Northwestern Water and Sewer District Projects

Stay safe as you travel throughout the area………..

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio, – The Northwestern Water and Sewer District (The District) delivers water and sewer services to over 20,000 customers in Wood, Henry, Sandusky, and Hancock counties.  Although many of our projects are performed underground, our utility work can impact roads throughout our service area.  Updates and additions are highlighted in bold and underlined.

Perrysburg Township: Ampoint Industrial Park Waterline Replacement*UPDATE*
Effective Tuesday, July 14 through Friday, July 17, Third Street, between J Street and D Street, will be closed for waterline reconnection.  Detour: J Street; First Street; D Street.  Through August, lane restrictions will be possible throughout Aimpoint Industrial Park and on Third Street, between Glenwood Road and D Street for waterline replacement.  Project complete:  August.  Project investment: $994,000.

Perrysburg Township: Sewer Lining
Through December, lane restrictions are possible in Perrysburg Township north of SR 795, west of 75, and south of the turnpike, for sewer rehabilitation.  Project complete:  February 2021.  Project investment: $1,230,000.

Rossford: Waterline Replacement
Through August, lane restrictions are possible on Santus Drive, Valley Drive, and on Glenwood Road in Rossford.  Project complete: October.  Project Investment: $1.5 million.

Rossford – Tree Streets Waterline Replacement
Through August, lane restrictions are possible on Maple Street, Oak Street, Walnut Street, and Superior Street for waterline replacement, installation of new hydrants, and meter pits.  Project complete: September. Project investment $740,000.

Rossford – Dixie Highway Sewer Rehabilitation
Through July, lane and shoulder restrictions are possible on Dixie Highway from Colony Road to Vineyard Drive for sewer rehabilitation.  Project complete: July. Project investment: $150,000.

Rossford – Lime City Road Waterline Replacement
Through July, intermittent lane restrictions are possible on Lime City Road between Dixie Highway and Marilyn Drive for waterline replacement.   Through July, lane restrictions are possible on Schreier Road near Lime City Road for waterline replacement.  Project complete:  July.  Project investment: $770,000.

Rossford – Eagle Point Sewer Replacement
Through July, lane and shoulder restrictions are possible on Eagle Point west of Colony Road for restoration work.  Project complete: July. Project investment: $1.2 million.

District-Wide Hydrant Flushing
Through July, weekdays from 7:30 am until 4 pm, crews will be flushing hydrants in various locations throughout Millbury, Northwood, and Lake Township.  Residents are advised to flush water from their taps if the water becomes discolored.  For more information:  https://nwwsd.maps.arcgis.com/apps/View/index.html?appid=17eef70e88ca43a4ac3b8649fb263199

 

 

RV Owners are the Surprise Financial Success Story of the Year

Unprecedented RV rental demand from cautious travelers has made owning an RV the go-to entrepreneurial venture of the year…

(Money Matters) Thursday, July 9, 2020

(NAPSI)—Millions of Americans who own an RV have it parked in their driveway or a storage facility for the better part of the year. With many families wary of airplanes and hotels these days, it may be time to consider renting your rig to make some serious cash.

Unprecedented RV rental demand from cautious travelers has made owning an RV the go-to entrepreneurial venture of the year.

 

According to peer-to-peer RV rental marketplace RVshare, RV bookings have reached unprecedented levels of demand, increasing more than 1,600% since the beginning of April and already tripling 2019 figures. As a result, RV owners are poised to capitalize on the surge of families discovering the unique and adventurous nature of RV travel for the first time.

In fact, the average RV owner who rents on the RVshare platform can earn up to $60,000 a year in rental income. The amount of money you can make from renting your RV can vary based on the type of vehicle you own. 

The most in-demand rentals on RVshare are Class C vehicles, which strike a great balance between features and price, making them popular with first-time renters. Class C rentals have an earning potential of $38,000 a year.  Class B vehicles, or camper vans, are the fastest growing in popularity on RVshare. With demand skyrocketing for these units, Class B rentals can earn up to $30,000 a year when listed on RVshare.

“During this time of financial instability, an RV can be converted into a significant money-making asset that many owners may not have previously considered,” said RVshare CEO Jon Gray. “For those who do not own an RV, now may be the time to invest. It’s not just pocket change that RV rentals can bring in.”

You can offset much or all of the cost of RV ownership from rental income. A survey of RV owners found that more than half (51%) are able to cover 76% or more of their RV’s financing cost through renting to travelers, with more than a third (35%) covering all or more of their financing cost.

RVshare’s Earnings Calculator can help evaluate the income potential of renting your RV, and to ease the minds of those new to the practice, RVshare provides owners with several tools and features to protect vehicles and their owners including:

•$1,000,000 Liability Insurance

•User Verification

•Secure Payments

•One-on-One Rental Coaching

•24/7 roadside assistance

Additional information on how to get started renting an RV can be found at https://rvshare.com/list-your-rv.

Make Your Garden Count For Butterflies

Whether you already find solace in gardening or are looking for a new hobby, you can help make a difference……

(Your Yard)

(NAPSI)­—In this season of social distancing, many Americans are turning to gardening, finding joy and peace in an outdoor activity that can be safely enjoyed from home. “What all gardeners know, and the rest of you may discover, is that if you have even the smallest space, a pot on a window ledge, a front step, a wee yard, there is no balm to the soul greater than planting seeds,” recently wrote Charlotte Mendelsen for The New Yorker. If you haven’t gotten your hands a little dirty yet, now could be the time.

More Milkweed for Monarchs

You can help protect pollinators and enjoy beautiful blooms when you plant milkweed…

This year, you can help feed both your soul and butterflies across the country by planting monarch habitat, including milkweed and other flowers that provide nectar. Milkweed in particular provides an essential source of food and is the only place monarch butterflies will lay their eggs.

Supporting monarchs is critical, as they face many health challenges including climate change, drought and habitat loss. However, anyone can help by planting milkweed and other brightly colored, pollinator-attractant flowers in the garden or even on the balcony.

There are 12 states that monarchs tend to visit during their annual migration. Those who live there can do their part by planting milkweed and recording their efforts in the HabiTally app. These states are:

• Illinois

• Indiana

• Iowa

• Kansas

• Michigan

• Minnesota

• Missouri

• Nebraska

• Oklahoma

• Ohio

• Texas

• Wisconsin

Any monarch habitat planted in these states (by May 31), and recorded in the app will be taken into consideration by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as it evaluates recommending that monarchs join the list of animals protected under the Endangered Species Act. With the help of your conservation efforts, monarch health may become secure enough to not need this designation.

Other Flowers That Butterflies Love

For people who don’t live in one of those 12 states, there are many other flowers they can plant to support butterflies, bees and other pollinators’ health while adding beauty to the garden with bright, happy blooms. These 10 plants attract butterflies and make vibrant, fragrant additions to any garden:

• Sunflowers

• Lavender

• Asters

• Coneflowers

• Black-eyed Susans

• Verbena

• Catnip

• Rosemary

• Sage

• Salvia

Whether you already find solace in gardening or are looking for a new hobby, you can help make a difference. So, plant a few flowers to see what gardening can do for you—and for butterflies—this year.

Learn More

Because monarch butterflies are an important pollinating insect that contribute to both agriculture and biodiversity, the Bayer Bee Care Program is committed to supporting their health, as well the health of other pollinators. You can download the free HabiTally app and get started by visiting the Apple App Store. To be sure you’re planting flowers that are best adapted to your region, visit www.Pollinator.org.

BVHS Weekend Column: Lyme Disease

The risk of getting Lyme disease from a tick bite is very low (about 1 in 100) if the tick is removed before it is engorged…..

LymeDisease, by  Jeffrey Eiden, MD, Family Medicine, Putnam County Primary Care



It is tick time again! Along with the warmer weather that gets us outside, hiking and tromping through the woods, comes the risk of exposure to ticks. When we think of ticks, we often think of Lyme disease. Here is a brief review of what you should know about ticks, preventing and treating tick bites, as well as some information about Lyme disease.

A tick is a small arachnid that is a parasite. Ticks require the blood of another organism to survive. They attach to a host, often a mammal, feed on blood, detach and repeat when they need another meal. Not all ticks carry diseases, but some do. There are 16 known human diseases transmitted by ticks. The best approach is to avoid ticks if possible or at least remove them soon after they attach.

Ticks are most active during warm weather. They are most often in wooded or brushy areas or in high grass. Be aware that you might encounter ticks when in this type of area. If you venture into an area that is likely to have ticks present, you should consider using a tick repellent. Most insect repellents also repel ticks. The recommendation is to use an insect repellent that contains DEET. Clothing, boots and tents can also be pre-treated with 0.5% permethrin which also repels ticks. Limiting exposed skin by covering it with clothing and by tucking pants into socks keeps ticks from finding a place to attach.

If a tick does attach, it is best to remove it as soon as possible. Get in the habit of checking for ticks after spending time outdoors. Look for ticks on clothes and shoes. Check pets also, as ticks can attach to them and then gain access to your home. It is also wise to bathe or shower within two hours of returning inside and to check over all your skin to be sure there are no ticks attached. Children should be thoroughly checked by parents.

When a tick is found on skin, remove it. The best way to remove a tick is to grasp it firmly with fine-tipped tweezers and pull away from the skin. It works best if the tip of the tweezers is as close to the skin as possible. Steady pressure should remove the tick. Avoid twisting or jerking. If the tick does not come off in one piece, remove the pieces left behind if possible. There are some “tricks” for removing ticks that are passed around, including using a match or nail polish. These do not work. Use the tweezers and pull.

Suppose you do find a tick that has attached to your skin. Remove it as above. Do not panic but do be alert for any signs or symptoms of tick-borne illness. These would include fever, chills, muscle aches and in some cases, rash. If any of these symptoms develop, contact your primary care provider for instructions.

Shifting to Lyme disease, the risk of getting Lyme disease from a tick bite is very low (about 1 in 100) if the tick is removed before it is engorged. This is why it is so important to find and remove ticks as soon as possible.

There is consideration for using a single dose of antibiotic to prevent Lyme disease after a tick bite, but this is only recommended in specific situations. The tick would need to be identified as a deer tick, as this is the only type of tick known to transmit Lyme disease. Deer ticks have black legs, which distinguishes them from other types of ticks. The tick should have been attached for 36 hours or more, as indicated by time since exposure or degree of engorgement. The antibiotic should be given within 72 hours of tick removal. The tick bite should have occurred in an area where at least 20% of ticks are infected with the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. This is an issue in parts of New England and parts of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Minnesota and Wisconsin. In Ohio, although we have deer ticks and some carry Lyme disease, we are not yet at area with this level of tick infection.

Another approach to preventing full-blown Lyme disease is to treat at the first sign of a rash that indicates possible infection. This rash is distinctive. It occurs at the site of the tick bite and is salmon to red-colored and circular. One-third of the time, it can have a clear area in the center that makes it look like a bull’s eye or target. The rash, called erythema migrans, tends to expand outward over several days, getting larger and larger. If you have had a tick bite and develop this type of rash where the bite occurred, you should call your primary care provider and be evaluated. Treatment at this point would typically be with a course of an antibiotic like doxycycline, amoxicillin or cefuroxime.

Lyme disease is caused by the body’s immune response to the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. The symptoms are divided into different phases, based on length of time since initial infection. The early localized phase of Lyme disease is usually about 7-14 days after the tick bite. It is characterized by the rash of erythema migrans, and symptoms typical of a viral infection, such as fatigue, fever, headache, muscle or joint pain and swollen lymph nodes. The symptoms are not often severe.

The early disseminated phase of Lyme disease occurs days to weeks after the tick bite and is caused by the spread of bacteria through the bloodstream, leading to inflammation in the affected area. There can be involvement of the heart or nervous system. Symptoms of infection in a particular organ are not common, but can be severe.

In addition to early symptoms, there can be a late phase of Lyme disease. This most commonly is seen as inflammation affecting the joint and muscles and happens in 80% of people who did not receive treatment with antibiotics for their early infection. Late Lyme disease can also cause neurologic symptoms, but this is rare.

Post-Lyme disease syndrome is a group of symptoms that can occur chronically after treatment for Lyme disease. The symptoms seen with this are headache, fatigue and joint pain. Because these types of symptoms are common, some people worry that they have post-Lyme disease syndrome even when they do not have a history of having had Lyme disease. It is not helpful to treat the post-Lyme disease syndrome with antibiotics, and it gradually resolves.

The diagnosis of Lyme disease is made based on history of possible exposure to ticks, characteristic signs and symptoms, and the finding of antibodies to Lyme disease on blood testing. The blood tests are not always helpful and should be ordered by a physician/provider after consultation and interpreted considering the patient’s story and symptoms.

As in so many medical conditions, prevention is key and early detection/treatment is the next best option. Watch out for ticks! But get outside and enjoy the warm weather whenever you can. Doctor’s orders. J

 

 

 

Wood County Parks Are Open

+ Parks open daily 8:00 am – 30 min. past sunset.
+ Restrooms are open. Please wear a mask inside.

  JULY 2020

We hope you are well and enjoying nature.
Parks are open daily 8:00 am until 30 minutes past sunset.
 
Bring your own water. We recommend a reusable water bottle.
 
In-person Program Guidelines:
Please do:
+ Register first at wcparks.org.
+ Wear a mask to programs.
+ Bring a water bottle with you.
+ Be courteous to others.
+ Wash hands frequently.
+ Let us know if you cannot attend.
 
– Do not attend if you are feeling unwell, or caring for a sick person.
 
We respectfully ask that you wear a mask to programs.
Thank you! Be well.
 
 
Buckwheat Planting
 
Sunday, July 5; 2 sessions
Carter Historic Farm
18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green
 
Watch historic equipment in action! Learn how buckwheat was planted using an early wooden 1900s grain drill. Leader: Chris Dauer
Photo by: Tony Everhardt.
Free Program
 
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
 
1:00 – 2:00 pm
 
 
Archery Skills:
The Complete Archer
 
 Arrowwood Archery Range
11126 Linwood Road, Bowling Green
 
Transform into an arrow-slinging archer! This program includes two sessions for the novice archer. Get the tools to safely navigate the range, become familiar with basic archery equipment and start working on precision and accuracy. Leader: Bill Hoefflin
Free Program
 
Tuesday, July 7; 6:30 – 8:30 pm
 
Thursday, July 9; 6:30 – 8:30 pm
 
 
Summer Science: Watersheds
 
Wednesday, July 8;
11:00 am- 12:30 pm
Teleconference
 
Join us for a teleconference lesson about watersheds. We will learn how water travels through our watershed and what it could be carrying with it. Leader: Nicole Sarver
Free Program
 
 
 
Hiking for Health
 
Friday, July 10; 10:00 – 11:30 am
Cricket Frog Cove
14810 Freyman Road, Cygnet
 
Join a naturalist for exercise and the wonder of watching the seasonal changes. The hikes will offer a true mind-body connection. Sign up for one week or all three. Leader: Jim Witter
Free Program
 
 
 
Top Rope Climbing
 
Saturday, July 11; 9:00 – 11:30 am
Sawyer Quarry Nature Preserve
26940 Lime City Road, Perrysburg
 
Did you know that there is a place for outdoor climbing in Wood County? Join Wood County Parks for an adventure at Sawyer Quarry Nature Preserve. Learn the basics of top-rope climbing from the adventure staff and try your hand at the walls in the quarry. All equipment is provided by Wood County Parks. The program is designed for ages 14 and up. Please register all individuals attending.
Program fee: $15.00
or, $10.00 for Friends of the Parks members.
Leader: Thomas Worsham
 
 
 
River Wading
 
Saturday, July 11; 2 sessions
Buttonwood Recreation Area
27174 Hull Prairie Road, Perrysburg
 
Get up close and personal with the life in the Maumee River as we explore some of its runs, riffles and pools. We will be in the water exploring with our hands and nets so wear quick drying clothes and footwear that can get wet and stay attached to your feet. Kids must be 8 years or older. Program cancelled in the event of high water.
Leaders: Bill Hoefflin and Nicole Sarver
Free Program
 
10:00 – 11:30 am
 
12:30 – 2:00 pm
 
 
Seed Starting Kits
 
Saturday, July 11; 1:00 – 3:00 pm
Carter Historic Farm
18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green
 
Growing plants is a great way to get connected to nature! Kids can stop by the farm to pick up a small amount of seeds, planting material and instructions on how to get their plants started. Once sprouted, we encourage you to send photos of the growing plants to Carter Historic Farm! Recommended for children ages 5-10. Leader: Stephanie Ross
Free Program
 
 
 
Explore the Wetlands
 
Tuesday, July 14; 2 sessions
W.W. Knight Nature Preserve
29530 White Road, Perrysburg
 
Search for macroinvertebrates, frogs and other creatures in and around the wetland. Learn how this ecosystem impacts our lives and how to contribute to good water quality.
Leader: Jim Witter and Nicole Sarver
Free Program
 
9:00 – 10:00 am
 
10:30 – 11:30 am
 
 
Top Rope Climbing for Kids
 
Thursday, July 23; 6:00 – 8:30 pm
Sawyer Quarry Nature Preserve
26940 Lime City Road, Perrysburg
 
Learn the basics of top-rope climbing from the adventure staff and try your hand at the walls in the quarry. All equipment is provided by Wood County Parks. The program is designed for ages 8-13. Please register all individuals attending the program, and limit spectators to one guardian per climber.
Leader: Thomas Worsham
Program fee: $15.00
or, $10.00 for Friends of the Parks members.
 
 
 
Scarf Weaving Kits for Kids
 
Saturday, July 25; 1:00 – 3:00 pm
Carter Historic Farm
 
Weaving is a useful and fun skill anyone can learn, even kids! Visit Carter Historic Farm to pick up a weaving kit with directions to make a yarn scarf. Once finished, we encourage you to send photos of the finished product to Carter Historic Farm! Leader: Corinne Gordon
Free Program
 
 
 
Composting 101 Series
 
Sunday, July 26; 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Carter Historic Farm
18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green
 
Join us for part 2 of our composting journey that will take place throughout the summer, and watch as our compost transforms into an organic “black gold” for plants to thrive in! You will learn the fundamentals of composting, various forms of composting, how to make a successful compost and why composting is important for the environment. This will be a hands-on event for those interested in getting a little dirty, but you are welcome to simply observe as well. Attending all 3 sessions is encouraged but not required.
Leader: Stephanie Ross
Free Program.
 
 
 
Paddle Through the Past
 
Friday, July 31; 6:00 – 8:30 pm
Orleans Boat Launch
 
Lead by historic interpreters Taylor Moyer and Craig Spicer, you’ll see the Maumee River through the eyes of those who came before. Explore the river by canoe, discovering how the river was significant to Native Americans, European settlers and to the formation of the culture we know today. A canoeing safety and skills session will precede the trip. Discover our roots with this Wood County Bicentennial Series program, offered in conjunction with Henry County Historical Society.
Leader: Craig Spicer
Program fee: $20.00
 
 
Status Update:
 
+ Parks open daily 8:00 am – 30 min. past sunset.
+ Restrooms are open. Please wear a mask inside.
+ Playgrounds are open. Please wash hands immediately before & after use.
+ Please observe 6-10 feet of social distancing.
+ Indoor facilities are closed.
+ Facility rentals are cancelled through August 2. 
+ Bring water. Water fountains are off.
+ Volunteering has resumed for self-guided activities only.
 
Carter Historic Farm
 
See what’s summer is like in a Depression-era farm by following the Facebook page.

180th Overhead Today – July 1

Alert fighter jets will conduct a test of the Aerospace Control Alert system… in and around the Lima, Ohio area, and surrounding counties.

Alert fighter jets from the 180th Fighter Wing will conduct a test of the Aerospace Control Alert system on Wed., July 1, between 8:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.

Those living in and around the Lima, Ohio area, and surrounding counties, may hear and/or see fighter jets in close proximity to a Civil Air Patrol aircraft, which will be taking on the role of a Track of Interest (TOI). A TOI is an aircraft that has been identified as a potential threat.

The purpose of the event is to exercise coordination between the Eastern Air Defense Sector, Federal Aviation Administration and 180FW.

Aerospace Control includes maintaining air sovereignty and air defense through the surveillance and control of airspace over Canada and the U.S.

These types of exercises are conducted on a routine basis as part of North American Aerospace Defense Command’s Operation Noble Eagle, which was initiated after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

Although scheduled for the morning, the exercise flights could be relocated, delayed or cancelled due to inclement weather.

For current photos and videos of the 180FW, visit: https://www.dvidshub.net/unit/180FWONG

NB Custom Cuts OPEN on the 4th!

OPEN Regular Hours 4th of July Weekend!

Senior Citizen Day is Tuesday at NB’s LOCAL butcher shop (10% OFF)!

Stop out today for YOUR Grilling needs!

OPEN Regular Hours 4th of July Weekend!

Your steaks – cut FRESH to your order! – NEVER Pre-packaged!

Call 419-257-3529 for information AND to place your order for pick-up!

 

Wood County Park District News

There is much to enjoy in Wood County nature…………

                                                           Hello, Summer 2020
                 

Wow, what a year! We hope you are well. There’s a lot going on. In good news, we turned 96. Not to flex, but we don’t look a day over 95. Honestly though, we are proud to conserve, enhance, interpret, and protect the natural and cultural resources of Wood County. We have more in common than our differences. Our mutual appreciation for nature can help bridge our divides and care for our Earth.
Love nature & be well.
Photo by: William Garrett
                                                                           
                               
Bring your own water. We recommend a reusable water bottle.
 
 
Nature Quest
 
Nature Quest is a series of activities.
 
*New: Virtual Escape Room.
 
 
First edition: Multi-park scavenger hunt. Clue: “Where life on a Depression-era farm is recreated, including chores, farm animals, cooking, and even school.”
 
 
Status Update:
 
+ Parks open daily 8:00 am – 30 min. past sunset.
+ Restrooms are open. Please wear a mask inside.
+ Playgrounds are open. Please wash hands immediately before & after use.
+ Please observe 6-10 feet of social distancing.
+ Indoor facilities are closed.
+ Facility rentals are cancelled through August 2. 
+ Bring water. Water fountains are off.
+ Volunteering has resumed for self-guided activities.
 
 
“Imagine Your Story” is the theme to the storywalks and the many engaging summer reading programs available to all ages.
 
Learn about the libraries and their summer reading programs.
Wood County District Public Library: wcdpl.org, 419-352-5104.
North Baltimore Public Library: nbpubliclibrary.org, 419-257-3621
 
Storywalks
 
A storywalk is a literary nature experience, or a natural literary adventure. Either way, it’s a charming way to read a book. Travel inward from either end of the Slippery Elm Trail, and the story will develop the further you go. Each Storywalk is around one eighth of a mile.
 
The Slippery Elm Trail is a 13-mile asphalt trail from Bowling Green to North Baltimore open daily from 6:30 am – 30 minutes past sunset.
 
“My New Red Bike” by James E. Ransome begins at the Bowling Green trailhead with parking at the Montessori School of BG. “Bird Builds a Nest” begins in North Baltimore with parking at the Slippery Elm Trail South Depot.
 
The North Baltimore Public Library, the Wood County District Public Library, and the Wood County Park District collaborated to create these storywalks for all to enjoy. Thank you to our community partners and volunteers!
 
Turtle Time
 
Turtle Time: Camouflage
 
Camouflage
Turtle Time: Diet & Resources
 
Diet & Resources
Turtle Time: The Shell
 
The Shell
Turtle Time: Aquatic vs Terrestrial
 
Aquatic vs. Terrestrial
 
 
Just Nature
 
Just Nature: A Sunset over the Maumee
 
Sunset over the Maumee
 
Ecopsychology
 
Ecopsychology Talk Part 1 v3
 
The dynamic field of Ecopsychology can point the way of individual thought and action which benefits the whole. Through Ecopsychology, we can create connection with the natural world and foster an ecological ethic of care for our communities, for our land, and for all the world. Dr. Rodriguez is on the faculty of Viridis Graduate Institute, an international graduate school for Ecopsychology. She also is the Events & Education Coordinator for Black Swamp Conservancy, as well as co-founder of Taproot: A Source, an online community which fosters healthy engagement with ourselves, each other, and our world
 
Ecopsychology Talk Part 3
Ecopsychology Talk - Part 2 of 3
 
 
In-person Program Guidelines:
Please do:
+ Register first at wcparks.org.
+ Wear a mask to programs.
+ Bring a water bottle with you.
+ Be courteous to others.
+ Wash hands frequently.
+ Let us know if you cannot attend.
 
– Do not attend if you are feeling unwell, or caring for a sick person.
 
We respectfully ask that you wear a mask to programs.
Thank you! Be well.
 
 
Teddy Bear Making Kit:
Sewing for Kids
 
Saturday, June 27; 1:00 – 3:00 pm pickup
Carter Historic Farm
18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green
 
Sewing is a basic skill everyone should know, even kids! Visit Carter Historic Farm to pick up a sewing kit with directions to make a felt teddy bear. Once finished, we encourage you to send photos of the finished product to Carter Historic Farm! Leader: Alyssa Garland
 
 
 
Composting 101 Series
 
Sunday, June 28; 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Carter Historic Farm
18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green
 
Join us for part 1 of our composting journey that will be taking place throughout the summer, and watch as our compost transforms into an organic “black gold” for plants to thrive in! You will learn the fundamentals of composting, various forms of composting, how to make a successful compost, and why composting is important for the environment. This will be a hands-on event for those interested in getting a little dirty, but you are welcome to simply observe as well. Attending all 3 sessions is encouraged but not required. Leader: Stephanie Ross
 
 
 
Buckwheat Planting
 
Sunday, July 5; 11:00 am – 12:00 pm 
and 1:00 – 2:00 pm
Carter Historic Farm
18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green
 
Watch historic equipment in action! Learn how buckwheat was planted using an early wooden 1900’s grain drill. Leader: Chris Dauer
Photo by: Tony Everhardt.
 
11:00 am – 12:00 pm
 
1:00 – 2:00 pm
 
 
River Wading
 
Tuesday, June 30; 6:30 – 8:00 pm
William Henry Harrison Park
644 Bierley Avenue, Pemberville
 
Get up close and personal with the life in the Portage River as we explore some of its runs, riffles and pools. We will be in the water exploring with our hands and nets so wear quick drying clothes and footwear that can get wet and stay attached to your feet.
Leaders: Bill Hoefflin and Nicole Sarver
 
 
Carter Historic Farm
 
Check out these fun farm activities and facts from the Carter Historic Farm. For video updates on the new chicks on the farm, check out the Facebook page.
Learn how to make strawberry jam and what life is like on a Depression-era farm.
 
Friends of the Parks
 
 
Commemorative Trail
 
Say it forever and leave a legacy with a Commemorative Trail Brick.
 
3 text lines on a 4 x 8″ brick = $100
5 text lines on an 8 x 8″ brick = $125
 
Photo Contest
Start taking photos now for the 2020 Photo Contest by the Friends of the Parks. Find the prospectus here.
 
 
Rudolph Bike Park
 
Wellness | Community | Adventure.
 
With three pump tracks and one mountain bike skills course, there will be cycling development and fun for everyone. Be a part of this exciting community project.
 

New veggie garden? 6 tips for keeping it healthy through summer

In a time of pandemic and staying at home, gardening gets you out into fresh air and sunshine…..

COLUMBUS, Ohio—Lots of Ohioans started gardening this spring, some for the very first time, possibly including you.

In a time of pandemic and staying at home, gardening gets you out into fresh air and sunshine, keeps you properly socially distanced, and yields healthy food for your family.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is cfaes-new-veggie-garden.jpg
Your garden can stay green and productive all summer. An expert from CFAES shares how to do it. (Photo: Getty Images.)

 

Call it, yes, a victory garden—one that stretches your food budget, limits your time in the grocery store, and helps ease the strain on food supply chains.

So how, now that your garden is growing, can you keep it strong all summer long?

Tim McDermott, an educator with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), shared his top six tips, especially for beginners. He runs the Growing Franklin food-producing blog,

Test your soil

A soil test will tell if the pH and nutrients are right for growing good, healthy crops. Learn more in the CFAES fact sheet at go.osu.edu/allaboutsoiltesting and at go.osu.edu/franklinsoiltest.

Use mulch

Spreading mulch on top of your soil will help it stay cool and conserve moisture—keys in the dog days of summer.

“Your plants will be happier because of it,” said McDermott, who works in the Franklin County office of CFAES’ Ohio State University Extension outreach arm.

Try grass clippings, composted leaves, plastic film, sawdust, hay, or straw. Mulch also helps suppress weeds.

Consider containers

Not enough room for a garden? Or wanting to add to what you’ve started? Consider growing crops in containers.

“It’s a great way to grow fruit, vegetables, and herbs in small spaces,” McDermott said.

Learn more in his blog post at go.osu.edu/containergarden1 and his webinar at go.osu.edu/containergarden2.

Give enough water

Garden plants need about an inch of water a week—but may need more in hot weather.

Nix weeds

Nip any weeds in the bud—literally or figuratively, as the case may be. Tackle them early—don’t let them go to seed. 

“It’s easier to stop one plant instead of many,” McDermott said.

Plan for fall

Fall’s a great time for gardens. “The rain comes back, there’s plenty of daylight, and the bugs start to go away,” McDermott said. “Plus pollinators are looking for food.”

Kale, Swiss chard, spinach, and lettuce are some of the good crops for autumn.

“Remember that your growing is supported by OSU Extension,” McDermott added. “We have offices in all 88 counties as well as Ask a Master Gardener and Ask an Expert help lines (go.osu.edu/askamastergardener and go.osu.edu/extensionaskanexpert).

“Feel free to contact us. We want to help you succeed.”

Tax value of farmland expected to drop

The declines should mean lower property taxes, on average, for most of the farmers…..

COLUMBUS, Ohio—There’s a bit of good news for Ohio farmers to counter the bad news caused by COVID-19, as well as by last year’s historic rain.

In counties scheduled for property value updates in 2020—about half of Ohio’s 88 counties—the average value of farmland enrolled in the Current Agricultural Use Value (CAUV) program should be about 40% lower than 2017–2019, or about $665 per acre.

That’s according to projections by researchers at The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

The same projections say that in counties due for property value updates in 2021—another quarter of Ohio’s counties—average CAUV values should be about 25% less than 2018–2020, or about $760 per acre.

The declines should mean lower property taxes, on average, for most of the farmers in those counties. 

The projections were published in a May report by postdoctoral researcher Robert Dinterman and Ani Katchova, associate professor and farm income enhancement chair, both of CFAES’ Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics.

“Less money paid in property tax will help reduce farmers’ costs and allow them to keep a greater share of the revenues they bring in,” Dinterman said.

But he noted that CAUV values are “not exactly equal to the property tax someone will pay.” A farm’s total property tax bill, he said, also depends on how many taxing jurisdictions the land is subject to and the tax rate, or millage rate, within those jurisdictions.

There could “certainly be a few cases where an agricultural landowner sees a large reduction in their CAUV value but has a corresponding increase in their millage rate and ends up paying the same in property taxes,” Dinterman said.

Ohio counties update their property values, including their CAUV values, every three years on a rotating basis, with about a third of the counties seeing updates every year. The new values then apply for the next three years.

Projected declines in CAUV values should mean lower property taxes, and keeping a larger share of their revenues, for many Ohio farmers. (Photo: Getty Images.)


The state’s CAUV program allows farmland to be taxed based on its agricultural value instead of its full market value. Enrollment in the program, which is voluntary, “normally results in a substantially lower tax bill for working farmers,” an Ohio Department of Taxation website says.

A county’s CAUV values are based, roughly, on a formula using net farm income data from over the past five to seven years. More specifically, the data comes from a hypothetical farm producing soybeans, corn, and wheat during that period. 

“In a nutshell, CAUV values are high when the previous five to seven years of farm income were high. CAUV values are low when the previous five to seven years of farm income were low,” Dinterman said.

Farmers had a boom in net income from about 2010-2014, which was partly a major cause of rising CAUV values in the past, he said.

“So now that we have been in a prolonged period of what people might consider low farm incomes, those values start to enter the CAUV formula and in turn lower their values,” Dinterman said. 

“Clearly a farmer does not want to have low income, but a bit of good news that comes with that is that at least their tax bills will be a bit lower,” he said.

Dinterman and Katchova’s report also states that based on early projections, the quarter of Ohio counties scheduled for CAUV updates in 2022 will see only a small decrease in their values, about 1%, to $880 per acre. 

That ties in with the researchers’ expectation that the CAUV declines won’t continue.

“We should give a bit of a warning to farmers that the recent trend we’ve seen in reduced CAUV values has plateaued,” Dinterman said.

The reason: a major legislative change to the CAUV formula—related to how capitalization rates are calculated—was started in 2017. The change was phased in, and 2020 marks the end of the phase-in.

“That phase-in over 2017–2020 helped ease into the lowest CAUV values we’ve seen since about 2012,” Dinterman said. “We’re likely to stay within a range of about $650–$900 for average CAUV values in the foreseeable future.”

Read the report at go.osu.edu/may2020cauv.

5 ways to help pollinators flourish

Pollinators such as bees, butterflies, flies, bats and hummingbirds transfer pollen between flowers and other plants, helping them grow and produce the fruit and vegetables we all eat….

(BPT) – You may already be aware that pollinators are important to everyone on the planet. But did you know that one in every three bites of food is made possible by native pollinators?

Pollinators such as bees, butterflies, flies, bats and hummingbirds transfer pollen between flowers and other plants, helping them grow and produce the fruit and vegetables we all eat — and that our beloved pets eat.

Because pollinators help grow the pumpkins, apples and cranberries used to make Beyond, a sustainability-minded natural pet food, the team has collaborated with The Nature Conservancy to initiate Project Blossom, with the mission of helping protect the declining population of pollinators. Purina’s Beyond has donated $100,000 to The Nature Conservancy to help its mission to support a healthy planet, to protect pollinators.

“The Nature Conservancy works around the globe to protect pollinators from challenges such as the loss and degradation of habitat, climate change and more,” said Chris Helzer, director of science for the Nature Conservancy in Nebraska. “By partnering with Beyond and being a part of Project Blossom, we are advancing our work to support a healthy planet for pollinators and all the other species we rely on for a healthy ecosystem.”

How you can help

Here are some simple things you can do to help pollinators thrive. They are fun, easy and educational projects you can enjoy with the whole family, especially while you’re spending more time at home and in your own yard and garden.

1. Learn

Kids find pollinators fascinating, and there’s a lot to learn about what they do for our ecosystem.

  • Visit The Nature Conservancy website as a starting point to discover more about how pollinators work.
  • Check out other websites, books or local outdoor gardens to explore native plants and pollinators that live in your area.
  • Make a list, map and/or photo project to describe what kinds of pollinators help which plants grow in your region.
  • Seek out resources to learn more about different types of pollinators and the threats they face. For example, when most people talk about bees, they assume honeybee, but there are more than 5,000 species of bees found in North America alone that need our support.

2. Plant

Once you’ve identified regional plants, flowers and shrubs that pollinators love, decide which ones to add to your outdoor space.

  • Involve the whole family in growing a variety of pollinator-friendly plants outside your home.
  • Avoid using pesticides in your yard or garden and learn which ones are least likely to affect bees and pollinators.
  • If you have limited outdoor space, use a small raised garden bed or a planter on your deck, balcony or patio.
  • Set up a pollinator window box.

3. Make

Collect supplies, like pieces of wood, and involve your kids in making a small project to help sustain pollinator communities in your own backyard.

4. Donate

Make a monetary contribution to the cause.

  • Make a donation to The Nature Conservancy, which helps conserve and protect land and water around the world.
  • Consider encouraging donations from friends and family.

5. Share

An easy way to spread awareness about pollinators is to create a conversation about them on social media.

  • Share the Project Blossom website with friends and family.
  • Post pictures of your pollinator projects or gardens to inspire others to join your efforts.

“We’re committed to keeping pets healthy and happy, which is why we’re committed to helping protect our planet and ultimately, pollinators that play an important role in our ingredient sourcing,” said Diane Herndon, senior manager of sustainability at Purina Beyond. “At Beyond, we hope Project Blossom will inspire people everywhere to help protect pollinators that play a vital role in nutritious ingredients that go in our cat and dog recipes.”

Visit BeyondPetFood.com/ProjectBlossom to learn more about what you can do to help your neighborhood be a friendlier place for much-needed pollinators.

conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends