NB Custom Cuts Specials Oct. 12 – 18

North Baltimore Custom Cuts has announced their SPECIALS through Tuesday, October 11th. CLICK HERE for more information!

North Baltimore Custom Cuts has announced their SPECIALS through Tuesday, October 11th. CLICK HERE for more information!

>>> Senior Citizen Tuesdays<<<

10% OFF ANY PURCHASE!

NB Custom Cuts Store Front
Located on Insley Road, just east of North Baltimore, off Quarry Road. Exit at I – 75 southbound at the Eagleville Road Exit (168) – turn right – go a 1/4 mile north!

Regular HOURS:

Monday – Friday: 8 am to 5 pm each day

Saturday: 8 am – 1 pm

WEEKLY SPECIALS –

USDA Choice Chuck Roast – $4.89

USDA Choice English Roast – $5.49

85% Lean Ground Beet – $4.59

Maple Flavored Breakfast Links – $4.59
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>>> Brats!!! <<<

 Chili Cheese Brats & Cheddar Brats 
 Regular Bratwurst 
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Keystone Canned Products

custom-cuts-keystone-chicken-broth

Chicken (28 oz) – $6.89
Chicken Broth – $2.89

custom-cuts-keystone-beef

Beef (28 oz) – $5.88
Beef Broth – $2.89
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> Deer Processing <
Tag & Deposit Required
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– We accept:
> Credit – – – Debit – – – EBT Cards <
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September Meat Raffle Winner

Billy Baltz

October Raffle > Tickets just $5.00

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Gift Certificates now available!

We have FRESH Chicken Salad

Mac Salad  & Potato Salad

(prices good thru Tuesday, October 18)

Stop out and check out the Meat Case, new items being added all the time!

Custom Cuts Meat Case July 1

We also offer:

– Everglades Seasonings –

– St. Mary’s Meats –

– Ginger’s Goodies & Homemade Breads –

– Walnut Creek Noodles

Custom Cuts Product Rack July 1

OTHER AWESOME DEALS and SELECTIONS:

 

 

 

Hydrant Flushing Continues Around Village

The North Baltimore Water Department will be flushing fire hydrants during the month of October.

NOTICE TO NORTH BALTIMORE RESIDENTS

The North Baltimore Water Department will be flushing fire hydrants during the month of October.

The flushing will be divided into four sections of the Village with the railroad and Main St. as the dividing mark.

Oct. 11-12 ……………………………………………………………………….Southeast

Oct. 13- 14 ………………………………………………………………………..Northeast

Oct. 15…………………………………………………………………………….Make-Up East Side

Oct. 17-18……………………………………………………………………….Southwest

Oct. 19-20……………………………………………………………………….Northwest

Oct. 21…………………………………………………………………………….Make-Up West Side

Residents may experience rusty water during this period. Please use caution when using water for laundry purposes. Should you do laundry during this testing period and rust appears on clothing, rust removing chemicals may be obtained through the Village office. The water will be safe to drink. If you should have any questions, please call the Water Department at (419) 257-2141 or the Village office at (419) 257-2394

Village of N. Baltimore

Water and Wastewater Dept.

October Home Checklist and Inspections

Leisa Zeigler, a lifelong resident of Northwest Ohio and Realtor since 2004 has been serving clients in Findlay and surrounding communities for many years.

She offers these basic tips for getting ready for a NW Ohio Winter! Following these 13 clean up routines inside and outside your home helps prepare your home for a change in the weather……….

Leisa Zeigler, a lifelong resident of Northwest Ohio and Realtor since 2004 has been serving clients in Findlay and surrounding communities for many years. She offers these basic tips for getting ready for a NW Ohio Winter!

October Home Checklist and Inspections

Following these 13 clean up routines inside and outside your home helps prepare your home for a change in the weather……….

  • Replace filters or wash permanent ones in heating system
  • Change batteries in carbon monoxide and smoke detectors
  • Reset programmable thermostat
  • Clean and inspect gutters and downspouts
  • Clean and store outdoor furniture and decorations
  • Wash window glass, frames and sill
  • Clean out weep-holes in sliders and change screen to storm panel
  • Wash storm door frame and replace storm panels
  • Remove portable air conditioner unit
  • Clean and store lawn equipment and tools
  • Winterize sprinkler system and drain and turn off outdoor water spigots
  • Plant spring flowering bulbs
  • Clean up fallen leaves, pine needles etc. from lawn and garden beds, build up soil with slow-release fertilizer and mulch plants for winter protection.

“Let Leisa List It!”

Leisa Zeigler, REALTOR
ERA Geyer Noakes Realty Group
Call or Text: 419.350.1406
E-mail: leisa.zeigler@era.com   
PAID AD

Chowline: YOGURT–So many choices, lots to like

Yogurt has a good amount of protein…………..

There seem to be a lot more kinds of yogurt than there ever used to be. I like it, but is yogurt really that popular?

Yogurt has made big gains over the years. Although it’s leveling off, yogurt consumption has more than doubled over the last 15 years, according to the National Agricultural Statistics Service. During that time, Greek yogurt appeared on the market and quickly gained steam, now accounting for about half of all yogurt sales.

What’s the appeal? Yogurt has a lot going for it. It has a good amount of calcium, although the amount can vary. To determine how much calcium is in your favorite yogurt, look for the Percent Daily Value for calcium listed on the Nutrition Facts label, and multiply it by 1,000 mg, which is the Daily Value for calcium. For example, if the label says a serving of your yogurt has 25 percent (0.25) of the Daily Value for calcium, then it has 250 mg. To compare, a cup of milk has about 300 mg.

It’s important to note that the recommended daily amount of calcium for people varies, from 1,300 mg for 9- to 18-year-olds, to 1,200 mg for men 71 and older and women 51 and older, to 1,000 mg for those in between. So, you have to do a little mental math to know if you’re getting enough. Fortunately, when the new Nutrition Facts labels appear on foods in 2018, they’ll list the actual amount of calcium in grams.

Also like milk, yogurt has a good amount of protein. A cup of plain low-fat yogurt has 12 grams of protein, compared with 8 grams in a cup of 2 percent milk. Again, your mileage may vary with the type of yogurt. To verify, check the Nutrition Facts.

Most types of yogurt also contain beneficial bacteria naturally found in the intestinal tract, but which can sometimes use a boost. These live cultures, such as Lactobacillus acidophilus, can improve digestive health and strengthen your immune system. Unfortunately, you can’t really tell how much of this bacteria is in the yogurt you eat. Even in yogurt with a “Live and Active Cultures” seal, which verifies the yogurt had at least 100 million cultures per gram (or 10 million for frozen yogurt) at the time it was made, the number of good bacteria can fade over time.

Although yogurt is a highly nutritious food, flavored varieties might contain more added sugar than you’re comfortable with. Flavored regular yogurt often has about 24-30 grams of carbohydrates, some from added sugars and some naturally from the sugars in the yogurt’s milk and fruit. Light varieties, with low- or no-calorie sweeteners, have half as many carbs. When the new Nutrition Facts labels come out, you’ll be able to easily see how much of the carbohydrate is from added sugars.

Or, opt for plain yogurt. It won’t have any added sugars, and you can add your own flavorings, such as vanilla, or top it with fresh or frozen berries yourself.

Plain whole-milk Greek yogurt is also a good substitute for sour cream. Along with some added tang, it provides fewer calories (190 per cup compared to 480 in sour cream), less fat (9 grams compared to 45), more protein (20 grams compared to 5) and more calcium (250 mg compared to 7). So, it’s worth an experiment or two to see how it might work in your recipes.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Briar Hill Meet, Greet & Eat – Thursday

Call TODAY to reserve your FREE seat for dinner, to join in meeting the new Executive Director and Director of Health Services at Briar Hill Health Campus!

Call TODAY to reserve your FREE seat for dinner, to join in meeting the new Executive Director and Director of Health Services at Briar Hill Health Campus!

briar-hill-meet-greet-eat-oct-2016-flyer

Parenting Press: Temperament Patterns and Values

When you think about teaching values like responsibility or persistence to your children, it helps to look at their temperament traits…….

Tip–A child’s innate temperament traits can either support or hinder your attempts to instill your values in your child.

Link to book description

When you think about teaching values like responsibility or persistence to your children, it helps to look at their temperament traits. A child’s inborn qualities can either support and help her acquire the value you wish to instill or they can make it harder to teach, says Dr. Harriet Heath, psychologist, educator, and author of Using Your Values to Raise Your Child to Be an Adult You Admire.

For example, a child who is highly distractible is not going to acquire the value of responsibility easily. Cleaning his room without supervision or reminding will likely take a much longer time to achieve than it will for a child who is very focused and persistent by nature.

On the other hand, that same focused and persistent child will have a hard time acquiring the values of flexibility and adaptability; she may very much resist leaving one activity to go to Grandma’s house, or not want to stop playing a game to go to bed, while her distractible brother finds transitions and adapting to new requirements a breeze.

Tools–All temperament traits make some life tasks and skills harder or easier to master. “The challenge for parents when temperament patterns hinder your child’s development of a value you hold is to find ways to help your child cope,” explains Heath. She offers the following list of directions and questions as a way to help parents make their expectations more realistic and their teaching of values more effective.

Describe a situation in your family that needs attention. (For example, your three year old daughter lets siblings and friends take toys away from her.)
Brainstorm–think of as many ideas as you can to deal with the situation.
Make a plan of how to respond to the situation, using ideas that support your values. Guide your choice by answering the following questions:
  • Which of your values are involved in this situation? (In the example above, assertiveness is a value that the child is failing to display.)
  • Which of your ideas for solutions will support your values?
  • How will your child’s basic needs and developmental level affect which ideas you try? (For example, a three year old might need to practice being assertive first around those she trusts.)
  • How will your child’s temperament patterns affect which ideas you try? (For example, this child might be very shy, a quality that would undermine the value of assertiveness. She will likely need more direction and support from her parents than another child to learn assertiveness.)
Carry out your plan.
Reflect on your plan’s success. Revise if necessary.

You’ll find more practical tips you can use right now in Using Your Values to Raise Your Child to Be an Adult You Admire by Harriet Heath, Ph.D.

 

Ohio Traffic Related Deaths

The Ohio State Highway Patrol (OSHP) and The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) continue their safety initiative to bring awareness to the high number of traffic deaths.

Ohio Traffic Related Deaths

The Ohio State Highway Patrol (OSHP) and The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) continue their safety initiative to bring awareness to the high number of traffic deaths. 

ODOT District Two shares these statistics with the media every other week. 

As of this week, Ohio has recorded 797 traffic deaths in 2016. This is about even with traffic deaths this time last year.

Ohio will again focus on increasing seat belt use – the most significant thing you can do (or wear) to survive a crash. Last year, about 32% of all traffic deaths involved unbelted drivers and passengers.

Over the past three years, about 64% of all unbelted-related crashes (regardless of severity) involved men.  About 30% of all unbelted crashes involved drivers and passengers between the ages of 15-25.  This is a great reminder for parents to model safe driving by wearing a seat belt all the time in every seat position, including the back.

Freeway Message Signs:

OHIO TRAFFIC

                      DEATHS THIS YEAR

797

THAT SEATBELT

                      LOOKS GOOD

ON YOU

Portable Message Signs

                      TRAFFIC

                      DEATHS

797

BUCKLE

UP

OHIO

Be safe, and give driving your full attention.

FOSTORIA COMMUNITY HOSPITAL OFFERS FLU VACCINATION CLINICS

Tue., Oct. 4 from 3:30 – 6 p.m. and Wed., Nov. 9 from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m

Protect yourself this flu season! Seasonal flu vaccination clinics will be held  Tue., Oct. 4 from 3:30 – 6 p.m. and Wed., Nov. 9 from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m at ProMedica Fostoria Community Hospital . The vaccine is for adults 18 years of age or older.

The cost of the flu vaccine will be $29, which is covered by Medicare Part B. A Medicare card and photo ID are required for those who utilize Medicare.

The clinic will be held in the ProMedica Fostoria Community Hospital Conference Center, on the hospital’s lower level, entrance 2.

For more information please call ProMedica Total Wellness at 419-436-6688.

For more information about ProMedica Fostoria Community Hospital, visit www.promedica.org/fostoria.

Bayer-Monsanto Merger Stifles Competition?

The proposed merger between German based pharmaceutical and chemical giant Bayer and U.S. based seed giant Monsanto would create the world’s largest supplier of seeds and agricultural chemicals. A merged company would control a quarter of the world’s seed and agrichemical market.

By Brian Depew on Sep 14 2016

The proposed merger between German based pharmaceutical and chemical giant Bayer and U.S. based seed giant Monsanto would create the world’s largest supplier of seeds and agricultural chemicals. A merged company would control a quarter of the world’s seed and agrichemical market.

This proposed merger follows two other mega-mergers in the agricultural input market. The Dow-DuPont merger and ChemChina-Syngenta deal both announced in the last year are reshaping an already highly consolidated market.

As giant transnational corporations increase their power over the market, independent farmers are left with fewer options and suffer from less competition between input providers. Farmers have already lost access to seed varieties and genetic traits while seeing the prices they pay for biotechnology traits skyrocket.

The Center believes in the power of a competitive marketplace and understands the role of government in guarding against unfair and anticompetitive market practices. We, therefore, call on the Department of Justice to block further mergers between any of the big six (quickly becoming the big four) agrichemical-seed companies.

We encourage concerned citizens to reach out to their members of Congress to voice support for Department of Justice action to block proposed mergers.

We also call on Congress to reverse the decades long decline in investment in plant breeding as they take up a new farm bill in 2017.

The recent merger activity should serve as a clarion call for the Department of Justice and Congress to act to protect a competitive market environment for independent farmers and ranchers.

Exercise benefits brain health, too

Thursday, Sept. 29 from 6:30 to 8 p.m………SIGN UP NOW!…………….

TOLEDO – Elizabeth Davis, a certified exercise physiologist from the ProMedica Wildwood Athletic Club, will be the guest speaker at a program called “Keep Moving for Brain Health” to be held in the Alzheimer’s Association, Northwest Ohio Chapter meeting room, 2600 N. Reynolds Road, Thursday, Sept. 29 from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

She will discuss how exercise and fitness help keep brains healthy.

A $5 program fee per person is suggested and reservations are requested. Please call 1-800-272-3900 to reserve a spot.

Chowline: Kids not eating fruit? Try cutting or slicing it

The USDA suggests cutting foods like grapes and cherry tomatoes in half before serving them to preschoolers……..

How can I get my grandchildren to eat more fruits and vegetables when they’re visiting? I am lucky that I get to have them over often, but I can’t seem to entice them to eat much produce.

You’re not alone. Most children (and teens and adults for that matter) don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables, according to data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

But for kids, you might try thinking small. That is, if you don’t already, try slicing fruits and vegetables into bite-size pieces. You might be surprised at the results.

Research by the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University indicates that slicing fruit could increase consumption, at least in school cafeterias. You might find similar success at home.

For the study, published in 2013 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, researchers first interviewed 23 elementary and middle school students and found two primary reasons why they avoided fresh fruit. Surprisingly, younger students said they found whole fruit to be too large and cumbersome to eat comfortably. Students with braces or missing teeth said the same thing. The second reason? The older students, particularly girls, said they felt the whole fruit was messy and unattractive to eat in front of others.

The researchers decided to test how slicing fruit, specifically apples, would affect consumption. They provided eight elementary schools with a commercial apple slicer. When students requested an apple, a cafeteria worker would slice it before giving it to the student. By doing so, the sales of whole fruit increased in the schools by an average of 61 percent.

The researchers then followed up their study in middle schools. Of six middle schools in a district, three were provided the commercial apple slicer, and three weren’t. In all, the slicers increased average daily apple sales by 71 percent. The researchers also examined cafeteria waste to determine how much of the apples served were eaten. They found that in schools with the fruit slicers, the percentage of students who ate more than half their apple increased by 73 percent.

This all points to how important it can be to pay as much attention to how food is served as to which food is served when it comes to encouraging kids to eat fruits and vegetables. Other research has shown that promoting cafeteria salad bars with superhero-type characters can increase consumption of vegetables. And, of course, children tend to pick up habits from watching important adults in their lives, so be sure to model the behavior you want to see them imitate.

Another thing to consider, depending on how old your grandchildren are, is to make sure there are no choking hazards. The USDA suggests cutting foods like grapes and cherry tomatoes in half before serving them to preschoolers.

For more information about overcoming barriers to eating healthy, take a look at the Cornell lab’s website at foodpsychology.cornell.edu. For tips from the USDA according to age group, see choosemyplate.gov/audience.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021 Coffey Road, Columbus, OH 43210-1043, or filipic.3@osu.edu.

Flower Garden of the Month – September 2016

There are lots of roses blooming, in several colors, along with many other plants. This is a home with beautiful flowers that could be featured any month.

The Flower Garden of the month can be seen at 815 Foley Run and belongs to Diane Wright.

There are lots of roses blooming, in several colors,  along with many other plants.  This is a home with beautiful flowers that could be featured any month.

The back corners of the yard are lined with evergreen trees and butterfly bushes.  Drive by and check this yard out. You will be impressed.

submitted by Kathy Eninger for the NB Garden Club

CLICK on the IMAGE to ENLARGE