Chowline: Fructose intolerance manageable with proper diet

More than half of patients who are fructose intolerant are able to maintain a low-fructose diet and are able to notice an immediate improvement in their symptoms……

My son has been complaining recently about tummy aches after eating certain fruits like grapes and watermelon. Lately, he can’t seem to tolerate apple juice even though it’s his favorite drink. Could the fruit be causing his pain? I thought that feeding him fruits was a healthy choice?

Generally, fruits and vegetables are a healthy choice for children. In fact, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, it is recommended that children ages 2-3 eat 1 cup of fruit per day, those ages 4-8 consume 1-1.5 cups, those ages 9-13 consume 1.5 cups, and those 14-18 consume 1.5-2 cups of fruit per day.

Fruits, fruit juices and some vegetables, however, contain a naturally occurring sugar known as fructose. Fructose is also found in honey, table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup used to sweeten many processed foods and beverages. Some people may suffer from fructose intolerance, a condition in which the body’s digestive system doesn’t absorb fructose properly. This can result in abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, diarrhea and gas for some.

According to a 2010 study by the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG), fructose intolerance is common in children with recurrent or functional abdominal pain, but the condition can be effectively managed with a low-fructose diet. It seems the condition is more prevalent in teenage girls who suffer from chronic abdominal pain, the study’s authors said.

According to the study, “Fructose Intolerance/Malabsorption and Recurrent Abdominal Pain in Children,” fructose intolerance in children is typically diagnosed by exclusion, meaning other gastrointestinal conditions like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are ruled out as the cause of the abdominal pain.

Once these have been ruled out, your doctor can test your son for fructose intolerance by administering a fructose breath test, which measures the rise in hydrogen in a person’s breath after an oral dose of fructose, according to the Cleveland Clinic Children’s Health Team.

If your child is diagnosed with fructose intolerance, you should see a registered dietitian to determine foods that are OK to eat and those that should be avoided. Generally, people with fructose intolerance should limit their intake of high-fructose foods such as juices, apples, grapes, watermelon, asparagus, peas and zucchini, according to the Mayo Clinic.

While it may be difficult to both find foods with low fructose and get your son to not eat foods with high fructose, there is good news for those with fructose intolerance: The ACG study found that more than half of patients who are fructose intolerant are able to maintain a low-fructose diet and are able to notice an immediate improvement in their symptoms.

Chow Line is a service of the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and its outreach and research arms, OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.  Send questions to Chow Line, c/o Tracy Turner, 364 W. Lane Ave., Suite B120, Columbus, OH 43201, or [email protected].

Ageists Beware – ‘The world belongs to the young at heart’

Ageists beware; the older generation is making a New Year’s resolution to play a new role in 2017 and beyond, says AMAC – – – ‘The world belongs to the young at heart’

WASHINGTON, DC, Jan 6 – Big changes are in store for America’s older citizens in 2017 and beyond, says Dan Weber, president of the Association of Mature American Citizens.
“It used to be that the world belonged to the young when in fact it has always belonged to the young at heart.  And, with more people living longer than ever before, the older generations have an opportunity to show our worth.  The stereotypes of the past are slowly but surely giving way to a new way to look at the so-called ‘older generation’ as more and more of us embrace active retirements and even the establishment of new business careers.” according Weber.
Recently, the Milken Institute’s Center for the Future of Aging shed light on the importance of recognizing the nation’s aging population as an invaluable asset.  At a summit convened to stress the importance of the contribution the older population can make in the nation’s future, participants focused on the need for “reframing perceptions of aging in the 21st century.”
Among their conclusions:  we must change our perceptions of growing old.  A report issued at the conclusion of the Milken summit stated that: “Today it is socially unacceptable to ignore, ridicule, or stereotype someone based on their gender, race, or sexual orientation.  So why is it still acceptable to do this to people based on their age?  Ageism creates a negative reality of aging.  It’s bad enough that ageism can influence public policy, employment practices, and how people are treated in society, but what’s worse is that we accept the ageist behavior ourselves and start acting it out.  Older people are as multidimensional as any other group in our society.  We need to show the multidimensionality of their passion.”
 
The Census Bureau estimates that America’s population aged 65 and over will be nearly 84 million people or nearly 20% of the nation’s expected population.
“What’s more important,” says Dan Weber, “is the fact that the majority of them will be active citizens, playing a transformative role in society.  The miracles of modern medicine will contribute to the ‘new look’ of old age, but it will be the self-determination that we express today that will make the difference.  There’s a lot of knowledge we carry around in our old brains and it is time to put that knowledge to good use by becoming role models and mentors.  It’s a New Year’s resolution befitting the knowledge we have amassed over the years.”
ABOUT AMAC
The Association of Mature American Citizens [http://www.amac.us] is a vibrant, vital senior advocacy organization that takes its marching orders from its members.  We act and speak on their behalf, protecting their interests and offering a practical insight on how to best solve the problems they face today.  Live long and make a difference by joining us today at http://amac.us/join-amac.

NB Custom Cuts Specials Jan. 2 – 7

Senior Discount Tuesday (SAVE 10%)!!! North Baltimore Custom Cuts SPECIALS through Saturday, January 7th. CLICK HERE for more information!

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Parenting Press: Discouraging Unkindness in Children

If your child does not demonstrate kindness, it may be that she hasn’t been taught well enough yet….

Tip—Help your children develop alternatives to unkind behavior and role-play options with them.

Last week we looked at ways to encourage kind behavior in our children. This week consider how to discourage unkind, mean, and rude behavior. Admittedly, there is a difference between a child being self-absorbed and just ignoring someone with a need and a child who goes out of his way to tease or be mean to another. However different the level of unkindness, the goal is the same: to resist the rewards of unkind behavior and encourage empathy in its place.

First, be aware that our culture does not particularly value kindness in comparison to achievement, power, humor, or competition. Being aware of others’ feelings or situations and responding to them in a caring fashion is something that your children will likely not be rewarded for in our society. If they make a funny joke at someone else’s expense, beat someone at a game, or get a better grade, chances are that the attention they receive from others will be immediate and positive. Consequently, it is primarily from their families (and their places of worship, if families so choose) that children receive guidance for being kind and discouragement for being unkind.

Tools—Being kind is not a value present at birth. But temperament does influence this value and temperament is definitely present at birth. Psychologist Harriet Heath, Ph.D., author of Using Your Values to Raise Your Child to Be an Adult You Admire, lists two temperament traits that affect how easily a child learns kindness.

“If a child is emotionally sensitive, he will be more aware of how another is feeling, which gives him useful information when he wants to care for another person,” writes Heath. “A child who is very focused on his own affairs and who is not a strong ‘people’ person has more difficulty in thinking about the needs of others.”

If your child does not demonstrate kindness, it may be that she hasn’t been taught well enough yet, or it may be that her temperament does not dispose her toward considering others. The good news is that all children can be taught kindness and all children can be discouraged from being unkind. Here are a few ideas for eliminating unkindness.

  • Recognize consequences. Educational psychologist Michele Borba says it’s critical that parents and teachers help children recognize that unkind actions do have consequences. She recommends being very clear about  unkind behavior you object to and why you disapprove. For example, “Telling Arianna she can’t come to your birthday party was mean. Making someone feel left out hurts her feelings. That’s not allowed in our family.”
  • Encourage empathy. You can do this by requiring your child to think about how the victim feels. Say things like, “Look, she’s crying. How do you think she feels?” “Can you see how upset he is? How did your comment make him feel?” “How would you feel if someone did that to you?” Sometimes children will deny that what they said or did was really so bad—“Oh, he can’t even take a joke. I don’t get mad when someone says that to me.” You can make the point that the person receiving the comment is the one who gets to decide how it feels, similar to how a person being touched, shoved, or hit is the one who gets to decide if it hurts.
  • Make amends. Give your child a chance to make amends to the person she’s hurt. She might apologize, do something kind for that person, or make some other nice gesture. Ask your child, “What can you do to make her feel better?”
  • What to do instead. Not only do children need unkind behavior to be stopped, they need to know what to do or say instead. For example, when the little girl was excluded from the birthday party, the parent could offer her daughter the following options:
  • Link to book description 
    • Refrain from talking about birthday parties at school; if you don’t bring up the subject, Arianna is unlikely to ask about it.
    • If Arianna asks you if she can come to your party, say, “My mom is in charge of the guest list.”
    • If Arianna is being unkind first and you are tempted to be unkind in return, just shrug your shoulders and say, “Whatever.” Then walk away.
    • Change the subject. Suggest that everyone play a game and immediately start playing.

You’ll find more practical tips you can use right now in Using Your Values to Raise Your Child to Be an Adult You Admire by Harriet Heath, Ph.D

NB Troop #315 Newsletter – Jan. 2017

Happy New Year Troop. 2017 will be a lot of fun for the scouts. We’ve planned everything from White water rafting to go carting this year. I’m including a calendar of what’s on the list for us so keep these dates noted.

submitted by Shawn Benjamin, Scoutmaster

Happy New Year Troop. 2017 will be a lot of fun for the scouts. We’ve planned everything from White water rafting to go carting this year. I’m including a calendar of what’s on the list for us so keep these dates noted.

January 8 Court of Honor for Danny, Tyler, Hank, and Cody at 2:00 pm NBMSHS
January 13 First Aid Meet in B.G.
January 15 Finish Plumbing Merit Badge
February 3 – 5 Winter Camp at Miakonda
February 15 Court of Honor Scout Ranks Virginia Theater
March 4-5 Camp Alaska at Doc Roberts
March ?? Blue Gold Ceremony
April 7 Pancake Supper
April ?? Spring Camporee
May 19-20 Armed Forces Camp
May 19-21 Retro camp at Miakonda
June 7 Monsoon Lagoon Go Carts and Water slides
June 18 – 24 Summer Camp and Camp Frontier
July 9 Family Picnic and Scout Awards
July 29 Good Ol Summertime Fundraiser
August 14-16 White water Rafting at Ohio Pyle
Septmeber 22-24 Luckey Fest

January 13 First Aid Meet in B.G.

The meet test scouts on First aid requirements from Tenderfoot, 2nd class and 1st class, It meets all requirements in their scout book for each rank. We’ll meet at 6:00 pm at scout-house and drive to B.G.. no cost and scout are fed. Return time is 9:30 pm

February 3 – 5 Winter Camp at Miakonda

Annual Wood District Winter camp. Scouts will sleep in cabins and program is planned for Saturday. Cost is $10.00 and includes lunch on Sat. We are cooking supper that night and voted on beef stew. Below is grocery list. Parents, please pick one item from the list and bring to meeting. Let me know what you have chosen

Frozen carrots 4 small bags
Frozen green beans 4 small bags
Frozen corn 4 small bags
Frozen peas 4 small bags
5 lbs Idaho potatoes
beef shredded 4 lbs can be split by 2 families
1 small bag sugar
8 packs kool-aid lemon-aid
3 lbs ham deli
3 packs buns burger
1 head lettuce
2 tomatoes
2 bags chips asst.

The ham is for Friday night quick meal since we are setting up . Sunday breakfast is already taken care of by Frank and Arron.

taken from this bog http://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2015/08/13/john-waynes-take-scout-law/

What was John Wayne’s take on the Scout Law

In 1979, dignitaries including President Gerald Ford honored Academy Award-winning actor John Wayne at a dinner hosted by the BSA’s Los Angeles Area Council.
The council named the John Wayne Outpost Camp after The Duke, paying tribute to the actor only a few months before his death on June 11, 1979.
It was at this dinner that Wayne shared his own interpretation of the Scout Law and what it means to him. (This script is from the May-June 1979 issue of Scouting found in our archives.)

“A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent,” he said.
“Nice words. Trouble is, we learn them so young we sometimes don’t get all the understanding that goes with them. I take care of that with my family. As each boy reaches Scout age, I make sure he learns the Scout Law. Then I break it down for him with a few things I’ve picked up in the more than half century since I learned it.
“A Scout is …

Trustworthy – The badge of honesty. Having it lets you look any man straight in the eye. Lacking it, he won’t look back. Keep this one at the top of your list.

Loyal – The very word is life itself, for without loyalty we have no love of person or country.

Helpful – Part sharing, part caring. By helping each other, we help ourselves, not to mention mankind. Be always full of help — the dying man’s last words.

Friendly – Brotherhood is part of that word. You can take it in a lot of directions — and do — but make sure and start with brotherhood.

Courteous – Allow each person his human dignity, which means a lot more than saying “yes ma’am” and “Thank you, sir.” It reflects an attitude that later in life you “wish you had honored more … earlier in life.” Save yourself that problem. Do it now.

Kind – This one word would stop wars and erase hatreds. But it’s like your bicycle. It’s just no good unless you get out and use it.

Obedient – Start at home, practice it on your family, enlarge it to your friends, share it with humanity.

Cheerful – Anyone can put on a happy face when the going’s good. The secret is to wear it as a mask for your problems. It might surprise you how many others do the same thing.

Thrifty – Means a lot more than putting pennies away, and it’s the opposite of cheap. Common sense covers it just about as well as anything.

Brave – You don’t have to fight to be brave. Millions of good, fine, decent folks show more bravery than heavyweight champs just by getting out of bed every morning, going out to do a good day’s work, and living the best life they know how against a lot of odds. Brave. Keep the word handy every day of your life.

Clean – Soap and water help a lot on the outside. But it’s the inside that counts and don’t ever forget it.

Reverent – Believe in anything that you want to believe in, but keep God at the top of it. With Him, life can be a beautiful experience. Without Him, you are just biding time.

Wayne thanked the hosts for putting his name on the Scout camp, adding, “I would rather see it here than on all the theater marquees the world over.”

NAMI Cable-lite Newsletter

National Alliance of Mental Illness – Wood County – Newsletter – Psychology Today: 8 Questions To Help You Evaluate 2016

December 30, 2016

In This Issue

-Become a Member of NAMI
*-NAMI Wood County on Facebook
*-NAMI in the News: 2016 in Review
*-New program in Wood County helps employees with substance abuse (With NAMI’s Amanda Moser)
*-Understanding What Causes Stigma
*-BP Magazine: Bipolar & the Dating Game
*-Psychology Today: 8 Questions To Help You Evaluate 2016

CLICK this LINK to view the complete newsletter: NAMI Cablelite Newsletter

Thank you for joining us this week for the Cable-Lite Newsletter.

We are nearing the end of 2016 and thank you all for taking part in the E-news and being a part of NAMI. At this time we like to remind you that it is easy with a modest fee to become a member of NAMI. With membership you get news from local, state, and national branches of the National Alliance of Mental Illness, as well  as support a worthy cause.

We wish you all a wonderful and safe New Year and thank you for following us through the  Cable-lite E-News!

www.namiwoodcounty.org

‘Sore Loser Syndrome’ threatens to disrupt America’s political process

At year-end, efforts are being made to disrupt the transition process of President-elect Donald Trump by crowds of disgruntled protesters.

WASHINGTON, DC, Dec 30 – At year-end, efforts are being made to disrupt the transition process of President-elect Donald Trump by crowds of disgruntled protesters.  In response, Dan Weber, president of the Association of Mature American Citizens published the following opinion article today:
The political left suffers from ‘sore loser syndrome’ in the wake of the election of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States.
It’s not uncommon for depression to set in when the candidate of your choice loses an election, but the pathetic parade of despair on display among many of those who were sure that Hillary Clinton was destined to become president has reached new heights.  The fact is, the anti-Trumpers are having temper tantrums.
Rather than expressing their dissent in a manner that shows them to be members of the peaceful, loyal opposition, on more and more occasions the anti-Trump protesters seem bent on disrupting America’s political process.  In particular, a number of radical socialists and progressives have been engaging in activities such as inciting violent demonstrations, voter intimidation in targeting Electoral College delegates, and facilitating voter fraud, which are clearly criminal and may indeed border on treason inasmuch as they are designed to disrupt our Constitutional processes.  It has even been suggested that some of them are financially backed by sinister outside sources.
However, whether they are doing what they do wittingly or unwillingly is irrelevant because the future of our democracy is at stake.
When the much-maligned Richard Nixon lost the Presidential Election to John F. Kennedy by a narrow margin, he was urged to demand a recount of the vote.  But he said: “Our country cannot afford the agony of a constitutional crisis and I damn well will not be a party to creating one just to become president or anything else.”
The situation has grown so threatening that individuals who might, otherwise, be inclined to join the chorus of opposition to Mr. Trump’s election, are slowly but surely urging acceptance.
As Juliet Pesner, a contributor to the Harvard Political Review, put it in a recent article entitled, The Folly of Anti-Trump Protests: “protests that reject the presidency itself and feature the burning of American flags raise the question-at what point are we threatening the very institutions upon which our democracy stands.”
When President-elect Trump takes office on January 20th, instead of a parade to celebrate the occasion a massive, potentially unruly protest is likely to greet the new President.  In her Harvard Political review article, Ms. Pesner suggests that “tens of thousands” of protesters have already accepted online invitations to be there.
It will be a gathering of those afflicted with SLS, sore loser syndrome, and we can only hope that the leaders of the Democratic Party, including Hillary Clinton and President Obama, will intervene.  It’s the only known treatment that might work on those suffering from the disease.
ABOUT AMAC
The Association of Mature American Citizens [http://www.amac.us] is a vibrant, vital senior advocacy organization that takes its marching orders from its members.  We act and speak on their behalf, protecting their interests and offering a practical insight on how to best solve the problems they face today.  Live long and make a difference by joining us today at http://amac.us/join-amac.

Resolutions for Your Home…

Resolutions for Your Home…When the new year arrives, promises and resolutions abound. Here’s the top-10 list of what the resolute home owner should accomplish this year.

Resolutions for Your Home…When the new year arrives, promises and resolutions abound. Here’s the top-10 list of what the resolute home owner should accomplish this year.

This time, it’s going to be different.  2017 a brand new year, brimming with possibilities, and you’ve resolved to move through your house like a whirling tornado of can-do, fixing, painting, and organizing. This year, nothing will stop you.
Welcome to your home improvement New Year’s Resolutions………
Based on the most-common top-ten resolutions gathered by Time magazine, USA.gov, and other sources, here is your inspiring list of home management goals.

  1. Lose weight (cut energy use)

Your house is a glutton, gobbling energy like a starved elephant. Gain control by trimming energy use.

A good place to start is your HVAC ductwork. Ducts are notorious energy-wasters, leaking your heating and cooling air through holes and loose connections.

Sealing and insulating your ductwork can improve the efficiency heating and cooling system by as much as 20%, saving you $200 per year or more, according to Energy Star. You’ll make your home more comfortable, and a more-efficient system helps extend the life of your furnace, air conditioner, or heat pump.

Because ducts are usually hidden inside walls, ceilings, attics, and crawl spaces, sealing and insulating them may be a difficult and time-consuming DIY job. If you can’t reach all your ducts, concentrate on those that are accessible.

Use duct sealant — called mastic — or metal-backed tape to seal the seams, holes, and connections. Don’t use the confusingly named “duct tape,” which won’t provide a permanent solution. Be sure to seal connections at vents and floor registers — these

are likely places for leaks to occur.

After sealing your ducts, wrap them in fiberglass insulation. Most hardware stores and home improvement centers have insulation wrap products made for ducts.

A professional heating and cooling contractor will charge $1,000 to $4,000 for the work, including materials, depending on the size of your home and accessibility to your ducts.

Insulating your ductwork may qualify for a rebate from your state or local municipality. Check the Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency.

  1. Quit smoking (purify indoor air)

The EPA lists indoor air quality as one of the top environmental health hazards. That’s because indoor air is full of potential contaminants, such as dust, mold spores, pollen, and viruses. The problem is at its worst during winter, when windows and doors are shut tight.

You can help eliminate harmful lung irritants in your home with these maintenance and improvement tips:

Maintain your HVAC system and change furnace filters regularly. Use the highest-quality filters you can afford ($10-$20) and change every month during peak heating and cooling seasons.

  • Keep indoor air pristine by using low-VOC paintswhen you remodel your rooms.
  • Use localized ventilation in kitchens and bathroomsto remove cooking fumes, smoke, and excess humidity. Make sure ventilation systems exhaust air to the outside of your home, rather than your attic crawl space or between ceiling joists.
  • In fireplaces and wood stoves, burn real firewoodrather than pressed wood products that may contain formaldehyde.
  • Use a portable air cleaner to help cleanse the air in single rooms. Portable air cleaner types include mechanical air filters, electrostatic precipitators, ion generators, and ultraviolet lamps.

Note that each type of air cleaner is designed to remove specific pollutants; no portable air cleaner removes all pollutants. Be wary of air cleaners that generate ozone — a known lung irritant.

  1. Get out of debt (budget for improvements) 

Creating a yearly budget for home improvement and maintenance helps prevent overspending, and encourages you to put aside money for major replacements — such as new roofing or a kitchen appliance — that come up every few years.

Protect your home finances by knowing how much you’ll probably spend each year. Data from the U.S. Census Bureau says that average annual maintenance and home improvement expenditures are about $3,300 per household. Leading lending institutions agree; HSH Associates and LendingTree.com place average costs of yearly maintenance and upkeep at 1% to 3% of your home’s initial price.

That means the owner of a $250,000 home should budget between $2,500 to $7,500 each year for upkeep and replacements. Have extra at the end of the year? Save it for more costly upkeep and replacement items down the road — you’ll probably need it then.

  1. Learn something new (educate yourself on home finances)

Want a little education that goes a long way toward your financial health? Learning how to improve your insurance score can help you keep your home insurance premiums from getting out of hand. Here are a couple of easy lessons:

  • Letting credit card debt build up is a black mark on your credit history — and an indicator that you’re likely to file an insurance claim. The more claims, the higher risk you appear to be to insurance agencies, which lowers your insurance score. Low scores mean higher rates for home insurance.
  • Keep payments on loans up-to-date. Don’t miss payment deadlines; if you do, notify your lender that your payment is forthcoming. Delinquent payments signal insurers that you can’t manage your money — resulting in a lower insurance score.

Need some Home Owner 101? Any time is a good time to bone up on basic home maintenance skills.

  1. Get organized (de-clutter) 

No excuses — that clutter has got to go! Start by creating more storage space so you can stash stuff easily.

At wit’s end for new storage space? You’ve probably got storage solutions you didn’t know you had. Put up a high shelf between the walls of a narrow hallway, and tuck storage in out-of-the-way nooks, such as under-stairs spaces and between wall studs.

If your small home is pinched for space, don’t despair: There’s still room for storage. Shoe organizers ($20) do more than hold shoes — use them to store keys, notepads, and cell phones. At about $300 per drawer, have a cabinetmaker install drawers in the toe kicks of your kitchen cabinets for napkins, cookie sheets, and appliance manuals.

More: Resolution: Put Your House on a Diet

  1. Volunteer (support your community)

In a world that often seems topsy-turvy, a little altruism helps restore balance. You can volunteer your time and energy to help others, and at the same time help promote safety and preserve the value of your neighborhood.

  • neighborhood watchprogram fosters a sense of community and helps stop crime. Set up a meeting with neighbors to discuss concerns and priorities. Gather facts to present at the meeting: What kinds of crimes happen nearby? Are there patterns? Ask a local police representative to come to your first meeting to answer questions.
  • Start a community garden. Bring together neighbors for bonding, eating healthier, and saving on groceries. A 4-by-16-foot raised bed garden plot provides $200-$600 worth of food annually. As the organizer, you can expect to spend 20-30 per month for six months getting your community garden going.
  1. Drink less (curb home water use) 

Our houses are thirsty. The average household uses about 400 gallons of water each day, or almost $700 per year in water and sewer costs. Making a few simple changes, such as installing EPA-certified WaterSense products, could trim up to $200 from your annual water bill. Add to that energy savings from reduced costs to heat water, and your yearly savings could reach $300 or more per year.

  • Low-flow showerheadsinclude technology that reduces the amount of flow yet keeps pressure up, resulting in shower streams that are powerful and satisfying. They cost from $10 to $150, and installation is an easy DIY job that takes only minutes.
  • Replacing your pre-1994, water-guzzling toilet with a low-flow toiletprevents $90 worth of water costs from being flushed away. HE (high-efficiency) toilets use compressed air and electric water pumps to flush with less than 1 gallon of water; older models required up to 8 gallons.
  1. Spend more time with family (share home improvement projects)

Spending quality time with your family takes quality planning — but it’s worth the effort. Rally your family around these fun-to-do projects to make every minute count:

  • Plant a tree. Pile the clan into the family wagon and shop for a tree that’ll become a new member of your family. Have your kids name it and help care for it. You might have to dig the hole, but everyone can take turns adding mulchand watering it. A bonus: planted where its shade will protect your house from summer sun, a $50-$100 tree cuts your yearly energy bill by $100 to $250.
  • Make a home emergency preparedness kit. Make a scavenger hunt of gathering up all the necessary supplies, such as flashlights, toilet paper, and duct tape, and assemble your kit during an evening together. It’s a good, non-scary way to teach small children about what to do if there’s an emergency.
  1. Get fit (exercise your DIY skills)

Looking to trim a little of the old spare tire? Routine home maintenance and repair is a double win — you’ll burn calories while keeping your house in tip-top shape. Try these essential fix-ups and improvements from CalorieLab:

  1. Be less stressed (use maintenance-free materials)

If you want less to worry about, install low-maintenance materials and products designed for durability and long, trouble-free service.

  • Fiber-cement sidinglasts for 50 years or more. It’s weather-proof, and resists dents, fire, insects, and rot. It’s exceptionally stable, even with changes in humidity, so that paint jobs last longer than on wood and wood-fiber siding products.
  • LED bulbslast a phenomenal 20,000 to 50,000 hours between changes, or about 18 to 46 years when used for 3 hours each day. Although the initial cost is high (about $40 per bulb), LED bulbs pay for themselves in energy savings in about 10 years.
  • Classic ceramic tilecomes in many colors and textures, but at its heart it’s incredibly tough, stain-resistant, and impervious to moisture. You can count on ceramic tile’s good looks to last for decades on floors and walls without needing repair or replacement.

Source: Houselogic.com

 

Custom Cuts for New Year’s Celebrations!

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!! North Baltimore Custom Cuts SPECIALS through Tuesday, January 3rd. CLICK HERE for more informati

North Baltimore Custom Cuts SPECIALS through Tuesday, January 3rd. CLICK HERE for more information!

>>> Senior Citizen Tuesdays<<<

10% OFF ANY PURCHASE!

NB Custom Cuts Store Front
Located on Insley Road, just east of North Baltimore, off Quarry Road. Exit at I – 75 southbound at the Eagleville Road Exit (168) – turn right – go a 1/4 mile north!

HOLIDAY HOURS:

 CLOSED – Monday, Jan. 2

Tuesday – Friday: 8 am to 5 pm each day

OPENSaturday (New Year’s Eve Day): 8 am – 1 pm

WEEKLY SPECIALS –

Boston Pork Butt Roast – $1.99/lb

Boneless Pork Loin Roast – $2.29/lb

Western Style Pork Ribs – $1.99/lb

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Daiseyfield

Whole Semi-Boneless Ham

> Cut and Sliced FREE <

> $2.49/lb <
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Locally raised freezer beef & pork

BEEF – $2.85/lb.

HOGS – $1.40/lb.

Price includes Cutting – Wrapping – Freezing

Prices are Hanging Weight – Call for details!

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> Deer Processing <
Tag & Deposit Required
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– We accept:
> Credit – – – Debit – – – EBT Cards <

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December Meat Raffle Winner 

> “Animal” <

Next Drawing January 2

Tickets $5.00 each

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Gift Certificates now available!

We have FRESH Chicken Salad

Mac Salad  & Potato Salad

(prices good thru Tuesday, January 3)

Stop out and check out the Meat Case, new items being added all the time!

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Parenting Press: Instilling Kindness and Compassion in Children

“We all want warm-hearted children who are guided by an internal moral compass………. “


Tip—Consciously model kind behavior for your child and be quick to notice it in him.

Link to book description

The winter holidays seem like an appropriate time to take a good look at how we go about instilling kindness and compassion in our children. Are we doing a good job? Is it enough?

We all want warm-hearted children who are guided by an internal moral compass—children who will care about the welfare and feelings of others and act on those emotions without thought to their own gain.

The question is, how do we go about creating and nurturing that kind of child? It sounds like a tall order, but in reality, instilling values in your children happens one day at a time, one teaching moment at a time. The present is always a good time to start, to continue, or to give renewed focus to this project.

Tools—Psychologist Harriet Heath, Ph.D., author of Using Your Values to Raise Your Child to Be an Adult You Admire, points out that being caring and compassionate is not a value present at birth. This is something that must be taught. It requires developing empathy (noticing and caring how another person feels), thoughtful decision-making, and problem- solving skills.

Here are a few ideas for parents on instilling kindness in children.

  • Be a good role model. Children learn from what they see you do. They learn from how you treat them.

    If you take the time to bring meals to a sick person, help elderly friends with yard work, take someone to a doctor’s appointment, or care for a friend’s children, your kids will notice.

    If you are in the habit of noticing your child’s emotions and asking gently about them, your children will learn that other people’s feelings are to be noticed and respected.

    Don’t be afraid to comment on your own kindnesses—when you’re role modeling for your kids, it doesn’t count as self-congratulation. You can say things matter-of-factly:, “Grandma was really cheered up when we brought her those flowers and visited with her. It really makes me feel good to do something kind for her.”

  • Talk about kindness. Have conversations with your kids about what kindness really is and why it’s important. For example, “It’s good to notice how people feel—then you can tell if they need help. Lots of people are shy or too embarrassed to ask for help so you have to be on the lookout” or, “Being kind means that you don’t expect anything in return. The person doesn’t have to pay you or do something nice back. You’re kind because it’s the right thing to do and it makes the world a better place.”
  • Notice when your child is kind. Watch for moments of kindness in your children and quietly remark on them. It’s a parenting truism that whatever behavior you give attention to, that’s what you’ll see more of. If you see your preschooler give the baby a toy, say, “That was kind of you.” If your 10-year-old helps his younger sister with her homework, pat him on the shoulder and say, “It makes me feel good inside to see you help your sister.” If your child tells of showing the new kid around the playground at recess, you could comment, “Wow. I’ll bet he was really grateful that someone was kind enough to be friendly to him. I’m proud you were that person.”

You’ll find more practical tips you can use right now in Using Your Values to Raise Your Child to Be an Adult You Admire by Harriet Heath, Ph.D.

NB Custom Cuts Specials & Holiday Hours

North Baltimore Custom Cuts SPECIALS & Holiday Hours! Senior Discount Tuesday (SAVE 10%)!!!

North Baltimore Custom Cuts SPECIALS & Holiday Hours!  Senior Discount Tuesday (SAVE 10%)!!!

 

>>> Senior Citizen Tuesdays<<<

10% OFF ANY PURCHASE!

NB Custom Cuts Store Front
Located on Insley Road, just east of North Baltimore, off Quarry Road. Exit at I – 75 southbound at the Eagleville Road Exit (168) – turn right – go a 1/4 mile north!

HOLIDAY HOURS:

 CLOSED – Monday Dec. 26 AND Jan. 2

Tuesday – Friday: 8 am to 5 pm each day

OPENSaturday (Christmas AND New Year’s Eve Day): 8 am – 1 pm

WEEKLY SPECIALS –

Daiseyfield Brand Semi-Boneless Hams

$2.49/lb – Sliced & Cut FREE!

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Whole Hog Sausage

2# for $5.00
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Locally raised freezer beef & pork

BEEF – $2.85/lb.

HOGS – $1.40/lb.

Price includes Cutting – Wrapping – Freezing

Prices are Hanging Weight – Call for details!
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> Deer Processing has resumed!<
Tag & Deposit Required

__________________

– We accept:
> Credit – – – Debit – – – EBT Cards <

 _____________________________________

Gift Certificates now available!

We have FRESH Chicken Salad

Mac Salad  & Potato Salad

(prices good thru Saturday, Dec. 31)

Stop out and check out the Meat Case, new items being added all the time!

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