplate.gov/teens. This website encourages teens to adopt healthy food and activity habits to last a lifetime.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Final Day for Community Wellness Day Registration

Please join us for Community Wellness Day on Thursday, June 16, 2016. Receive 20 different blood tests for one low price. Registration will take place from May 16 – 20!

Registration will take place from May 16 – 20, 2016 by calling 419-354-8679

Join Wood County Hospital in taking a positive step toward improving your health by taking part in our Community Wellness Day, held in the hospital meeting rooms. Gain valuable information in regards to your health status and use this information to take action to reach your wellness goals.

This event will offer over 20 different blood tests for a low price. In addition, participants will receive various free screenings and educational information which will provide you an overview of your current general health. Get a jump start on your path to a healthy lifestyle!

Please join us for Community Wellness Day on Thursday, June 16, 2016. Receive 20 different blood tests for one low price.

WCH Health and Wellness graphic

Chowline: Why food safety is vital during pregnancy

When a woman becomes pregnant, she undergoes all sorts of physical changes……

Why are pregnant women at greater risk of foodborne illness?

When a woman becomes pregnant, she undergoes all sorts of physical changes that are necessary for her body to accept and nurture the growing baby in her womb.

One of those changes involves part of the mother’s immune system called “cell-mediated immunity.” When it’s working normally, cell-mediated immunity helps fight the kinds of pathogens that move from cell to cell. This doesn’t affect the part of the immune system that involves antibodies, which remains fully functioning during pregnancy.

Cell-mediated immunity is the type of immunity involved when a person has an organ transplant and the body rejects the new organ, thinking it’s a foreign invader. When a woman becomes pregnant, the body suppresses this function to allow the body to accept the fetus.

That’s all well and good, but it does put the mother and fetus at higher risk for some types of foodborne illness.

According to foodsafety.gov, the federal government’s hub for food safety information, the top five pathogens related to food poisoning during pregnancy are bacteria Listeria monocytogenes, Campylobacter, E. coli and Salmonella, and a parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Depending on the pathogen and the severity of the illness, these can cause miscarriage, premature birth, stillbirth or birth defects in the fetus, as well as serious health problems for the mother.

chowline food duringpregnancy
photo: iStock

Food Safety for Pregnant Women, online at foodsafety.gov/risk/pregnant, provides details about each of these pathogens as well as other guidelines, including:

  • Avoid unpasteurized milk and products made from it. Soft cheeses, such as brie, feta, Camembert, Roquefort, queso blanco and queso fresco are frequently made with unpasteurized milk. Some hard cheeses are also made with raw or unpasteurized milk. Always read the label.
  • Avoid unpasteurized juice or cider. Even fresh-squeezed juice has been associated with E. coli.
  • Avoid raw seafood and be selective with smoked seafood. Both pose a risk from Listeria. Smoked seafood is OK only if it is canned or otherwise processed to be shelf-stable (the kind that doesn’t need refrigeration), or is an ingredient in a casserole or other dish cooked to at least 165 degrees F.
  • Avoid premade ham, chicken, tuna or other meat or seafood salads, such as those you can buy in a deli. Make them at home instead.
  • Don’t eat hot dogs or lunchmeats unless you’ve heated them to steaming hot — 165 degrees F.
  • Be sure any eggs you eat are cooked until the yolk is firm. Any casseroles or foods containing raw eggs should be cooked to 160 degrees F. Avoid foods containing raw or undercooked eggs, including unpasteurized eggnog, cookie or cake batter, Caesar salad dressing, tiramisu, eggs Benedict, homemade ice cream and freshly made hollandaise sauce.

For more details, see foodsafety.gov/risk/pregnant.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Wood County Clean Plate Awards to be Presented Thursday

The 2016 Clean Plate Award will be presented to forty (40) licensed food service operations out of more than 800 food service operations in Wood County.

The Annual Wood County Clean Plate Awards

 

Bowling Green, OH – Wood County Health District is pleased to announce the presentation of this year’s Clean Plate Awards on Thursday, May 12, 2015 at 5:30 p.m. The presentation will take place at the Wood County Health District located at 1840 East Gypsy Lane Road, Bowling Green, Ohio.

 

The 2016 Clean Plate Award will be presented to forty (40) licensed food service operations out of more than 800 food service operations in Wood County. These restaurants and other food service operations have been dedicated to upholding excellent sanitation and food safety knowledge within their facility. The recipients will receive a certificate of excellence and recognition of excellent performance in food safety from the Wood County Health District.  The winners of the Clean Plate Award will also receive a Clean Plate Award decal to display at their facility. This is the sixth year that the Wood County Board of Health will hand out the awards. “The Food Service Operations in Wood County that are presented with the Clean Plate Award have gone above and beyond in the practice of safe food handling,” said Lana Glore, Director of Environmental Services at the Wood County Health District.

 

This year’s recipients include: American Table Family Restaurant, Bass Pro Shop, Bowling Green High School, Bowling Green Manor, Bowling Green Middle School, Carolyn’s Personalized Catering, Conneaut Elementary, Crim Elementary, Eagle Point Elementary, Eastwood High School, Eastwood Middle School, Edible Arrangements, Fernando’s, First Solar/Eurest Dining, Glenwood Elementary, Holiday Inn Express and Suites, Kenwood Elementary, Luckey Elementary, Marco’s Pizza #8, Nazareth Hall, Northwood High School, Northwood Elementary, Olney Elementary, Pemberville Elementary, Poppin George’s Kettle Corn of BG, Rita’s Dairy Bar, Rossford High School, Subway #5859, Super Suppers – Perrysburg-Maumee, Swig,  Wood County Committee on Aging in Rossford, Northeast Center, Perrysburg, North Baltimore, Pemberville, Wayne & Bowling Green, Wood County Justice Center, Wood Lane School, and WSOS Perrysburg/Rossford Early Childhood Center.

 

Questions regarding the Clean Plate Awards may be directed to Kelly Bechstein, Registered Sanitarian at 419-354-2702, ext. 3283 or kbechstein@co.wood.oh.us.

STARTS TODAY – Village Posts Hydrant Flushing Schedule

Residents may experience rusty water during this period. Please use caution when using water for laundry purposes …….

NOTICE TO NORTH BALTIMORE RESIDENTS:

The North Baltimore Water Department will be flushing fire hydrants during the month of May.  The flushing will be divided into four sections of the Village with the railroad and Main St. as the dividing mark.

May 9-10….…………………………………………………………………………….Southeast

May 11-12…….……………………………………………………………………….Northeast

May 13…………………………………………………………………………………..Make-Up East Side

May 16-17…….……………………………………………………………………….Southwest

May 18 -19…………………………………………………………………………….Northwest

May 20………………………………………………………………………………….Make-Up West Side

Residents may experience rusty water during this period.  Please use caution when using water for laundry purposes.  Should you do laundry during this testing period and rust appears on clothing, rust removing chemicals may be obtained through the Village office.  The water will be safe to drink.  If you should have any questions, please call the Water Department at (419) 257-2141 or the Village office at (419) 257-2394

Village of N. Baltimore

Water and Wastewater Dept.

Chow Line: Takeaways from the Biggest Loser Study

Focus on health, not the scale………

I recently heard some discouraging news about the prospects of losing weight and keeping it off. What is the best course for people like me, who had a lifelong battle with weight?

You’re likely talking about the study that followed 14 “Biggest Loser” contestants six years after they competed on the TV show. The study, in the journal Obesity, has received wide media coverage.

One of the participants actually weighs less than she did at the end of the competition, but the other 13 regained some or all of the weight they had lost. While more than half retained at least a 10 percent weight loss six years later, five now weigh as much or more as they did before the Biggest Loser. Their level of physical activity had not changed significantly since the end of the competition.

What surprised the researchers most were the measurements of the participants’ “resting metabolic rate,” or the calories a person burns while at rest. It’s generally known that when people diet and they trim down, their metabolism slows and they don’t burn as many calories. But researchers found that as these participants regained pounds, their metabolic rates did not increase as expected. In order to maintain their weight, most Biggest Loser graduates must eat 200 to 800 fewer calories per day than other people who weigh exactly the same as they do.

chowline weight loss exercise

In addition to that hurdle, researchers found that the participants continue to have significantly lower levels of the hormone leptin. Less leptin triggers hunger and cravings, and is normal when you diet. The participants had normal levels of leptin when they started the Biggest Loser competition and almost none when they finished. Six years later, the participants’ leptin levels had not returned to normal. They were hungry, all the time.

So, what does this mean for you? Since everyone is different, it’s difficult to say. But here are some things to consider:

  • Focus on health, not the scale. Eat 2 to 2.5 cups of vegetables and 1 to 1.5 cups of fruit every day, and round out your diet by focusing on whole grains, lean protein and healthy oils. And get plenty of physical activity: Make it your goal to walk, play sports or work out for at least 30 minutes five days a week. Even if the pounds don’t drop, regular physical activity lessens the risk of chronic disease.
  • Take guidance from the National Weight Control Registry, www.nwcr.ws, a database of more than 10,000 people who have lost 30 pounds or more and have kept it off for at least a year. Most report they have had success by maintaining a low-calorie, low-fat diet, and 90 percent say they exercise an average of an hour a day. But understand the hunger pangs you will likely feel are real, and you will have to work harder to maintain your weight than your lean friends.
  • Shed any shame or guilt you feel about your weight. As science learns more about individual differences in metabolism as well as leptin and other hormones that affect hunger and appetite, it’s easier to understand the biological underpinnings of why so many of us struggle with weight issues. Self-blame doesn’t help.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

 

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month

During Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month in May –and during the rest of the year –drivers of all motor vehicles are reminded to safely “share the road” with motorcyclists and to be extra alert to help keep motorcyclists safe.

May is Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month.

More motorcyclists are on the roads of Wood County more than ever.

During Motorcycle Safety Awareness Month in May –and during the rest of the year –drivers of all motor vehicles are reminded to safely “share the road” with motorcyclists and to be extra alert to help keep motorcyclists safe.

Let’s look at a comparison of Motorcycle Statistics for the past two years. These numbers will show an increase from 2014 to 2015 in most areas:

2015:

Total Motorcycle Crashes – 54

Total Fatal Crashes – 4

Total Injury Crashes – 33

Total Deaths – 4

Total Injuries – 36

Alcohol Involved fatal crashes – 2

Alcohol Involved Injury crashes – 1

2014: Total Motorcycle Crashes – 40

Total Fatal Crashes – 0

Total Injury Crashes – 36

Total Deaths – 0

Total Injuries – 41

Alcohol Involved fatal crashes – 0

Alcohol Involved Injury crashes – 1

Be safe when riding your bike. Look out for motorcycles.

For More Information:

Lt. Jerrod Savidge, 419-352-2481

Motor Cycle Wreck - Safety

Chowline: How to help your child eat a healthy diet

Noticing your child’s sweet tooth and looking for ways to help shows that you are aware of the importance of establishing a healthy diet early in life……

Our toddler has a sweet tooth. Should we let him indulge, or is it time to start restricting snacks?

Guidance from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says establishing healthy food habits early in life, along with a good dose of daily exercise, is key in helping children become healthy, active adults. So, yes. Just like the rest of us (adults), your toddler should be learning to eat small portions of sweets every once in a while, not all the time.

If you believe your child is already overweight, you should discuss your concerns with your son’s doctor. The academy suggests letting children “grow into” their weight without a special calorie-restricting diet. Children’s bodies are growing and developing, so you don’t want to put them on a weight-loss diet. Too much calorie restriction could deprive them of the energy and nutrients they need to properly develop bone and tissue as they grow taller. And, putting too much focus on weight could cause body image issues.

Still, a recent study indicates that it may be especially beneficial to pay attention to food choices in young children who crave sweets.

chowline kid eating sweets
photo credit: Pixabay

The study, “Eating in the Absence of Hunger and Weight Gain in Low-income Toddlers,” is being published in the May 2016 issue of Pediatrics. Researchers looked at young children, specifically 209 children at 21 months, 27 months and 33 months old. They focused on those from low-income families because they are at a higher risk of childhood obesity. The researchers found that the toddlers who ate more cookies after a filling meal and who became upset when the sweets were taken away had gradual increases in body fat over the course of the study. Interestingly, the children who chose a salty option (potato chips or cheese puffs) instead of cookies did not experience the same weight gain. Still, the overall finding was that the tendency to eat when not hungry increased during toddlerhood, particularly with sweets, and this was associated with an increase in body fat.

So, it’s good that you’re paying attention. Noticing your child’s sweet tooth and looking for ways to help shows that you are aware of the importance of establishing a healthy diet early in life. Here are some suggestions from the academy:

  • Being a good role model is important: Children easily pick up on their parents’ habits. Be sure you’re eating properly.
  • Put the focus on health, and refrain from negative comments about weight.
  • Become aware of the difference between eating when hungry and eating for other reasons — because of boredom, for example. Teach your child to pay attention to their inner cues and to choose food only when they’re truly hungry, and to stop eating when they’re satisfied.
  • Don’t use food to pacify or reward children. That can lead to a pattern of emotional eating.
  • Make snacks healthful: Whole-grain cereal, graham crackers, fresh fruit slices and string cheese are among good choices.

For more good ideas, go online to see the academy’s guidance for parents at eatright.org/resources/for-parents.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

NB Recycling Center

OPEN EVERY SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH* – – – How To Prepare & Separate Your Recyclables

NB Recycling Center –

Please help make recycling happen by preparing and sorting your recyclable materials as requested on this page. Careful preparation and separation of recyclables is important because manufacturers require clean and contaminant-free materials to make new products.

OPEN EVERY SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH*

– 9 am – Noon –

At the Old Water Plant Building on East High Street. south of the Village Park

Please, No Trash. Do not leave items at the recycling site when it is closed or unattended. Bring recyclables to the site only during the posted and attended hours. Please have recyclable items separated into their proper categories.

We appreciate your cooperation! The Wood County Solid Waste District and the North Baltimore Masonic Lodge, who staff the local operation.

How To Prepare & Separate Your Recyclables

ALUMINUM BEVERAGE CANS

Drain completely.

Recycle separately from Steel Cans.

Cans may be flattened to save space.
Aluminum Beverage Cans only

No scrap aluminum No aluminum castings (these can  jam our equipment)
recycle alcans

BOOKS

Hardcover Textbooks
Softcover Textbooks
Encyclopedias
Paperbacks
Please, No Spiral Bound, Wirebound.
recycle books

PLASTIC BOTTLES

Bottles only.
Remove and discard bottle caps.
Drain and Rinse bottles
Please, No plastic bags
recycle plastic-bottles
CARDBOARD

BOXES SHOULD BE FLATTENED.
You may place flattened boxes in larger boxes for easy handling.
No foam, No peanuts, No packing material, and No wax-coated cartons or boxes (e.g. milk, juice)
recycle Cardboard

OFFICE PAPER

white & colored paper
envelopes (windows are OK)
file folders,
carbonless forms
index cards.
Labels, stamps and sticky notes are OK.
Put shredded office paper in plastic bags.
Please,No metal No “spirals” or other bindings No glossy paper No tissue, waxed or wrapping paper and paper towels
recycle officepaper

GLASS BOTTLES AND JARS

Throw away caps and lids.
Rinse clean.
To protect your eyes, look away as you place glass in our container.

No Pyrex, No heat resistant glass, No ceramic, No china, No light bulbs, and No mirrors.
recycle glass
MAGAZINES AND CATALOGS

Must be printed on glossy paper.
Staples do not need to be removed.
Remove from boxes or bags and place loose magazines into container provided.
Please, No Newspaper Inserts, No loose sheets, No junk mail, No plastic wrappers, No product samples, and No non-shiny covers or pages.
recycle magazines

NEWSPAPER (The Recycling trailer is located in the Chamber Lot (“old Food Center”) on West State Street at 2nd Street, by the tracks)

Including

Newspaper Inserts and ads
Phone Books
Tear phone books into sections one inch or thinner

No wet newspaper, No plastic bags and No bundles tied with string.
recycle newspaper

STEEL CANS

­Food Cans
EMPTY Aerosol Cans
Rinse clean.Place loose lids in cans and pinch ends closed to keep lid inside and to prevent cuts.
Recycle Aluminum Beverage Cans separately

Please, No coat hangers, No wires and No scrap steel
Recycle steelcans

NO RECYCLED MATERIALS WE CANNOT RECYCLE

No Plastic Except Bottles
No Drink Boxes, plastic or wax  Cartons
No Wet Newspaper
No Light Bulbs
No Mirrors or windows
No heat resistant glass
No Trash
No  Yard Waste*
No Plastic Bags*
No Polystyrene*
No Used Motor Oil*
No paint
*Local Businesses recycle these items.

THANK YOU FOR RECYCLING!

Questions should be directed to the Wood County Solid Waste District. Solid Waste District Website

*CLOSED some Saturday’s due to Holidays and local events (The last Saturday of July – Good Ole Summertime Day).

Help Wanted – NB Gardens of the Month

It’s time to start selecting North Baltimore Gardens of the Month for flower gardens and vegetable gardens. We will be cruising around town to find one of each for the next several months, but we could use a little help.

It’s time to start selecting North Baltimore Gardens of the Month for flower gardens and vegetable gardens.  We will be cruising around town to find one of each for the next several months, but we could use a little help.

If you see a garden you would like to see featured, please send an email to keninger@who.rr.com and we will do our best to get pictures to share with our community.

keninger tulips
Tulips burst forth, in front of Kathy Eninger’s home.

Parenting Press: Handling School Conferences Effectively

You get a call from the middle school asking you to participate in a conference concerning your child’s school behavior and progress. It’s not a parenting moment you relish…….

Handling School Conferences Effectively

Tip—When we react to our children’s school problems as if they were ours, we interfere with our children’s ability to experience them as theirs.

You get a call from the middle school asking you to participate in a conference concerning your child’s school behavior and progress. It’s not a parenting moment you relish. It might, in fact, be more appropriately labeled an ibuprofen moment.

How should you handle this? Counselor Louise Tracy, MS, author of Grounded for Life?! Stop Blowing Your Fuse and Start Communicating with Your Teenager, advises parents to first get hold of their own emotions. Many of us jump from outrage to immediate judgment and yelling, she explains. We seem to want the child to feel as bad as we do.

“When our words carry high levels of anger, disappointment, and disapproval, we’re being affected by our child’s behavior and its consequences as if the bad things were happening to us,” comments Tracy. “Remember that our child’s school behavior, and the experiences that follow it, belong physically and emotionally to her.”

Tools—Tracy advises parents to remember that school problems are the child’s and it is her responsibility to resolve them with her teachers. If your youngster’s behavior is under discussion, then she should be present at the conference. Your participation in a school conference is to facilitate communication so that the child and the teacher can resolve the problem. Tracy recommends supporting the school’s authority, but also ensuring that your child gets speaking time in the conference.

  • Ask the teacher to summarize the problem so that everyone will be working from the same base.
  • Check your child’s understanding of the problem. Ask your child to restate the problem in her own words, including its consequences in grades, classroom environment, or the teacher’s feelings.
    Link to book description
  • Create speaking time for your child. Ask for your child’s ideas and feelings—whatever information she may wish to contribute from her perspective.
  • Ensure adult acknowledgment or response. If the teacher does not react, you can ask for clarification, such as, “Are you saying you speak out because you think your teacher doesn’t really understand the situation?”
  • Reflect the child’s concerns and redirect her back to the problem. For example, “Still, with thirty students and only one teacher, it’s thirty-to-one and your teacher says that’s not manageable for her. She wants your concerns handled some other way. What else do you think might work?”

At this point, the conference is really between the student and teacher as they work toward solving the problem.

You’ll find more practical tips you can use right now in Grounded for Life?! Stop Blowing Your Fuse and Start Communicating with Your Teenager by Louise Felton Tracy, M.S.