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May 23, 2024 7:57 am

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Weekly Averages for Household Grocery Spending

Trace One just released a new report about the U.S. states spending the most on groceries.

Overall, grocery prices are up nearly 25% since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, though certain items have seen even more significant upticks. This upward trend in food costs is particularly concerning for families on tight budgets, as food expenses represent a non-negotiable necessity.

Groceries account for the largest share of individual spending in a number of states where income is relatively low, or where grocery prices are especially high. However, even in regions where grocery spending constitutes a smaller portion of income, consumers still find themselves grappling with significant weekly food bills. In 37 states, consumers report weekly household grocery expenditures exceeding $250 on average.

Researchers calculated the share of total consumer spending allocated to groceries for each state, then ranked states accordingly. The full report also includes a complete breakdown of price increases for nearly 40 popular grocery store items since March 2020.

Here are the key takeaways from the report for Ohio:

  • The average Ohio household spends $254 on groceries each week.
  • On average, grocery spending represents 8.6% of Ohio residents’ total consumer spending.
  • Overall, residents of Ohio are spending more on groceries than the national average.

Grocery Store Items That Have Increased Most in Price

Grocery Items

RankItemChange in price since March 2020Two-year change in priceOne-year change in price
1Eggs+50.0%+27.1%-6.8%
2Beef roasts+40.0%+6.5%+11.2%
3Flour+36.0%+17.3%-0.2%
4Sugar & substitutes+34.9%+19.1%+5.6%
5Beef steaks+32.6%+6.6%+7.2%
6Carbonated drinks+32.1%+16.4%+4.2%
7Fruits & vegetables (canned)+31.6%+13.1%+2.7%
8Salad dressing+31.5%+16.0%-0.4%
9Biscuits, rolls, & muffins+31.4%+13.3%+2.6%
10Butter & margarine+29.4%+14.8%-2.1%
11Chicken+29.2%+8.7%+2.0%
12Juices+27.9%+14.9%+2.7%
13Cakes, cupcakes, & cookies+27.6%+15.8%+0.2%
14Fruits & vegetables (frozen)+27.4%+14.0%-0.9%
15Lettuce+27.3%+7.2%+5.8%
16Bread+26.5%+15.4%+0.2%
17Prepared foods (frozen or dried)+26.4%+8.9%-0.4%
18Candy+26.3%+14.5%+4.4%
19Pork chops+26.3%+1.5%+2.5%
20Ground beef+25.8%+4.8%+6.2%
21Spices & condiments+24.8%+13.4%+2.6%
22Soups+24.5%+11.0%-0.2%
23Snacks+23.6%+9.7%+0.1%
24Breakfast cereal+23.1%+10.6%-1.7%
25Bacon, sausage, & related+22.3%-0.9%-0.3%
26Rice & pasta+22.0%+9.6%-1.4%
27Citrus fruits+21.4%-5.7%-1.3%
28Coffee+20.8%+7.9%-2.2%
29Milk+19.2%+3.9%-1.6%
30Ice cream & related+18.5%+13.2%-1.9%
31Fish & seafood (processed)+17.1%+1.2%-2.0%
32Fish & seafood (fresh)+16.0%-1.2%-3.1%
33Potatoes+13.9%+8.8%-0.9%
34Cheese+11.0%+4.8%-3.1%
35Ham+10.3%-0.2%-4.2%
36Apples+8.7%-5.4%-10.1%
37Bananas+7.0%+1.9%+0.0%
38Tomatoes+1.6%+5.0%+4.5%
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Grocery Store Items That Have Increased Most in Price
 
Mississippi 9.8% $291 $190 $216 $275 $366 $373
Hawaii 9.7% $334 $199 $262 $317 $403 $408
Kansas 9.5% $251 $146 $202 $278 $276 $387
West Virginia 9.3% $239 $161 $221 $242 $269 $296
Kentucky 9.2% $255 $152 $221 $239 $311 $314
Maine 9.2% $250 $124 $217 $240 $317 $423
Montana 9.2% $246 $145 $195 $278 $318 $313
Oregon 9.2% $249 $145 $222 $231 $313 $323
New Mexico 9.1% $286 $167 $251 $273 $339 $407
Wyoming 9.1% $254 $150 $221 $252 $325 $372
South Carolina 9.1% $254 $164 $228 $260 $275 $323
Georgia 9.0% $278 $170 $214 $303 $327 $312
Vermont 8.9% $249 $131 $220 $290 $292 $313
Alabama 8.7% $272 $148 $224 $323 $322 $320
Nevada 8.7% $295 $156 $247 $269 $348 $400
North Carolina 8.7% $266 $170 $212 $255 $309 $422
Iowa 8.7% $227 $135 $181 $232 $309 $265
Idaho 8.6% $258 $150 $215 $246 $277 $358
Ohio 8.6% $254 $141 $217 $254 $309 $305
Louisiana 8.6% $283 $165 $255 $313 $300 $299
New Hampshire 8.5% $239 $125 $222 $231 $282 $312
Indiana 8.4% $239 $137 $209 $249 $241 $294
Michigan 8.2% $236 $130 $202 $232 $309 $287
Florida 8.2% $287 $163 $239 $312 $337 $358
Rhode Island 8.2% $256 $138 $216 $272 $318 $341
Arkansas 8.2% $261 $141 $217 $272 $294 $325
Virginia 8.2% $260 $150 $229 $247 $309 $327
Texas 8.2% $286 $158 $242 $283 $300 $363
Colorado 8.1% $280 $149 $224 $284 $341 $383
Wisconsin 8.0% $221 $123 $208 $244 $256 $294
Missouri 7.9% $244 $130 $201 $258 $290 $311
Washington 7.9% $288 $160 $245 $283 $349 $339
Alaska 7.8% $329 $206 $244 $347 $437 $382
Utah 7.8% $278 $133 $211 $252 $326 $317
Nebraska 7.8% $235 $137 $197 $233 $281 $264
Arizona 7.7% $272 $162 $221 $269 $352 $361
Delaware 7.7% $246 $143 $201 $292 $294 $331
Oklahoma 7.6% $279 $152 $226 $303 $324 $395
Pennsylvania 7.6% $249 $149 $202 $248 $323 $321
California 7.5% $298 $177 $223 $294 $325 $333
Massachusetts 7.5% $272 $163 $218 $266 $314 $344
Tennessee 7.4% $270 $140 $227 $275 $326 $355
Illinois 7.4% $269 $157 $221 $256 $286 $371
South Dakota 7.3% $256 $134 $231 $282 $282 $305
Connecticut 7.2% $266 $170 $204 $293 $311 $402
New Jersey 7.1% $275 $192 $220 $273 $290 $378
Maryland 7.1% $266 $150 $224 $254 $319 $374
New York 7.0% $266 $176 $206 $266 $341 $418
North Dakota 7.0% $265 $152 $242 $295 $288 $360
Minnesota 6.9% $251 $116 $197 $265 $325 $292

Methodology

Data sources include the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) March 2024 Consumer Price Index, U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) 2022 Personal Consumption Expenditures by State (released October 2023), and U.S. Census Bureau 2023 Household Pulse Survey.

To determine the grocery store items that increased the most in price, researchers calculated the percentage change in CPI between March 2020 and March 2024 across the most common grocery (food at home) items. Researchers also calculated the two-year change in CPI between March 2022 and March 2024, as well as the one-year change in CPI between March 2023 and March 2024.

State-level data on grocery spending was sourced from the BEA and Census Bureau. The share of total consumer spending allocated to groceries for each state was calculated by dividing the per-capita spending on food and beverages purchased for off-premises consumption by the total per-capita personal consumption expenditures. Total weekly grocery spending by state and household size simply represents self-reported data collected and provided by the Household Pulse Survey.

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2 Responses

  1. Hang on Greg. We will look back five years from now as these being the Good Ole Days. It’s not that prices are too high; it’s that the dollar has been so devaluated through quantitative easing that there is no buying power remaining. It’s why gold is so high – besides all the wars and other uncertainty.

    It’s true that you can’t dig yourself out of a hole, a bootstrap analogy; however, you can do you best to look down the horizon to avoid the hole in the first place. The predators are everywhere – pay day lenders, telemarketers, etc. waiting to take advantage.

    In the end, you have to be smarter than the hole in order not to fall into it.

  2. When you report stories like this it takes me back to when the Republicans say don’t live beyond your means and pull yourself up by the bootstraps now it’s a crime that prices are too high, I guess we have been spoiled too long.

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