GOST Fun Run / Walk – “Remember the Horn!”

“NEW” this year – the NBHS Track Team brings back an NB “training” tradition for athletes, walkers and joggers over the years… “Running The Horn”!

After years of a “competitive” 5k race for North Baltimore’s Good Ole Summertime Day, this year the NBHS Track Team brings back an NB “training” tradition for athletes, walkers and joggers over the years… “Running The Horn”!

The Fun Run/Walk (approx. 1.9 miles) will begin at the Old High School Historical Marker (Corner of South Second and State Streets) and will finish at NB’s War Memorial Football Stadium at the NB Village Park.

ONLINE REGISTRATION:  GOST “FUN RUN” Registration HERE!

Date: Saturday, July 27th, 2019

Time: Begins at 8:00 AM

Awards presented to first man and woman in each group – immediately following completion of the race.

Registration: Begins at 7:00 AM (by the Old High School Historical Marker)

Entry Fee: $5.00

Age Groups: Graduation years: 1977 & before, 1978-1982, 1983-1987, 1988-1992, 1993-1997, 1998-2002, 2003-2007, 2008-2012, 2013-2019, 2020-2023, 2024-2025, 2026 & beyond

Contact:

Cyndi Hotaling
419-346-1646
cyndih430@gmail.com

Make Checks Payable to:

North Baltimore Chamber of Commerce (NBACC)

NB Garden Club GOST Flower Show Entry Info

NB Garden Club Annual Flower Show for GOST

THE NORTH BALTIMORE GARDEN CLUB IS SPONSORING A FLOWER SHOW SATURDAY, JULY 27, 12PM-5PM AT THE NORTH BALTIMORE PUBLIC LIBRARY WOLFE COMMUNITY ROOM.

ENTRIES MAY BE DROPPED OFF:

  • FRIDAY, JULY 26, 5 PM-7 PM
  • SATURDAY, JULY 27, 9 AM-10 AM – Judging is closed and will be from 10 AM-Noon.
  • All items need to be picked up between 5p-6p Saturday, July 27, unless arrangements are made at time of drop off

FOR PRINTED RULES AND A LIST OF CATEGORIES, PLEASE GO TO DAWN’S FLOWER SHOP, MILLER INSURANCE, OR THE NORTH BALTIMORE PUBLIC LIBRARY.  THE FLOWER SHOW IS PART OF THE GOOD OLD SUMMERTIME CELEBRATION THAT SAME DAY!

NEW THIS YEAR – we will have a “fun” category to display any extra entries, or things maybe not ready to be judged.

All gardeners welcome!

SHOW CATEGORIES

ALL FLOWER SPECIMENS NEED TO BE IN CLEAR VASES OR JARS. THE GARDEN CLUB HAS VASES AVAILABLE FOR USE IN THE SHOW. PLEASE REMOVE ALL SPENT FLOWERS PRIOR TO JUDGING, AND PLEASE HAVE THE REQUIRED NUMBER OF BLOOMS IN CATEGORIES THAT ARE SPECIFIC. PLEASE BE ABLE TO TELL US WHAT SUB CATEGORY YOUR ROSE SPECIMEN WILL BE ENTERED IN AT TIME OF DROP OFF. WE HAVE ENTRY BLANKS AVAILABLE AT THE NORTH BALTIMORE PUBLIC LIBRARY IF YOU WISH TO FILL OUT AHEAD OF TIME. THE NORTH BALTIMORE GARDEN CLUB AND THE JUDGE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO ADD OR SUBTRACT CATEGORIES BASED ON ITEMS BROUGHT IN.

PLANT CATEGORIES:

ANNUAL HANGING BASKET INDOOR PLANT HANGING BASKET

HOUSE PLANTS FAIRY GARDEN

ORCHIDS AND BONSAI LARGE FLOOR PLANTS

AFRICAN VIOLETS/FLOWERING HOUSE PLANTS

BEGONIA GERANIUM

ANNUALS CATEGORIES: CLEAR VASE ONLY, WE CAN PROVIDE

MARIGOLDS, LARGE, ONE BLOOM MARIGOLDS, DWARF, 2 BLOOMS

PETUNIAS, SINGLE, 2 FLOWERS ONE COLOR

PETUNIAS, DOUBLE, 2 FLOWERS ONE COLOR

ZINNIAS, DWARF, 2 BLOOMS ONE COLOR ZINNIAS, LARGE, 1 BLOOM

SNAPDRAGON, ONE STEM SALVIA, 1 STEM

SUNFLOWER, SMALL, 2 BLOOMS SUNFLOWER, LARGE, 1 BLOOM

GLADIOLUS, ANY VARIETY NOT TO EXCEED 20 INCHES

ALL OTHER ANNUALS NOT LISTED…TWO BLOOMS SMALL, ONE BLOOM LARGE

ROSES:

HYBRID TEA ROSE, ONE BLOOM GRANDIFLORA, 1 SPRAY

FLORIBUNDA, ONE SPRAY MINIATURE, 1 SPRAY

SHRUB OR KNOCK OUT, ONE SPRAY OTHER ROSE (NOT LISTED)

PERENNIALS:

CLEMATIS, ANY VARIETY, ONE BLOOM COREOPSIS, ANY VARIETY, THREE BLOOMS

DAISY, ANY VARIETY, 2 BLOOMS DELPHINIUM, ONE STOCK

GLOBE THISTLE, ONE STEM DAY LILY, ONE SCAPE*

PHLOX, ONE STEM YARROW, ONE STEM 

RUDBECKIA, ANY COLOR, 2 BLOOMS

ECHINACEA (CONEFLOWER) ANY COLOR, ONE STOCK

HOSTA, ANY VARIETY, ONE LEAF

ORIENTAL OR ASIATIC LILY ONE STEM

ANY OTHER PERENNIALS NOT LISTED, SMALL=2 BLOOMS, LARGE= 1 BLOOM

BUTTERFLY BUSH ONE STEM

*SCAPE: STEM WITH FLOWERS AND BUDS, LENGTH NOT TO EXCEED 24 INCHES.

ARRANGEMENTS: 

PATRIOTIC THEME ANY SIZE

MINIATURE ARRANGEMENT, LESS THAN SIX INCHES

LARGE ARRANGEMENT, ANYTHING OVER SIX INCHES

ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE IN ANY TYPE OF CONTAINER WHICH HOLDS WATER. ARRANGEMENTS MUST CONTAIN AT LEAST 50% LIVING ITEMS

PICK UP OF ITEMS WILL BE FROM 5PM-6PM SATURDAY NIGHT. PLEASE MAKE ARRANGE FOR SOMEONE TO PICK UP BY 6PM

THANKS FOR PARTICIPATING IN THE 2019 FLOWER SHOW

Extreme Heat: Stay Safe This Summer 

Home Instead offers tips to protect older loved ones

July 20, 2019 – Summer is here and warmer weather is the perfect time for families to enjoy outdoor activities such as gardening and picnics. However, for seniors, extreme temperatures during the summer months can pose health risks. In fact, the CDC notes that adults 65 and older do not adjust as well as young people to sudden changes in temperature, making them more vulnerable to heat related health problems such as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, sunburn and heat rash.

 

“June through September is when most families plan trips and spend extended periods of time outdoors,” said Lakelyn Hogan, Gerontologist and Caregiver Advocate of Home Instead Senior Care. “It’s important for older adults to participate in these family activities, while taking the steps necessary to ensure their comfort and safety. Be sure your loved one takes frequent indoor breaks, carries and properly stores medications, and wears light colored clothing.”   

 

Home Instead encourages families to take the following steps to help keep their loved ones safe this summer:

 

  • Make sure your aging loved one takes preventive health measures – like preparing for summer heat exposure by choosing protective clothing. Mayo Clinic recommends wearing loose-fitting, lightweight clothing to allow the body to better cool itself naturally. Adding a broad-brimmed hat or cap can also help keep internal temperatures low and protect from sunburn – a condition that heightens the risk of heat stroke by reducing the skin’s ability to regulate heat.

 

  • Plan ahead to avoid strenuous activity during the hottest parts of the day. Many activities such as running errands or visiting friends and family members can be scheduled for the morning or evening hours, when temperatures are lower and the sun’s rays are less direct. If the time cannot be adjusted, stay hydrated and rest frequently in a cool area to avoid the increased risk of overheating.

 

  • Pay attention to symptoms of heat-related health problems. The University of Connecticut found that older adults are the most susceptible demographic to dehydration due to reduced kidney function that occurs naturally as we age, as well as the frequent use of diuretics often taken for high blood pressure. Be aware of muscle cramps, dizziness, headaches, constipation or impaired memory or concentration function, which can signal dehydration. Also watch for the symptoms of heat stroke; high body temperature, confusion or slurred speech, flushed skin, rapid breathing and a headache.

 

  • Take action to cool someone experiencing heat-related symptoms. Once a symptom is identified, immediate action is critical to treat the senior and prevent escalation. Mayo Clinic shares three steps:
    • Get the person in the shade, indoors and out of the heat
    • Remove any excess clothing to help the body breathe
    • Cool the person with whatever means available (e.g. place a wet towel on the person’s head, neck or armpits or submerge the individual in cool water)

 

  • Monitor and/or assist with medications. According to a recent survey of seniors conducted by Home Instead, many seniors taking five or more prescription medications admit challenges in managing their medications. Education programs such as Let’s Talk about RxSM provide families with resources to help manage medications more efficiently and avoid any mishaps. This is particularly important during the summer months, as some prescribed medications may affect a senior’s natural ability to stay hydrated and dissipate heat. Talk with your senior and their doctor about any increased risks connected to medications.

 

Additional free family resources and additional information on summer safety tips for seniors, visit https://www.caregiverstress.com/

NB Flower Garden of the Month – June

The North Baltimore Garden Club has named Pete Lopez on Gillette Ave. as Gardener of the Month for June!

Way to go Pete!

NOTE:  I need to double check, but I believe that I may have seen a Garden of the Month sign at a beautiful vegetable garden at Bob McCartney’s on S. Poe at George. (i’ll go back by later today – unless someone already has a photo or it’s on good ol’ Facebook…)

Chef Cooper to be Featured at Salsa! Salsa!

The community event will take place on Thursday, August 1 from 4 -6 p.m……

Chef Tim Cooper, executive chef at Birchaven Village, a division of Blanchard Valley Health System, will be the featured presenter at the 2019 Salsa! Salsa! event. 

The community event will take place on Thursday, August 1 from 4 -6 p.m. at the Hancock Farmers’ Market, 200 West Main Cross Street (Findlay).

Chef Cooper will be presenting a live demonstration of salsa preparations and other preparations. Each attendee will receive a complimentary recipe card from his personal cookbook and tasty samples.

“I enjoy the excitement of cooking for people and adding vibrant, new flavors to menus,” Chef Cooper shared, “There’s nothing that’s off limits.”

To learn more about other BVHS events and programs please visit bvhealthsystem.org

 

 

SUDDEN OAK DEATH CONFIRMED IN OHIO

How To Report Possible Infected Plants

(REYNOLDSBURG, Ohio) – The Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA), in coordination with USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS), has detected sudden oak death caused by Phytophthora ramorum on rhododendron plants shipped to Walmart and Rural King stores throughout the state. Both retailers have agreed to initiate a voluntary recall of plants from their stores.

Sudden Oak Death

It was recently confirmed that Ohio is one of several Midwest states that have received infected plant material. Approximately 1,600 rhododendron plants from the infected nursery were shipped to Ohio retailers. This shipment went to at least 17 other states.

Gardeners and homeowners who have recently purchased a rhododendron from Walmart or Rural King should monitor the plant for signs of disease, including leaf spots and shoot dieback. It is also advised that Ohioans who purchased rhododendrons or lilac plants from these stores between March and May of this year to dispose of them to prevent further spread of the disease. Plants can be destroyed by burning, deep burial or double-bagging the plant, including the root ball, in heavy duty trash bags for disposal into a sanitary landfill (where allowable).

Consumers should not compost or dispose of the plant material in municipal yard waste. Garden tools used on any affected plants should be sanitized with bleach or 91% (or higher) alcohol before they are used again.

Click here to report possible infected plants.

2019 July Wood County Park District Programs

Adventurer’s Nature Camp, Farm Camp, more……

Adventurers Farm Camp
(11 – 12 yrs)
 
Monday – Friday, July 15 – 19;
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Carter Historic Farm
18331 Carter Road, BG
 
Experience the summer life of old-time play and homestead chores for children growing up on a 1930s farm. Whether feeding the livestock, baking Dutch oven cookies, tending the vegetable patch, or playing ringolevio in the woodlot, campers will learn about the reward of farm work and the joy of outdoors play. 
Program fee: $60, scholarships available
 
 
 
Adventurers Nature Camp
(11 – 12 yrs)
 
Monday – Friday, July 15 – 19;
1:00 – 4:00 pm
W.W. Knight Nature Preserve
29530 White Road, Perrysburg
 
Prepare for adventure! Campers engage in outdoor activities such as archery, canoeing, and rappelling at different parks throughout the week. Each day has a different natural science theme that is highlighted by educational and recreational activities. 
Program fee: $60, scholarships available
 
 
 
Trail Tikes Summer Camp
(5 – 6 years)
 
Monday – Friday, July 15 – 19;
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
W.W. Knight Nature Preserve
29530 White Road, Perrysburg
 
Campers enjoy a short story about nature that sets the theme for the rest of the day’s fun and learning activities. Taking a nature hike, creating art, and learning about our local outdoor world and what calls it home are all part of this camp for young ones! 
Program fee: $60, scholarships available
 
 

Keeping livestock nourished despite hay shortage

While humans can live reasonably OK without much fiber, which just passes through our bodies, cattle cannot…..

COLUMBUS, Ohio—Less salad, more carbs and proteins.

That’s counter to what many say is right for our diet. But for cows and other livestock, that’s the direction in which their diets are likely to shift. Farmers are trying to keep their animals well fed amid a Midwest shortage in hay and other grasses grown for livestock to eat.

“They have to start cutting back right now,” said Bill Weiss, dairy nutritionist with The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

Cutting back doesn’t mean the animals will have to eat less. It means they might need to eat more alternatives to the higher amounts of fiber they typically get.

So, for example, if hay, which is high in fiber, normally makes up about half the diet for a dairy cow or other animal, some of that hay could be substituted with, say, cottonseed — what’s left of a cotton plant once the cotton fibers are removed, Weiss said.

Farmers might also feed their livestock additional grain (protein and carbohydrates) and less of the fibrous (saladlike) portions of various plants, Weiss said.

“It’s what we have to do,” he said.

Before making any changes in what their animals are fed, livestock owners should consult with a nutritionist, Weiss said.

While humans can live reasonably OK without much fiber, which just passes through our bodies, cattle cannot. They need it. About one-third of their diet should be fiber, which provides them energy and keeps their digestive systems healthy.

Many farmers across Ohio are considering different diet options for their livestock because the state’s hay supply is the lowest since the 2012 drought, and the fourth lowest in 70 years. And the persistent spring rain during Ohio’s wettest yearlong period on record did not allow much hay to be cut in time for it to be the highest quality.

Dairy cows are particularly affected. Most dairy farmers feed their cows large amounts of corn silage, which is made by chopping the entire corn plant and letting it ferment in a silo. But the wet spring has delayed or prevented the planting of corn, a key ingredient in a lot of livestock feed. So, with fewer corn acres expected to be planted and an already low supply of hay, farmers are scrambling to plant other crops to feed their animals, such as cool-season grasses including oats and cereal rye.

“Timing is critical here,” Weiss said.

Some of the options being considered for animal feed are grasses such as sorghum and sorghum-sudangrass, and other warm-season summer annuals. If planted soon, they can be harvested September through early October and then fed to animals.

“These feed options are not as nutritious as conventional ones,” Weiss said. “But we can make them work.”

Farmers wanting to plant summer annuals to feed their livestock need to do so before July 15 in order to have enough of a warm growing season to grow and to be able to harvest before frost arrives, said Mark Sulc, a CFAES forage specialist.

Other cool-season crops can be planted a little later, starting the last week of July and into August, Sulc said. These include oats and spring triticale, which will be ready for harvest starting in early October and into November. Oats and spring triticale can also be planted in mixtures with cereal rye, which has the advantage of being able to survive the winter and will produce animal feed early next spring.

Since many farmers will be planting these annual crops for the first time this year, it’s critical for growers to know the requirements for each type to produce sizeable yields, Sulc said.

The flurry of planting annual crops for livestock feed “will help the shortage, but it’s not going to solve it completely,” he said. “We can’t grow enough this year to supply the entire demand. That’s why we need to consider alternative fiber sources.”

For more information on forage options, visit go.osu.edu/forages.

To learn about the various requirements for each forage option, visit go.osu.edu/forageguide.

NWSD District-Wide Hydrant Flushing 

Construction Project Updates…

Northwestern Water and Sewer District Projects

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio, – The Northwestern Water and Sewer District (The District) delivers water and sewer services to over 19,000 customers in Wood, Sandusky, and Hancock counties.  Although many of our projects are performed underground, our utility work can impact roads throughout our service area.  The District will announce updates and when additional projects are under contract.  Updates and additions are highlighted in bold and underlined.

Northwood/Perrysburg & Lake Townships – Water Main Installation 
Through July, lane restrictions are possible at Tracy and McNerney Roads for water main installation.  Additionally, at this time, lane restrictions are possible at the intersection of Oregon Road and Caple Boulevard.  Project complete: July.  Project investment: $155,000.

Perrysburg Township – Sanitary Sewer Improvements 
Through August, short-term intermittent lane restrictions are possible throughout Perrysburg Township for restoration.  Project complete: August.  Project investment: $998,000.

Rossford – Sewer Lining Project
Through July, watch for shoulder restrictions and construction crews on roads north of Eagle Point Road for sewer lining. Project complete: July. Project investment: $767,000. 

Northwood – East Broadway Valve
Through October, watch for shoulder restrictions and construction crews between Wales and Andrus roads for valve installation. Project complete: October. Project investment: $480,000.

District-Wide Hydrant Flushing 
Through October, weekdays from 8 am until 3:30 pm, crews will be flushing hydrants in various locations throughout Wood County.  Residents are advised to flush water from their taps if the water becomes discolored.  For more information: http://www.nwwsd.org/what-we-do/water/water-facts/hydrant-main-line-flushing-info/

Federal change to assist farmers who plant cover crops

Many Midwestern farmers unable to plant soybeans and corn in time to get decent yields are instead filing insurance claims and planting alternative crops primarily to protect the topsoil or to feed their livestock.

Federal change to assist farmers who plant cover crops

COLUMBUS, Ohio—Farmers prevented from planting a cash crop due to unrelenting rain can now sow a cover crop and still be eligible to receive some federal trade assistance. This aid is in addition to crop insurance payments on those acres.

The change in policy on cover crops that the U.S. Department of Agriculture made on July 1 is one of several allowances the agency has made in recent weeks to assist farmers in the Midwest, where persistent rain has delayed or prevented many growers from planting cash crops.

The funds for trade assistance on cover crop acreage will come through the Market Facilitation Program (MFP), aid for farmers that was created to help offset growers’ losses as a result of the recent, international tariffs on U.S. goods.

Many Midwestern farmers unable to plant soybeans and corn in time to get decent yields are instead filing insurance claims and planting alternative crops primarily to protect the topsoil or to feed their livestock.

Seed for these so-called “cover crops” is disappearing quickly, said Harold Watters, an agronomy field specialist for Ohio State University Extension. OSU Extension is the outreach arm of The Ohio State University College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES).

“There isn’t much,” he said. “People have grabbed up what was out there.”

A lot of farmers across the Midwest will be planting cover crops, some for the first time this year, Watters said.  

A cover crop, such as cereal rye or oats, can hold in place valuable topsoil, reduce weeds in a field, and add crucial organic matter to a field.

Besides qualifying for federal trade assistance, farmers who plant cover crops can collect crop insurance on acreage that had been intended for a cash crop. But farmers have to follow USDA stipulations.

Given delayed and prevented planting across the Midwest, the USDA recently adjusted some rules to help farmers, particularly those in need of hay for livestock at a time when hay levels are severely low in the Midwest.

Regardless of which cover crop a farmer selects for a field, the grower cannot harvest that crop for grain and sell it in the marketplace to collect crop insurance for those acres. However, this year, starting Sept. 1, the USDA is allowing farmers to use their cover crop for grazing, to harvest it as hay, or to chop the entire plant and feed it to their livestock.

Midwestern farmers are also being allowed to plant corn as a cover crop, provided the entire plant is chopped for livestock feed rather than the ears being harvested and sold as grain. Growers will also need to follow cover crop recommendations on seeding rate and row width.

Corn is expensive to grow compared to, say, oats, but it’s also a good fortifying food for livestock, Watters said.

Additional aid to Ohio farmers could come if the USDA declares the entire state, or portions of it, a disaster area. The state experienced the wettest yearlong period on record from June 2018 to May 2019, which has left soils persistently wet and unable to be worked.  

USDA’s Farm Service Agency requested a disaster declaration for three Ohio counties—Fulton, Henry, and Lucas—in northwestern Ohio, where farmers are expected to experience disproportionate losses.

On June 14, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine asked the USDA to designate the entire state a disaster area, given that excessive rainfall has hindered or prevented planting in many areas. Even farmers who were able to plant, if they did so later in the grower season, risk getting significantly lower yields on their crop.

Growers in areas that U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue declares disasters could qualify for low-interest loans. They also could get higher returns on crop insurance claims for acreage where they could not plant a cash crop, said Ben Brown, a CFAES assistant professor and the program manager of CFAES’ Farm Management Program.

The disaster declaration will not likely be given to the entire state, but will more likely be declared only in northwestern Ohio, which has experienced the heaviest rainfall and the greatest delays and prevented planting, Brown said.

If the disaster declaration is made for any part of the state, that will help, but how much that will assist farmers in staying afloat is uncertain, he said.

Without the disaster declaration, “profit margins, which are already razor-thin, will be squeezed even further,” Brown said.

For more information about disaster assistance, see go.osu.edu/disasteraid. 

For more information about how to plant corn as a cover crop to meet the qualification in Ohio, see go.osu.edu/corncover.

Darn Skeeters………..

Did you know that a mosquito’s life cycle averages about two weeks, but can range from a few days to a month?

Did you know that a mosquito’s life cycle averages about two weeks, but can range from a few days to a month?

Eggs hatch when they’re exposed to water. The larva then live in the water, surfacing to breathe air. Pupa form for up to a week, just before the bugs become adults, when their body parts will harden and they’ll begin to fly. Only female adults bite and feed on the blood of humans and animals. Females will feed and then lay eggs directly on water or soil, or at the base of some plants or in places that may fill with water. Their eggs can survive dry conditions for several months. Learn more at https://www.epa.gov/mosquitocontrol/general-information-about-mosquitoes 

Preventing mosquito bites
• Use an insect repellent that includes DEET, or another EPA-approved product.
• Wear long, loose, light-colored clothing when possible.
• Remove standing water sources to discourage breeding.
• Limit outdoor activities at dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.

Discourage mosquitos from breeding
If it’s full of water, something as small as a bottle cap can be a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Discourage breeding at your home by removing sources of standing water. Walk around the outside of your home at least once a week and empty any water that’s collected in toys, birdbaths, buckets and other objects. Get rid of old tires and other objects that can collect water. 

Larvicides can be used to treat wet areas that will not be used for drinking, where mosquitoes may breed. Wood County Health Department distributes mosquito dunks to residents free of charge. They can be used in areas like rain barrels, pool covers, fountains, septic tanks and gutters. For more information, visit the health department’s Environmental Health Division on East Gypsy Lane Road in Bowling Green, or call 419-354-2702. 

Disease transmission
Mosquito control is vital because their bites can transmit a wide range of diseases, including dengue, La Crosse encephalitis, West Nile virus, and Zika. Zika can be spread locally through sex with a partner who was bitten by an infected mosquito while traveling. Condoms can reduce this risk. The CDC has an advisory page specifically for travelers at https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel

Pregnant women who have Zika are capable of having babies with microcephaly, a condition that can cause serious developmental problems, such as skull deformity and brain damage. Using a condom every time is critical when having sex with someone who has traveled to an area where Zika is more prevalent. This is important even if your partner has no symptoms. Visit https://www.cdc.gov/zika/index.html for more information.

Farmers market coupons available for WIC participants

Program allows families to get produce from local markets….

BOWLING GREEN — Families who participate in the Women, Infants and Children program through Wood County Health Department are eligible to receive $20 in coupons to shop for produce at local farmers markets.

This is the third year for the Farmers Market Nutrition Program offered by Wood County WIC. Pregnant, postpartum and breastfeeding women and children 6 months or older who are participating in WIC are eligible to receive the one-time, $20 benefit to purchase fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs from authorized farmers until Oct. 31. Coupons will be given to WIC participants on a first-come, first-served basis.

WIC participation improves the length of pregnancy and birth weight, improves the diets of women and children and reduces late fetal deaths. WIC children are better immunized, have better vocabulary and are more likely to have a regular source of health care. Children ages 2-4 who participate in WIC are also less likely to be obese.

WIC staff will be at the downtown farmers market in Bowling Green on Aug. 14 to share program information. Recipe ideas using fresh produce are available at Wood County WIC, located at 639 S. Dunbridge Road, Bowling Green.

If you are interested in becoming an authorized FMNP farmer or want to learn more about the program, call Wood County WIC at 419-354-9661.

The mission of Wood County Health Department is to prevent disease, promote healthy lifestyles and protect the health of everyone in Wood County. Our Community Health Center provides comprehensive medical services for men, women and children. We welcome all patients, including uninsured or underinsured clients, regardless of their ability to pay, and we accept most third-party insurance. For more information, visit WoodCountyHealth.org